Advanced Safety Engineering and Management

Prospective students should use this checklist to obtain specific admissions requirements on how to apply to Graduate School.

Note that this program is totally online.

Website: http://www.uab.edu/asem
Degree Offered: MEng
Director: Donald S. Burke, Ph.D.
E-mail: mbidez@uab.edu
Program Manager Randy Cadieux
Phone: (205) 480-9759
E-mail rcadieux@uab.edu

Instructors

The MEng-ASEM graduate program is taught by a team of practicing safety and health professionals with Dr. Donald Burke serving as overall Course Director. Practitioner-Scholars facilitate online discussions on key topics of interest in their industry sector and provide industry-specific case studies. Students participate in peer-to-peer learning activities discussing current topics of interest and real world experiences using on line discussion boards.

Admission

ASEM Admission Requirements Admission to the UAB MEng-ASEM program requires the following:

• Applicants not satisfying the grade point average requirement and/or holding a degree from a nationally accredited school may receive admission on a provisional basis, subject to assessment and recommendation of the program director. To apply, visit the UAB Graduate School’s website (uab.edu/graduate) and click the ‘Apply Now’ button.

Additional Information

Comments: The ASEM program is totally online. There are no campus classes, meetings, or activities. Course delivery includes asynchronous and synchronous learning modes.
Entrance Tests: None
Number of Recommendations Required: Three (including one personal essay and two letters of recommendation, one of which must be from your current, direct supervisor)
Deadline for All Application Materials to be in the Graduate School Office: Six weeks before term begins (see UAB academic calendar - https://www.uab.edu/students/academics/academic-calendar)
Application Submission Deadline for Entry Term(s): Fall: July 1; Spring: November 1; Summer: April 1

For detailed program information, contact:
Randy Cadieux, MS, MEng, Program Manager and Instructor
MEng in Advanced Safety Engineering and Management
UAB School of Engineering, HOEN 101
1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294-4440
Telephone: 205-480-9759
E-mail: asem@uab.edu
Web: http://www.uab.edu/asem

Master of Engineering in Advanced Safety Engineering and Management

If a student earns a grade of C in a course, they must retake that course in order to receive credit. Students must earn a grade of B or higher on the reattempt of the course.

Plan II - 33 hours

RequirementsHours
ASEM 601ASEM Seminar 10
ASEM 610Introduction to System Safety - Prevention through Design3
ASEM 611Hazard Analysis and Waste Elimination3
ASEM 612Engineering Risk3
ASEM 613Human Performance and Engineering Design3
ASEM 614Engineering Ethics and Acceptable Risk3
ASEM 615Leading through Climates of Change3
ASEM 616Policy Issues in Prevention through Design3
ASEM 617Crisis Leadership and Safety-Critical Design3
ASEM 628Electrical Systems Safety3
ASEM 619Capstone Project - Part 13
ASEM 620Capstone Project - Part 23
Total Hours33
1

 Must be taken each semester

Courses

ASEM 601. ASEM Seminar. 0 Hours.

Seminar focusing on student research and guest presentations of various topics of interest to safety and risk management engineers and safety professionals. Live classes in ASEM 601 are held on Sunday from 3:00-4:30 pm CDT. Live class dates will alternate with other ASEM Live classes during this time slot to avoid time conflicts.

ASEM 610. Introduction to System Safety - Prevention through Design. 3 Hours.

Best practice in any business sector requires the pursuit of a triple bottom line - protecting people, planet, and profit. This course provides an overview of system safety in general and Prevention through Design in particular and explores their efficacy in helping companies achieve a bottom line that is socially, environmentally, and financially rewarding. Topics of inquiry include the processes of hazard analysis and risk assessment, the concept of "acceptable" risk, the safety decision hierarchy of controls, safety standards (the mandatory minimum vs. the voluntary best practice), safety as a cost control strategy, and the critical elements of a comprehensive, advanced safety program. Course content is presented within the framework of real-world case studies from a variety of industry sectors, including, but not limited to, manufacturing, utilities, and health care and includes several guest lectures by leaders in the profession. Students apply course content to their own business environment. Guest lecturers from diverse backgrounds will discuss their experiences in managing safety in the workplace. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. Live classes in ASEM 610 are held three times per semester on Sunday from 1:30-3:00pm CDT. Students are expected to attend four live classes in ASEM 601 as well. Course must be taken during the first semester.

ASEM 611. Hazard Analysis and Waste Elimination. 3 Hours.

Hazards have the potential to cause harm to people, planet, and profits. Hazard analysis is a process that begins with the identification of a hazard and proceeds into an estimate of the severity of harm or damage that could result if the potential is realized and a hazard-related incident occurs (ASSE TR-Z790.001 – 2009). This course examines engineering techniques utilized to systematically and logically identify and analyze hazards in the workplace. These techniques include preliminary hazard list (PHL), preliminary hazard analysis (PHA), system hazard analysis (SHA), subsystem hazard analysis (SSHA) and others. Students work in teams to use these techniques to retrospectively analyze a real-world disaster.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B] or EGR 610 [Min Grade: B]

ASEM 612. Engineering Risk. 3 Hours.

Engineering risk is defined both quantitatively and qualitatively as an estimate of the probability that a hazard-related incident will occur and of the severity of harm or damage that could result. This course provides students with tools to assess and reduce safety risks in their own company. These tools include risk assessment matrices, probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) measures, including event tree analysis, fault tree analysis, and other prevention through design concepts. The role of a structured, formalized decision analysis process in preventing serious injuries and fatalities is also explored. Students engage in a risk mitigation decision analysis project, which is specific to their company and/or business sector. Guest lecturers from diverse industries discuss their experiences in assessing and managing risk. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. LiveClasses in ASEM 612 are held three times per semester on Sunday from 1:30-3:00 pm CDT. Students are expected to attend four LiveClasses in ASEM 601 as well.
Prerequisites: (ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B] or EGR 610 [Min Grade: B])

ASEM 613. Human Performance and Engineering Design. 3 Hours.

Companies can miss important opportunities to eliminate waste if they rely primarily on training to prevent human error. This course explores the historical perspective on human error and serious injury. The course material will provide a solid understanding of the principles of occupational biomechanics and human tolerance to injury with focus on human anthropometry and mechanical work capacity. This course also includes studies of human reliability, static analysis of systems in equilibrium and mechanical systems, design and performance. Due to the quantity of back related injuries and related lost time in the workplace, back pain and injury is studied along with the effect of vibration on the human body. Real-world case studies provide for application of the engineering hierarchy of controls: hazard elimination, hazard substitution, engineering controls, warnings, administrative behavior controls, and personal protective equipment. The course also examines the design aspects of ergonomics, the biomechanical engineering basis of injury prevention, and the long term economic consequences of seemingly minor injuries. In semester projects, students perform incident investigations using biomechanical and other data. After gathering and analyzing data to determine injury causation, they will identify and re-design error-provocative environments in their own workplaces. Guest lecturers from diverse backgrounds will discuss their experiences with human performance and/or biomechanics. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. Live Classes in ASEM-613 are held 3 times per semester on Sunday from 1:30-3:00 pm CDT. Students are expected to attend 4 Live Classes in ASEM-601 as well.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B]

ASEM 614. Engineering Ethics and Acceptable Risk. 3 Hours.

This course explores the economic, social, and political consequences of safety risk and considers provocative real world dilemmas: What is acceptable risk? Are the fundamental canons of engineering ethics contrary to the concept of acceptable risk? What is the worth of human life? Students will conduct critical reviews of corporate safety and ethics policies from market leaders in all major industries as well as their own company. Real-world case studies provide the framework for exercises in resolving conflicts of interest and avoiding the dilemma of "whistle blowing." Guest lecturers from diverse backgrounds will discuss their experiences with ethics in the workplace. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. Live Classes in ASEM-614 are held 3 times per semester on Sunday from 3:00-4:30 pm CDT. Students are expected to attend 4 Live Classes in ASEM-601 as well.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently)

ASEM 615. Leading through Climates of Change. 3 Hours.

All progressive companies are moving toward greater sustainability - protecting people, planet, and profits. To guide their companies through these changes and integrate safety into the priorities at the executive level, safety engineers and professionals must have strong leadership skills. This course explores engineering leadership best practices, including the eight steps of transformational leadership - creating a sense of urgency, creating a guiding coalition, developing a vision and strategies, communicating the vision, empowering broad-based action, generating short term wins, consolidating gains and anchoring the culture. This course also explores the concept of Resilience Engineering and helps students understand the impacts of socio-technical risks. Guest lecturers from diverse industries discuss their experiences in managing change in today's global business environment. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. Live Classes in ASEM-615 are held three times per semester on Sunday from 3:00-4:30 pm CDT. Students are expected to attend four Live Classes in ASEM-601 as well.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B]

ASEM 616. Policy Issues in Prevention through Design. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of best practices in four major policy areas: (1) cost-benefit analysis; (2) corporate culture and the "HR Department"; (3) standards, codes, and regulations; and (4) strategic alliance development. Case studies are used to illuminate both the role of engineers and other safety professionals in shaping public policy on the local, national and international levels and the ethical challenges they encounter. The significance of an organization's corporate culture in developing and implementing advanced safety management plans is also explored. Students conduct "gap analyses" of their company's policies by comparing them to best practices and identifying unintended consequences of poor safety policy in their own business and industry sector. Students will engage in discussion board posts on contemporary policy issues and participate in exercises related to federal rulemaking. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. Guest lecturers from diverse backgrounds will discuss their experiences with policy issues. Live Classes in ASEM-616 are held three times per semester on Sunday from 3:00-4:30 pm CDT. Students are expected to attend four Live Classes in ASEM-601 as well.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B]

ASEM 617. Crisis Leadership and Safety-Critical Design. 3 Hours.

Unique technical and leadership skills are required to avert or manage a crisis. This course teaches students those skills in an experiential learning environment. Case studies of real-world industrial and environmental disasters provide the framework for exploring critical human-machine interfaces; crisis communication; coping with people in recovery and developing and implementing a business continuity response. Students will engage in discussion board posts and develop a Business Impact Analysis report for their work environment or business unit. Guest lecturers from diverse backgrounds will discuss their experiences in managing crisis events. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. Live Classes in ASEM-617 are held three times per semester on Sunday from 3:00-4:30 pm CDT. Students are expected to attend four Live Classes in ASEM-601 as well.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B]

ASEM 619. Capstone Project - Part 1. 3 Hours.

Bringing to bear the competencies acquired through the program, students develop a proposal, outline, schedule and rough draft of a comprehensive, advanced safety engineering and management plan for their business unit/specialty area that is consistent with the ANSI/AIHA Z10-2005, Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems standard. Judicious selection of the Capstone topic and of projects throughout the ASEM curriculum allows students to build on and use earlier course products to support their Capstone report. Live participation in a quarterly 1.25 hour online forum is required. Must be taken during the penultimate or final semester.
Prerequisites: (ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B] or EGR 610 [Min Grade: B]) and (ASEM 611 [Min Grade: B] or EGR 611 [Min Grade: B]) and (ASEM 612 [Min Grade: B] or EGR 612 [Min Grade: B]) and (ASEM 613 [Min Grade: B] or EGR 613 [Min Grade: B]) and (ASEM 614 [Min Grade: B] or EGR 614 [Min Grade: B]) and (ASEM 615 [Min Grade: B] or EGR 615 [Min Grade: B]) and ASEM 616 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently) or EGR 616 [Min Grade: B]) and (ASEM 617 [Min Grade: B] or EGR 617 [Min Grade: B]) and ASEM 618 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently) or EGR 618 [Min Grade: B] or ASEM 628 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently)

ASEM 620. Capstone Project - Part 2. 3 Hours.

Students complete the development of their comprehensive, advanced safety engineering and management (ASEM) plan, including background information of the project, an ASEM plan (management and employee participation, planning, implementation and operation, evaluation and corrective action and management review), and rollout strategy. Students must submit completed report with detailed attachments, and orally present project highlights to the class in a live online classroom setting. Live participation in a quarterly 1.25 hour online forum is required.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 611 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 612 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 613 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 614 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 615 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 616 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 617 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 618 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently) or ASEM 628 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently)

ASEM 628. Electrical Systems Safety. 3 Hours.

There is a subset of occupational hazards characterized as low frequency, but with very high consequence (potential for catastrophic loss, fatality or permanent disabling injury). A mishap involving unintentional exposure or contact with electrical energy is one of the low frequency/high consequence exposures. We live in an electrical world, with electrical hazards embedded in nearly every aspect of daily living – at home, at work, in public places, and in recreational activities. This course explores hazards, risks and context of electrical mishaps coupled with a systems safety engineering approach to manage the risks. Course content is presented within the framework of real-world case studies from a variety of industry sectors, including, but not limited to, manufacturing, utilities, and health care and includes several guest lectures by leaders in the profession. Students apply course content to their own business environment. Live Classes in ASEM-628 are held three times per semester on Sunday from 3:00-4:30 pm CDT. Students are expected to attend four Live Classes in ASEM-601 as well.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B] or EGR 610 [Min Grade: B]

ASEM 690. Special Topics in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Special Topic.

ASEM 691. Individual Study in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Individual study.

Faculty

Burke, Donald S. , Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering; Program Director, Advanced Safety Engineering and Management Program; Track Leader, Advanced Safety Engineering, Interdisciplinary Engineering PhD Program, 2013, B.S., Ph.D. (UAB)
Cadieux, Randy E., Instructor of Engineering; Program Manager of Advanced Safety Engineering and Management Program, 2012, BA (New Hampshire), MS (Capitol College), MEng-ASEM (UAB)
Etterer, Judith, MSPH, Adjunct Professor; Staff Assistant, BS (UNA), MSPH (UAB), Mine Safety and Health Administration
Floyd II, H. Landis, PE, CSP, CMRP, CRL Fellow IEEE, Adjunct Professor and Principal Consultant, Electrical Safety Group, Inc., retired from DuPont as Principal Consultant Electrical Safety and Technology & Global Electrical Safety Competency Leader, B.S. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University)
Shivers, Charles H., Professor and Associate Director of Advanced Safety Engineering Management Program, 2017, BS (Auburn), ME (Texas A&M), PhD (UA Huntsville)
Silver, Carla, CSP, Adjunct Professor; Safety Engineer, Merck, 2017, BS (Atlantic Christian College), MEng-ASEM (UAB)