Civil, Construction and Environmental

The Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering (CCEE) department offers both a master and doctoral level program, and cutting-edge research covering various facets of Civil Engineering theory and practice. A knowledgeable and experienced group of faculty members work closely with students to provide them with the tools required to succeed professionally in globally-competitive work environments.

CE-Civil Engineering Courses

CE 515. Building Information Modeling (BIM). 3 Hours.

This class will be an introduction to the virtual world of design and construction. Topics covered will include uses for technology, what is BIM, and will have a focus on AutoCAD and Revit Software. An emphasis will be placed on the use of these tools and their practical applications to the real world environment. Students will be provided with the software through the Autodesk Student community and will be required to complete a Multi-Step term Project.

CE 516. Mechanical Vibrations. 3 Hours.

Free and forced single-degree-of-freedom systems. Multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Damped, forced two-degree-of- freedom systems. Simple continuous systems. CE 215 (Dynamics) and E 220 (Mechanics of Solids) are prerequisites for this course.

CE 520. Advanced Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Variation of stress at point including determination of principal and maximum shear stresses. Basic problems involving symmetrical deformation; thickwall cylinders, spheres, and rotating disk. Torsions of noncircular sections. Curved beams. Failure Theories. Unsymmetrical bending and shear center. CE 220 (Mechanics of Solids) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 526. Foundation Engineering. 3 Hours.

Application of principles of soil mechanics to: determine bearing capacity and settlement of spread footings, mats, single piles and pile groups; site investigation, evaluate data from field and laboratory tests; estimation of stresses in soil masses; lateral resistance of piles and pile groups; retaining walls, sheetpiles and coffer-dams.
Prerequisites: CE 332 [Min Grade: D] and CE 455 [Min Grade: D]

CE 530. Water Supply/Drainage Design. 3 Hours.

Water requirements; wastewater characteristics. Hydraulics and design of sewers; distribution, and reuse of water. Development of water supplies; design considerations. CE 337 (Hydraulics) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 531. Energy Resources. 3 Hours.

Overview of the various energy resources: oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, hydro, solar, geothermal, biomass, wind, and ocean energy resources, in terms of supply, distribution, recovery and conversion, environmental impacts, economies, policy, and technology. Concepts and opportunities for energy conservation; including electric power generation, changing role of electric utilities, transportation applications, and energy use in developing countries. Field trips.

CE 533. Solid and Hazardous Wastes Management. 3 Hours.

Overview of waste characterizations, regulations, and management options.

CE 534. Air Quality Modeling and Monitoring. 3 Hours.

Atmospheric pollutants; effects, reactions, and sources. Air pollution meteorology and dispersion modeling. Ambient monitoring. ME 250 (Introduction to Thermodynamic Sciences) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 537. Environmental Experimental Design and Field Sampling. 3 Hours.

Experimental design, sensitivity analyses, water sampling, and flow monitoring. Receiving water chemical reactions. Field investigations. CE 344 (Civil Engineering Analysis I) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 537L. Environmental Experimental Design and Field Sampling Lab. 0 Hours.

Lab experiences in environmental experimental design and field sampling.

CE 542. Hwy Materials and Construction. 3 Hours.

Properties of materials used in highway construction. Construction methods and management. CE 332 (Soil Engineering) and CE 345 (Transportation Engineering) are suggested prerequisites for this course.

CE 543. Pavement Design & Construction. 3 Hours.

Analysis of stresses and strains in pavement systems. Design and construction of flexible and rigid pavements, base courses and subgrades. Effects of loading on pavement life.

CE 544. Civil Engineering Analysis II. 3 Hours.

Sampling and experimental design. Hypotheses testing. Decision Analyses. Multiple regression analyses. Nonparametric methods. Analysis of experimental data in civil engineering research; regression, experimental design, non-parametrical analysis. CE 344 (Civil Engineering Analysis I) is suggested as a prerequisite for this course.

CE 553. Design of Wood Structures. 3 Hours.

Design and detailing of timber structures. Properties and specifications for dimension and glulam timber. Design of beams, columns, beam-columns, connections (nails and bolts), roof diaphragms, and shear walls. Design of timber structures to meet the requirements of the National Design Specifications Standards. CE 360 (Structural Analysis) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 554. Design of Masonry Structures. 3 Hours.

Design and detailing of masonry structures. Nomenclature, properties, and specifications for components. Design of assemblages, simple masonry structures, unreinforced and reinforced elements, and complex masonry structures. CE 360 (Structural Analysis) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 556. Prestressed Concrete Design. 3 Hours.

Principles and concepts of design in prestressed concrete including elasticand ultimate strength analysis for flexural, shear, bond, and deflections. Principles of concordancy and linear transformation for indeterminate prestressed structures. CE 455 (Reinforced Concrete Design) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 557. Concrete Technology. 3 Hours.

Properties of concrete in relation to specifying, purchasing, and evaluating concrete materials. Fresh and hardened concrete properties. Concrete mix design procedures. Effects of finishing, curing, weather conditions, and various construction procedures. Ready mix concrete production and field placement techniques. Specifications writing to ensure good quality concrete and field inspection procedures. Case studies of problems in concrete construction. CE 222) (Civil Engineering Materials Laboratory) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 560. Structural Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Elastic beam deflections, beam columns, lateral torsional buckling, column stability, plastic design, plate bending, yield line theory.

CE 561. Introduction to the Finite Element Method. 3 Hours.

Concepts and applications of the finite element method. Development and applications of basic finite elements. Software use.
Prerequisites: CE 220 [Min Grade: C]

CE 562. Advanced Structural Analysis. 3 Hours.

Analysis of indeterminate structures using classical and matrix methods. Use of large-scale computer programs. A grade of C or better in CE 360 (Computer Methods in Civil Engineering) or its equivalent is required.

CE 564. Structural Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Closed form and numerical solutions to single-degree-of-freedom structural models. Analysis of multistory frames. Computer application and seismic analysis. Techniques of modal analysis.
Prerequisites: CE 215 [Min Grade: D] and CE 360 [Min Grade: D]

CE 567. Wind and Seismic Loads. 3 Hours.

Methods for calculating loads on structures caused by extreme winds and earthquakes. Calculation of wind loads on various types of structures according to theory and codes. Determination of earthquake loads on structures using structural dynamics and codes. CE 360 (Structural Analysis) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 568. Bridge Engineering. 3 Hours.

Bridge loads, steel beam bridges, composite beam bridges, bridge bearings, reinforced and prestressed concrete slab and T-beam bridges, bridge evaluations and ratings, upgrade methodologies; computer applications. CE 450 (Structural Steel Design) and CE 455 (Reinforced Concrete Design) are prerequisites for this course.

CE 580. Introduction to Water and Wastewater Treatment. 3 Hours.

Physical unit operations, and chemical/biological unit processes for water and wastewater treatment. Design of facilities for treatment. Treatment and disposal of sludge. CE 236 (Environmental Engineering) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 585. Engineering Hydrology. 3 Hours.

Hydrologic principles including hydrology cycle, precipitation data, and stream-flow measurements. Applications to engineering problems; stream-flow analysis and watershed management.

CE 590. Special Topics in (Area). 3 Hours.

CE 600. Sustainable Construction. 3 Hours.

Study of sustainable construction techniques and best practices. Provides an understanding of the interdependencies between planning, designing, building, operating, and demolishing the built environment and their impacts on the natural environment. Course topics will include: (1) issues of recourse efficiency, economics, ethics, waste, human health, environmental justice, and industrial ecology; (2) alternative practices that significantly reduce adverse environmental impacts of built infrastructure, and (3) explore past and present thinking of engineering practitioners in this newly emerging discipline.

CE 601. Construction Methods. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of construction methods, building systems, material and equipment used in the construction of buildings, earthworks, bridges and roads. Excavation, formwork, concrete, masonry, and steel erection methods. Types of foundations that can be used for a project are presented.

CE 602. Construction Contracting, Bidding, and Estimating. 3 Hours.

Estimation of construction project costs:direct and indirect, labor, material, and equipment costs. Overhead and profit, bidding, computer-based estimating. Introduction to the U.S. legal system as it applies to civil engineering and construction. Fundamental concepts of contract and tort law, claims, risk management, business formation and licensing, agency, insurance and bonding, and real property.

CE 603. Construction Accounting and Financial Management. 3 Hours.

Covers financial accounting and cost control concepts dealing with the integration and management of both company and project-level revenue and expense. It shows how effective cost control methodology and data are essential to monitoring and controlling current project budgets as well as developing accurate future bids. Course covers accounting systems unique to construction companies and financial analysis methods typically employed; progress payment disbursement; forecasting and trends; cash flow life cycle theory; computer applications; project funding; and the use of cost information and associate reports.

CE 604. International Construction Contracts and Law. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of the fundamental aspects of the law that affects construction and engineering companies as well as the project owners. Particular emphasis is placed on contract forms and provisions related to liability for engineering design and construction companies, the roles of the typical participation in the process, and dispute resolution.

CE 605. Project Management. 3 Hours.

Presents the theory and practice of project management as a distinct discipline with applications in time, cost, and performance management. Managerial, organizational, behavioral and cost benefit aspects of project management are covered, as well as various applied models for organizing, executing, and monitoring a project. Basic estimating techniques to determine cost and time for construction work packages are discussed followed by scheduling model techniques to include the Critical Path Method (CPM), Precedence Diagramming Method (PDM), Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT), and Gantt charts.

CE 606. Advanced Project Management. 3 Hours.

Directed study of selected topics in construction management. The schedule of classes will list topics selected. Topics will include: business policy and problems relating to construction companies, contractors' organization, financial management, project management, supervision, cost analysis and equipment economics, team building, professional ethics, leadership and topics in construction law.

CE 607. Engineering Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

Course focuses on the entrepreneurial engineer--a new type of engineer who needs a broad range of business skills and knowledge above and beyond a strong science and engineering background. The course will introduce engineering students to the key aspects of engineering entrepreneurship including business planning, solving problems, risk taking, financing, marketing, and entrepreneurial leadership. The students will also be introduced to the many opportunities and challenges that accompany starting and operating an entrepreneurial venture. Entrepreneurial company leaders will present their experiences and share their leadership styles as part of the course.

CE 608. Green Building Design. 3 Hours.

Quantitative introduction to the principles of "Green Building Design". Provides students an understanding of the interdependencies between economics, technology, design, building occupation and the subsequent impact on the natural environment. Course will emphasize green building materials, new technologies, and sustainable construction methods. Course will also include LEED Case Studies (industrial, commercial, residential, and institutional examples).

CE 609. Advanced Topics in Engineering Law. 3 Hours.

Course will cover advanced topics in engineering law as it relates to sustainable design and construction practices. Examples include BIM, crane regulations, safety, international contracts and joint venture, term sheets, etc.

CE 610. The Engineered Environment. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of environmental engineering as they apply to the construction of the built environment and contemporary issues faced by engineers in developing nations such as Egypt. Topics included Air pollution, solid waste management, water treatment, environmental ethics, etc.

CE 612. Theory of Elasticity. 3 Hours.

Equations of linear reduction to plane stress, plane strain, and generalized plane strain. Airy and Love stress functions in solution of problems.

CE 615. Theory of Elastic Stability. 3 Hours.

Static stability of bars, beams, trusses, and rigid frames. Dynamic stability of bars. Energy method applied to bucking problems. General theory of elastic stability. CE 220 (Mechanics of Solids) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 617. Theory of Plates and Shells. 3 Hours.

Linear theory and solutions of plates and various shapes. Large deflection theory and solutions of rectangular and circular plates. Membrane and bending theories of shells. Solutions of problems in conical, cylindrical, and spherical shell.

CE 621. Transportation Engineering Seminar. 1 Hour.

Seminar focusing on student research and guest presentations of various topics of interest to graduate transportation engineering students.

CE 622. Traffic Flow Theory. 3 Hours.

Microscopic and macroscopic traffic flow characteristics. Traffic flow analytical techniques including car-following models, traffic stream models, shock wave analysis. Queuing analysis and gap acceptance. Simulation models for network analysis. CE 345 (Transportation Engineering) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 623. Non-Motorized Transportation Design and Planning. 3 Hours.

Urban planning principles that support non-motorized transportation, local bicycle or pedestrian plans, non-motorized transportation safety related considerations, non-motorized transportation design including traffic calming techniques, procedures for capacity analysis of pedestrian facilities.

CE 624. Simulation Models for Transportation Applications. 3 Hours.

Basic concepts of simulation models for analysis and optimization of transportation systems. Experimentation with planning simulation models and traffic models for signal timing and capacity analysis. CE 345 (Transportation Engineering) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 625. Intelligent Transportation Systems. 3 Hours.

Legal, institutional and planning issues. System architecture, telecommunication techniques, Advanced User Services, intermodal systems, deployment programs, cost and benefit evaluation.

CE 628. Construction Management Capstone Case Studies, Part 1. 1 Hour.

Students review case studies involving project planning and risk assessment or individual topical study.
Prerequisites: CE 669 [Min Grade: C] and CE 670 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

CE 631. Environmental Law. 3 Hours.

Law as it applies to the practicing environmental engineer. New and emerging regulations.

CE 632. Industrial Waste and Wastewater Treatment. 3 Hours.

Solid wastes and wastewaters from various industries. Assessment of treatability, system design, and equipment selection.

CE 633. Solid and Hazardous Waste Management. 3 Hours.

Provides students a quantitative introduction to solid and hazardous waste characterizations, international regulations, and management options. Course topics to include (1) Solid waste management hierarchy (reduce, reuse, recycle, recovery, responsible disposal); (2) Dry tomb landfill design; (3) Hazardous waste identification and treatment/disposal.

CE 636. Stormwater Pollution Management. 3 Hours.

Quality and quantity of stormwater. Receiving water problems and sources of pollutants. Runoff quality and quantity characterizations. Erosion control. Selection and design of controls; regulations.

CE 638. Water and Wastewater Chemistry. 3 Hours.

Aquatic chemistry. Chemical behavior of pollutants in receiving waters. Fate of common pollutants. Chemical kinetics in natural waters. Photochemical reactions. Modeling of wastewater discharges.

CE 639. Sediment Sources and Controls. 3 Hours.

Erosion and sediment transport areas; design of common erosion control practices.

CE 640. Wastewater Treatment Engineering. 3 Hours.

Wastewater sources and characteristics. Design and operation of wastewater treatment facilities, including grit removal, oil and grease removal, dissolved air flotation, activated sludge process, trickling filters, and rotating biological contractors, stabilization ponds and aerated lagoons, anaerobic processes for wastewater treatment and sludge digestion. Ultimate disposal of wastewater residues and considerations of discharge criteria.

CE 641. Civil Engineering Seminar. 1 Hour.

Seminar focusing on guest presentations of various civil and environmental engineering topics of interest for CEE Masters students. Mandatory enrollment once prior to graduation.

CE 646. Traffic Engineering Operations. 3 Hours.

Highway and Intersection capacity analysis, traffic signal timing and phasing, coordination, freeway operations, non-signalized traffic control techniques. CE 345 (Transportation Engineering) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 648. Urban and Transportation Planning. 3 Hours.

Land use planning for transportation systems; trip generation, trip distribution, and traffic assignment. CE 345 (Transportation Engineering) or an equivalent is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 649. Engineering Liability. 3 Hours.

Laws related to liability for engineering design in the context of productsliability and construction projects; roles and liabilities between various parties involved in construction projects.

CE 650. Advanced Structural Steel. 3 Hours.

Beams, columns, tension members, and connections; current research. CE 450 (Structural Steel Design) or its equivalent is required.

CE 655. Advanced Reinforced Concrete. 3 Hours.

Beam, column, and slab actions; current research. CE 455 (Reinforced Concrete Design) or its equivalency is required.

CE 658. Engineering Management. 3 Hours.

Management techniques for the practicing engineer.

CE 663. Finite Element Methods. 3 Hours.

Theory and applications in structural mechanics. Plane stress, plane strain, axisymmetric problems, solids, plates, shells, nonlinear systems.

CE 669. Advanced Project Management. 3 Hours.

Skills generally required for sound project management in a variety of management settings are studied in addition to specific management issues typically associated with engineering and construction companies. Students are introduced to the Project Management Institute¿s Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). A discussion of corporate organizational structures and the evolving use of project management processes helps establish an appreciation for the role of a Project Manager. The elements of a project and the role and responsibilities of the Project Manager are studied in depth. Students are also acquainted with risk management concepts, financial, labor, safety, equipment, contracting issues facing managers in the engineering and construction environment. Particular emphasis is placed on individual management strengths and weakness, team building, and characteristics of successful companies. One of the primary vehicles for discussion will be small case studies from real companies and the outside reading of one or two relevant topical books.

CE 670. Const Estimating & Bidding. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: CE 669 [Min Grade: C] and CE 672 [Min Grade: C]

CE 671. Constr Liability & Contracts. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of the fundamental aspects of the laws that affect construction and engineering companies as well as the project owners. Particular emphasis is placed on contract forms and provisions related to liability for engineering design and construction companies, the roles of the typical participation in the process, and dispute resolution. Students will learn the importance of contract language negotiations and the impact of project risk transfer.
Prerequisites: CE 669 [Min Grade: C]

CE 672. Constr Methods and Equipment. 3 Hours.

This course provides students a big-picture understanding of the construction methods employed to bring the concepts and designs of architects and engineers to physical reality. The International Building Code is presented in the course material as are the fundamental principles of green building and sustainable design. Detailed study of typical building materials, design details and construction methods are presented in a logical sequence. Students will understand the planning and deployment of equipment, materials, labor, and subcontractors using a variety of building material and system types. This course provides a necessary baseline knowledge vocabulary and understanding of the role and activities of the designers, engineers, material suppliers, inspectors and constructors in the commercial building process.
Prerequisites: CE 669 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

CE 673. Construction Contracting Bidding and Estimating. 3 Hours.

This course provides students a big-picture understanding of the construction methods employed to bring the concepts and designs of architects and engineers to physical reality. The International Building Code is presented in the course material as are the fundamental principles of green building and sustainable design. Detailed study of typical building materials, design details and construction methods are presented in a logical sequence. Students will understand the planning and deployment of equipment, materials, labor, and subcontractors using a variety of building material and system types. This course provides a necessary baseline knowledge vocabulary and understanding of the role and activities of the designers, engineers, material suppliers, inspectors and constructors in the commercial building process.
Prerequisites: CE 670 [Min Grade: C] and CE 672 [Min Grade: C]

CE 674. Green Bldg Desgn/Construction. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the emerging trends in green building sustainable design and construction. The Course will include instruction suitable to prepare students for the Leadership in Energy and Environmental (LEED©) Green Building Rating System certification exam.
Prerequisites: CE 670 [Min Grade: C] and CE 672 [Min Grade: C]

CE 675. Fundamentals of Financial & Managerial Accounting for Non-Financial Managers. 3 Hours.

This course provides an extensive overview of financial and managerial accounting concepts for non-financial managers. Students will learn the basic elements of accounting (Generally Accepted Accounting Practices). They will understand how typical financial records and financial statements are established for companies. Once the basics are understood, students will study how financial data is used for internal cost controlling, planning, and budgeting. Fundamental financial calculations associated with the time value of money, debt instruments, taxes, inflation, and cash flow estimates are emphasized. Students will be expected to demonstrate proficiency in the use of Excel business functions in solving financial problems.
Prerequisites: CE 670 [Min Grade: C] and CE 673 [Min Grade: C]

CE 676. Construction Project Risk Management. 3 Hours.

This course addresses the methodologies employed in the engineering and construction industries to assist in rational decision making in the face of uncertainty. The course reviews the fundamentals of common probabilistic theories and models, data sampling, hypothesis testing and the basics of Bayesian Decision Theory. In addition, basic financial analysis tools will be reviewed. Theoretical models will then be applied to specific examples encountered in engineering and construction decision making with emphasis on engineering economics applications.
Prerequisites: CE 669 [Min Grade: C]

CE 677. Construction Acct & Finance. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to some of the particular accounting needs, practices and methods unique to construction companies. Students will understand the details of budget preparation, cost tracking and reporting systems. Emphasis is placed on understanding the importance of linking detailed project planning, scheduling with cost accounting and reporting in the management of individual construction projects and the company as a whole. A broad overview of financial management of construction companies and the specific tools used to operate the enterprise are discussed. Business planning, financing and contracting strategies suitable for a cyclical demand industry are discussed.
Prerequisites: CE 669 [Min Grade: C]

CE 678. Constr Bus Sys & Info Tech. 3 Hours.

The use of information management systems design and construction operations is studied in detail. Emerging technology and state-of-the-art equipment and software will be discussed. The importance of information technology and equipment, and benefit cost tradeoffs for different company and project sizes will be discussed and investigated by students. A large portion of the course effort is the student group investigative topical research project and oral presentation.
Prerequisites: CE 669 [Min Grade: C]

CE 679. Constr Methods-Detail & Finish. 3 Hours.

This course is an extension of the concepts and technical terminology introduced in Construction Methods and Equipment. Topics explored in this course include green design/sustainable construction, finishing systems, windows and cladding, HVAC/plumbing, and roofing. The International Building Code will be examined, as well as fundamental engineering design, and construction methods. Upon completion, students will be better equipped to read and understand drawings and specifications, necessary skills for detailed estimating of cost and time.
Prerequisites: CE 672 [Min Grade: C]

CE 680. CM Capstone Studies. 3 Hours.

Students review case studies involving project planning and risk assessment; or individual topical study, case studies emphasizing project control and coordination; or individual topical study, case studies emphasizing technology advancements in construction methods and project management; or individual topical study.
Prerequisites: CE 669 [Min Grade: C] and CE 670 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

CE 681. Environmental Chemistry. 3 Hours.

Chemical equilibrium, acid/base, chemical concepts in pollutant behavior. Chemical kinetics, redox system, hydrolysis, pesticides, chemical wastes.

CE 682. Water Treatment Engineering. 3 Hours.

Water sources and characteristics. Design and operations of water treatment facilities. Including lime softening operations, co-agulation, flocculation, clarification dissolved air flotation, filtration, disinfection, absorption, ion exchange and sludge management.

CE 683. Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes Lab. 3 Hours.

Construction and evaluation of bench-scale treatment processes. Treatability of water and wastewater. Coagulation of sedimentation, settleability of biological sludge, aerobic biological treatment, chemical treatment, water softening toxicity, disinfection, and sludge treatment processes.

CE 684. Construction Project Admin. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the important business, legal, and management aspects of construction management with emphasis on administrative procedures. The course is an extension of Advanced Project Management concepts with specific focus on the construction management issues facing owners, engineers, constructors, architects, and students to include the international business environment.
Prerequisites: CE 669 [Min Grade: C]

CE 685. Engineering Hydrology. 3 Hours.

Hydrologic principles including hydrologic cycle, precipitation data, and stream-flow measurements. Applications to engineering problems; stream-flow analysis and watershed management. A grade of C or better in CE 337 (Hydraulics) or its equivalency is required.

CE 686. Engineering Hydrogeology. 3 Hours.

Groundwater movement, natural quality, contamination, and restoration. Physical and chemical properties of groundwater. Well hydraulics and flow net analyses. Prevention and control of groundwater contamination. CE 485 (Engineering Hydraulics) and MA 252 (Differential Equations) are required.

CE 687. Stormwater Detention Pond Design. 3 Hours.

Stormwater problems and control methods. Urban hydrology prediction procedures for drainage and water quality studies. Detention pond design basics, limitations and multiple benefits.

CE 688. Strategic Management and Leadership Applications in a Global Environment. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to prepare students to face the demanding management and leadership challenges facing construction and engineering industry leaders as competition becomes ever more globalized. The necessity to personally remain trained and relevant in the changing business environment is emphasized. Strong resume writing and oral interview skills are emphasized as a necessary skill for job seekers as well as job providers. Strategic planning, management and leadership in the built environment requires savvy leaders with exceptionally developed analytical and communications skills suitable for multi-disciplinary and multi-national ventures. Every individual and organization must continually innovate and reinvent to stay competitive. In a competitive environment, a strong working knowledge of the financial markets is essential and students are exposed to multiple lessons presented by financial industry practitioners. Students participate in a group project designed to reinforce the methodology associated with preparing and presenting a dynamic business plan. This course will provide the opportunity for students to discuss and research these concepts and to recognize the necessity to think independently, challenge conventional thinking, and visualize alternatives.
Prerequisites: CE 669 [Min Grade: C]

CE 689. Building Information modeling (BIM) Techniques. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an overview of the evolution of BIM technology in the construction industry followed by hands-on training in the basic application of contemporary BIM software. Students will learn basic modeling skills and how to produce graphical presentations. Advanced applications of BIM technology will be discussed and demonstrated. Students will be provided with BIM software and will be required to complete a multi-step BIM model as a term project.
Prerequisites: CE 669 [Min Grade: C]

CE 690. Special Topics in (Area). 1-3 Hour.

Special Topics (Area).

CE 691. Individual Study in (Area). 1-4 Hour.

Individual Study (Area).

CE 692. CE Capstone Project. 3 Hours.

This course covers specific contemporary topics related to civil engineering practice and knowledge. Capstone project using case studies to apply skills, knowledge, techniques, and concepts developed in prior courses.

CE 693. Applied Research in CEE. 3-9 Hours.

Research tools, including elements of experimental design and proposal preparation. Effective communication, literature searches, and exploratory data analysis. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CE 694. Sustainable Construction. 3 Hours.

Provides students an understanding of the interdependencies between planning, designing, building, operating, and demolishing the built environment and their impacts on the natural environment. Course topics will include: (1) Issues of recourse efficiency, economics, ethics, waste, human health, environmental justice, and industrial ecology; (2) Alternative practices that significantly reduce adverse environmental impacts of built infrastructure, and (3) Explore past and present thinking of engineering practitioners in this newly emerging discipline.

CE 695. International Construction Contracts/Liability. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of the fundamental aspects of the law that affects construction and engineering companies as well as the project owners. Particular emphasis is placed on contract forms and provisions related to liability for engineering design and construction companies, the roles of the typical participation in the process, and dispute resolution.

CE 697. Master's Project. 3-9 Hours.

A UAB Master's Project must demonstrate evidence of scholarly study and writing that ultimately contributes to the scientific knowledge base. This course is designed to allow students the opportunity to develop original ideas or seek to advance knowledge through theory, conceptualization, design, testing of tools, instruments, or procedures relevant to the practice of civil engineering.

CE 698. Non-Thesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

CE 699. Thesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

Prerequisites: GAC M

CE 712. Theory of Elasticity. 3 Hours.

Equations of linear reduction to plane stress, plane strain, and generalized plane strain. Airy and love stress functions in solution of problems.

CE 715. Theory of Elastic Stability. 3 Hours.

Static stability of bars, beams, trusses, and rigid frames. Dynamic stability of bars. Energy method applied to buckingproblems. General theory of elastic stability.

CE 717. Theory of Plates and Shells. 3 Hours.

Linear theory and solutions of plates of various shapes. Large deflection theory and solutions of rectangular and circular plates. Membrane and bending theories of shells. Solutions of problems in conical, cylindrical,and spherical shell.

CE 721. Transportation Engineering Seminar. 1 Hour.

Seminar focusing on student research and guest presentation of various topics of interest to graduate transportation engineering students.

CE 722. Traffic Flow Theory. 3 Hours.

Microscopic and macroscopic traffic flow characteristics. Traffic flow analytical techniques including car-following models, traffic stream models, shock wave analysis. Queuing analysis and gap acceptance. Simulation models for network analysis.

CE 723. Non-Motorized Transportation Design and Planning. 3 Hours.

Urban planning principles that support non-motorized transportation, local bicycle or pedestrian plans, non-motorized transportation safety related considerations, non-motorized transportation design including traffic calming techniques, procedures for capacity analysis of pedestrian facilities.

CE 724. Simulation Models for Transportation Applications. 3 Hours.

Basic concepts of simulation models for analysis and optimization of transportation systems. Experimentation with planning simulation models and traffic models for signal timing and capacity analysis.

CE 725. Intelligent Transportation Systems. 3 Hours.

Legal, institutional and planning issues related to Intelligent Transportation Systems. System architecture, telecommunication technologies. Advanced User Services, intermodal systems, deployment, cost benefit evaluation.

CE 731. Environmental Law. 3 Hours.

Law as it applies to the practicing environmental engineer. New and emerging regulations.

CE 732. Industrial Waste and Wastewater Treatment. 3 Hours.

Solid wastes and waste waters from various industries; assessment of treatability, system design, and equipment selection.

CE 736. Stormwater Pollution Management. 3 Hours.

Quality and quantity of stormwater. Receiving water problems and sources of pollutants. Runoff quality and quantity characterizations. Erosion control. Selection and design of controls; regulations.

CE 738. Water and Wastewater Chemistry. 3 Hours.

Aquatic chemistry. Chemical behavior of pollutants in receiving waters. Fate of common pollutants. Chemical kinetics in natural waters. Photochemical reactions. Modeling of wastewater discharges.

CE 739. Sediment Sources and Controls. 3 Hours.

Erosion and sediment transport in urban areas, design of common erosion control practices.

CE 740. Wastewater Treatment Engineering. 3 Hours.

Wastewater sources and characteristics. Design and operation of wastewater treatment facilities, including grit removal, oil and grease removal, dissolved air flotation, activated sludge process, trickling filters, and rotating biological contactors, stabilization ponds and aerated lagoons, anaerobic processes for wastewater treatment and sludge digestion. Ultimatedisposal of wastewater residues and considerations of discharge criteria.

CE 741. Civil Engineering Seminar. 1 Hour.

Seminar focusing on guest presentations on various civil and environmental engineering topics of interest for CEE Ph.D. students. Mandatory enrollment at least once prior to graduation.

CE 749. Engineering Liability. 3 Hours.

Laws related to liability for engineering design in the context of productsliability and construction projects; roles and liabilities between various parties involved in construction projects.

CE 750. Advanced Structural Steel. 3 Hours.

Beams, columns, tension members, and connections; current research.

CE 755. Advanced Reinforced Concrete. 3 Hours.

Beam, column, and slab actions; current research.

CE 758. Engineering Management. 3 Hours.

Management techniques for practicing engineers.

CE 763. Finite Element Methods. 3 Hours.

Theory and applications in structural mechanics. Plane stress, plane strain, axisymmetric problems, solids, plates, shells, nonlinear systems.

CE 781. Environmental Chemistry. 3 Hours.

Chemical equilibrium, acid/base, chemical concepts in pollutant behavior. Chemical kinetics, redox system, hydrolysis, pesticides, chemical wastes.

CE 782. Water Treatment Engineering. 3 Hours.

Water sources and characteristics. Design and operation of water treatmentfacilities including lime softening operations, coagulation, flocculation, clarification, dissolved air flotation, filtration, disinfection, absorption, ion exchange, and sluge disposal.

CE 783. Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes Lab. 3 Hours.

Construction and evaluation of bench-scale treatment processes. Treatability of water and wastewater. Coagulation of sedimentation, settleability of biological sludge, aerobic biological treatment, chemical treatment, water softening toxicity, disinfection, and sludge treatment processes.

CE 786. Engineering Hydrogeology. 3 Hours.

Groundwater movement, natural quality, contamination, and restoration. Physical and chemical properties of groundwater. Well hydraulics and flow net analyses. Prevention and control of groundwater contamination.

CE 787. Stormwater Detention Pond Design. 3 Hours.

Stormwater problems and control methods. Urban hydrology prediction procedures for drainage and water quality studies. Detention pond design basics, limitations and multiple benefits.

CE 790. Special Topics in (Area). 1-3 Hour.

Special Topics(In Area).

CE 791. Individual Studies (In Area). 1-4 Hour.

Individual Studies(In Area).

CE 793. Applied Research in Civil and Environmental Eng.. 3 Hours.

Research tools, including elements of experimental design and proposal preparation. Effective communication, literature searches, and exploratorydata analysis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CE 797. Environmental Health Engineering Internship. 6 Hours.

Off-campus internship experience working with industries, utilities or government agencies.

CE 798. Non-Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

CE 799. Dissertation Research. 1-16 Hour.

Prerequisites: GAC D

CECM-Construction Egr Mgmnt Courses

CECM 669. Advanced Project Management. 3 Hours.

Skills generally required for sound project management in a variety of management settings are studied in addition to specific management issues typically associated with engineering and construction companies. Students are introduced to the Project Management Institute¿s Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). A discussion of corporate organizational structures and the evolving use of project management processes helps establish an appreciation for the role of a Project Manager. The elements of a project and the role and responsibilities of the Project Manager are studied in depth. Students are also acquainted with risk management concepts, financial, labor, safety, equipment, contracting issues facing managers in the engineering and construction environment. Particular emphasis is placed on individual management strengths and weakness, team building, and characteristics of successful companies. One of the primary vehicles for discussion will be small case studies from real companies and the outside reading of one or two relevant topical books.

CECM 670. Construction Estimating and Bidding. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of typical construction delivery systems and the planning and contracting associated with each. A broad study of estimating methodology ranging from rough "ball park" estimates to detailed unit pricing is presented focusing on labor, equipment, materials, subcontractors, job conditions, location, overhead and profit. This course is intended to establish a basic understanding of the estimating process; and therefore, substantial course focus will be placed on the term group project.
Prerequisites: (CECM 669 [Min Grade: C] or CE 669 [Min Grade: C])

CECM 671. Construction Liability & Contracts. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of typical construction delivery systems and the planning and contracting associated with each. A broad study of estimating methodology ranging from rough "ball park" estimates to detailed unit pricing is presented focusing on labor, equipment, materials, subcontractors, job conditions, location, overhead and profit. This course is intended to establish a basic understanding of the estimating process; and therefore, substantial course focus will be placed on the term group project.
Prerequisites: (CECM 669 [Min Grade: C] or CE 669 [Min Grade: C]) and (CECM 672 [Min Grade: C] or CE 672 [Min Grade: C])

CECM 672. Construction Methods and Equipment. 3 Hours.

This course provides students a big-picture understanding of the construction methods employed to bring the concepts and designs of architects and engineers to physical reality. The International Building Code is presented in the course material as are the fundamental principles of green building and sustainable design. Detailed study of typical building materials, design details and construction methods are presented in a logical sequence. Students will understand the planning and deployment of equipment, materials, labor, and subcontractors using a variety of building material and system types. This course provides a necessary baseline knowledge vocabulary and understanding of the role and activities of the designers, engineers, material suppliers, inspectors and constructors in the commercial building process.
Prerequisites: CECM 669 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently) or CE 669 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

CECM 673. Project Planning and Control. 3 Hours.

This course provides students a big-picture understanding of the construction methods employed to bring the concepts and designs of architects and engineers to physical reality. The International Building Code is presented in the course material as are the fundamental principles of green building and sustainable design. Detailed study of typical building materials, design details and construction methods are presented in a logical sequence. Students will understand the planning and deployment of equipment, materials, labor, and subcontractors using a variety of building material and system types. This course provides a necessary baseline knowledge vocabulary and understanding of the role and activities of the designers, engineers, material suppliers, inspectors and constructors in the commercial building process.
Prerequisites: (CECM 670 [Min Grade: C] or CE 670 [Min Grade: C]) and (CECM 672 [Min Grade: C] or CE 672 [Min Grade: C])

CECM 674. Green Building Design/Construction. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the emerging trends in green building sustainable design and construction. The Course will include instruction suitable to prepare students for the Leadership in Energy and Environmental (LEED©) Green Building Rating System certification exam.
Prerequisites: (CECM 670 [Min Grade: C] or CE 670 [Min Grade: C]) and (CECM 672 [Min Grade: C] or CE 672 [Min Grade: C])

CECM 675. Advanced Construction and Engineering Economics. 3 Hours.

This course provides an extensive overview of financial and managerial accounting concepts for non-financial managers. Students will learn the basic elements of accounting (Generally Accepted Accounting Practices). They will understand how typical financial records and financial statements are established for companies. Once the basics are understood, students will study how financial data is used for internal cost controlling, planning, and budgeting. Fundamental financial calculations associated with the time value of money, debt instruments, taxes, inflation, and cash flow estimates are emphasized. Students will be expected to demonstrate proficiency in the use of Excel business functions in solving financial problems.
Prerequisites: (CECM 670 [Min Grade: C] or CE 670 [Min Grade: C]) and (CECM 672 [Min Grade: C] or CE 672 [Min Grade: C])

CECM 676. Construction Project Risk Management. 3 Hours.

This course addresses the methodologies employed in the engineering and construction industries to assist in rational decision making in the face of uncertainty. The course reviews the fundamentals of common probabilistic theories and models, data sampling, hypothesis testing and the basics of Bayesian Decision Theory. In addition, basic financial analysis tools will be reviewed. Theoretical models will then be applied to specific examples encountered in engineering and construction decision making with emphasis on engineering economics applications.
Prerequisites: (CECM 669 [Min Grade: C] or CE 669 [Min Grade: C]) and (CECM 673 [Min Grade: C] or CE 673 [Min Grade: C])

CECM 677. Construction Accounting and Finance. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to some of the particular accounting needs, practices and methods unique to construction companies. Students will understand the details of budget preparation, cost tracking and reporting systems. Emphasis is placed on understanding the importance of linking detailed project planning, scheduling with cost accounting and reporting in the management of individual construction projects and the company as a whole. A broad overview of financial management of construction companies and the specific tools used to operate the enterprise are discussed. Business planning, financing and contracting strategies suitable for a cyclical demand industry are discussed.

CECM 688. Strategic Management and Leadership Applications in a Global Environment. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to prepare students to face the demanding management and leadership challenges facing construction and engineering industry leaders as competition becomes ever more globalized. The necessity to personally remain trained and relevant in the changing business environment is emphasized. Strong resume writing and oral interview skills are emphasized as a necessary skill for job seekers as well as job providers. Strategic planning, management and leadership in the built environment requires savvy leaders with exceptionally developed analytical and communications skills suitable for multi-disciplinary and multi-national ventures. Every individual and organization must continually innovate and reinvent to stay competitive. In a competitive environment, a strong working knowledge of the financial markets is essential and students are exposed to multiple lessons presented by financial industry practitioners. Students participate in a group project designed to reinforce the methodology associated with preparing and presenting a dynamic business plan. This course will provide the opportunity for students to discuss and research these concepts and to recognize the necessity to think independently, challenge conventional thinking, and visualize alternatives.
Prerequisites: CE 669 [Min Grade: C] or CECM 669 [Min Grade: C]

CECM 689. Building Information Modeling (BIM) Techniques. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an overview of the evolution of BIM technology in the construction industry followed by hands-on training in the basic application of contemporary BIM software. Students will learn basic modeling skills and how to produce graphical presentations. Advanced applications of BIM technology will be discussed and demonstrated. Students will be provided with BIM software and will be required to complete a multi-step BIM model as a term project.
Prerequisites: CECM 669 [Min Grade: C] or CE 669 [Min Grade: C]

CESC-Sustainable Smart Cities Courses

CESC 600. Principles of Sustainable Development. 3 Hours.

The course will begin by discussing the concepts, viewpoints and fundamentals essential for understanding urban sustainable development agenda. This will be followed by the evaluation of international conferences and action items proposed by the scientific / professional community to advance sustainable smart cities development. You will review basic earth sciences to better evaluate the impact our anthropogenic activities have on the natural environment and therefore how to minimize adverse future outcomes. Throughout the course case studies of sustainable developments will be used to illustrate the value, challenges and limitations of this concept. In the end, you will possess the knowledge base needed to help advance sustainable smart cities development.

CESC 602. Introduction to Sustainable Smart Cities. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the issues surrounding sustainable development within cities and explores how the smart city concept can contribute to the urban sustainable development agenda. The course begins by considering the key characteristics of contemporary urbanization and the issues and challenges that these present for sustainability and urban environmental management. The meaning and nature of sustainability for cities will be discussed, followed by a consideration of the definitions of a smart city and a discussion of the key elements of a smart city including its contribution to both urban governance and the more effective and efficient management of natural resources. With reference to case studies the final part of the course will explore and evaluate the role that smart city processes and applications can play in enhancing the social, economic and environmental aspects of sustainable development within urban areas.

CESC 604. Low-Carbon and Renewable Energy Systems for Smart Cities. 3 Hours.

As the energy infrastructure is arguably the most important feature in any city energy efficiency and integration of renewable energy sources within urban areas are central to the smart city concept. This course will firstly explore why there is a need for the greater use of low carbon and renewable energy systems within cities, followed by an introduction to the range of low carbon and renewable energy technologies currently available. The course will then move on to introduce the concept of the smart grid and then explore the potential to integrate low carbon and renewable energy systems into smart grids in order to move towards cost-effective, efficient and more environmentally friendly energy provision within cities. Challenges and issues associated with the greater integration of low carbon and renewable energy systems into energy infrastructure within large urban areas will also be considered.

CESC 606. Managing Natural Resources and Sustainable Smart Cities. 3 Hours.

The course examines the challenges of resource use and management within the context of an urbanizing world, exploring how new concepts within the smart and sustainable city agenda may contribute to addressing these challenges. The course begins by considering contemporary patterns of resource use created by cities in the modern world at a variety of scales from the local to the global. New approaches in the form of ecosystem services and urban metabolism in relation to natural resource management are examined in terms of their contribution to developing a smart and sustainable city agenda. The course continues by exploring a selection of key natural resources challenges (e.g. water, energy, air quality and climate) and the development of new management approaches and strategies in these areas. The course concludes by examining the development of integrated environmental management systems and governance structures within which these new approaches can be implemented with reference to a series of case studies.

CESC 608. Green Infrastructure and Transportation. 3 Hours.

The course will begin by discussing the concepts, viewpoints and fundamentals essential for understanding green infrastructure development [namely the (re)development of natural and semi natural areas within an urban district] and sustainable transportation planning. Discussions will then focus on how; (i) the mixed ecosystems resulting from the development of green infrastructure can be utilized to support enhanced human occupation of the urban environment while taking advantage of passive / natural alternatives and (ii) approaches such as walkability, smart location, compact development and mixed land use development can contribute to sustainable transportation planning in cities. Course case studies of green infrastructure project outcomes (job creation, enhance property valuation, aesthetics, etc.) and sustainable transportation planning will be used to illustrate the value, challenges and limitations to green infrastructure and sustainable transport planning. In the end, students will possess an expanded knowledge base needed to help advance the development of sustainable smart cities.

CESC 610. Health and Liveability. 3 Hours.

This course will address the multidisciplinary aspects of urban environmental quality and its impact on human well-being. It will provide a critical appreciation of the factors which influence health, well-being and quality of life within contemporary urban environments, demonstrate the importance of genomics and health informatics in developing strategies for improving the health and well-being of urban citizens, explore the importance of urban design and the contribution of the development of food smart cities in improving both urban health and liveability, and understand the increasingly important role of ICT in facilitating delivery of effective and responsive urban health, well-being and quality of life strategies.

CESC 612. Green Buildings. 3 Hours.

The course will begin by discussing the concepts, viewpoints and fundamentals essential for understanding green building and construction. Discussions will then be focused on how key stakeholders and their future collaborations can begin to incorporate sustainable construction practices for the betterment of the project (new construction and inventory rehabilitation). This will be followed by the evaluation of sustainable construction rating systems (LEED, BREEAM, etc.) and how they can be applied to occupied buildings throughout an urban environment. Modular case studies of sustainable construction projects (individual structures to entire community developments) will be used to illustrate the value, challenges and limitations of this concept. In the end, students will possess an expanded knowledge base needed to help advance sustainable smart cities development.

CESC 614. Smart Technologies. 3 Hours.

CESC 616. Big Data and Smart Cities. 3 Hours.

The world is becoming increasingly digitally interconnected and this instrumentation, data collection, interconnection, storage, and analysis can provide the capacity to radically transform how cities monitor, manage and enhance their environmental quality and liveability. This course will provide an introduction to what big data is and how it can contribute to the smarter, more sustainable management of cities. The course will begin by discussing the concepts of big data and the big data revolution, and an overview of the ways in which data can be captured, stored and analyzed. This will be followed by a consideration of how big data can be used by city managers to optimize: their use of physical and digital infrastructures; their sustainable use of natural resources; citizen service delivery; and citizen engagement, participation and urban governance. You will also be introduced to some of the challenges presented by big data, both the technological challenges and the ethical and social implications associated with collecting, storing and using big data. Throughout the course case studies of big data in action will be used to illustrate the value, challenges and limitations of big data in the smarter, more sustainable management of cities.

CESC 618. Research Methods and Project Planning. 3 Hours.

As a student of smart city processes and urban environmental management you need to understand the research process which enables you to take the knowledge and skills which you have learned and apply it to a specific urban sustainability / environmental management issue. This course is not intended to provide a training in research techniques, but rather to make you aware of a wide range of investigative and analytical methods and techniques using examples drawn from the areas of smart city approaches, urban sustainability and environmental management. Both quantitative and qualitative methodologies and primary and secondary data collection will be covered. You will be encouraged to reflect on the research process and its outcomes by critiquing research papers written from methodological standpoints. You will then apply this knowledge to create a viable research proposal for your own Sustainable Smart Cities Masters project. This proposal will require you to identify and justify for your chosen topic; (i) appropriate research questions, (ii) methodologies and data sampling / collection techniques, (iii) ethical and health and safety implications and, (iv) a timetable of action.

CESC 620. Sustainable Smart Cities Research Project. 3 Hours.

This course will develop skills in both research and technical writing in the area of applying and/or evaluating sustainable smart cities processes and policies to a specific urban environmental or sustainability issue. The research proposal produced as part of the Research Methods and Project Planning course will be implemented. This will involve further research into the relevant background and context of a chosen project topic, implementation and evaluation of appropriate methods for collecting and analyzing data, observations and information, the ability to present findings clearly and concisely, and appreciate their significance in relation to the smart city and sustainable urban management agendas. Research should be at the forefront of student's chosen sustainable smart cities research topic and be at a level similar to that required for acceptance and presentation at a national level conference or symposium on smart and sustainable cities. For students in relevant employment, projects may be carried out in your place of work subject to discussions between you, your employer/line manager, and your project supervisor.

CESE - Structural Engineering Courses

CESE 656. Advanced Mechanics of Materials for Structural Engineering. 3 Hours.

This course will review the basic fundamentals of mechanics of materials and will extend the concepts to include 3 dimensional stress and strain, plastic behavior, energy methods, nonlinear behavior, fatigue and fracture, rectangular linear elastic plates, indeterminate structures and stability.

CESE 657. Advanced Design of Steel Structures. 3 Hours.

Design of major components in steel-framed buildings, including composite beams and slabs, beam-columns, moments connections, bracing members, bracing connections, and column base plates.

CESE 659. Advanced Design of Concrete Structures. 3 Hours.

In this course students will study the behavior and design of continuous reinforced concrete structures submitted to gravity and lateral loads. The study will include biaxial loading of columns, continuous one-way beams and slabs two-way floor systems, and torsion loading.

CESE 660. Prestressed Concrete Behavior and Design. 3 Hours.

The course will explore the characteristics and design of pre-stressed concrete structural components to include elastic and ultimate strength analyses for flexural, shear, torsion, deflection, strand bond, and pre-stress loss.

CESE 662. Advanced Structural Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course explores the structural analysis of indeterminate structures using classical and approximate methods and structural analysis software. Specific emphasis is placed on the determination of forces in typical multistory, rectilinear frames subject to gravity and lateral loads. In addition to first order analysis, the course included analysis for second order effects and plastic analysis.

CESE 664. Bridge Engineering. 3 Hours.

This course includes the study of bridge loads, including moving load analysis; methods for approximate structural analysis, preliminary bridge design methods, and the structural design of bridge decks and girders.

CESE 665. Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering. 3 Hours.

This course includes the study of earthquake-induced vibrations of single and multi-degree-of-freedom systems, such as single and multistory frames. Emphasis will be placed on structural steel and reinforced concrete building frames. Response spectrum analysis will be investigated as well as building codes and static and dynamic lateral load force procedures.

Faculty

Attard, Thomas L., Associate Professor of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, 2014, B.S.C.E (Univ. of Nevada, Reno), M.S.C.E., Ph.D. (Arizona State), Structural engineering, sustainable infrastructure systems, mechanics of sustainable systems
Fouad, Fouad H., Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering; Chair, Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering; Associate Director, University Transportation Center for Alabama, 1981, B.S.C.E. (Alexandria, Egypt), M.S.C.E. (Texas), Ph.D. (Texas A&M), P.E. (Alabama, Texas), Structural Engineering, Reinforced Concrete, Concrete Materials
Gilmer, Dianne, Instructor of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, 2009, B.S. (Samford), MEng-CEM (UAB), Engineering Online Education, Learning Management System Applications, Student Retention in Online Learning Programs
Hitchcock, Wilbur A., Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering; Director of Construction Engineering Management Program, 2005, B.S. (U.S. Military Academy), M.E.C.E., Ph.D. (Texas A&M), Engineering Online Education, Sustainable Structural Design Advances, Infrastructure Resilience
Hosch, Ian E., Assistant Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, 2012, B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E, Ph.D. (UAB), Structural Engineering, Engineering Mechanics, Geotechnical Engineering
Kirby, Jason, Associate Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering; Director, Sustainable Smart Cities Program, 2005, B.S. (Auburn), M.S., Ph.D. (Alabama), Environmental Engineering, Water Resources, Hydraulics
Peters, Robert W., Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, 2001, B.S. (Northwestern), M.S., Ph.D. (Iowa State), P.E. (Indiana and Illinois), Environmental Engineering, Water and Wastewater Treatment, Hazardous Waste Treatment
Segner, E. P. Jr., Professor Emeritus of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1990, B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E. (Texas), Ph.D. (Texas A&M), P.E. (Alabama, Texas, Oklahoma, Tennessee), Engineering Education, Engineering Mechanics, Structural Engineering
Sisiopiku, Virginia P., Associate Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, 2002, B.S. (Aristotelian University of Thessaloniki), M.S., Ph.D. (Illinois-Chicago), Transportation Engineering, Traffic Engineering
Sullivan, Andrew, Assistant Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, 2009, B.S.C.E. (Pennsylvania), M.S.C.E. (UAB), P.E. (Alabama), Transportation Engineering, Traffic Operations
Uddin, Nasim, Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, 2001, B.S. (University of Engineering and Technology, Bangladesh), M.S. (Oklahoma-Norman), Ph.D. (SUNY Buffalo), P.E. (New York), Structural Engineering, Wind and Seismic Loads, Bridge Design
Waldron, Christopher, Assistant Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, 2008, B.S.C.E. (Drexel); M.S.C.E., Ph.D. (Virginia Tech), P.E. (Commonwealth of Pennsylvania), Structural Engineering, Bridge Design, Engineering Mechanics