Human Studies

Program Contact Information

Program Coordinator Room Phone Number
Counselor EducationDr. Shannon McCarthy152(205) 975-8334
Educational LeadershipDr. Keith Gurley210B(205) 975-1983
Community Health and Human Services Dr. Retta Evans204(205) 996-2701
Kinesiology - Teacher CertificationDr. Sandra Sims224(205) 996-2721
Kinesiology - Exercise PhysiologyDr. Jane Roy205(205) 934-1757
ResearchDr. Melanie Shores246(205) 975-8487
FoundationsDr. Tondra Loder-Jackson219(205) 934-8304

Educational Foundations

The Educational Foundations (EDF) Program examines how educational institutions shape and are shaped by the social and cultural structures within our society. Our mission is to offer a program that examines current teaching contexts and practice, research, and theory with the aim of increasing our professional candidates' knowledge and understanding of the socio-cultural, historical, political, and economic factors, as well as the philosophical underpinnings, that influence education and shape the societies and world in which we live. Within a diverse world, we also believe that professional educators should recognize a profound need to intentionally learn about and incorporate their students' personal experiences, cultures, and community resources into their instruction and programs. It is through our courses that students come to encounter, interrogate, better understand, and embrace the increasingly diverse landscape of our society and P-12 students.

Educational Psychology and Research

At the undergraduate level, The Educational, Psychology and Research Program (EPR) provides courses in psychological foundations and measurement and evaluation that are necessary for all prospective teachers to complete who are pursuing an undergraduate teaching degree. We also house the undergraduate Introduction to Statistics that serves the Health and Kinesiology programs and concentrations.

At the graduate level, we provide educational psychology courses that meet the program requirements for graduate teacher certification programs as well as courses taken for recertification and electives for other Masters, Educational Specialists, and doctoral programs within and outside of the School of Education. Our program houses the research methods and statistics courses that are requirements for the graduate programs within the School of Education. These courses also attract graduate students from programs outside the School of Education such as Nursing, Public Health, and the School of Health Professions.

Counselor Education

For detailed information regarding admission requirements for the School of Education graduate programs, please visit the Admissions Requirements website at https://www.uab.edu/education/studentservices/admission-requirements.

Overview

The program in Counselor Education at the University of Alabama at Birmingham prepares Clinical Mental Health, Marriage, Couples, and Family and School counselors at the Master's level.  At the master's level, students acquire core knowledge and clinical skills, which enable them to enter the profession of counseling. 

All counseling concentrations (Clinical Mental Health, Marriage, Couples, and Family and School) are designed to meet the course-work and field experiences requirements for professional licensure in the State of Alabama. A 15 credit Marriage, Couples, and Family certificate is offered to provide additional coursework for mental health and school counselors who would like to broaden their clinical expertise and knowledge in Marriage, Couples, and Family counseling. The School Concentration is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).  The School Counseling Concentration meets the course work and field experiences required by the Alabama State Department of Education for certification.

The Counselor Education program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). The accreditation is through January 15, 2018.  The Clinical Mental Health Counseling concentration, a 61 hour program, is currently accredited under the 2001 standards for Community Counseling programs as a Community Counseling program. The CACREP 2009 standards combine the Community Counseling and Mental Health Counseling standards into standards for Clinical Mental Health Counseling programs. The counseling program intends to seek accreditation for this program as a Clinical Mental Health Counseling program when it comes up for reaccreditation, per CACREP guidelines. The counseling program also intends to seek CACREP accreditation for the Marriage, Couples, and Family program in the next reaccreditation process.

Admission Process

Consideration for admission to graduate study in Counselor Education will occur in the fall and spring semesters. The completed application packet must be received by the Counselor Education Program from the Graduate School by the dates shown:

Entry Term Deadline
FallMarch 1
SpringSeptember 1

Admission to graduate study in Counselor Education is initiated through the Graduate School and all required materials are to be submitted per specified instructions delineated by the Graduate School. 

Each applicant seeking admission to a Counselor Education program concentration must include with the other required materials, a typewritten statement of professional purpose that reflects the applicant’s background, development, pertinent work-related experience, professional career objectives and specified ways that completion of this program will contribute to his/her goal for becoming a professional counselor.

Standardized Test Scores and GPA Requirements

Undergraduate GPA:  (2.75 or better)

Standardized Test Scores: GRE-V (146 or better) and GRE-Q (147 or better)

Per the 2016 Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Program (CACREP) Standards, admission decisions must include consideration of each applicant’s (1) career goals, (2) aptitude for graduate-level study, (3) potential success in forming effective counseling relationships, and (4) respect for cultural differences.

Given these requirements, the admission committee considers multiple sources of information when making decisions. Because GRE test scores are one of several indicators, lower scores will not automatically disqualify applicants just as high scores do not automatically guarantee admission. Additional sources of information include previous/current grade point average, letters of recommendation, and a personal statement. It should be noted that our applicants typically score above the 50th percentile on both the quantitative and verbal domains.

In addition, applicants deemed to have acceptable scores, strong references, appropriate statement of purposes, and grades will be invited for an interview that will include a series of individual interviews, a group experience, and a possible writing sample with the Counselor Education faculty. Applicants should not infer they have been admitted into the program if granted an admissions interview.

The Counselor Education faculty will make admission decisions after reviewing the applicant's credentials in their entirety, and some candidates meeting minimum requirements may not be admitted. Further, the faculty reserves the right to make subjective decisions about a candidate’s ability to appropriately complete graduate work which may influence the decision to admit. Candidates participating in the interview may be given one of two decisions: a) admit, b) denied. Students are notified of their admission status following the interview.

Non-Degree Seeking Students

Potential students may take classes prior to admission to the Counselor Education Program as "non-degree seeking" students. However, non-degree seeking students are limited to 12 hours of coursework that may be transferred into the Counselor Education Program. Non-degree seeking students may enroll in elective courses with the permission of the instructor. It would be important for non-degree seeking students to make an advising appointment with a Counselor Education faculty member prior to enrolling in Area II courses as choices made could impact on future clinical placements. Non-degree seeking students are not permitted to take Area I counseling courses without permission of the instructor. It is also important to note that students taking coursework as a non-degree seeking student do so at their own risk. Enrolling and passing non-degree seeking coursework does not guarantee admission into the program as admission criteria (e.g., test scores, undergraduate GPA, and interview) are the primary factors considered when reviewing student suitability for the program

Program Outcomes

Students in the program are required to meet specific outcomes for the program.  These outcomes involve knowledge, skills, and abilities. Outcomes are met when students pass critical “high stakes” assessments in the program. Failure to achieve the required outcomes will result in termination from the program. 

Evaluation of Candidates

There are 7 Checkpoints in the assessment system for counseling candidates: Admissions, Course-based Assessments, Comprehensive Exams, Practicum, Internship, and Eligibility for Graduation/Certification.  Evaluation of the counselor-in-training is an on-going process. The faculty reserves the right to assess the candidate's appropriateness to be a professional counselor.

Dispositions

Counselor Education faculty individually review the professional dispositions (behaviors and attitudes) of students within each course in accordance with the School of Education’s policy and procedure.  Additionally, faculty will collectively review student dispositions and overall progress in the program at the end of each semester.  Dispositional areas identified as deficient could result in termination from the program.

Clinical Experience: Master’s Level

Before admission to the program, students in the school counseling concentration must submit to fingerprinting and a Background Review conducted by the Alabama State Department of Education at the student’s cost. For information on the cost and how to complete this requirement, go to http://background.alabama.gov/.  No school counseling student shall begin a clinical placement (Practicum or Internship in an education environment) in Alabama without a suitability letter from the Alabama State Department of Education demonstrating that the student’s criminal background  has been reviewed and cleared by the Department of Education.  Clinical Mental Health counseling students are not required to submit to fingerprinting or a background review upon admission to the Counselor Education Program.  However, Clinical Mental Health counseling students are required to complete clinical placements in order to obtain the master’s degree in counseling and many of the outside agencies/entities require fingerprinting and background reviews prior to accepting a student for clinical placement.  For all counseling students, the appearance of one or more felonies and/or several misdemeanors on a student’s background review may negatively impact placement potential and/or credential obtainment.

Per CACREP standards, before beginning the first semester of their clinical experience, students must obtain and submit proof of individual liability insurance. This is to be procured by the student at the student’s expense and must be maintained throughout the student’s clinical experience. Student must submit proof of current individual liability coverage at the beginning of each semester that student is enrolled in a clinical experience. This is a requirement for all counselor education students, regardless of concentration. If proof of insurance is not provided, student will be administratively removed from the clinical course.

Prerequisites for the clinical experience include successful completion of required coursework, meeting the required outcomes and competencies in Areas I and II, and successful completion of comprehensive exams. The practicum experience requires a minimum of 100 hours (including 40 hours of direct client contact) on-site at an appropriate setting to be determined by the Clinical Coordinator. The internship is 600 hours (including 240 hours of direct client contact) on-site. Grading for the clinical experiences is on a Pass/Fail basis. To receive a Pass grade the counselor-in-training must be able to demonstrate basic counseling skills, behave in an appropriate professional manner consistent with the American Counseling Association's Code of Ethics, and satisfactorily complete the academic, dispositional and outcome requirements set forth in both the practicum and internship classes. 

ECG 695, Practicum : Each semester of your clinical experience is graded PASS or FAIL in three areas:  (a) Proficiency in counseling skills and competencies; (b) Proficiency in each evaluation area submitted by the on-site supervisor; and (c) Pass group supervision requirements.  These areas are NOT averaged.  You must maintain a PASS in EACH area to receive a PASS for the course.  If you FAIL one area, you will FAIL the course.  You will receive a syllabus each semester of practicum/internship describing the requirements necessary to PASS your clinical experience.  Students who do not meet the appropriate skill development by the end of the semester of ECG 695 have two options:  receive an (I), or receive an (F).

Option 1:  Students in ECG 695 who receive an (I) for the developmental remediation shall do so in consultation with the course instructor. A remediation plan shall be developed.  Program faculty may also have input into the remediation plan. The remediation plan will outline specific skills which were not met in ECG 695 and will state measurable objectives that are directly related to the unmet skill areas.  The remediation plan will go into effect the following semester.  Upon satisfactory completion of the remediation plan, the (I) will be changed to reflect the student's progress. If the student passes the course, then the student will be allowed to move forward and register for ECG 697 (a) in the next semester.  A student cannot register for ECG 697 (a) while in remediation for ECG 695. If the student is unable to meet the objectives outlined in the remediation plan, the student's (I) in ECG 695 will be recorded as an (F) and the student will be administratively dropped from the Counselor Education Program.

Option 2:  Students in ECG 695 who receive an (F) will be administratively dropped and not allowed to continue in the Counselor Education Program.

ECG 697 (a), Internship :  Each semester of your clinical experience is graded PASS or FAIL in three areas:  (a) Proficiency in counseling skills and competencies; (b) Proficiency in each evaluation area submitted by the on-site supervisor; and (c) Pass group supervision requirements.  These areas are NOT averaged.  You must maintain a PASS in EACH area to receive a PASS for the course.  If you FAIL one area, you will FAIL the course.  You will receive a syllabus each semester of practicum/internship describing the requirements necessary to PASS your clinical experience.  Students who do not meet the appropriate skill development by the end of the semester of ECG 697 (a) have two options:  receive an (I), or receive an (F).

Option 1:  Students in ECG 697 (a) who receive an (I) for the developmental remediation shall do so in consultation with the course instructor. A remediation plan shall be developed.  Program faculty may also have input into the remediation plan. The remediation plan will outline specific skills which were not met in ECG 697 (a) and will state measurable objectives that are directly related to the unmet skill areas.  The remediation plan will go into effect the following semester.  Upon satisfactory completion of the remediation plan, the (I) will be changed to reflect the student's progress. If the student passes the course, then the student will be allowed to move forward and register for ECG 697 (b) in the next semester.  A student cannot register for ECG 697 (b) while in remediation for ECG 697 (a).  If the student is unable to meet the objectives outlined in the remediation plan, the student's (I) in ECG 697 (a) will be recorded as an (F) and the student will be administratively dropped from the Counselor Education Program.

Option 2:  Students in ECG 697 (a) who receive an (F) will be administratively dropped and not allowed to continue in the Counselor Education Program.

Receiving an Incomplete:  A student will be allowed to participate in a remediation plan only TWICE during their clinical experience.

Concentrations: Master’s Level

Clinical Mental Health Counseling

The Master of Arts in Counseling with a concentration in Clinical Mental Health counseling is designed to prepare students to demonstrate knowledge and skills with several counseling modalities appropriate for a broad range of clients in a multicultural society; interact effectively with other helping professionals and referral resources; make appropriate counselor-client related decisions in the context of professional, ethical, and legal guidelines; and fill effectively entry-level positions of professional responsibility within the specialization of agency counseling. The coursework is approved by the Alabama Board of Examiners in Counseling, which allows graduates of the program to pursue licensure as professional counselors in the state of Alabama.  This program takes no less than 3 years to complete.  For most students, it takes approximately 3.5 years or 10 terms (including summers) to complete the program.

COURSE OF STUDY

(61 Semester Hours)

Area I:

RequirementsHours
EPR 590Research & Prgm Eval in Coun4
ECG 612Professional Orientation3
EPR 614Lifespan Human Development3
ECG 621Theories of Individual Counseling3
ECG 624Assessment (Prerequistes: EPR 590)3
ECG 626Group Counseling: Process and Procedures (Prerequisites: ECG 624)3
ECG 628Social and Cultural Diversity3
ECG 630Career Development: Vocational and Life Planning3
ECG 638Practicum I: Clinical Skills and Techniques (Prerequisite: ECG 621)3
Total Hours28

Comprehensive Exam

The Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Exam will be given the semester of successful completion or upon successful completion of Area I. This is a “high stakes” assessment.  Students who do not successfully pass this examination will be given the opportunity to re-take the exam a maximum of two times. There are no exceptions. Students unsuccessful in passing the comprehensive exam after 3 attempts will be dismissed from the program.

AREA II:

RequirementsHours
ECG 600Intro to Community Counseling3
ECG 650Diagnosis and Treatment of Psychological Disorders3
Elective (discontinued, fall, 2012)
Elective (discontinued, fall, 2012)
ECG 631Suicide Prevention (Required, Fall, 2012)3
ECG 660Relationships and Human Sexuality (Prerequisite: ECG 691 - Required Fall, 2012)3
ECG 613Foundations of Substance Abuse (required, Fall, 2012)3
ECG 652Advanced Counseling Techniques (Required, Fall, 2012)3
ECG 653Counseling Children and Adolescents (Required, Fall, 2012)3
ECG 691Introduction to Couples and Family Counseling (Required, Fall, 2012)3
Total Hours24

AREA III: Clinical Requirements

RequirementsHours
ECG 695Practicum II: Supervised Field Experience3
(Prerequisites: Area I, Compehensive Exams, and Faculty Recommendation)
Practicum is 100 hours minimum with 40 hours of direct client contact
ECG 697Counseling Internship (6 hours-2 semesters)6
(Prerequisite: ECG 695)
Internship is 600 hours with 240 hours of direct client contact
Total Hours9

Marriage, Couples, and Family Counseling

The Master of Arts in Counseling with a concentration in Marriage, Couples, and Family counseling is designed to prepare students to work with individuals, couples, or groups where interpersonal relationships are examined for the purpose of achieving more adequate, satisfying, and productive marriage and family adjustments; make appropriate ethical decisions as counseling professionals; comprehend systems theory and use it to conceptualize problems and solutions for couples and families; and fill effectively, entry-level positions of professional responsibility within the specialization of marriage and family counseling. The coursework allows graduates of the program to pursue licensure as marriage and family therapists in the state of Alabama. This program takes about 3 years to complete.

COURSE OF STUDY

(61 Semester Hours)

Area I:

RequirementsHours
EPR 590Research & Prgm Eval in Coun4
EPR 614Lifespan Human Development3
ECG 612Professional Orientation3
ECG 621Theories of Individual Counseling3
ECG 624Assessment (Prerequisite: EPR 590)3
ECG 626Group Counseling: Process and Procedures (Prerequisite: ECG 621)3
ECG 628Social and Cultural Diversity3
ECG 630Career Development: Vocational and Life Planning3
ECG 638Practicum I: Clinical Skills and Techniques (Prerequisite: ECG 621)3
ECG 691Introduction to Couples and Family Counseling3
Total Hours31

Comprehensive Exam

The Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Exam will be given the semester of successful completion or upon successful completion of Area I. This is a “high stakes” assessment. Students who do not successfully pass this examination will be given the opportunity to re-take the exam a maximum of two times. There are no exceptions. Students unsuccessful in passing the comprehensive exam after 3 attempts will be dismissed from the program.

AREA II

RequirementsHours
ECG 613Foundations of Substance Abuse3
ECG 650Diagnosis and Treatment of Psychological Disorders3
ECG 653Counseling Children and Adolescents3
ECG 685Marriage and Couples Counseling (Prerequisite: ECG 691)3
ECG 660Relationships and Human Sexuality (Prerequisite: ECG 691)3
ECG 680The Intersections of Family and Community Systems (Prerequisite: ECG 691)3
ECG 689Advanced Family Counseling Techniques (Prerequisites: ECG 691; ECG 694)3
Total Hours21

Area III: Clinical Requirements

RequirementsHours
ECG 695Practicum II: Supervised Field Experience (Prerequisites: Area I, Comprehensive Exams, and Faculty Recommendation)3
Practicum is 100 hours minimum with 40 hours of direct client contact
ECG 697Counseling Internship (6 hours - 2 semesters) (Prerequisite: ECG 695)6
Internship is 600 hours with 240 hours of direct client contact
Total Hours9

School Counseling

According to the American School Counseling Association, "the purpose of a counseling program in a school setting is to promote and enhance the learning process."  The goal is to enable all students to achieve success in school and to develop into contributing member of our society.

The concentration in School counseling is designed to prepare individuals as counselors in grades K-12. The program leading to the Master of Arts in Counseling degree requires a minimum of 49 semester hours of prescribed coursework to meet the academic and field experience requirements for the SDE Class A Professional Certificate in school counseling.

Admissions: In addition to the admission requirements for the Counselor Education Program, candidates seeking admission to the school counseling concentration must possess a minimum of a 2.75 undergraduate grade point average.  Before the school counseling student can receive certification, the school counseling student must satisfactorily obtain a passing score on the following assessments: Alabama Educator Certificate Test, the Praxis II Test in School Counseling, the National Counselor Exam.

The school counseling concentration meets the course work and field experiences required by the Alabama State Department of Education for certification. The concentrations meet the academic and field experience requirements for licensure as professional counselors in Alabama.

COURSE OF STUDY

(49 Semester hours)

Area I

RequirementsHours
EPR 590Research & Prgm Eval in Coun4
ECG 612Professional Orientation3
ECG 621Theories of Individual Counseling3
EPR 614Lifespan Human Development3
ECG 624Assessment3
ECG 626Group Counseling: Process and Procedures3
ECG 628Social and Cultural Diversity3
ECG 630Career Development: Vocational and Life Planning3
ECG 638Practicum I: Clinical Skills and Techniques3
Total Hours28

Comprehensive Exam

A National Comprehensive Examination will be given the semester of successful completion or upon successful completion of Area I. This is a “high stakes” assessment.  Students who do not successfully pass this examination will be given the opportunity to re-take the exam a maximum of two times. There are no exceptions. Students unsuccessful in passing the comprehensive exam after 3 attempts will be dismissed from the program.

AREA II

RequirementsHours
ECG 620Foundations of School Counseling3
ECG 623Comprehensive Counseling and Guidance: M/H School3
ECG 627Comprehensive Counseling and Guidance: M/H School3
Elective (discontinued, fall, 2012)
ECG 619Special Issues for School Counselors3
Total Hours12

AREA III: Clinical Requirements

RequirementsHours
ECG 695Practicum II: Supervised Field Experience3
(Prerequisites: Areas I & II, Comprehensive Exams, and Faculty Recommendation)
Practicum 100 hours; 40 direct hours.
ECG 697Counseling Internship6
(Prerequisite: ECG 695)
Internship 600 hours; 240 direct hours
Total Hours9

Certificate: Master's Level

Certificate in Marriage, Couples, and Family Counseling

The certificate in Marriage, Couples, and Family counseling prepares school counselors and clinical mental health counselors to position themselves to more effectively work with clients, to better align with evidence-based practice, and to increase their range of services and versatility through additional coursework in this subject area. The certificate is open to current UAB counselor education students as well as graduates of Master’s level school counseling and mental health programs. The certificate consists of 15 credits of coursework, and takes students about one year to complete on average.

Admission Process

Candidates seeking admission to the Marriage, Couples, and Family counseling certificate who are graduates of a Master’s level counselor education program, must complete an application found on the UAB counselor education website, as well as submit a statement of purpose, three letters of recommendation and their graduate-level transcript. Equivalent completed coursework from a CACREP counseling program may be substituted for a required course for the certificate. Admission is accepted for summer and fall terms. The prerequisite course for all other coursework for the certificate is offered in the summer term only. Applicants who do not receive a waiver for this course would apply for the summer term. Applicants who receive a waiver for the prerequisite course would apply for the fall term.

Current UAB clinical mental health or school counseling students who wish to pursue the MCF certificate should speak with their advisor to arrange to complete the required coursework.

COURSE OF STUDY

(15 Semester hours)

RequirementsHours
ECG 691Introduction to Couples and Family Counseling3
ECG 685Marriage and Couples Counseling (Prerequisite: ECG 691)3
ECG 660Relationships and Human Sexuality (Prerequisite: ECG 691)3
ECG 680The Intersections of Family and Community Systems (Prerequisite: ECG 691)3
ECG 689Advanced Family Counseling Techniques (Prerequisites: ECG 691; ECG 685)3
Total Hours15

 

Educational Leadership

Because admission to these programs is selective, prospective students should contact a departmental advisor to determine specific admission requirements for the degree or certificate in which they are interested. For detailed information regarding admission requirements for the School of Education graduate programs, please visit the Admissions Requirements website at https://www.uab.edu/education/studentservices/admission-requirements.

The following degrees are offered:  MAE in Instructional Leadership (leading to Alabama Class A Certification in Instructional Leadership); the Educational Specialist Degree (leading to Alabama Class AA Certification in Instructional Leadership – must have Class A in Instructional Leadership first); the Doctorate of Education degree (Ed.D.) in Educational Leadership (must have Ed.S. in Educational or Instructional Leadership to apply).

The programs leading to the Doctorate of Education (Ed.D.) degree in educational leadership are offered at UAB by the joint faculties of UAB and the University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa). Admission is highly selective and is open every other year. In addition to the Graduate School requirements, a portfolio and writing sample are required by the program.

Additional Information

For detailed information, contact Dr. Keith Gurley, Program Director, Educational Leadership, Department of Human Studies, UAB School of Education, 1720 2nd Avenue South, EB 210B, Birmingham, AL 35294-1250.

Telephone: 205-975-1983
E-mail:   kgurley@uab.edu
Web:  http://www.uab.edu/education/humanstudies/educational-leadership 

Dispositions

Educational Leadership faculty individually review the professional dispositions (behaviors and attitudes) of students within each course in accordance with the School of Education’s policy and procedure.  Additionally, faculty will collectively review student dispositions and overall progress in the program at the end of each semester.  Dispositional areas identified as deficient could result in termination from the program.

Community Health and Human Services

For detailed information regarding admission requirements for the School of Education graduate programs, please visit the Admissions Requirements website at https://www.uab.edu/education/studentservices/admission-requirements.

Overview of Our Programs

The Community Health and Human Services program at UAB is designed to prepare students to work in various professional health settings including national/state health agencies, clinical-based programs and community agencies.  In addition to studying contemporary health content, students learn the process of assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating health-related programs and interventions. Students are provided numerous opportunities to practice classroom skills in the community through service learning imbedded throughout the curriculum.

Master of Arts in Education:  Community Health

The Community Health and Human Services program at UAB prepares students for advanced employment opportunities beyond the bachelor's degree level (MAE in Community Health)Work settings include public, volunteer, and private health agencies, clinics, and worksites.  Students use skills in health education program planning, implementation, and evaluation.  Students are also provided numerous opportunities to practice classroom skills in the community through service learning.  Students learn research protocol and have opportunities to complete either a thesis or take comprehensive exams.  Required courses include research design, foundations of health education, planning and evaluating programs, administration, and health behavior theory.  Course work is aligned with the responsibilities and competencies of advanced level health educators developed by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing www.nchec.org.  This program of study has been developed to include the knowledge and skill competencies needed to be eligible and prepared to sit for the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) exam.

M.A.Ed. Admission Process

Consideration for admission to the master’s degree program will occur each Fall and Spring term. The completed application packet must be received by the Community Health and Human Services Program from the Graduate School by the dates shown:

Entry Term Deadline
FallApril 30
SpringOctober 30

Admission to graduate study in Community Health and Human Services is initiated through the Graduate School and all required materials are to be submitted per specified instructions delineated by the Graduate School. M.A.Ed. applicants should have a cumulative GPA of 2.50/4.00 or greater for prior college coursework and preferred MAT score of 399 or greater, or preferred GRE scores of 150 or greater for Verbal Reasoning and 149 or greater for Quantitative Reasoning. In rare cases, applicants who do not meet these standards may be considered for admission if the faculty determines the candidate brings something unique to the learning community.

In addition, applicants must include a typewritten statement of professional purpose that reflects the applicant’s background, development, pertinent work-related experience, professional career objectives and specified ways that completion of this program will contribute to his/her goal for becoming a health education professional.

All applications for graduate admission are reviewed by the community health and human services faculty. Applicants deemed to meet requirements will be contacted for an interview with the Admissions Committee. Applicants should not infer they have been admitted into the program if granted an admissions interview.  Selection will be made by the faculty after reviewing the applicant's credentials in their entirety, and some candidates meeting minimum requirements may not be admitted. Candidates participating in the interview may be given one of two decisions:  a) admit, or b) not admit. Students are notified of their admission status following the interview.

Programs of Study for Master’s Degrees

(Program Coordinator, Dr. Retta Evans, rrevans@uab.edu)

The Graduate Certificate in Community Health Education is designed for students who have a desire to work in the community or enhance their skills in academia and want some preparation at the graduate level in community health, but not a full master's degree.  This certificate will formally recognize UAB students and community professionals who receive the necessary skills and training in community health education.

RequirementsHours
CHHS 631Planning and Implementing Health Education/Promotion Programs3
CHHS 632Administration of Health Education/Promotion Programs3
CHHS 642Health Behavior and Health Education3
CHHS 697Evaluation of Health Education/Promotion Programs3
Choose One of the Following Options3
CHHS 610Foundations of Health Education/Promotion3
CHHS 606Advanced Issues of Disease Prevention in Health Education/Promotion3
CHHS 689Intervention Strategies for Health Education/Promotion3
CHHS 621Health Communication3
Total Hours27

The M.A.Ed. in Community Health is designed to prepare individuals for advanced health education careers in agency, schools, worksites, and allied health care settings. This program is aligned with the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing and prepares studentsto sit for the CHES/MCHES certification. CHES/MCHES provides evidence of competency of the knowledge, skills andapplication of the Areas of Responsibilities defining the role of an entry or masters-level health educator. Program options allow students to select thesis, or non-thesis as options.

M.A.Ed. – Community Health, Thesis Option

Thesis required (33 hours course work required)

NOTE: No individual course grade below “C” will be accepted. Each course with a grade below “C” must be repeated.

RequirementsHours
Major Courses
CHHS 606Advanced Issues of Disease Prevention in Health Education/Promotion3
CHHS 610Foundations of Health Education/Promotion3
CHHS 631Planning and Implementing Health Education/Promotion Programs3
CHHS 632Administration of Health Education/Promotion Programs3
CHHS 642Health Behavior and Health Education3
CHHS 697Evaluation of Health Education/Promotion Programs3
CHHS 689Intervention Strategies for Health Education/Promotion3
Additional Requirements
Students must have these courses or equivalents, or take them with CHHS 610:
CHHS 223Introduction to Disease Prevention in Health Education/Promotion3
CHHS 343Behavioral Theory in Health Education/Promotion3
Research Courses
EPR 609Statistical Methods and Research in Education: Intermediate3
EPR 596Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Educational Research3
Thesis3
Graduate Elective (MUST be approved by a Commnity Health and Human Services advisor)3
Total Hours39

M.A.Ed. – Community Health, Non-Thesis Option

 (33 hours course work required.)

NOTE: No individual course grade below “C” will be accepted. Each course with a grade below “C” must be repeated.

RequirementsHours
Major Courses
CHHS 606Advanced Issues of Disease Prevention in Health Education/Promotion3
CHHS 610Foundations of Health Education/Promotion3
CHHS 631Planning and Implementing Health Education/Promotion Programs3
CHHS 632Administration of Health Education/Promotion Programs3
CHHS 642Health Behavior and Health Education3
CHHS 689Intervention Strategies for Health Education/Promotion3
CHHS 697Evaluation of Health Education/Promotion Programs3
Additional Requirements
Students must have these courses or their equivalents, or take them with CHHS 610:
CHHS 223Introduction to Disease Prevention in Health Education/Promotion3
CHHS 343Behavioral Theory in Health Education/Promotion3
Research Courses
EPR 609Statistical Methods and Research in Education: Intermediate (Prerequisite EPR 608)3
EPR 596Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Educational Research3
Graduate Elective (Must be approved by a Community Health and Human Services advisor).3
CHHS 693Advanced Field Experience in Community Health Education3-6
Total Hours39-42

Comprehensive Examination Non-Thesis Option Only

Students in the Non-Thesis M.A.Ed. program must complete a supervised internship including comprehensive exams during their last semester of course work. The examination process is intended to allow students to demonstrate the appropriate aptitude for advanced level health education. The process encompasses the content knowledge and critical thinking skills that Community Health and Human Services faculty believes every student graduating from this program should possess. A student cannot attempt the internship and comprehensive exam more than twice. Those who cannot complete the internship and exam with a passing score during the second attempt will be dismissed from the program and not allowed readmission. Contact your community health and human services academic advisor for further information.

Community Health Concentration with Nonprofit Management Certificate

Through this joint venture between the Community Health and Human Services program and the Department of Government, students learn advanced health education programming planning, implementation, and evaluation as well as nonprofit management skills such as grant writing and fund raising. The program exposes students to volunteer, and private health agencies; clinics; and worksites.

Admission Requirements: Admission to the Master of Arts in Education, Health Education, Community Health Concentration with Nonprofit Management Certificate is a two-part process. Students must apply for admission through the UAB Graduate School and must also complete the Non-Profit Management application. For more information on this application, visit this link www.uab.edu/cas/government/graduate-program/nonprofit-management-certificate. For more information about this program, visit this link www.uab.edu/education/humanstudies/chhs/maed-in-health-education-nonprofit-management.

RequirementsHours
Common Courses for Both Thesis and Non-Thesis Options
CHHS 610Foundations of Health Education/Promotion3
CHHS 606Advanced Issues of Disease Prevention in Health Education/Promotion3
CHHS 631Planning and Implementing Health Education/Promotion Programs3
MPA 671Marketing and Fundraising3
MPA 672Nonprofit Management3
CHHS 642Health Behavior and Health Education3
CHHS 689Intervention Strategies for Health Education/Promotion3
MPA 689Program Evaluation3
EPR 609Statistical Methods and Research in Education: Intermediate3
Graduate Level MPA Elective (choose one):
Grants Management
Special Topics in Public Administration
GIS for Managers
Strategic Planning
Course for Thesis Option Only:
Thesis Research

Graduate Traineeship in Pediatric Pulmonary Care (with School of Health Professions)

 A Graduate Traineeship in Pediatric Pulmonary Care (PPC) is offered to one student and is designed specifically for professionals desiring a graduate degree in Community Health and Human Services who are interested in pediatric pulmonary care, and aspiring to positions of leadership..The traineeship features a combination of planned coursework, hospital rounds, pulmonary clinics, patient and family education and research experience and is designed specifically for professionals desiring a graduate degree in Community Health and Human Services (master’s or doctorate), who are interested in pediatric pulmonary care, and aspiring to positions of leadership. This 12-month interdisciplinary training program is offered to graduate students in Respiratory Therapy - Community Health and Human Services nursing, nutrition, social work and medicine. Training is provided in each of the Maternal and Child Health Leadership Competencies. The Traineeship includes a monthly stipend (for up to 12 months) and tuition assistance (limited to U.S. citizens or to individuals with a permanent visa). IF interested in the PPC program, contact Dr Wajih Ahmad, wahmad@uab.edu

Student Professional Dispositions

Community Health and Human Services faculty individually review the professional dispositions (behaviors and attitudes) of students within each course in accordance with the School of Education’s policy and procedure.  Additionally, faculty will collectively review student dispositions and overall progress in the program at the end of each semester.  Dispositional areas identified as deficient could result in termination from the program.

Graduate Program Policies 

No individual course grade below “C” will be accepted. Each course with an earned grade below “C” must be repeated. Repeating a required health education course more than twice is not permitted. If a student receives a grade lower than a “C” after their second attempt, he or she will be dismissed from the Community Health and Human Services program and not allowed readmission.

Non-Degree Seeking Graduate Students

Following admission to the UAB Graduate School, students may enroll in elective Community Health and Human Services courses as "non-degree seeking" students with the permission of the instructor. Non-degree seeking students are limited to 12 hours of coursework. It is essential for non-degree seeking students to make an advising appointment with a faculty member prior to enrolling in elective courses as some elective courses have pre-/co-requisites. Non-degree seeking students are not permitted to take "core" health education courses prior to admission. Enrolling and passing non-degree seeking coursework does not guarantee admission into a masters or doctoral degree program. Admission criteria (e.g., test scores, cumulative GPA, recommendations, and interview) are the primary factors considered when reviewing student suitability for admission to a program.

Health Education/Health Promotion

For detailed information regarding admission requirements for the School of Education graduate programs, please visit the Admissions Requirements website at https://www.uab.edu/education/studentservices/admission-requirements.

Health Education/Health Promotion (PhD)

Graduate Program Director (Education): Dr. Retta Evans, rrevans@uab.edu

Ph.D. Health Education/Health Promotion

The PhD in Health Education/Health Promotion is a UA System degree jointly administered by three units: UAB School of Education and College of Arts & Sciences, UAB School of Public Health, and UA College of Human Environmental Sciences. Students draw upon the expertise and resources of a diverse and highly qualified faculty. Faculty members strive to create a rigorous scholarly and supportive atmosphere for students to develop intellectually with the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to be ethical and responsible health education professionals. 

Ph.D. Admission Process

Consideration for admission to graduate study in health education will occur each Fall and Spring term. The completed application packet must be received by the Community Health and Human Services Program from the Graduate School by the dates shown:

Entry Term Deadline
FallApril 30
SpringOctober 30

Candidates for admission must have completed a bachelor’s or master’s degree from an accredited institution in health education or a health-related field. Admission to doctoral study is initiated through the Graduate School. Applicants will: (a) request official transcripts of all college coursework to send to UAB Graduate School; (b) submit (3) letters of recommendation from professors or others who are qualified to judge your ability to complete doctoral coursework; (c) complete the GRE indicating UAB as the recipient of your scores; and (d) submit writing sample(s), such as an essay describing your academic training, professional experiences and career goals.  Admission to the program is competitive.

Ph.D. applicants should have a cumulative GPA of 3.00/4.00 or greater for prior college coursework and preferred GRE scores of 312. or greater Faculty consider GRE scores as one indicator of an applicant’s potential success in the doctoral program.

Ph.D. Health Education/Health Promotion Program of Study

Students may enter the program with either a bachelor's or master's degree in health education, or a master's degree in a closely related health field. Prerequisite coursework includes Foundations of Health Education, Health Education Planning and Evaluation, and Research Design and Statistics. These requirements may be corequisite components in the program.

Students entering the program with a master’s degree may transfer appropriate coursework to this program; however, this will not reduce the number of courses required. Students will not be required to retake coursework already completed but may be required to complete prerequisites as part of their planned course of study.

A required review of student credentials prior to admission will identify strengths and needs. This review will provide students with a blueprint for their course of study and will be conducted by the program director and faculty advisor.

The PhD degree program will require students to complete a minimum of 72 credit hours: 42 hours of coursework, 12 hours of research internship, and 18 hours of dissertation research. Students will meet regularly with a faculty advisor to plan course enrollment. 

Research and Statistics Prerequisites: Students are required to have completed the following courses (or equivalents) BEFORE enrolling in the Advanced Research and Statistical Methods Core.

RequirementsHours
EPR 594Introduction to Educational Research Design3
EPR 596Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Educational Research3
EPR 608
  & EPR 607
Statistical Methods and Action Research
   and Microcomputer Applications to Statistical Analysis
4
EPR 609Statistical Methods and Research in Education: Intermediate3
Total Hours13

The specific components of the PhD program in health Education and Health Promotion are outlined below.

Ph.D. through the School of Education

RequirementsHours
I. Health Education and Promotion CORE Courses12
Advanced Theoretic/Scientific Basis of Health Education & Health Promotion
Planning and Administration of Health Education/Promotion Programs
Evaluation of Health Education/Promotion Programs
Health Education Seminar I
Health Education Seminar II
Health Education Seminar III
II. Advanced Research and Statistical Methods Core12
Principles of Epidemiologic Research
Qualitative Research: Inquiry and Analysis
Computer Applications and Advanced Statistical Methods
Graduate Research Design 1
Survey Methods in Educational Research
Mixed Methods Approaches to Educational Research
III. Coursework in the Social and Behavioral Sciences 218
IV. Research Internship12
V. Dissertation18
Total Hours72
1

Choose one course that fits the needs of your dissertation, with the approval of an advisor. Two examples are listed, but other courses could apply.

2

 Selection of courses pre-approved by doctoral program advisor to build knowledge and skills in a cognate area, e.g. Health Disparities, Research, Global Health, Public Health Policy, Aging and Health, Disabilities and Health.


Comprehensive Examination

A written comprehensive examination is required of all candidates for the Ph.D. degree. Your preparation will include studying course content, core competencies for the profession, and related literature of the discipline. Prior to taking the exam, students must have completed their core course requirements. Students must register for a minimum of 3.0 hours of graduate work during the semester in which the comprehensive exam is taken.

The Comprehensive exam will be offered twice each year and is written and graded by the graduate faculty in the joint doctoral program. The examination will be a synthesis of the core coursework as well as core competencies in the field of Health Education and Health promotion. Grading of the comprehensive exam is done blinded, and by consensus. Students who fail to achieve passing scores will have one attempt to remediate within a calendar year. If a student fails a section for the second time, they will be dismissed from the program.

For detailed information regarding admission requirements for the School of Education graduate programs, please visit the Admissions Requirements website at https://www.uab.edu/education/studentservices/admission-requirements.

Kinesiology

Degrees offered include the Master of Science in Education and the Educational Specialist. At the master's degree level, students may specialize in Exercise Physiology (see listing below for more information about this program) or complete a teacher certification program. (traditional master’s program for those holding a valid B level certificate in physical education or the alternative master’s program for those NOT completing an undergraduate physical education teacher education program). The teacher certification program links teacher certification with the graduate program in physical education. For example, the M.S. awards the level A certificate and the Ed.S. is linked to the AA certificate. Each program requires a teaching certificate in physical education at the previous level (e.g., B certificate for admission to the A level, except the Alternative A program, and the A certificate for admission to the AA certificate).

Dispositions

Physical Education faculty individually review the professional dispositions (behaviors and attitudes) of students within each course in accordance with the School of Education’s policy and procedure.  Additionally, faculty will collectively review student dispositions and overall progress in the program at the end of each semester.  Dispositional areas identified as deficient could result in termination from the program.

Master of Science and "A" level teaching certificate; Non-Thesis

(31- 34 hours)

Teaching Field: At least 1/3 of the program shall be teaching field courses. (18 hours)

RequirementsHours
KIN 643Curriculum Development in Physical Education3
KIN 647Teaching Strategies and Issues in K-12 PE3
KIN 697Advanced Field Experience in Kinesiology3
600 Level Electives as approved by advisor (KIN 645 and KIN 649 are recommended)6
Total Hours15

Additional Courses: (13-16 hours)

RequirementsHours
Survey of Special Education Coursework: Required if not previously completed (0-3 hours)
ECY 600Introduction to Exceptional Learner3
EPR 607Microcomputer Applications to Statistical Analysis1
EPR 608Statistical Methods and Action Research3
EDF or EPR 600 level course3
Elective (as approved by advisor)9
Total Hours19

Master of Science and "A" level teaching certificate; Thesis

(30-33 hours)

Teaching Field: At least 1/3 of the program shall be teaching field courses. (18 hours)

RequirementsHours
ECY 600Introduction to Exceptional Learner3
KIN 643Curriculum Development in Physical Education3
KIN 647Teaching Strategies and Issues in K-12 PE3
KIN 693Advanced Field Experience in Physical Education3-6
KIN 699Thesis Research6
Survey of Special Education Coursework: Required if not previously completed (0-3 hours)
Total Hours18-21

Additional Courses: (13 hours)

RequirementsHours
EDF or EPR 600 level course3
EPR 596Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Educational Research3
EPR 609Statistical Methods and Research in Education: Intermediate3
Elective (as approved by advisor)6
Total Hours15

Alternative A (Non-Traditional 5th-Year Physical Education program) Non-Thesis

(51-54 hours)

Additional requirements are 14 hours of prescribed coursework. Contact the Office of Student Services in Suite 232 of the  Education Building for specific courses required.

RequirementsHours
Survey of Special Education Coursework: Required if not previously completed (0-3 hours)
ECY 600Introduction to Exceptional Learner3
Curriculum and Teaching:
Professional Studies:
EDF or EPR 500 - 600 level course (Advisor Approval Required)3
EDR 551Reading in Content Areas3
EDU 500Education as a Profession1
Evaluation of Teaching and Learning:
EPR 607Microcomputer Applications to Statistical Analysis1
EPR 608Statistical Methods and Action Research3
Reading:
Internship:
KIN 696Elementary/Secondary Physical Education Internship9
Teaching Field:
At least 1/3 of the program shall be teaching field courses
KIN 500Organization & Admin of PE3
KIN 509Assessment in Physical Education3
KIN 511Elementary School Physical Education3
KIN 520Fitness and Motor Skill Acquisition3
KIN 520LSport Skill Proficiency1
KIN 523Techniques of Teaching LIFE Skills in Secondary Schools3
KIN 589Physical Education Instructional Strategies6
KIN 645Advanced Motor Development3
KIN 647Teaching Strategies and Issues in K-12 PE3
KIN 649Adapted Physical Education3
KIN 607Principles of Coaching3
Total Hours57

Ed.S. Degree

(30-33 hours)

RequirementsHours
Teaching Field:
At least 1/3 of the program shall be teaching field courses (12)
KIN 636Current Readings in Physical Education3
KIN 715Advanced Field Experience in Physical Education3
KIN 726Supervised Research in Physical Education3
Survey of Special Education Coursework: Required if not previously completed. (0-3 hours)
ECY 600Introduction to Exceptional Learner3
KIN 729Physical Education Seminar3
Additional Courses:
EPR 596Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Educational Research3
EPR 609Statistical Methods and Research in Education: Intermediate3
Electives with Permission of Advisor600- or 700-level Professional Studies or Teaching Field courses12
Total Hours33

Exercise Physiology

The Exercise Physiology specialization offers a master's degree option for students interested in either clinical exercise physiology or physiology research. The curriculum is multidisciplinary and comprises courses in the Schools of Education, Medicine, Health Related Professions, and Public Health. Two program plans are offered (detailed below). Plan I culminates with a thesis research project, and Plan II culminates with a written comprehensive exam. Resources for student participation in research include a Muscle Research Laboratory, a Strength Performance Laboratory, and a Body Composition/Energy Metabolism Laboratory. Wide arrays of field experiences are also available in local agencies and clinics. In addition to Graduate School admission requirements, prospective students must have completed undergraduate coursework in physiology, anatomy, and chemistry. First-year students begin in the fall term. Listed below are the courses required in the program and a sample of elective courses.

M.S. Program

Admission Requirement and Prerequisites

In addition to the general admission requirements of the Graduate School, potential applicants must have passed an undergraduate or graduate level BY or CH course.  This prerequisite is not part of the graduate program.

Plan I - 27 hours and Thesis

(33 Hours of Coursework)

RequirementsHours
EPR 596Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Educational Research3
EPR 609Statistical Methods and Research in Education: Intermediate3
KIN 637Physiology of Exercise I3
KIN 638Physiology of Exercise II3
KIN 642Practicum in Physiology3
KIN 699Thesis Research6
Electives in Major12
Total Hours33

Plan II - 36 Hours and Comprehensive Exam

(36 hours of coursework)

Major Courses (12-15 hours)

RequirementsHours
EPR 596Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Educational Research3
EPR 609Statistical Methods and Research in Education: Intermediate3
KIN 637Physiology of Exercise I3
KIN 638Physiology of Exercise II3
Electives in Major24
Total Hours36

Sample Major Electives for Plan I and II

RequirementsHours
Electives
CHHS 502Mental Health and Stress Management3
CHHS 642Health Behavior and Health Education3
GBS 746JExercise Medicine Journal Club1
GER 540Biology of Aging3
KIN 585Advanced Exercise Testing and Prescription3
KIN 630Mechanical Analysis of Motor Skills3
KIN 639Exercise Prescription for High Risk Populations3
KIN 640Advanced Techniques in Conditioning the Athlete3
KIN 641Advanced Planning/Management of Fitness Facilities3
KIN 645Advanced Motor Development3
KIN 656Advanced Sport Psychology3
KIN 672Advanced Treatment of Athletic Injuries3
KIN 674Advanced Sports Nutrition3
KIN 690Seminar in Sports Administration3
KIN 694Special Projects in Kinesiology1-6
KIN 697Advanced Field Experience in Kinesiology3-6
NTR 601Advanced Medical Nutrition3
NTR 618Nutritional Biochemistry6
NTR 579Obesity in the 21st Century3
NTR 625Human Nutr Through the Life Cy3
NTR 650Body Composition and Energy Metabolism3
Total Hours62-70

 

 

CHHS-Comm Hlth & Human Serv Courses

CHHS 502. Mental Health and Stress Management. 3 Hours.

Fundamental concepts of mental illness with emphasis on etiology, symptomology, treatment, and prevention of mental illness. Includes elementary skills, dynamics of stress, and contemporary methods of stress management.

CHHS 508. Drug Abuse Prevention and Education. 3 Hours.

Concept, manifestation, and causes of addiction. Major drug classifications and their effects. Potential of drug education as preventive mechanism.

CHHS 521. Health Communication. 3 Hours.

This course promotes skills appropriate for selected health problems, problem solving, and referrals. It also promotes skills to enhance communication with clients, peers, and community members at large. Health-related theories, communication theories, and marketing strategies are discussed in this course.
Prerequisites: (HE 141 [Min Grade: C] or CHHS 141 [Min Grade: C] or HPE 200 [Min Grade: C] or HE 222 [Min Grade: C] or CHHS 222 [Min Grade: C]) and (HE 342 [Min Grade: C] or CHHS 342 [Min Grade: C])

CHHS 523. Human Sexuality. 3 Hours.

Biological, sociological, psychological, and moral aspects of human sexuality. Includes biological overview, behavioral variations, research in sexuality, social issues, sexual decision making, sexuality of special.

CHHS 526. Student Health & Wellness Center Peer Education. 3 Hours.

The intent of this course is to provide students will the skills to facilitate group presentations on health related content to their peers. Students will complete the Certified Peer Education Training a comprehensive, interactive, and skills-based training. Students will learn about the programs and services offered at the UAB Student Health and Wellness Center and be able to articulate this to new student users. Students will learn basic alcohol and other drug information in preparation for presentation to their peers.

CHHS 527. SHAPE Peer Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to effectively communicate accurate information related to sexual health and decision-making. The concept of total health and the effects of lifestyle and decision-making on the quality of life will be emphasized.

CHHS 531. Planning and Implementing Health Education/Promotion Programs. 3 Hours.

Content and process for planning, implementing, and evaluating programs in health education and health promotion. Sociological, psychological, and epidemiological foundations of health promotion programs. Development of practical skills for school, occupational, clinical, and community settings. A comprehensive program planning assessment will reinforce quantitative literacy in the profession.
Prerequisites: CHHS 343 [Min Grade: C] or HE 343 [Min Grade: C]

CHHS 532. Administration of Health Education/Promotion Programs. 3 Hours.

Administrative theory and practice related to health and fitness programs in various components of programs, materials, and service personnel. Design instrument and methodology.
Prerequisites: CHHS 343 [Min Grade: C] or HE 343 [Min Grade: C]

CHHS 598. Lifespan Dimensions in Women's Health and Nutrition. 3 Hours.

Highlights will include health issues specific to women, chronic diseases, body image and eating disorders, health promotion and disease prevention, pregnancy, childbirth and lactation, weight loss/maintenance, menopause and ageing, fitness management and stress management.

CHHS 601. Current Readings in Health Education. 1-3 Hour.

Review of literature in health education. Development of annotated bibliography pertinent to professional practice.

CHHS 606. Advanced Issues of Disease Prevention in Health Education/Promotion. 3 Hours.

HE 606 is an introductory course designed to teach graduate-level health promotion students, the basic principles, methods, and applications of epidemiology and issues in disease control.
Prerequisites: CHHS 223 [Min Grade: C] or HE 223 [Min Grade: C]

CHHS 610. Foundations of Health Education/Promotion. 3 Hours.

Explores issues related to history, ethics, settings, agencies and organizations, literature, philosophy, theory,and roles and responsibilities relevant to health education and health promotion.

CHHS 621. Health Communication. 3 Hours.

This course promotes skills appropriate for selected health problems, problem solving, and referrals. It also promotes skills to enhance communication with clients, peers, and community members at large. Health-related theories, communication theories, and marketing strategies are discussed in this course.
Prerequisites: CHHS 610 [Min Grade: C] or HE 610 [Min Grade: C]

CHHS 626. Student Health and Wellness Center Peer Educators. 3 Hours.

The intent of this course is to provide students with the skills to facilitate group presentations on health related content to their peers. Students will complete the Certified Peer Education Training, a comprehensive, interactive, and skills-based training. Students will learn about the programs and services offered at the UAB Student Health and Wellness Center and be able to articulate this to new student users. Students will learn basic alcohol and other drug information in preparation for presentation to their peers.

CHHS 631. Planning and Implementing Health Education/Promotion Programs. 3 Hours.

Content and process planning and implementing programs in health education and health promotion. Sociological, psychological, and epidemiological foundations of health promotion programs. Development of practical skills for school, occupational, clinical, and community settings. A comprehensive program planning assessment will reinforce quantitative literacy in the profession. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course.
Prerequisites: CHHS 610 [Min Grade: C] or HE 610 [Min Grade: C]

CHHS 632. Administration of Health Education/Promotion Programs. 3 Hours.

Administrative theory and practice related to health and fitness programs in various components of programs, materials, and service personnel. Design instrument and methodology.

CHHS 640. Content Issues I. 3 Hours.

The content issues course allows the student to explore a topic, of his/her choice, in depth. The resulting document(s) must be thorough including a detailed, complete review of historical and current literature related to the topic.

CHHS 641. Content Issues II. 3 Hours.

The Content Issues II course allows a student to build upon information gathered in Content Issues I or can be developed as a new project. A general outline is provided below. Identification of the health issue or problem Description of who is being affected (including their risk factors) Discussion of national, state, and local initiatives and interventions aimed at reducing the problem and/or risks.

CHHS 642. Health Behavior and Health Education. 3 Hours.

Students will examine the determinants of successful client-professional interactions. This includes learning about the interaction between clients culture and health-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Students will critique consumer health information using multiple media. Case studies and web-based exercises assist students to consider health behaviors across settings and population groups.
Prerequisites: CHHS 610 [Min Grade: C] or HE 610 [Min Grade: C] or KIN 637 [Min Grade: C] or PE 637 [Min Grade: C]

CHHS 689. Intervention Strategies for Health Education/Promotion. 3 Hours.

Ethical, theoretical, and practical aspects of health education; teaching techniques, decision-making skills, curricular development, organization skills, and techniques.
Prerequisites: CHHS 610 [Min Grade: C] or HE 610 [Min Grade: C]

CHHS 690. Ethical Problems and Principles in Health Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to review and discuss case studies involving ethical decisions.

CHHS 691. Special Topics in Health Education. 3-6 Hours.

HE 691 is offered to advanced students who display a high level of commitment to their studies, willingness to work flexible hours, a desire to become involved in research and training, and the ability to work independently under faculty supervision. At least 4 goals will be accomplished during this semester: 1. To complete a review of professional literature related to educator’s knowledge of, and response to body dysmorphic disorders; 2. To prepare a detailed summary of the Steps to a HealthierUS fitness and nutrition initiative; 3. To offer technical assistance to staff and volunteers of the Steps to a HealthierUS – River Region consistent with the logic model and Year Two Community Action Plan aimed at goal achievement; 4. To prepare an objective typewritten summary of accomplishments completed in this course during the semester.

CHHS 692. Supervised Research in Health Education. 3-6 Hours.

CHHS 692 is offered to advanced students who display a high level of commitment to their studies, willingness to work flexible hours, a desire to become involved in research and training, and the ability to work independently under faculty supervision.
Prerequisites: EPR 608 [Min Grade: C] or EPR 609 [Min Grade: C]

CHHS 693. Advanced Field Experience in Community Health Education. 3-6 Hours.

The internship experience is designed to enhance the student's skills in planning, implementing, and evaluating health promotion interventions.

CHHS 696. Ethical Problems and Principles in Health Education/Promotion. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to review and discuss case studies involving ethical decisions.

CHHS 697. Evaluation of Health Education/Promotion Programs. 3 Hours.

This course provides the graduate health education student with the competencies, knowledge and skills to plan and to implement an evaluation of health promotion-disease prevention for a defined population at risk.

CHHS 699. Thesis Research. 1-3 Hour.

Research and completion of the thesis.
Prerequisites: GAC M

CHHS 730. Special Topics in Health Education. 3-6 Hours.

Special Topics in Health Education.

CHHS 731. Advanced Theoretic/Scientific Basis of Health Education & Health Promotion. 3 Hours.

Examination of theoretical, scientific, historical, and philosophical issues that serve as a basis for health education and health promotion.

CHHS 732. Planning and Administration of Health Education/Promotion Programs. 3 Hours.

Content and process for planning, implementing, and evaluating programs in health education and health promotion. Sociological, psychological, and epidemiological foundations of health promotion programs. Development of practical skills for school, occupational, clinical, and community settings. A comprehensive program planning assessment will reinforce quantitative literacy in the profession.

CHHS 733. Evaluation of Health Education/Promotion Programs. 3 Hours.

This course provides the graduate health education student with the competencies, knowledge and skills to plan and to implement an evaluation of health promotion-disease prevention intervention for a defined population at risk.

CHHS 734. Health Education Seminar I. 1 Hour.

Seminars introduce doctoral students to various topics related to professionalism.

CHHS 735. Health Education Seminar II. 1 Hour.

Seminars introduce doctoral students to various topics related to professionalism.

CHHS 736. Health Education Seminar III. 1 Hour.

Seminars introduce doctoral students to various topics related to professionalism.

CHHS 740. Evaluation of Research Methods in Health Education and Promotion Programs. 3 Hours.

This course provides a comprehensive examination of models for planning health education and health promotion programs. This is a required core course for advanced students enrolled in the joint doctoral degree program in Health Education/Health Promotion offered by the University of Alabama and University of Alabama at Birmingham. Effective program planning and administration is a collaborative, rather than a solitary activity. The format for this course extends beyond lecture with applied learning activities. Students will apply skills of program planning and propose effective implementation and evaluation to a variety of unique settings (school, occupational, clinical and/or community agency).
Prerequisites: CHHS 610 [Min Grade: C]

CHHS 741. Evaluation of Health Education/Promotion Programs. 3 Hours.

This course provides the doctoral health education student with the competencies, knowledge and skills to plan and to implement an evaluation of health promotion-disease prevention intervention for a defined population at risk. Developing competencies through applied evaluation assignments will transfer to thesis and dissertation research projects and future employment. Students will become familiar with Healthy People 2020: The National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives for the Year 2020, Healthy Alabama 2010, NCHEC Responsibilities and Competencies and current professional literature. Each class session is structured to provide a detailed explanation and examples of appropriate theory, methods and their application to evaluate health promotion and disease prevention programs.

CHHS 742. Health Disparities in Diverse Populations. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge base on contemporary issues related to health, disparities in health outcomes and social determinants of health. It is intended to provide students with a broader understanding of the structural and psychosocial factors related to health disparities. To do so, the course will focus on theoretical frameworks that draw on an ecological perspective and examine how factors associated with families, peers, schools, neighborhoods, and communities influence health.

CHHS 798. Supervised Research in Health Education/Promotion. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is for students to engage in meaningful research and writing activities.

CHHS 799. Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

Design and completion of the dissertation.

ECG-Counseling, Human Services Courses

ECG 600. Intro to Community Counseling. 3 Hours.

Individuals entering the counseling profession to work with community agencies and organizations are facing a paradigm shift in the way many traditional counselors think and act. This course addresses the specific needs of students preparing for contemporary counseling careers in community/agency settings including the multi-faceted roles and functions of a professional counselor, the counseling needs of special community populations, and the professional/ethical issues unique to community counseling.

ECG 612. Professional Orientation. 3 Hours.

Emphasis on understanding of professional roles and responsibilities; ethical and legal issues; historical perspectives; preparation standards; credentialing; trends and issues in the counseling profession.

ECG 613. Foundations of Substance Abuse. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the counseling specialization of substance abuse counseling. Students will be guided through (a) a critical examination of the etiological theories of substanceabuse, (b) the pharmacological, physiological, psychological, and behavioral efects of the most common psychoactive drugs, (c) the role and function of self-help groups, and (d) the role and function of substance abuse counseling professionals.

ECG 619. Special Issues for School Counselors. 3 Hours.

This course will expose the school counselor-in-training to a variety of critical incidents. These incidents (situations) will cover a variety of experiences which will be presented in a seminar environment and will require the student counselor s expertise and proper response. Authoritiesfrom the various school systems, law enforcement agencies, counseling/ mental health agencies, and child protective agencies will provide knowledge and insight from their perspectives.

ECG 620. Foundations of School Counseling. 3 Hours.

Social, psychological, economic, and philosophic trends leading to development of guidance programs in American schools. Organization and administration of guidance services.

ECG 621. Theories of Individual Counseling. 3 Hours.

Educational, vocational, and personal counseling. Observations and simulations.

ECG 622. Group/Classroom Guidance in Schools. 3 Hours.

The process and practice of group and classroom guidance and counseling with children (K-12) will be explored.

ECG 623. Comprehensive Counseling and Guidance: M/H School. 3 Hours.

Principles and practices of comprehensive counseling and guidance in the middle/high school related to curriculum, guidance services, and the guidanceprogram.

ECG 624. Assessment. 3 Hours.

Assessment in Counseling.
Prerequisites: EPR 590 [Min Grade: C]

ECG 626. Group Counseling: Process and Procedures. 3 Hours.

Theory and Processes of Group Guidance.
Prerequisites: ECG 621 [Min Grade: C]

ECG 627. Comprehensive Counseling and Guidance: M/H School. 3 Hours.

Guidance in Elementary School.

ECG 628. Social and Cultural Diversity. 3 Hours.

Societal Issues in Counseling.

ECG 629. Counseling Families in a Multicultural Society. 3 Hours.

The intent is to facilitate an understanding of family dynamics and cultural sensitivity. Counseling Families in a Multicultural Society provides opportunities for students to explore, understand, and appreciate families from culturally diverse backgrounds. Contents includesfamily and multicultural theories/concepts related to structure, dynamics, growth and development, assessment, possible counseling interventions, and research related to health promotion, maintenance, and restoration of diverse cultural groups.

ECG 630. Career Development: Vocational and Life Planning. 3 Hours.

Career Development: Theory and Research.

ECG 631. Suicide Prevention. 3 Hours.

The course will address the epidemiology of suicide, demographic and incidence information about at-risk groups, risk factors, protective factors, warning signs, assessment of emergency risk and chronic risk, intervention strategies, nomenclature, national strategy planning, prevention advocacy, and attention to the bereaved and complicated mourning and subsequent postvention. Students will be engaged in case studies and assessment exercises, research and review into the literature, hear from guest speakers including advocates and survivors, journal writing and reflection, exams, and presentations.

ECG 637. Adlerian Family Counseling. 3 Hours.

ECG 638. Practicum I: Clinical Skills and Techniques. 3 Hours.

Practicum: Introduction to the Counseling Process.
Prerequisites: ECG 621 [Min Grade: C]

ECG 650. Diagnosis and Treatment of Psychological Disorders. 3 Hours.

Counseling the Psychologically Impaired Client.
Prerequisites: ECG 621 [Min Grade: C] and ECG 624 [Min Grade: C] and ECG 626 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 614 [Min Grade: C]

ECG 652. Advanced Counseling Techniques. 3 Hours.

This course will involve the study of theoretical approaches to counseling which have been demonstrated to be culturally-relevant and conceptually inclusive of multiple theories and techniques: Advanced Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques will be emphasized (other techniques will also be explored). Selected readings, academic discussion and clinical application will be stressed. Critical thinking and active participation are essential. Students will focus on the application of theoretical information towards a goal of case conceptualizations as a precursor to effective treatment planning.
Prerequisites: ECG 621 [Min Grade: C] and ECG 638 [Min Grade: C]

ECG 653. Counseling Children and Adolescents. 3 Hours.

This course will review current evidenced based treatment interventions for children and families. Candidates will learn play therapy techniques, art therapy techniques, and behavioral interventions including how to create behavioral contracts, and methods for writing informative treatment plans. Candidates will aslo learn specific strategies for engaging parents and siblings in treatment, and will learn specific structural and narrative based theoretical approaches to family therapy.

ECG 660. Relationships and Human Sexuality. 3 Hours.

This course utilizes the lens of a family systems approach while introducing counseling skills to understand and treat clinical issues related to human sexuality.

ECG 661. Play Therapy I. 3 Hours.

Counseling children. Counseling theories and techniques appropriate to working with children are explored. Play Therapy is emphasized.

ECG 662. Play Therapy II. 3 Hours.

Counseling children. Advanced counseling theories and advanced techniques appropriate to working with children are explored. Play therapy is emphasized.

ECG 663. Adventure-Based Counseling. 3 Hours.

Improvement of self-concept and social life skills through physical, spiritual, emotional, and mental development in creative activity outdoors. Natural environment used as a learning laboratory for leadership, teamwork, problem solving, decision-making, conflict resolution, and physical fitness.

ECG 664. Challge Crse Fund II. 3 Hours.

This course continues introduces students to the background, philosophy, ethical issues, and risk management required to high ropes facilitation. Introduces students to a variety of high challenge course initiatives used for learning and problem solving, trust team building, and self-confidence and communication skills. How to present high challenge courses initiatives to diverse groups will be emphasized. Specific attention will be given to addressing learners of different ages and varying abilities. Additionally, an overview will be given of how counseling and ropes courses experiences can be integrated.

ECG 665. Adventure Processing and Facilitation. 3 Hours.

This course provides the skills necessary for facilitating a variety of client groups educational, recreational, corporate, and therapeutic indoor experience programs. The curriculum includes the Experiential Learning Cycle, stages of group development, leading group discussion, active listening, frontloading, de-briefing, use of metaphors and transfer of learning. Activities are used to faciliate leadership, teamwork, problem solving, descision-making and conflict resolution. This knowlegde will enhance students' ability to adapt their program to various groups. How to faciliatate and lead group discssion with diverse groups will be empasized.

ECG 666. Orgainzation and Administration of Adventure Education. 3 Hours.

Students will synthesis their experience in adventure leadership, instruction and programming to explore the details of managing an adventure program. Topics include risk management for the administrator, operations and file management, legal issues, accreditation standards, staff recruitment, hiring and training, marketing and fiscal management. Special attention will be given to managinf an universally designed challenge course.

ECG 680. The Intersections of Family and Community Systems. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the interactions and issues that arise between the family system and prominent community and social systems, with a focus on the education system and schools, the medical system and wellness, and mental health. Contemporary issues affecting families in the context of these systems will also be examined. These interactions and issues will be examined through a systemic lens with an emphasis on family strengths and resilience.
Prerequisites: ECG 691 [Min Grade: D]

ECG 685. Marriage and Couples Counseling. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to principles of effective couples therapy while preparing them to critically assess couple relationships. This course will be taught from a systems perspective and will include an overview of models and techniques drawn from evidence based research. This course is designed to blend theory and application. Students in this course will participate in didactic and experiential learning and will participate in simulations and case presentations to further understand clinical aspects of couples therapy.
Prerequisites: ECG 691 [Min Grade: C]

ECG 689. Advanced Family Counseling Techniques. 3 Hours.

This course will serve as an in-depth exploration of limited theories of family therapy, including Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Family Therapy, their more recent expressions within the professional literature, and how to consider them against the standards of evidenced based practice. Conceptual understanding and acquisition of specific treatment skills through direct clinical experiences and reflection/advisory teams will be emphasized. This course is designed to allow students to gain a greater understanding of how these key theoretical approaches and techniques, and advanced systemic concepts, can be applied in marriage and family therapy practice.
Prerequisites: ECG 685 [Min Grade: C] and ECG 691 [Min Grade: C]

ECG 691. Introduction to Couples and Family Counseling. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to family, systems, and relational therapies. An overview of theoretical concepts and intervention strategies associated with traditional and systemic theories of marriage and family therapy will be provided. This course also provides and examination of how family therapy has been shaped through cybernetics and systems theory.

ECG 692. Independent Readings in Counselor Education. 1-3 Hour.

ECG 695. Practicum II: Supervised Field Experience. 3 Hours.

ECG 697. Counseling Internship. 3,6 Hours.

A field experience in a counseling setting appropriate to the student s program, where the student is expected to participate in all of the activities of the school or agency counseling services, within the constraints of ethical practice.
Prerequisites: ECG 695 [Min Grade: P]

EDF-Foundations of Education Courses

EDF 600. Urban Education. 3 Hours.

An examination of the historical, social, political, and economic factors that shape urban education in America.

EDF 601. The History of American Curricular Thought. 3 Hours.

An examination of American educational history using primary source documents to provide insight into the evolution of curriculum, policy, and educational practice.

EDF 602. Critical Social Issues in American Education. 3 Hours.

An examination of contemporary social issues facing American schools, from politics and policy, school structure, and curriculum to pedagogical practice. The relationship of the school to society is also addressed.

EDF 603. Philosophy and Education. 3 Hours.

An examination of various philosophical schools of thought, their application to the field of education, and their relevence to teaching, learning, and life.

EDF 604. Social Philosophies and Education. 3 Hours.

An examination of various schools of social and political philosophy and theories pursuant to contemporary educational problems. Topics may include class structure, the cultural context of schooling, identity politics, ecological issues, physical and mental health issues, and the history of social theory related to educational policy and practice.

EDF 605. Educational Foundations and Metropolitan Life. 3 Hours.

The UAB School of Education maintains that specific knowledge, understandings, attitudes, and skills are necessary for a teacher to be effective in the urban setting. This knowledge extends beyond the classroom and embraces the total community and its families. Thus, effective urban teachers must understand the child, the family, and the community. The UAB School of Education further maintains that the successful teacher: must develop ways to cut across home and school; does not separate academic from social, moral, and emotional development; and ideally incorporates all of the resources of the school (including parents) into a common blending of care and education.

EDF 606. Social Movements in Education. 3 Hours.

An examination of how the Progressive education movement, along with other major social movements in recent history have shaped American education. The history of the Civil Rights Movement in Birmingham and its impact on schools, communities, and the lives of educators and students are of special interest.

EDF 608. Theories of Knowledge. 3 Hours.

An examination of the various philosophical and cultural conceptions of knowledge, and how these inform and impact research, educational practice, andlived experience.

EDF 616. Comparative Education. 3 Hours.

An examination of the cultural forces influencing the structure and function of education in selected countries.

EDF 620. Culture and American Education:Race Class and Gender. 3 Hours.

An examination of the interlocking influences and socially constructed meanings and understandings of culture, race, ethnicity, class and gender in American education.

EDF 624. Ethics and Education. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course is twofold: first, it covers some of the foundational materials in the philosophy of ethics and their application to the fie ld of education; second, it looks at the present moral context of schools and the problems and potentials of morally directed education.

EDF 691. Special Problems in The Foundations of Education. 3 Hours.

EDF 697. Individual Readings in Foundations of Education. 1-3 Hour.

EDF 698. Individual Research in Foundations of Education. 1-3 Hour.

EDF 700. Urban Education. 3 Hours.

An examination of the historical, social, political, and economic factors that shape urban education in America.

EDF 701. The History of American Curricular Thought. 3 Hours.

An examination of American educational history using primary source documents to provide insight into the evolution of curriculum, policy, and educational practice.

EDF 702. Critical Social Issues in American Education. 3 Hours.

An examination of contemporary social issues facing American schools, from politics and policy, school structure, and curriculum to pedagogical practice. The relationship of the school to society is also addressed.

EDF 703. Selected Topics In Educational Philosophy. 3 Hours.

An examination of various philosophical schools of thought, their application to the field of education, and their relevance to teaching, learning, and life.

EDF 706. Social Movements in Education. 3 Hours.

An examination of how the Progressive education movement, along with other major social movements in recent history have shaped American education. The history of the Civil Rights Movement in Birmingham and its impact on schools, communities and the lives of educators and students are of special interest.

EDF 708. Ethical Dilemmas in Educational Administration. 3 Hours.

Ethical Dilemnas in Educational Administration.

EDF 711. Theories of Knowledge. 3 Hours.

An examination of the various philosophical and cultural conceptions of knowledge, and how these inform and impact research, educational practice, andlived experience.

EDF 713. History of Educational Philosophy. 3 Hours.

A historically sequenced survey of educational philosophy from the ancient Greeks, 18th century enlightenment thought, American pragmatism, and existentialism to postmodernism.

EDF 716. Comparative Education. 3 Hours.

EDF 720. Cult and Amer Educ: Race Class and Gender. 3 Hours.

An examination of the interlocking influences and socially constructed meanings and understandings of culture, race, ethnicity, class, and gender in American education.

EDF 724. Ethics and Education. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course is twofold: first, it covers some of the foundational materials in the philosophy of ethics and their application to the field of education; second, it looks at the present moral context of schools and the problems and potentials of morally directed education.

EDF 750. Special Problems in the Foundations of Education. 3-9 Hours.

A topical seminar on special problems and issues in educational foundations. Can be taken for 3, 6, or 9 credit hours,.

EDF 755. Educational Studies in Diverse Populations: Theory of Inquiry. 3 Hours.

This course looks at contemporary issues concerning diversity and institutions of education, and examines the various epistemological lenses and theoretical perspectives that can be used to conduct research about culture and human differences as related to educational policy and practice.

EDF 765. Metropolitan Education Studies Proseminar. 3 Hours.

This required seminar introduces doctoral candidates in the Educational Studies in Diverse Populations program to the multidimensional, interdependent, dynamic, and very often, contentious relationships among urban school districts, the central cities in which they are nested, and their surrounding suburban and exurban school districts and municipalities. The seminar emphasizes the historical, political, social, and cultural contexts of urban and metropolitan education. Some of the overarching questions explored are: What is the relationship between education and an equitable society? What are the purposes of public education? What are the requirements for an educational system that could offer equal opportunity? The seminar emphasizes intensive reading, analysis, synthesis, and discussion of critically-reviewed texts in the fields of urban education and metropolitan studies. The seminar highlights the historical and contemporary experiences of students and families in the majority population of Birmingham’s urban school districts as well as the emerging minority population in suburban and exurban districts (i.e., predominantly African American, Hispanic/Latino/a, and immigrant populations).

EDF 797. Independent Studies. 3 Hours.

Independent readings under the direction and supervision of EDF faculty. Doctoral status and the permission of the instructor are required.

EDF 798. Individual Research in the Foundations. 3 Hours.

EDL-Educational Leadership Courses

EDL 601. Foundations of Instr. Ldrshp. 3 Hours.

The purpose of the course is to provide a strong foundation in strengthening knowledge and skills in instructional leadership. The student will be prepared to become an instructional leader who engages the school community in developing a shared vision; will plan effectively; will use critical thinking and problem-solving; will collect, analyze and interpret data; allocate resources and evaluate results for the purpose of continuous school improvement. Requires admission to the EDL Masters Program.

EDL 602. Fld Exp: Found of Inst Ldrshp. 1 Hour.

Through observing, participating, and leading field based experiences assigned in EDL 601, Foundations of Instructional Leadership students will gain practical knowledge and skills needed to be effective school leaders.

EDL 603. Data Driven Decision Making. 3 Hours.

This course prepares the future school leader to effectively use and interpret data in all form to lead and monitor continuous school improvement. Students will become conversant with technologies that enhance classroom instruction. The students will lead in a school improvement project and conduct a needs assessment for technology planning. Requires admission to the Master's Program in Instructional Leadership.

EDL 604. Fld. Exp. in Data Driven Dec.. 1 Hour.

Through observing, participating, and leading field based experiences assigned in EDL 603, Data Driven Decision Making for School Improvement, students will gain practical knowledge and skills in using data and techniques to enhance the leadership of a school.
Prerequisites: EDL 601 [Min Grade: C] and EDL 602 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 605. Residency in Inst. Ledrshp. 6 Hours.

The purpose of the Residency in Instructional Leadership is to give the future leader authentic experiences in a continuum of observing, participating, and leading in K-12 schools without the distraction of teaching responsibilities or other coursework requirements. Class to be conducted in 10 consecutive days in local school/schools.
Prerequisites: EDL 601 [Min Grade: C] and EDL 603 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 606. Supervision/ Ment. Inst. Staff. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to prepare the future school leader to utilize knowledge of human resources to accomplish school and system goals. This involves developing the ability to design and implement effective professional development and facilitate teaching that will impact student achievement. A final unit will assist the future leader in seeking mentoring opportunities for him or herself.
Prerequisites: EDL 601 [Min Grade: C] and EDL 603 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 607. Fld Exp. in Super / Mentoring. 1 Hour.

Through observing, participating and leading field based experiences assigned in EDL 606, Supervision and Mentoring of Instructional Staff, students will gain practical knowledge and skills in implementing staff development, supervisory staff and creating mentoring opportunities for new teachers and oneself.
Prerequisites: EDL 601 [Min Grade: C] and EDL 603 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 608. Org. & Financial Mgt. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to prepare instructional leaders to develop the knowledge and skills to apply financial procedures for public schools in Alabama. An emphasis on strategies to utilize student data as the impetus for allocating financial resources will be part of the curriculum. In addition, students will explore guidelines for creating safe school facilities.
Prerequisites: EDL 601 [Min Grade: C] and EDL 603 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 609. Fld. Exp. in Org & Finc Mgmt. 1 Hour.

Through observing, participating, and leading field-based experiences assigned in EDL 608, students will gain practical knowledge and skills in applying financial procedures, allocating resources and creating safe K-12 schools.
Prerequisites: EDL 601 [Min Grade: C] and EDL 603 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 610. Legal & Ethical Foundations. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is twofold: (1) Candidates will give a fundamental knowledge of ethical principles based on the Alabama Educator Code of Ethics and guidelines of the State Ethics Commission and (2) Candidates will gain a working knowledge of legal principles established by local, state, and federal legislatures and judicial requirements.
Prerequisites: EDL 601 [Min Grade: C] and EDL 603 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 611. Fld. Exp. in Legal/Eth Found. 1 Hour.

Through observing, participating and leading field based experiences assigned in EDL 610 Legal and Ethical Foundations of School Leadership, students will gain a working knowledge of legal and ethical principles necessary to employ in K12 school leadership.
Prerequisites: EDL 601 [Min Grade: C] and EDL 603 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 612. Best Prac. Inst. Ldrship. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to prepare instructional leaders who can create positive learning environments for all students. Special emphasis will be placed on using data to assess and improve student achievement. Students will explore the needs of diverse populations and the legal mandates for providing services to diverse student populations.
Prerequisites: EDL 611 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 613. Supervision and Curriculum Development. 1 Hour.

Through observing, participating leading field based experiences assigned in EDL 612, Best Practices for Instructional Leadership for Diverse Populations, students will gain practical experience needed to meet the instructional needs of diverse populations.
Prerequisites: EDL 611 [Min Grade: C] and EDL 612 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 614. Planning for Change. 3 Hours.

This course explores the process and school leader's role in effecting organizational change. Course readings and discussions will help to develop student knowledge and skill bases in effecting change at the indiviaual, organization, and systems levels and will examine key issues in planning for and effecting change amoung stakeholders groups throughout the school community.
Prerequisites: EDL 611 [Min Grade: C] and EDL 612 [Min Grade: C] and EDL 613 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 615. Non-Thesis in Educational Leadership. 3 Hours.

This course will prepare students for the degree of Master of Education in the preparation of a master's level thesis. The processed of reviewing relevant literature and designing a research study will be examined. The course will culminate in the students' development of a proposal.

EDL 617. Politics of Education. 3 Hours.

Politics of Education. Education leaders learning to take action within thecomplex maze of political relations within schools, between schools and their communities, and within levels of government. Prerequisite: Admissionto Master s level program in EDL or approval by instructor. 3 hours.

EDL 618. Ethics and Leadership. 3 Hours.

Ethics and Leadership. An examination of ethical issues and dimensions of ethical decision making. Prerequisite: Admission to Master s level program in EDL or approval by instructor. 3 hours.

EDL 619. School-Based Problem Solving. 3 Hours.

School-Based Problem Solving. An analysis and application of techniques for school-based problem solving.

EDL 620. Public School Organization and Administration. 3 Hours.

EDL 621. The School Principalship. 3 Hours.

EDL 622. Clinical Supervision:Administrators and Supervisors. 3 Hours.

Clinical Supervision:Administrators and Supervisors.

EDL 623. School Finance. 3 Hours.

In this course students will learn about the process of developing and monitoring a school budget, Various approaches to budget development will be examined , including line-item, zero-based, and program-based budgeting. The course will also explore multiple sources of revenue for schools, and the processes and guidelines for budget allocation, procurement, and expenditure.

EDL 625. Education Management. 3 Hours.

Education Management. An overview of education management techniques for the improvement of the education enterprise and student learning. Prerequisite: Admission to Master s level program in EDL or approval by instructor. 3 hours.

EDL 626. Advanced Clinical Supervision:Admin and Supervisors. 3 Hours.

This course will explore the role of school principals, assistant principals, and other instructional supervisory personnel in working with instructional staff to improve instruction to affect increased levels of learning for all students.
Prerequisites: EDL 522 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 630. School and Community. 3 Hours.

EDL 631. Education and the Political Environment. 3 Hours.

EDL 635. Survey of School Law. 3 Hours.

EDL 637. Legal Liability and the Educator. 3 Hours.

EDL 640. Introduction to Community Education. 3 Hours.

EDL 641. Community Education for School Administrators. 3 Hours.

EDL 642. Operation and Admin: Community Education Program. 3 Hours.

EDL 643. Community Resources Workshop. 3 Hours.

EDL 644. Instructional Supervision. 3 Hours.

This course will explore the role of the school principal and other key school leaders in the process of guiding instructional staff toward improvement and excellence in instruction. Key instructional processes will be examined, including planning, pre-observaton conferencing, observation of instruction, observational strategies and techniques, post-observation conferencing, and planning for professional improvement.

EDL 660. Administrative Leadership I. 3 Hours.

EDL 661. Simulation in Educational Leadership. 3 Hours.

This is a course designed to provide practice for prospective school administrators in observing teachers in the classroom. Emphasis is placed on developing the skill base of school leaders in observing, note-taking, and providing meaningful feedback to classroom teachers regarding the delivery of instruction and student response. Skills are also developed in assisting teachers in writing their own professional development plans based upon classroom observation.

EDL 665. Supervision of Instruction in Elementary Schools. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the process of classroom observation and feedback for prospective school administrators planning for a career in elementary school leadership. Emphasis is placed on the development and use of observational strategies and techniques across content areas and on the development of instructional skills for teachers.

EDL 666. Supervision of Secondary Instruction. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the process of classroom observation and feedback for prospective school administrators planning for a career in secondary school leadership. Emphasis is placed on the development and use of observational strategies and techniques across content areas and on the development of instructional skills for teachers.

EDL 670. Theories in Educational Leadership. 3 Hours.

In this course leading theories pertaining to the process of learning, instruction, and leadership will be explored. The course involves readings of several key theorists in leadership, dicussion of those theories, and emphasizes the practical application of those theories to the everyday professional work of school administrators,.

EDL 671. Practicum in Elementary Instructional Supervision. 3 Hours.

In this course, pre-service elementary school administrators will be required to observe classroom teachers in the act of delivering instruction. Emphasis is placed on developing specific observational skills and techniques in observing classroom instruction, note-taking, and the provision of timely and meaningful feedback for elementary classroom teachers in order to improve their instructional skills and to affect increased levels of learning for all students.

EDL 672. Practicum in Secondary Instructional Supervision. 3 Hours.

In this course, pre-service secondary school administrators will be required to observe classroom teachers in the act of delivering instruction. Emphasis is placed on developing specific observational skills and techniques in observing classroom instruction, note-taking, and the provision of timely and meaningful feedback for secondary classroom teachers in order to improve their instructional skills and to affect increased levels of learning for all students.

EDL 675. Administration and Supervision of Student Teaching. 3 Hours.

In this course, pre-service school administrators will explore best practices in coaching and mentoring student teachers. Key issues of concern to the effective development of pre-service teachers will be addressed, including processed of planning for instruction, classroon management, conferencing with parents, building a familiarity with curriculm and instructional delivery, and planning for a professional interview.

EDL 685. Workshop in Administration and/or Supervision. 1-3 Hour.

EDL 690. Internship in Educational Leadership. 1-6 Hour.

This course provides practical, hands-on experience for pre-service school administrators wherein they shadow practicing school administrators to observe the many demands and functions of the role. Students work directly in a school setting with a selected school administrator, and assume leadership in several leadership projects as collaboratively identified by the school administrator and student.

EDL 691. Practicum in Educational Leadership. 3 Hours.

Practicum in Educational Leasdership.

EDL 692. Individual Readings in Educational Leadership. 3 Hours.

EDL 694. Seminar in Educational Leadership. 1-3 Hour.

EDL 695. Community Education Seminar. 1-3 Hour.

EDL 696. Practicum in Community Education. 3-6 Hours.

EDL 698. MR Lev Non-Thesis Res. 3 Hours.

EDL 699. Thesis Research. 1-6 Hour.

Advanced Research in Educational Leadership.
Prerequisites: GAC A

EDL 701. Organizational Leadership and Decision Making I. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction for school leaders in the process of faculitating shared decision-making. Basic concepts of organizational theory are explored with an examination of how these theories migth be applied to practice in order to build school leaders' effectiveness in involving all stakeholder groups in making important school-based decisions.

EDL 702. Organizational Leadership and Decision Making II. 3 Hours.

This course provides an in-depth examination for school leaders in the process of facilitating shared decision-making. Selected organizational theories are explored more deeply with an examination of how these theories might be applied to practice to build school leaders' effectiveness in involving all stakeholder groups in making important school-based decisions. School leaders will develop expertise in the knowledge and application of a selected organizational theory as applied to decision-making.

EDL 703. Theory and Practices of Supervision Leadership. 3 Hours.

Specific leadership and supervisory or management theories will be explored with an emphasis on how these theories can help to guide and enhance school leaders' practice. An array of theories will be introduced, and students will select one or two theories to study more deeply. Students will be required to examine their own professional practice in terms of the selected theories and explore how the theoretical famework helped them understand their practice more deeply.

EDL 704. Educational Law and Policy Development. 3 Hours.

In this course, students will take an indepth look at influential court decisions and legislation that affects the operation of schools and school districts in modern society. Futhermore, the processes, responsibilities and multiple roles in the development of school and school district policy will also be explored.

EDL 705. The Management of Educational Programs and Services. 3 Hours.

In this course, the process and responsibilities of operational leadership and management will be explored. Oversight resource allocation, facilities functions, transportation, food service, school-wide discipline and school safety are among several key topics to be examined.

EDL 706. Current Issues in Community Education. 3 Hours.

EDL 707. International Aspects of Community Education. 3 Hours.

EDL 708. Administration Leadership II. 3 Hours.

EDL 709. Theories of Educational Leadership. 3 Hours.

EDL 710. Mentoring for Educational Leadership. 3 Hours.

In this course, students will develop their knowledge base and skill sets in mentoring instructional staff in the development of their own practice as classroom instructors. Concepts of mentoring as a key process in professional development of teachers will be examined. Specific mentoring skills and strategies will be emphasized. Studetns will be required to examine current mentoring program goals and processes as well as practice their own skills in mentoring.

EDL 711. Collaborative Problem Solving. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce candidates to the analysis and application of strategies for school-based problem solving. Course content will include: an introduction to the basics tenets of change in schools, learning to use quality tools (TQM), shared decision-making/ group processes/ effective teaming/mentoring & cognitive coaching in professional development, using data to make decisions, and practical applications of problem-solving in schools.

EDL 711L. Collab Probl Solv: Fld Exper. 1 Hour.

The field experience consists of investigating the processes of collaboration and change that are currently implemented in the candidate¿s own school district.

EDL 711R. School-Based Problem Research. 1 Hour.

The action research consists of identification of a project, usually within the candidate¿s own school district, that will require collaboration with a selected problem-solving team at one¿s school site.

EDL 712. School System Administration. 3 Hours.

EDL 713. Leadership of Special Education Programs. 3 Hours.

EDL 714. Advanced School Business Management. 3 Hours.

EDL 715. Non-Thesis Research in Education Leadership. 3 Hours.

EDL 716. Workshop in Administration and/or Supervision. 1-6 Hour.

EDL 717. Leading Change Through Action Research. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to strengthen knowledge and skills in the areas of effective leadership and systemic organizational change. This course will teach participants the skills and strategies to prepare for and introduce change in their schools through an identified school-based problem solving project. Candidates will be required to lead a collaborative effort of analyzing and applying strategies and quality tools in addressing a school-based problem, preferably one that is impacting student achievement. Course content will include: an introduction to quality tools (TQM), shared decision-making, group processes, effective teaming, and using data to make decisions. Co-Requisite: EDL 717L.

EDL 717L. Field Experience for Leading Change Through Action Research. 1 Hour.

The course is designed to give Ed.S. candidates authentic, practical experience in leading in a school. A minimum of 20 hours of field experience, spent in leadership activities correlating to the core course, at the school site, will be required as the field experience for EDL 717-L. the Field Experience Course is taken concurrently with the core course. CoRequisite: EDL 717 -1 hour credit.

EDL 718. Essential Skills for Organizational Leadership. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to strengthen knowledge and skills essential to effective leadership in the school setting. Candidates will increase their understanding of and skills in utilizing participatory /shared decision making; using data focused on student learning to drive the decision making process; communicating high expectations for student learning; and enhancing human resource development. Candidates will demonstrate the ability to analyze various situations involving community and stakeholder relationships through the structural, human resource, political, and symbolic frames and devise appropriate courses of action based on this analysis of school programs. Co-Requisite EDL 718L.

EDL 718L. Field Experience for Essential Skills for Organizational Leadership. 1 Hour.

The course is designed to give Ed.S. candidates authentic, practical experience in leading in a school. A minimum of 20 hours of field experience, spent in leadership activities correlating to the core course, at the school site, will be required as the field experience for EDL 718-L. The Field Experience Course is taken concurrently with the core course. CoREquisite: EDL 718 -1 hour credit.

EDL 719. Mentoring & Coaching Skills for School Leaders. 3 Hours.

In an era of ensuring highly qualified teachers through embedded, research-based staff development, the role of supervision and mentoring has taken on an unprecedented role in successful schooling. Supervision and mentoring are at the ¿heart¿ of schooling. In addition, future school leaders need to understand their own mentoring needs, and be comfortable with seeking a mentor for themselves. In this course, candidates will conduct a comprehensive critical examination of mentoring concepts, both for personal development and for instructional supervision of classroom teachers. The skills of supervision through cognitive coaching will be learned and practiced. Implications for individual and group development and the improvement of instruction are emphasized. The field experience, EDL 719L will involve candidates seeking a mentor for themselves, as well as engaging in mentoring a new teacher. Co-Requisite: EDL 719L.

EDL 719L. Field Experience for Mentoring & Coaching Skills for School Leaders. 1 Hour.

The course is designed to give Ed.S. candidates authentic, practical experience in leading in a school. A minimum of 20 hours of field experience, spent in leadership activities correlating to the core course, at the school site, will be required as the field experience for EDL 719-L. the Field Experience Course is taken concurrently with the core course. Co-Requisite: EDL 719- 1 hour credit.

EDL 720. Field Project in Educational Leadership. 1-6 Hour.

In this course, students enrolled in the Doctorate of Education program work closely with their course instructor to develop their proposal for dissertation research. The content and structure of the proposal and dissertation are examined, including conducting a comprehensive review of the relevant literature and the techniques and strategies of data collection, analysis, and development of conclusions and implications related to research findings. The anticipated culminating field project is the development and defense of the proposal for doctoral dissertation research.

EDL 721. Administration of Staff Personnel. 3 Hours.

EDL 722. Current Issues in Educational Leadership. 3 Hours.

EDL 723. Administration of Educational Programs and Services. 3 Hours.

Administration of Educational Programs and Services.
Prerequisites: EDL 620 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 724. Educational Leadership Seminar II. 1-3 Hour.

EDL 725. Current Issues and Problems in School Administration. 3 Hours.

This is a seminar type course that explores current issues affecting the profession of school leadership. Various topics of concern will be presented and discussed. Multiple guest speakers with expert knowledge of selected issues may be invited to present in this class. Students will be required to reflect carefully about their own positions relative to select issues and problems.

EDL 726. Advanced Clinical Supervision Administrator/Supvis. 3 Hours.

EDL 727. Leading the Adult Learning Community. 3 Hours.

This course is divided into the following conceptual units: a.

EDL 727L. Field Experience for Leading the Adult Learning Community. 1 Hour.

The course is designed to give Ed.S. candidates authentic, practical experience in leading in a school. A minimum of 20 hours of field experience, spent in leadership activities correlating to the core course, at the school site, will be required as the field experience for EDL 727-L. the Field Experience Course is taken concurrently with the core course. Co-Requisite: EDL 727.

EDL 728. Management of the Learning Organization. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to strengthen knowledge of and skills in essential management functions within the school or district setting, as noted in specified ISLLC and Alabama Administrative Code Standards. The course will focus on practices and procedures that are vital to the efficient and effective operation of a school or a school district. Co-Requisite: EDL 728L.

EDL 728L. Field Experience for Management of the Learning Organization. 1 Hour.

The course is designed to give Ed.S. candidates authentic, practical experience in leading in a school. A minimum of 20 hours of field experience, spent in leadership activities correlating to the core course, at the school site, will be required as the field experience for EDL 728-L. The Field Experience Course is taken concurrently with the core course. Co-Requisite: EDL 728.

EDL 729. Advanced Research in Educational Leadership. 1-6 Hour.

Prerequisites: EPR 608 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 730. Advanced Focus on the Principalship. 3 Hours.

EDL 731. Law, Ethics, and Policy for Educational Leaders. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is twofold: 1) Candidates will gain a fundamental knowledge of ethical principles based on the Alabama Educator Code of Ethics and the guidelines of the State Ethics Commission. 2) Candidates will gain a working knowledge of legal principles established by local, state, and federal legislative and judicial requirements. Candidates will be able to demonstrate an understanding of legal and ethical principles related to underrepresented populations within the school setting. Candidates will be able to demonstrate a knowledge and application of the ethical principles stipulated in the Alabama Educator Code of Ethics and accompanying legal precepts. Candidates¿ ability to make sound legal and ethical decisions will be enhanced through a better understanding of board policies and politics as well as through reflection on and clarification of personal values and beliefs. Co-Requisite: EDL 731L.

EDL 731L. Field Experience for Law, Ethics, and Policy for Educational Leaders. 1 Hour.

The course is designed to give Ed.S. candidates authentic, practical experience in leading in a school in the area of law, ethics, and policy. A minimum of 20 hours of field experience, spent in leadership activities correlating to the core course, at the school site, will be required as the field experience for EDL 731-L. The Field Experience Course is taken concurrently with the core course. Co-Requisite: EDL 731.

EDL 732. Leadership of Special Programs. 3 Hours.

Leadership of Special Programs coalesces the knowledge of and ability to lead special programs within a school site. Candidates will apply leadership skills in developing a comprehensive home school collaborative project and a comprehensive technology integration project. In addition, candidates will develop curriculum which will align state standards unique to career and technical education. Emphasis will be placed on models of communication, problem solving, conflict resolution and team building principles and skills. Focus will also be placed on best practices in the development of community information, networking, public relations, and media. The technology portion of this class will focus on the total integration of technology into a school community. Co-Requisite: EDL 732L.

EDL 732L. Field Experience for Leadership of Special Programs. 1 Hour.

The course is designed to give Ed.S. candidates authentic, practical experience in leading in a school. A minimum of 20 hours of field experience, spent in leadership activities correlating to the core course, at the school site, will be required as the field experience for EDL 732-L. The Field Experience Course is taken concurrently with the core course. Co-Requisite EDL 732.

EDL 735. Professional Leadership. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of key issues related to professional leadership from the perspective of the teacher leader. Special emphasis will be give to the following course themes: Alabama Educator Code of Ethics, ethical and professional conduct, school law and policy, and adult learning.

EDL 735L. Field Experience/Professional Leaderhip. 1 Hour.

Field-based experience to accompany EDL 735.

EDL 735R. School Based Problem Research Project/Professional Leadership. 1 Hour.

Action-research project to accompany EDL 735.

EDL 746. Practicum in Instructional Leadership. 1 Hour.

[Course required in the Ed.S. program for candidates who completed the Class A Administrative Certification before 2009, before program redesign].The course content consists of the Practicum activities chosen by the candidate from the menu of Critical Leadership Activities from the Practicum Handbook. The candidate will be required to have a mentor (the same one as for all coursework) and the mentor will assist the candidate in selecting meaningful leadership experiences. Candidates will conduct leadership activities at any time during the four semesters of the Ed.S. program. Where possible, candidates should acquire experiences in diverse settings. The experiences may be conducted at the elementary, middle school, high school, or central office level.

EDL 748. Current Issues and Problems in School Administration. 3 Hours.

Current Issues and Problems in School Administration.

EDL 750. Issues and Problems in School Finance. 3 Hours.

This is a seminar type course that explores current issues affecting the financing and funding of schools both locally and across the nation. Issues such as equity and adequacy in school funding will be examined. Key legislation issues will also be explored. Multiple quest speakers with expert knowledge of selected school finance issues may be invited to present in this class. Students will be required to reflect carefully about their own positions relative to select issues and problems in school finance.
Prerequisites: EDL 701 [Min Grade: C] and EDL 702 [Min Grade: C] and EDL 703 [Min Grade: C] and EDL 704 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 752. Advanced Educational Planning. 3 Hours.

EDL 755. Advanced School System Administration. 3 Hours.

An advanced course for practicing school leaders examining the various aspects of leadership of a school district from the level of the principalship and beyond. This course explores systems theory and systems thinking relative to the various systems enacted in the leadership of a school district.

EDL 756. Current Legal Problems in Alabama Education. 3 Hours.

An advanced course for practicing school leaders examining the various aspects and implications of educational state and national level case law and policy governing and related to leadership of a school district from the level of the principalship and beyond.
Prerequisites: EDL 535 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 758. Problems in Supervision. 3 Hours.

This is a seminar type course that explores current issues regarding the effective supervision of schools in the context of recent legislation and challenges. Issures such as developing school culture and strategic planning, supervision of instruction, and addressing the demands of an increasingly diverse clientele will be examined. Professional standards and expectations for school leaders as supervisors will also be explored. Multiple guest speakers with expert knowledge of selected school supervision issues may be invited to present in this class. Students will be required to reflect carefully about their own positions relative to select issues and problems in the supervision of schools.

EDL 760. Advanced Administrative Leadership. 3 Hours.

This is a seminar type course that explores current issues regarding the effective administration and leadership in schools and school districts. Issues such as standard-based leadership; developing school and district mission, vision, values, and goals; clinical supervision and professional development of instructional and supervisory staff to address student achievement; and addressing the demands of an increasingly diverse clientele will be examined. Multiple guest speakers with expert knowledge in school leadership roles may be invited to present in this class. Students will be required to reflect carefully about their own positions relative to leadership in schools and school districts.

EDL 762. Futurism in Community Education. 3 Hours.

EDL 766. Advanced Clinical Supervision for Admin/Supervisor. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide building principals and district-level administrators a chance to examine, in depth, best practices in clinical supervision of classroom teachers and school administrators. Emphasis is placed on how to help teachers and school-level leaders improve their practice in leading for high levels of student achievement. Although it is not a pre-requisite, this course is designed to build topics covered in EDL 626.

EDL 770. Advanced Administrative Leadership. 3 Hours.

EDL 772. Advanced Technology of Educational Planning. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: EDL 732 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 792. Directed Study in Educational Leadership. 3 Hours.

EDL 796. Individual Readings in School Law. 3-6 Hours.

Prerequisites: EDL 535 [Min Grade: C]

EDL 797. Doctoral Internship in Educational Leadership. 1-12 Hour.

EDL 798. Non-Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

This course is for doctoral students in educational leadership who have completed their preliminary course work but who have not yet developed or defended their proposal for doctoral/dissertation research.

EDL 799. Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

This course is for doctoral students in educational leadership who have completed their preliminary course work and have successfully defended their proposal for doctoral/dissertation research and who, upon the recommendation of their dissertation committee, are entered into doctoral candidacy through the Graduate School. A minimum of 12 hours of EDL 799.
Prerequisites: GAC D

EPR-Educational Psychology Courses

EPR 510. Measurement and Evaluation in Education ECE. 3 Hours.

For early childhood/elementary education majors only. Basic concepts and principles of measurement and evaluation of personal and academic progress in classroom. Elementary descriptive statistics and measurement techniques used in student evaluation. Quantitative literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).

EPR 511. Measurement and Evaluation in Education Secondary Ed. 3 Hours.

For secondary education majors only. Basic concepts and principles of measurement and evaluation of personal and academic progress in classroom. Elementary descriptive statistics and measurement techniques used in student evaluation. Quantitative literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).

EPR 590. Research & Prgm Eval in Coun. 4 Hours.

This course will provide an introduction to major principles, strategies, and instruments in social science research and program evaluation. Students will become familiar with (1) basic strategies used to conduct research; (2) basic methodology for collecting and interpreting data typically reported in counseling; (3) basic conventions for published reporting research in his/her field of interest; (4) basic program evaluation; and (5) the knowledge and skills to become consumers and producers of counseling research.

EPR 594. Introduction to Educational Research Design. 3 Hours.

Introduction to educational research design purposes and characteristics of research process, types of research approaches and research designs, procedures for collecting, analyzing and evaluating data, critical review of published research, research ethics and institutional review.
Prerequisites: EPR 607 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 608 [Min Grade: C]

EPR 596. Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Educational Research. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide a practical introduction to qualitative research and its application in education, social, and behavioral sciences.
Prerequisites: EPR 594 [Min Grade: C]

EPR 607. Microcomputer Applications to Statistical Analysis. 1 Hour.

Excel and SPSS will be used for statistical analyses and data interpretation. Lab to accompany EPR 608. Must be taken concurrently.
Prerequisites: EPR 608 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

EPR 608. Statistical Methods and Action Research. 3 Hours.

This statistics course will cover descriptive and inferential statistics to include the following: measures of central tendency; measures of variability; frequency distributions; normal curve; probability; sampling; regression; hypothesis testing; and analysis of variance. Excel and SPSS will be used for statistical analyses and data interpretation.

EPR 609. Statistical Methods and Research in Education: Intermediate. 3 Hours.

This course will cover basic inferential techniques including hypothesis testing and parametric and non-parametric techniques related to factorial ANOVA and within-subjects ANOVA designs. A significant focus of this course is on assumptions, rationale, application and interpretation of various analysis of variance techniques.
Prerequisites: EPR 607 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 608 [Min Grade: C]

EPR 610. Child Psychology. 3 Hours.

This course covers human development through infancy, preschool, and preadolescence.

EPR 611. Adolescent Psychology. 3 Hours.

This course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in the psychological, social, emotional, moral, cognitive, cultural and physical development of adolescents and how these aspects affect classroom and school behavior.

EPR 614. Lifespan Human Development. 3 Hours.

The objective of this course is to further students' knowledge of human development, the multidisciplinary study of how people change and how they remain the same over time. Topics to be covered will include developmental theories, biological development, social developing, language development, cognitive development, young adulthood, and aging.

EPR 616. Personality Theories. 3 Hours.

This course covers the major theoretical perspectives of the development of personality.

EPR 622. Learning Theories. 3 Hours.

This course covers the application of learning theories to educational practice, behavioral theories, information processing, biochemical basis of memory and learning, as well as other major learning theories.

EPR 650. Educational and Psychological Testing. 3 Hours.

This course will cover the basic principles, research, and theories on the testing and measurement of psychological and educational constructs. Students should expect to complete the course with knowledge of various techniques for educational and psychological testing, familiarity of several professionally developed tests, in depth knowledge on one test of student's choice, and knowledge of measurement theory which includes reliability and validity.
Prerequisites: EPR 607 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 608 [Min Grade: C]

EPR 688. Seminar on Current Issues: Measurement/Eval School. 3 Hours.

This course provides advanced training on current issues, policies, and methods in educational measurement and evaluation relevant to classroom teachers.
Prerequisites: (EPR 410 [Min Grade: C] or EPR 510 [Min Grade: C]) or (EPR 411 [Min Grade: C] or EPR 511 [Min Grade: C])

EPR 691. Independent Readings in Educational Psychology and Research. 3 Hours.

Independent Readings in Educational Psychology and Research.

EPR 695. Survey Methods in Educational Research. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of the basic principles, applications, and types of survey research in education. Students completing this course should have basic knowledge of the survey implementation procedures, use of appropriate sampling techniques and principles of survey instrument construction. Students should be able to develop reliable survey items, establish reliability and validity of survey scales and instruments, and demonstrate awareness of ethical issues related to conducting survey research. Finally, students will learn how to evaluate and critique published survey research studies.
Prerequisites: EPR 594 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 607 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 608 [Min Grade: C]

EPR 696. Qualitative Research: Inquiry and Analysis. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth insight into the history, philosophy and applications of qualitative research. The course provides a structured field experience of designing and conducting a qualitative small-scale research study within a select qualitative approach.
Prerequisites: EPR 594 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 596 [Min Grade: C]

EPR 700. Data Based Decision Making. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of key issues related to data-based decision making for students who are interested in moving into leadership positions within their own school and school system. Issues such as Response to Intervention (RTI), progress monitoring, formative and summative evaluation, basic statistical and measurement issues, and other related topics are introduced and discussed.

EPR 700L. Field Experience/Data Based Decision Making. 1 Hour.

Field-based experience to accompany Data Based Decision Making.

EPR 700R. School Based Problem Research Project/Data Based Decision. 1 Hour.

Action-research project to accompany Data Based Decision Making.

EPR 710. Computer Applications and Advanced Statistical Methods. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of multivariate analyses including multiple regression, MANOVA, logistic regression, discriminant function analysis, factor analysis, cluster analysis, and related procedures. The course focuses on conducting analyses, interpreting results, and conducting studies that require multivariate analyses.
Prerequisites: EPR 607 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 608 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 609 [Min Grade: C]

EPR 719. Internship and Seminar in School Psychology II. 1-6 Hour.

EPR 728. Seminar on Research in Education. 3 Hours.

EPR 790. Mixed Methods Approaches in Action Research. 3 Hours.

Application of mixed methods research to designing and conducting action research studies involving collecting and analyzing both quantitative and qualitative data. Types of action research models and their major characteristics; steps in designing and conducting mixed methods action research studies; specific types of mixed methods action research designs; sampling, data collection, analysis, validation, and evaluation of mixed methods action research projects. Applied knowledge of designing and conducting a mixed methods action research study.
Prerequisites: EPR 594 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 596 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 607 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 608 [Min Grade: C]

EPR 792. Mixed Methods Approaches to Educational Research. 3 Hours.

This course will provide an overview of mixed methods research, including the history and philosophy of mixed methods research, relevant emerging literature, types of research problems addressed, types of mixed methods designs, and the writing and evaluation of mixed methods studies.
Prerequisites: EPR 594 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 596 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 607 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 608 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 609 [Min Grade: C]

EPR 793. Doctoral Seminar in Research Evaluation and Design. 3 Hours.

EPR 796. Qualitative Research: Doctoral Seminar. 3 Hours.

Qualitative Research: Doctoral Seminar.
Prerequisites: EPR 596 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 696 [Min Grade: C]

HPE-Health & Physical Educ Courses

KIN - Kinesiology Courses

KIN 500. Organization & Admin of PE. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the student with opportunities to increase his/her knowledge of problems and issues involved in the organization and administration of physical education programs in elementary and secondary schools.
Prerequisites: KIN 136 [Min Grade: C] or PE 136 [Min Grade: C]

KIN 509. Assessment in Physical Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to investigate the basic concepts of measurement and evaluation as applied to physical education. Through online modules students will acquire knowledge and skills related to the assessment and interpretation of student status, teacher effectiveness, and program effectiveness.

KIN 511. Elementary School Physical Education. 3 Hours.

This course will include the nature and content of a developmentally appropriate elementary physical education program.
Prerequisites: (KIN 136 [Min Grade: C] or PE 136 [Min Grade: C]) and (KIN 305 [Min Grade: C] or PE 305 [Min Grade: C])

KIN 520. Fitness and Motor Skill Acquisition. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and the skills necessary to analyze and appropriately teach motor skills and design developmentally appropriate fitness activities for adolescents.
Prerequisites: (KIN 136 [Min Grade: C] or PE 136 [Min Grade: C]) and (KIN 305 [Min Grade: C] or PE 305 [Min Grade: C])

KIN 520L. Sport Skill Proficiency. 1 Hour.

This course will enable candidates to acquire the knowledge and the skills necessary to teach the critical elements needed to perform all basic sport skills. Candidates will demonstrate skill proficiency in the sport skills as well as the ability to teach others to perform the skills.
Prerequisites: KIN 305 [Min Grade: C] or PE 305 [Min Grade: C]

KIN 523. Techniques of Teaching LIFE Skills in Secondary Schools. 3 Hours.

This course will enable candidates to learn techniques and strategies for teaching LIFE (Lifelong Individualized Fitness Education) skills typically covered in a high school physical education program.

KIN 585. Advanced Exercise Testing and Prescription. 3 Hours.

This course studies participant screening, risk stratification, and exercise assessment/testing and prescription to apparently healthy, special and diseased populations. Successful communication, programming and management principles for health/fitness settings will also be examined.
Prerequisites: (KIN 400 [Min Grade: C] or PE 400 [Min Grade: C]) or (KIN 637 [Min Grade: B] or PE 637 [Min Grade: B])

KIN 589. Physical Education Instructional Strategies. 6 Hours.

This course will focus on information to help potential physical educators attain teaching skills and knowledge necessary to design, implement and evaluate developmentally appropriate K-12 physical education programs. Students will gain hands-on experience with students in elementary, middle and high school settings.

KIN 601. Introduction to Sports Administration. 3 Hours.

This course will explore the field of sport administration. Students will learn about the many skills needed to be an effective administrator.

KIN 607. Principles of Coaching. 3 Hours.

This course will explore the principles of coaching regarding sport psychology, sport pedagogy, sport physiology, and sport management.

KIN 615. Sport Facility Planning. 3 Hours.

Principles of planning and managing sport facilities and events.

KIN 618. The Olympic Games. 3 Hours.

The Olympic Games will be investigated through a brief analysis of the history of the Ancient Olympic Games, an in-depth analysis of the Modern Olympic Games and the development of their global social, economic, political and cultural significance.

KIN 623. Philosophical Perspectives in Sport Administration. 3 Hours.

This course will address conceptual skills of an administrator beyond management skills, including addressing current trends and issues in education, physical education and athletics.
Prerequisites: EPR 692 [Min Grade: C]

KIN 630. Mechanical Analysis of Motor Skills. 3 Hours.

Analysis of motor skills in children, youth, and adults.
Prerequisites: KIN 307 [Min Grade: C] or PE 307 [Min Grade: C]

KIN 631. Foundations of Physical Education. 3 Hours.

Basic foundations of physical education in the school setting.

KIN 632. Supervision of Physical Education. 3 Hours.

Principles of supervising and maintaining a physical education program.

KIN 635. Principles of Management in Sports. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to give students an overview of the duties, responsibilities and problems facing athletic administrators in today's sports-conscious society.

KIN 636. Current Readings in Physical Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to assist the student in locating, analyzing, and synthesizing professional literature relative to current trends, issues and research in physical education.

KIN 637. Physiology of Exercise I. 3 Hours.

Basic content related to exercise physiology.

KIN 638. Physiology of Exercise II. 3 Hours.

Advanced content related to exercise physiology.

KIN 639. Exercise Prescription for High Risk Populations. 3 Hours.

Advanced Techniques in Exercise Testing.
Prerequisites: KIN 637 [Min Grade: C] or PE 637 [Min Grade: C]

KIN 640. Advanced Techniques in Conditioning the Athlete. 3 Hours.

Strategies for conditioning the athlete.
Prerequisites: KIN 400 [Min Grade: C] or PE 400 [Min Grade: C] or KIN 637 [Min Grade: C] or PE 637 [Min Grade: C]

KIN 641. Advanced Planning/Management of Fitness Facilities. 3 Hours.

Advanced knowledge and skills needed for successful management, marketing, operational leadership, evaluation, and planning principles of commercial, corporate, clinical, and community health/fitness facilities.

KIN 642. Practicum in Physiology. 3 Hours.

Field-based experience in physiology.
Prerequisites: (KIN 637 [Min Grade: C] or PE 637 [Min Grade: C]) and (KIN 638 [Min Grade: C] or PE 638 [Min Grade: C])

KIN 643. Curriculum Development in Physical Education. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the development of curricula in physical education grades K-12. Principles of curriculum development, existing curriculum models and current trends and contemporary issues related to curriculum development as discussed.

KIN 644. Application of Exercise Physiology to Fitness and Performance. 3 Hours.

Students in this course will learn the scientific principles that underlie exercise physiology. In this course you will learn about exercise tests to evaluate fitness, and exercise training to promote performance and health, and disease prevention throughout the lifespan.

KIN 645. Advanced Motor Development. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide graduate students the opportunity to develop skill and knowledge related to lifespan motor development. Through online discussion, readings, and laboratory activities, students will be exposed to information regarding physical growth, maturation, and aging; motor skill acquisition from infancy through adulthood; perceptual-motor development; physiological changes and exercise over the lifespan; and sociocultural influences on motor development.

KIN 647. Teaching Strategies and Issues in K-12 PE. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to update graduate students who are currently teaching physical education or seeking initial certification regarding new teaching strategies and methodologies as well as current state and national issues affecting K-12 physical education programs.

KIN 649. Adapted Physical Education. 3 Hours.

This course will prepare students for making wise and informed decisions about curriculum and placement options for students with disabilities in physical education settings.
Prerequisites: KIN 645 [Min Grade: C] or PE 645 [Min Grade: C]

KIN 650. Social Aspects of Sport. 3 Hours.

This course is a study of sport from a sociological perspective. Physical Educators, Coaches, and the sport novice alike will benefit from discussion that stimulates critical-thought concerning sport and how it relates to social life in modern culture. This course will help students view sport as more than just a reflection of the world in which they live. A global, issues-oriented approach to study the role of sports in society, sport- related controversies and the issues that cause them.

KIN 651. Issues and Problems in Coaching. 3 Hours.

This course is an introductory study of issues and problems, or dilemmas that often arise in sport, physical activity and recreation programs and could potentially result in legal situations. This course will approach issues and problems from a practical perspective as they relate to the legal duties of individuals who coach in youth, recreation, interscholastic, or intercollegiate settings. The course will include a study of current issues and problems in sport, physical activity and recreation through examination and critical analysis.

KIN 652. Measurement and Evaluation of Athletes. 3 Hours.

This course is primarily designed to help athletic coaches locate, select, and construct quality sport skill tests. Additional attention will be given to body composition, fitness, and psychological assessment of athletes. Students will review reasons why coaches should measure and evaluate athletes, and survey sound testing procedures.

KIN 653. Plan/Conduct Act Prog for Indiv with Disabilities. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with knowledge and skills needed to meet the unique fitness and physical activity needs of individuals with various disabilities. Through class discussions and course assignments, students will learn to design and implement personal training/fitness programs and disability sports/recreation programs for individuals with disabilities based on assessments of health related strengths and needs.

KIN 655. Motor Learning. 3 Hours.

Principles of teaching and learning motor skills.

KIN 656. Advanced Sport Psychology. 3 Hours.

Psychological principles of sports.

KIN 663. Adventure-Based Counseling. 3 Hours.

Improvement of self-concept and social life skills through physical, spiritual, emotional, and mental development in creative activity outdoors. Natural environment used as a learning laboratory for leadership, teamwork, problem solving, decision-making, conflict resolution, and physical fitness.

KIN 664. Challenge Crse Fund II. 3 Hours.

This course continues introduces students to the background, philosophy, ethical issues, and risk management required to high ropes facilitation. Introduces students to a variety of high challenge course initiatives used for learning and problem solving, trust team building, and self-confidence and communication skills. How to present high challenge courses initiatives to diverse groups will be emphasized. Specific attention will be given to addressing learners of different ages and varying abilities. Additionally, an overview will be given of how counseling and ropes courses experiences can be integrated.

KIN 665. Adventure Processing and Facilitation. 3 Hours.

This course provides the skills necessary for facilitating a variety of client groups educational, recreational, corporate, and therapeutic indoor experience programs. The curriculum includes the Experiential Learning Cycle, stages of group development, leading group discussion, active listening, frontloading, de-briefing, use of metaphors and transfer of learning. Activities are used to facilitate leadership, teamwork, problem solving, decision-making and conflict resolution. This knowledge will enhance students' ability to adapt their program to various groups. How to facilitate and lead group discussion with diverse groups will be emphasized.

KIN 666. Organization and Administration of Adventure Education. 3 Hours.

Students will synthesize their experience in adventure leadership, instruction and programming to explore the details of managing an adventure program. Topics include risk management for the administrator, operations and file management, legal issues, accreditation standards, staff recruitment, hiring and training, marketing, fiscal management. Special attention will be given to managing an universally designed challenge course.

KIN 672. Advanced Treatment of Athletic Injuries. 3 Hours.

Advanced treatment of athletic injuries.

KIN 674. Advanced Sports Nutrition. 3 Hours.

Nutritional needs of athletes.

KIN 690. Seminar in Sports Administration. 3 Hours.

Overview of administration of sports programs.

KIN 693. Advanced Field Experience in Physical Education. 3-6 Hours.

Field Experience in Physical Education applying the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.
Prerequisites: EPR 609 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 692 [Min Grade: C] and (KIN 726 [Min Grade: C] or PE 726 [Min Grade: C])

KIN 694. Special Projects in Kinesiology. 1-6 Hour.

Special topics course in kinesiology.

KIN 695. Problems in Physical Education. 3-6 Hours.

Examination of current trends and problems in physical education.

KIN 696. Elementary/Secondary Physical Education Internship. 9 Hours.

This internship provides an opportunity for physical education students to participate in actual class for 15 weeks. Interns teach at two levels; elementary and either middle or high school. Student teaching is a culminating practical experience during which interns will likely be called upon to synthesize and apply all knowledge and skills acquired during previous coursework.

KIN 697. Advanced Field Experience in Kinesiology. 1-6 Hour.

Culminating field experience in Kinesiology.
Prerequisites: KIN 547 [Min Grade: C] or PE 547 [Min Grade: C] or KIN 488 [Min Grade: C] or PE 488 [Min Grade: C]

KIN 698. Coaching Internship (Individual Sport). 3 Hours.

Culminating internship in coaching.
Prerequisites: KIN 607 [Min Grade: C] or PE 607 [Min Grade: C] or KIN 407 [Min Grade: C] or PE 407 [Min Grade: C]

KIN 699. Thesis Research. 1-6 Hour.

Kinesiology Thesis Research.
Prerequisites: GAC M

KIN 710. Special Topics in Physical Education. 3 Hours.

Special topics course in physical education.

KIN 715. Advanced Field Experience in Physical Education. 3-6 Hours.

Within your current teaching environment, demonstrate your teaching practice of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.
Prerequisites: KIN 647 [Min Grade: C] or PE 647 [Min Grade: C]

KIN 718. Practicum in Exercise Physiology. 3 Hours.

Practicum in Exercise Physiology.

KIN 720. Research Design and Methodology. 3 Hours.

Research and design methods in kinesiology.
Prerequisites: EPR 692 [Min Grade: C]

KIN 726. Supervised Research in Physical Education. 3-6 Hours.

Completion of research project in the field of physical education.
Prerequisites: EPR 609 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 692 [Min Grade: C]

KIN 728. EdS Thesis Research. 3-6 Hours.

Completion of indepth research in the field of kinesiology.

KIN 729. Physical Education Seminar. 3 Hours.

This course involves the development of thesis or research project presentation.
Prerequisites: EPR 609 [Min Grade: C] and EPR 692 [Min Grade: C]

Faculty

Ahmad, Wajih, Assistant Professor of Community Health and Human Services, 1998, B.S., M.Ph., Ph.D. (UAB)
Collins, Loucrecia, Associate Professor of Educational Leadership, 2000, B.S., M.A., Ed.D. (Mississippi State)
Evans, Retta, Associate Professor of Community Health and Human Services, 2003, B.S., (Fort Hays), M.S. (Northeastern), Ph.D. (Arkansas)
Fiedler, Robin L., Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology and Research, 2008, B.S. (Edinboro), M.Ed. (Virginia Commonwealth), Ph.D. (Auburn), Measurement, Educational Psychology, Educational Statistics
Fisher, Gordon, Assistant Professor of Kinesiology, 2012, B.S. (Hillsdale), M.S. (Mississippi State), Ph.D. (Auburn), Postdoctoral Fellow (UAB), Exercise Physiology; Exercise/Nutrition, Mitochondrial Bioenergetics, Oxidative Stress, and Chronic Inflammation
Forbes, Laura, Assistant Professor of Community Health and Human Services, 2005, B.S. (Ball State), M.S. (Central Florida), Ph.D. (South Carolina)
Gurley, Dennis Keith, Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership, 2012, B.A. (Trinity), M.Ed., Ed.D. (Wichita State), Pre-Service and In-Service Development for School Leaders, Professional Learning Communities, and Organizational Theory
Hall, Sean, Assistant Professor of Counselor Education, 2012, B.A., M.A. (Florida Gulf Coast), Ph.D. (Old Dominion), Counselor Education, Clinical Mental Health Counseling, Assessment and Intervention Techniques, Processes and Outcomes Research, Dropout Prevention
Hunter, Gary R., Professor of Kinesiology, 1984, B.S. (Eastern Michigan), M.A., Ph.D. (Michigan State), B.S. (Eastern Michigan), M.A., Ph.D. (Michigan State)
Loder-Jackson, Tondra, Associate Professor of Foundations of Education, 2003, B.S. (Birmingham-Southern), M.P.P. (Chicago), Ph.D. (Northwestern)
McKnight, Andrew, Associate Professor of Foundations of Education, 2003, B.A. (Virginia Commonwealth), M.A.Ed. (William & Mary), Ph.D. (North Carolina at Greensboro)
McNeese, Rose, Associate Professor of Educational Leadership, 2013, B.S. (Southern Mississippi); Ed.S., Ph.D. (Georgia State)
Menear, Kristi S., Associate Professor of Kinesiology, 2001, B.A. (Louisiana), M.A., Ph.D. (New Orleans)
Peters, Gary B., Associate Professor, 2010, B.A., M.A. (Governors State), Ed.S., Ph.D. (UAB), Leadership; Organizational Theory
Petri, Cynthia J., Associate Professor of Community Health and Human Services, 1992, B.A., M.S., Ph.D. (Purdue)
Plaisance, Eric, Assistant Professor of Kinesiology, 2013, B.S. (Nicholls State), M.S. (United States Sports Academy), Ph.D. (Auburn)
Roy, Jane, Associate Professor of Kinesiology, 2001, B.S., M.A., PhD. (Alabama)
Shores, Melanie L., Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology and Research, 2005, B.S., M.A.M., M.A., Ph.D. (Auburn)
Sims, Sandra, Assistant Professor of Kinesiology, 2005, B.S. (Montevallo), M.A. (UAB), Ed.S. (UAB), Ph.D. (Southern Mississippi)
Snyder, Scott W., Associate Professor of Research and Early Childhood Special Education, 1988, B.A. (SUNY-Potsdam), M.S., Ph.D. (Purdue)
Tyson, Lawrence E., Associate Professor of Counselor Education, 1997, B. A. (Atlantic Christian), M.Ed. (Rollins), Ph.D. (Mississippi State)
Wilkinson, Larrell, Assistant Professor of Community Health and Human Services, 2012, B.S. (Tennessee State University), MSPH, Ph.D. (University of South Carolina), Health Education, Health Disparities/Health Equity, Access and utilization of health care services, Substance Abuse