JS-Justice Sciences Courses

Courses

JS 100. Introduction to the Criminal Justice System. 3 Hours.

Introduction to criminal justice as a system consisting of interactions among three main components: police, courts, and corrections and the processes involving those components.

JS 101. Crime and Criminality. 3 Hours.

Examination of the causes and consequences in society of crime/delinquency, including theoretical explanations, sources of data on crime/delinquency, and efforts at controlling the behavior.

JS 110. Introduction to Forensic Science. 3 Hours.

Overview of the major components of forensic science including death investigation, toxicology, osteology, questioned documents, law, and criminalistics.

JS 115. Comparative Criminal Justice Systems. 3 Hours.

Analysis of police, judicial, and correctional components found in the world's four major legal systems: Common Law, Islamic, Napoleonic and Socialist.

JS 120. Introduction to Statistics. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic statistical theory and analysis. Course emphasizes computation, units of measurement, and evaluation of quantitative assertions; interpretation of quantitative data; use of quantitative data for problem-solving; and communication of information using numbers/words appropriate for the audience. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).

JS 125. Introduction to Forensic Psychology. 3 Hours.

Overview of issues involving the intersection of law and psychology. Focus on role of clinical asessment of competency, scientific jury selection, expert witnesses in court, punishment and sentencing, and related issues.

JS 150. Foundations of Law. 3 Hours.

Examination and analysis of the evolution, function, and sources of law and legal systems in Western culture.

JS 160. Introduction to Private Security. 3 Hours.

Survey of the field of private security, including organizational, administrative, operational, and liability issues common to it.

JS 220. Police in America: An Overview. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the history and evolution of modern law enforcement in the United States, including the role and functions of police in the community.
Prerequisites: JS 100 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

JS 230. The Judicial Process in America: An Overview. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the structure and function of American courts, including judicial selection and behavior, the prosecution function, jury system, and the role of lawyers.
Prerequisites: JS 150 [Min Grade: C], JS 100 [Min Grade: C] and JS 150 [Min Grade: C]

JS 240. Corrections in America: An Overview. 3 Hours.

Introduction to history and evolution of probation, prisons, parole, and community-based programs for adult and juvenile offenders.
Prerequisites: JS 100 [Min Grade: C] and JS 101 [Min Grade: C]

JS 250. Criminalistics: An Overview. 3 Hours.

Introduction to indentification and application of major types of physical trace evidence in criminal cases involving analysis and comparision. Laboratory component included; Laboratory fee is charged.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C]

JS 300. Research Methods in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Introduction to ideas, techniques, and problems associated with social research with an emphasis on criminal justice/criminology applications. Writing assignments emphasize ability to make a logical argument and respond to counter claims; incorporating outside sources into written materials; and use conventions appropriate for the discipline. Writing is a significant component of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] and JS 101 [Min Grade: C]) or (CJ 100 [Min Grade: C] and CJ 101 [Min Grade: C])

JS 305. Religion and Crime. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to research on the impact of religious institutions and values on multiple aspects of public policy and life. Students will explore the impact of religion on law creation, crime-control attitudes, criminal and deviant behaviors, provision of social services, politics, and race/ethnic relations.

JS 307. Crime and Everyday Life. 3 Hours.

Examines everyday aspects of crime, including different forms of crime, media involvement, crime patterns, and policy responses.

JS 320. Police Organization and Administration. 3 Hours.

Analysis of organizational and administrative structure and function of police departments in the U.S.
Prerequisites: JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C] or (CJ 101 [Min Grade: C]) and JS 220 [Min Grade: C]

JS 321. Police-Community Relations. 3 Hours.

Overview and analysis of historical and contemporary relationship between police agencies and the public; legal issues; analysis of crime prevention programs, community participation, and police discretion.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and (CJ 220 [Min Grade: C] or JS 220 [Min Grade: C])

JS 322. Legal Aspects of Private Security. 3 Hours.

Introduction to and examination of critical legal aspects of private security, especially liability issues.
Prerequisites: JS 160 [Min Grade: C]

JS 330. Criminal Law. 3 Hours.

Analysis of the development of criminal law, including legal elements of a crime, defenses in criminal cases, appellate case analysis, and legal terminology.
Prerequisites: JS 230 [Min Grade: C] and (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) or (JS 150 [Min Grade: C])

JS 331. Criminal Procedure. 3 Hours.

Introduction to legal rules relating to the criminal process from investigation through punishment.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C]

JS 332. Criminal Evidence. 3 Hours.

Examination of the system of rules and standards, both state and federal, by which admission of proof at criminal trial is regulated.
Prerequisites: JS 230 [Min Grade: C] and (CJ 100 [Min Grade: C] or JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or JS 150 [Min Grade: C])

JS 333. Trial Advocacy. 3 Hours.

Overview of preparations for civil and criminal litigation including courtroom procedure, evidence, and the art of advocacy.
Prerequisites: JS 230 [Min Grade: C] and (CJ 100 [Min Grade: C] or JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or JS 150 [Min Grade: C])

JS 334. Legal Research and Writing. 3 Hours.

Overview of elements of legal research and writing with an emphasis on developing and writing a legal brief, locating sources of legal information and logically and persuasively applying the information in an argumentative fashion.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C] or JS 150 [Min Grade: C]) and JS 230 [Min Grade: C]

JS 335. Mediation. 3 Hours.

Examination of mediation as a specific form of alternative dispute resolution (ADR), including its history, development, and processes.
Prerequisites: JS 150 [Min Grade: C], JS 230 [Min Grade: C] and (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C] or JS 150 [Min Grade: C])

JS 336. Criminal Investigation: Techniques and Analysis. 3 Hours.

Examination of both technical and analytical aspects of the criminal investigative process.

JS 337. Introduction to the Intelligence Community. 3 Hours.

Overview of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) and its role in the intelligence community; Examination of the development and expansion of state and local fusion centers and first responder roles in evolving federal, state, and local intelligence community enterprise.

JS 338. Intelligence Oversight and Legal Controls. 3 Hours.

Historical development of intelligence oversight from the 1940s to the present; intelligence abuses; expansion of executive branch authority post-September 11, 2001.
Prerequisites: JS 337 [Min Grade: C]

JS 339. Methodologies in Intelligence Analysis. 3 Hours.

Introduction to analytical tactics, techniques, and procedures used by and in the intelligence community.
Prerequisites: JS 337 [Min Grade: C]

JS 340. Terrorism and the Intelligence Community. 3 Hours.

Examines application of the intelligence cycle (collection, analysis, management & dissemination of information) to the war on terrorism using case studies of successes and failures.
Prerequisites: JS 337 [Min Grade: C]

JS 341. Correctional Institutions. 3 Hours.

Introduction to prisons, jails, and juvenile institutions in the U.S.; evolution of penology and correctional change strategies; inmate social system; prison stress, violence, and reform.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and JS 240 [Min Grade: C]

JS 342. Probation and Parole. 3 Hours.

Analysis of history, structure, and function of probation and parole systems in the United States; pre-sentence investigations; offender selection and classification; offender supervision; and agency administration.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and JS 240 [Min Grade: C]

JS 343. Community-Based Corrections. 3 Hours.

Examination of contemporary redefinition of correctional functions emphasizing development and use of community resources; diversion of offenders from criminal justice system; nontraditional correctional programs.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and JS 240 [Min Grade: C]

JS 344. Science and Technology in the Intelligence Community. 3 Hours.

Introduction to, and critical examination of, science and technology capability of each member agency within the intelligence community.
Prerequisites: JS 337 [Min Grade: C]

JS 350. Advanced Criminalistics. 3 Hours.

Examination of advanced criminalistics, including biological or genetic properties of evidence, trace evidence analytics, and firearm and tool-mark examinations.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C]

JS 351. Forensic Science Lab I. 3 Hours.

Basic identification and individualization of common, frequently occurring physical evidence materials, with emphasis on trace evidence.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 110 [Min Grade: C]

JS 352. Forensic Science Laboratory III. 3 Hours.

Basic identification and individualization of common, frequently occurring physical evidence materials, with emphasis on biological materials.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C] and CJ 110 [Min Grade: C]

JS 360. Criminology. 3 Hours.

Identification and assessment of early and modern theories concerning the causes of crime in society.
Prerequisites: JS 101 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 101 [Min Grade: C]

JS 362. Victimology. 3 Hours.

Examination of the criminal-victim relationship and societal reaction to victims including victim services, restitution, and compensation.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and (CJ 101 [Min Grade: C] or JS 101 [Min Grade: C])

JS 380. Media, Crime & Justice. 3 Hours.

Examination of issues in crime and justice as depicted in popular media, including motion pictures, television, video, and other media.

JS 390. The Death Penalty in America. 3 Hours.

Overview of capital punishment in America including its history and justification, major Supreme Court rulings, current issues, and future directions.

JS 400. Drugs and Society. 3 Hours.

This course teaches students the pharmacological effects of and different categories of drugs. Different theories of drug use are discussed as well as the historical development of drug laws. Various harms associated with drug use are discussed as well as the consequences of drug prohibition. Lastly, students are expected to understand the different methods of drug research.

JS 402. Introduction to Computer Forensics. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the use of analytical and investigative techniques in criminal or civil litigation to identify, collect, examine and preserve evidence/information magnetically stored or encoded.

JS 403. Restorative Justice. 3 Hours.

Introduction to, and analysis of, movement in criminal justice to institutionalize peaceful approaches to harm, problem-solving and violations of legal and human rights. Includes discussion of specific programs, critical evaluation of these programs, and analysis of future directions of the movement.

JS 404. Serial Killers. 3 Hours.

Examination of the psychology and sociology of serial killers, including case studies, agency responses and related issues.

JS 408. Juvenile Delinquency. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the nature, scope, and causes of illegal behavior by juveniles, and societal repsonses to that behavior.

JS 410. Criminal Justice Ethics. 3 Hours.

Analysis of systems of ethics and their applicability to problems in the administration of the justice system including those facing police officials, lawyers, judges, and correctional professionals. Writing and Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and JS 220 [Min Grade: C] and JS 230 [Min Grade: C] and JS 240 [Min Grade: C] and JS 300 [Min Grade: C]

JS 411. Juvenile Justice System. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the evolution and operation of specialized agencies and procedures to address juvenile law-breaking, including emerging problems and solutions.

JS 412. Juvenile Law. 3 Hours.

Review and analysis of emerging statutory and case law in American juvenile justice.

JS 413. The Legal Profession. 3 Hours.

Weekly seminars conducted by accomplished practitioners in civil litigation, criminal prosecution, criminal defense, labor and employment law, products liability, domestic relations, military justice, environmental, indigent legal aid, and alternative dispute resolution (ADR) techniques. JS 150 and JS 230 are suggested prerequisites for this course.
Prerequisites: JS 150 [Min Grade: C] and JS 230 [Min Grade: C]

JS 415. Investigating Online Crimes. 3 Hours.

Introduction to cyber investigative techniques involving focused analysis of email and websites; examination of legal process and preparing evidence in cyber crime cases; rules concerning introduction of digital evidence.
Prerequisites: JS 402 [Min Grade: C]

JS 424. Serial Killers in Cross-National Settings. 3 Hours.

Examines serial homicide in cross-national settings including offender disorders; crime scene analysis; significance of victims; and offender classification process.

JS 434. Mock Trial Competition. 3 Hours.

Represent UAB as member of Mock trial Team in invitational, regional, and national competition. May be repeated for maximum of 12 hours of which not more than 6 hours may be counted toward fulfilling major or minor requirements.

JS 436. The Intelligence Community. 3 Hours.

Weekly seminars by intelligence community experts covering relevant topics including state fusion centers; proliferation of intelligence units within first responder agencies; growing role of the private sector; and local prosecution for intelligence agency abuse.

JS 437. Cybercrime and Forensics. 3 Hours.

Overview of all aspects of media forensics including analysis of character encoding, file formats, and digital media; examination of disk acquisition and duplication techniques; application of media forensic techniques in criminal investigation scenarios.
Prerequisites: JS 402 [Min Grade: C]

JS 440. White Collar and Corporate Crime. 3 Hours.

Introduction to, and analysis of, illegal/deviant behavior occurring in complex organizational settings, including theoretical explanations; patterns and case studies; and control strategies.

JS 441. Terrorism and Social Control. 3 Hours.

Exploration of causes and consequences of terrorism and how governments respond, including investigation, prosecution, and punishment of terrorists.

JS 442. Race, Crime, Gender and Social Policy. 3 Hours.

Examination of how subordinate status of minority groups (African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans and Women) affects interaction with the justice system as offenders, victims, and professionals.

JS 443. Women and the Criminal Justice System. 3 Hours.

Examination of women's experiences as offenders, victims, and professionals in the criminal and civil justice systems.

JS 444. Law and Society. 3 Hours.

Examination of relationship between law and society, including how law is used to facilitate or retard social change, social control, and social conflict.

JS 445. Juvenile Corrections. 3 Hours.

Examination of historical and contemporary efforts to reduce juvenile delinquency through institutional and community-based programs; innovative programs; evaluation of program effectiveness.

JS 450. Questioned Death Investigation. 3 Hours.

Introduction to and analysis of questioned deaths, including techniques used in case investigation; overview and history of coroners' offices structure and function in the U.S.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 110 [Min Grade: C]

JS 451. Research Methods in Forensic Science. 3 Hours.

Review of routinely used research methods to conduct forensic science scientific studies.
Prerequisites: CJ 110 [Min Grade: C] or JS 110 [Min Grade: C]

JS 452. Questioned Documents. 3 Hours.

Introduction to and analysis of questioned documents, including techniques used in case investigation. Laboratory fee charged.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] and JS 110 [Min Grade: C]) or (CJ 100 [Min Grade: C] and CJ 110 [Min Grade: C])

JS 453. Investigation of Fires and Explosions. 3 Hours.

Introduction to arson investigation including overview of specific techniques used in case investigation; case preparation and presentation in court.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 110 [Min Grade: C]

JS 456. Forensic Approaches to Osteology. 3 Hours.

Introduction study of structure and function of bones with particular emphasis on ability to identify age, sex, and population type of skeletal material.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 110 [Min Grade: C]

JS 460. Violence: An American Tradition. 3 Hours.

Examines violence as an American tradition, including historical acts of violence as catalysts for social change, destructive or negative violence, and policies and prevention strategies.

JS 465. Cold Case Analysis. 3 Hours.

Introduction to methods used in analyzing unsolved cases, including innovative technology, 3rd party investigators, and teams.

JS 466. Spatial Analysis and Crime Mapping. 3 Hours.

This skills-based class will introduce students to the application of geographic information systems (GIS) to crime-related topics and issues.

JS 477. Legislative Issues in the Intelligence Community. 3 Hours.

Case studies of legislative contributions to and curbs on intelligence community's legal authority, including Patriot Act, Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), Defense Department Authorization Act, and state and local legislative initiatives.

JS 481. Honors Research. 3 Hours.

Undergraduate research project developed and completed under direction of faculty mentor.

JS 482. Honors Research and Colloquium. 3 Hours.

Completion of undergraduate Honors Project under the guidance of a faculty mentor with presentation of project at department colloquium.

JS 483. Patterns in Crime. 3 Hours.

Examination of the major correlates of crime and criminality; critical examination of major sources of information from which data on crime correlates are gathered.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] and JS 101 [Min Grade: C]) or (CJ 100 [Min Grade: C] and CJ 101 [Min Grade: C])

JS 490. Independent Research in Criminal Justice. 1-3 Hour.

Independent readings, research or project approved and directed by a criminal justice faculty member who supervises proposed plan of study. Permission of Department Chair.

JS 491. Independent Research in Criminal Justice. 1-3 Hour.

Independent readings, research or project approved and directed by a criminal justice faculty member who supervises proposed plan of study. Permission of Department Chair.

JS 497. Internship and Capstone in Criminal Justice for Practitioners. 3-6 Hours.

Supervised capstone experience for students already working in a local, state, or federal criminal justice or ancillary agency. Course strongly emphasizes demonstration of student¿s ability to communicate in written form to appropriate audiences, including competence in grammar and mechanics; understanding and practicing ethical decision making and civic responsibility; and quantitative analyses including construction and interpretation of tables and ability to adequately communicate quantitative information. Prerequisite: Permission of Internship Coordinator. May be repeated for maximum of 12 hours of which not more than 6 hours may be counted toward fulfilling major or minor requirements. Ethics and Civil Responsibility and Writing are significant components of this course (QEP).

JS 498. Distance Internship and Capstone in Criminal Justice. 3-6 Hours.

Supervised capstone experience in criminal justice agency located more than 100 miles from Birmingham. Course strongly emphasizes demonstration of student¿s ability to communicate in written form to appropriate audiences, including competence in grammar and mechanics; understanding and practicing ethical decision making and civic responsibility; and quantitative analyses including construction and interpretation of tables and ability to adequately communicate quantitative information Prerequisite: Permission of Internship Coordinator. May be repeated for maximum of 12 hours of which not more than 6 hours may be counted toward fulfilling major or minor requirements. Ethics and Civil Responsibility and Writing are significant components of this course (QEP).

JS 499. Internship and Capstone in Criminal Justice. 3-6 Hours.

Supervised capstone experience in local, state, or federal criminal justice or ancillary agency. Course strongly emphasizes demonstration of ability to communicate in written form to an appropriate audience, including competence in grammar and mechanics; understanding and practicing ethical decision making and civic responsibility; and quantitative analyses including construction and interpretation of tables and ability to adequately communicate quantitative information. Prerequisite: Permission of the Internship Coordinator. May be repeated for maximum of 12 hours of which not more than 6 hours may be counted toward fulfilling major or minor requirements. Ethics and Civil Responsibility and Writing are significant components of this course (QEP).