The UAB Undergraduate Academic Experience

Shared Vision for a UAB Graduate

The Shared Vision for a UAB Graduate reflects high expectations in the areas of Communication, Knowledge, Problem-Solving, and Citizenship.

Communication - A UAB graduate

  • Participates effectively in the world of ideas and information.
  • Reads with comprehension, attention to detail, and an awareness of context, tone, and interconnections with other texts, life experiences, and public events.
  • Writes correctly and effectively in response to specific needs and for diverse audiences and contexts.
  • Speaks effectively as determined by audience, setting, and circumstances.
  • Uses information technology effectively for professional communication.

 

Knowledge - A UAB graduate

  • Possesses a depth and breadth of knowledge sufficient for informed decision-making.
  • Demonstrates substantial knowledge in a disciplinary major.
  • Differentiates among methodologies, major ideas and figures, and specific information or issues relevant to the sciences and humanities.
  • Uses effectively the technology appropriate for one’s discipline.

 

Problem-Solving - A UAB graduate

  • Collects and evaluates data and analyzes complex issues, using appropriate methods.
  • Demonstrates critical thinking skills by synthesizing information, making reasonable arguments, and arriving at logical conclusions.
  • Demonstrates quantitative reasoning by interpreting data in multiple formats and applying quantitative methods to solve complex problems.
  • Demonstrates the ability to achieve goals through collaboration.

 

Citizenship - A UAB graduate

  • Is aware of contemporary issues and prepared to engage responsibly in the community.
  • Understands civic responsibility and engages in informed decision-making with respect to social and political issues.
  • Recognizes that values and ethics are integral to one’s academic, personal, and professional life.
  • Respects the significant role of diversity in the contemporary world.

 

The Shared Vision for a UAB Graduate is achieved through the UAB Undergraduate Academic Experience, which begins with the first year experience and the core curriculum; continues with major courses, elective courses, and perhaps courses required for a minor or certificate; and culminates in a capstone experience.

First Year Experience

Every UAB first year student will share a common foundation for learning, whatever their majors or professional goals. This common foundation is found in the Discussion Book and the First Year Experience (FYE) course.

Discussion Book

Since 2005, UAB has selected an annual UAB Discussion Book as one focal point for uniting the students, faculty, and staff of this research extensive campus. The Discussion Book always has literary merit, raises complex ethical questions, is relevant to contemporary social issues, and broadens the reader's understanding of diversity in a meaningful way. It also serves as a means to introduce entering freshmen to the concept of difficult dialogues and learning outcomes central to our goals for undergraduate education.

Students are able to purchase the book at the Barnes & Noble UAB Bookstore during New Student Orientation. The day before fall classes begin, President Garrison welcomes all new students into the UAB family. After a presentation usually by the discussion book author, students participate in small group discussions facilitated by the President, Provost, deans, chairs, faculty, and staff of UAB.

The UAB Discussion Book is the focus of a monthly Discussion Book Dialogue series, off-campus events, and various campus activities scheduled during the following academic year. Developed as part of UAB's Quality Enhancement Plan, the UAB Discussion Book project promotes civic engagement, respectful dialogue about often controversial issues, and more knowledgeable participation in a diverse global society.

First Year Experience Course Requirement

Students entering UAB with fewer than 24 hours of college credit must enroll in and pass a first year experience (FYE) course in their first 24 credit hours at UAB.

FYE courses are the gateway to undergraduate education at UAB. FYE courses improve student success by helping to bridge the gap between high school experiences and university expectations and enhance successful progress towards graduation by establishing the foundations for academic achievement and holistic development. FYE courses include:

  • Freshman Learning Communities
  • UNIV 101 The University Experience
  • School or Department focused FYE courses, which are the required option for certain majors (check catalog requirements).

Core Curriculum Requirements 

Sometimes called general education courses, the core curriculum is a selection of required and elective courses that together promote six competencies which build the foundation for attainment of the Shared Vision for a UAB Graduate. 

A graduating student should be able to demonstrate the following core competencies:

  • Reading and writing skills sufficient to ensure access to information and ideas in the institution’s curriculum as well as in society at large.
  • An ability to make aesthetic judgments in the arts, literature, and humanities based on relevant historical, social, or philosophical contexts.
  • The ability to collect and evaluate information within the context of the scientific method and to use this ability to further one’s understanding of the natural world.
  • The ability to apply mathematical skills and quantitative reasoning to solve problems and interpret information.
  • The ability to reason and evaluate information within the context of the social and behavioral sciences and to use this ability to further one’s understanding of the social, economic, and political environment.
  • Knowledge of contemporary and/or historical issues.

Who is required to fulfill the Core Curriculum Requirements?

  • First time college freshmen who have no credit for college work (excepting credit earned while still enrolled in high school).
  • Those returning UAB students or transfer students who are enrolling as a degree student after an absence from college of more than 12 months.
  • Students who enrolled for the first time in any institution of higher education in Fall 1998 or later and who subsequently transferred to the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Any student with a valid articulation contract from an Alabama two-year school will be able to enroll under the terms of the contract. Contracts prior to Fall 1998 must have been submitted to UAB’s Office of Admission according to the procedures in place at the time.

Since Fall Term 2000, all undergraduate students entering UAB have been subject to the 1998 Core Curriculum requirements.

Can One Satisfy Core Curriculum Requirements with Alternative Credit?

Students may satisfy certain Core Curriculum requirements by presenting credit earned through the following: Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), College Level Examination Program (CLEP), and Credit by Examination (CBE). Students with AP, IB, or CLEP credit must have official documents sent to the Office of Enrollment Management, ATTN: Alternative Credit, 1605 Building, 1605 11th Avenue South, (205) 934-5503, for evaluation and acceptance before credit can be posted on the UAB transcript. 

What Courses Satisfy Core Curriculum Requirements?

Core curriculum requirements are divided into four areas, and all students must fulfill requirements in each area. Specific school restrictions for each area are listed below the description of the Core Curriculum Requirements. See the appropriate section in this catalog for specific major requirements in each area.

Core CurriculumHours
Area I. Written Composition 6 hours

Effective written communication skills are essential in a literate society. Requirements include six semester hours in written composition. UAB students must complete EH 101 English Composition I and EH 102 English Composition II with the grade of C or better within their first 30 hours or as soon as possible thereafter.

RequirementsHours
EH 101English Composition I3
EH 102English Composition II3

 

Area II. Humanities and Fine Arts 12 hours

Study in the humanities addresses the ability to deal with questions of values, ethics, or aesthetics as they are represented in literature, philosophy, religion, and the arts, and is fundamental to general education. Requirements include at least 12 semester hours in humanities with a minimum of three semester hours in literature, three semester hours in the fine arts, and the remaining hours from the humanities and/or fine arts. In addition to literature, disciplines in the humanities include, but are not limited to, philosophy, religious studies, speech, foreign languages, art, music, theatre, and dance. As part of the common Core Curriculum, students must complete a six-semester hour sequence either in literature (Area II) or in history (Area IV).

The following courses satisfy Area II of the Core Curriculum:

RequirementsHours
AAS 200Introduction to African-American Studies3
ARA 101Introductory Arabic I3
ARA 102Introductory Arabic II3
ARH 101The Art Experience3
ARH 203Ancient and Medieval Art3
ARH 204Renaissance through Modern Art3
ARH 206Survey of Asian Art3
CHI 101Introductory Chinese I3
CHI 102Introductory Chinese II3
CMST 101Public Speaking3
EH 216Introduction to Literature3
EH 217World Literature I: Before 16603
EH 218World Literature II: 1660-Present3
EH 221British and Irish Literature I: Before 18003
EH 222British and Irish Literature II: 1800-Present3
EH 223American Literature I: Before 18653
EH 224American Literature II: 1865-Present3
FLL 120Foreign Cultures3
FLL 220Foreign Literatures in English Translation3
FR 101Introductory French I4
FR 102Introductory French II4
FR 108Introductory Intensive French4
FR 201Intermediate French I3
FR 202Intermediate French II3
GN 101Introductory German I4
GN 102Introductory German II4
GN 201Intermediate German I3
GN 202Intermediate German II3
GN 204Readings in German Literature3
ITL 101Introductory Italian I3
ITL 102Introductory Italian II3
JPA 101Introductory Japanese I3
JPA 102Introductory Japanese II3
MU 120Music Appreciation3
PHL 100Introduction to Philosophy3
PHL 115Contemporary Moral Issues3
PHL 116Bioethics3
PHL 120Practical Reasoning3
PHL 125Introduction to Ethics3
PHL 203Philosophy of Religion3
SPA 101Introductory Spanish I /QL4
SPA 102Introductory Spanish II4
SPA 108Introductory Intensive Spanish4
SPA 201Intermediate Spanish I3
SPA 202Intermediate Spanish II3
THR 100Introduction to the Theatre3
THR 105Introduction to Dance3
THR 200Plays on Film3

 

Area III. Natural Sciences and Mathematics 11 hours

Study in the natural sciences and mathematics emphasizes the scientific method and applies quantitative or inductive reasoning. Requirements include at least 11 semester hours with at least three semester hours in mathematics at the pre-calculus algebra level or higher and at least eight semester hours in the natural sciences. All courses in the natural sciences must include laboratory experiences. Disciplines in the natural sciences include, but are not limited to, astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, and physics. UAB students must take the required three semester hours in mathematics within their first 60 hours or as soon as possible thereafter.

The following courses satisfy Area III of the Core Curriculum:

RequirementsHours
AST 101
  & AST 111
Astronomy of the Universe
   and Astronomy of the Universe Laboratory
4
AST 102
  & AST 112
Astronomy of Stellar Systems
   and Astronomy of Stellar Systems Laboratory
4
AST 103
  & AST 113
Astronomy of the Solar System
   and Astronomy of the Solar Systems Laboratory
4
AST 105
  & AST 115
Extraterrestrial Life
   and Extraterrestrial Life Laboratory
4
BY 101
  & BY 102
Topics in Contemporary Biology
   and Topics Contemporary Biology Laboratory
4
BY 111
  & BY 112
Extended Topics in Contemporary Biology
   and Ext Topics Contemporary Biology Laboratory
4
BY 123Introductory Biology I4
BY 124Introductory Biology II4
CH 105
  & CH 106
Introductory Chemistry I
   and Introductory Chemistry I Laboratory
4
CH 107
  & CH 108
Introductory Chemistry II
   and Introductory Chemistry II Laboratory
4
CH 115
  & CH 116
General Chemistry I
   and General Chemistry I Laboratory
4
CH 117
  & CH 118
General Chemistry II
   and General Chemistry II Laboratory
4
ENV 108
  & ENV 109
Human Population and the Earth s Environment
   and Laboratory in Environmental Science
4
ES 101
  & ES 102
Physical Geology
   and Physical Geology Laboratory
4
ES 103
  & ES 104
History of the Earth
   and History of the Earth Laboratory
4
MA 105Pre-Calculus Algebra3
MA 106Pre-Calculus Trigonometry3
MA 107Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry4
MA 109Survey of Calculus3
MA 110Finite Mathematics3
MA 125Calculus I4
MA 126Calculus II4
MA 227Calculus III4
MA 252Introduction to Differential Equations3
MA 260Introduction to Linear Algebra3
PH 201College Physics I4
PH 202College Physics II4
PH 221General Physics I4
PH 222General Physics II4
PHS 101Physical Science4

 

Area IV. History, Social, and Behavioral Sciences 12 hours

Study in history and the social and behavioral sciences deals primarily with the study of human behavior, social and political structures, and economics. Requirements include 12 semester hours with at least a three-semester hour course in history and at least six semester hours from among other disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences. Disciplines include, but are not limited to, anthropology, economics, geography, political science, psychology, and sociology. As part of the common Core Curriculum, students must complete a six-semester hour sequence either in literature (Area II) or in history (Area IV). 

The following courses satisfy Area IV of the Core Curriculum:

RequirementsHours
ANTH 101Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
ANTH 106Introductory Archaeology3
ANTH 120Language and Culture3
CMST 105Introduction to Human Communication3
EC 210Principles of Microeconomics3
EC 211Principles of Macroeconomics3
GEO 121World Regional Geography3
HY 101Western Civilization I3
HY 102Western Civilization II3
HY 104World History to 16003
HY 105World History 1600 to the Present3
HY 120The United States To 18773
HY 121The United States Since 18773
ITS 101Introduction to International Studies3
PSC 101Introduction to American Government3
PSC 102Introduction to Comparative Politics3
PSC 103Introduction to International Relations3
PSC 221American State and Local Government3
PY 101Introduction to Psychology3
PY 201Honors Introduction to Psychology3
PY 212Developmental Psychology3
SOC 100Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 245Contemporary Social Problems3
WS 100Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies3
 
Area V. Pre-Professional, Pre-Major, and Elective Courses

Certain degrees/major may require students to take additional required courses and/or elective courses appropriate to the individual degree or program. Students should consult the appropriate college or school section of this catalog to see whether Area V requirements apply to them.

Total Semester Hours:41

What is the relationship between the core competencies and the core curriculum courses? 

The matrix below identifies how specific core curriculum courses introduce or reinforce the desired core competencies which build the foundation for attainment of the Shared Vision for a UAB Graduate. Faculty who teach courses in the disciplines have identified these core competencies as essential for success in upper-division major courses. 

UAB has chosen to place special emphasis on three essential competencies embedded in the six core competencies identified below. These targeted competencies are writing, quantitative literacy, and ethics & civic responsibility. Core courses which intentionally provide specific instruction in, practice of, and assessment of writing, quantitative literacy, and ethics & civic responsibility are identified below with a W, QL, and/or ECR. 

The UAB Core Curriculum Matrix

Core Competency

Demonstrate reading and writing skills sufficient to ensure access to information and ideas in the institution's curriculum, as well as in society at large.

RequirementsHours
Core Curriculum Courses in Which Introduced
CMST 101Public Speaking3
BY 123Introductory Biology I4
BY 124Introductory Biology II4
EH 101English Composition I3
EH 102English Composition II3
EH 216Introduction to Literature3
ENV 109Laboratory in Environmental Science1
FR 101Introductory French I4
GN 101Introductory German I4
MA 126Calculus II4
MA 252Introduction to Differential Equations3
PHS 101Physical Science4
SPA 101Introductory Spanish I /QL4
Core Curriculum Courses In Which Practiced and Reinforced
AAS 200Introduction to African-American Studies3
ARH 204Renaissance through Modern Art3
EH 102English Composition II3
EH 217World Literature I: Before 16603
EH 218World Literature II: 1660-Present3
EH 221British and Irish Literature I: Before 18003
EH 222British and Irish Literature II: 1800-Present3
EH 223American Literature I: Before 18653
EH 224American Literature II: 1865-Present3
FR 102Introductory French II4
FR 201Intermediate French I3
FR 202Intermediate French II3
GN 102Introductory German II4
GN 201Intermediate German I3
GN 202Intermediate German II3
GN 204Readings in German Literature3
PHL 100Introduction to Philosophy3
PHL 115Contemporary Moral Issues3
PHL 116Bioethics3
PHL 120Practical Reasoning3
PHL 203Philosophy of Religion3
SPA 102Introductory Spanish II4
SPA 201Intermediate Spanish I3
SPA 202Intermediate Spanish II3
THR 100Introduction to the Theatre3
THR 200Plays on Film3

Core Competency

Demonstrate an ability to make aesthetic judgments in the arts, literature, and humanities based on relevant historical, social, or philosophical contexts.

RequirementsHours
Core Curriculum Courses in Which Introduced
ARH 101The Art Experience3
EH 216Introduction to Literature3
MU 120Music Appreciation3
PHL 100Introduction to Philosophy3
PHL 115Contemporary Moral Issues3
PHL 120Practical Reasoning3
PHL 203Philosophy of Religion3
THR 100Introduction to the Theatre3
THR 105Introduction to Dance3
Core Curriculum Courses In Which Practiced and Reinforced
ARH 203Ancient and Medieval Art3
ARH 204Renaissance through Modern Art3
ARH 206Survey of Asian Art3
THR 200Plays on Film3
EH 217World Literature I: Before 16603
EH 218World Literature II: 1660-Present3
EH 221British and Irish Literature I: Before 18003
EH 222British and Irish Literature II: 1800-Present3
EH 223American Literature I: Before 18653
EH 224American Literature II: 1865-Present3

Core Competency

Demonstrate the ability to collect and evaluate information within the context of the scientific method and to use this ability to further one's understanding of the natural world.

RequirementsHours
Core Curriculum Courses in Which Introduced
AST 101Astronomy of the Universe3
AST 102Astronomy of Stellar Systems3
AST 103Astronomy of the Solar System3
AST 105Extraterrestrial Life3
BY 101Topics in Contemporary Biology3
CH 105Introductory Chemistry I3
CH 107Introductory Chemistry II3
CH 115General Chemistry I3
CH 117General Chemistry II3
PH 201College Physics I4
PH 221General Physics I4
PHS 101Physical Science4
Core Curriculum Courses In Which Practiced and Reinforced
AST 111Astronomy of the Universe Laboratory1
AST 112Astronomy of Stellar Systems Laboratory1
AST 113Astronomy of the Solar Systems Laboratory1
AST 115Extraterrestrial Life Laboratory1
BY 101Topics in Contemporary Biology3
BY 102Topics Contemporary Biology Laboratory1
BY 112Ext Topics Contemporary Biology Laboratory1
BY 123Introductory Biology I4
BY 124Introductory Biology II4
CH 105Introductory Chemistry I3
CH 106Introductory Chemistry I Laboratory1
CH 107Introductory Chemistry II3
CH 108Introductory Chemistry II Laboratory1
CH 115General Chemistry I3
CH 116General Chemistry I Laboratory1
CH 117General Chemistry II3
CH 118General Chemistry II Laboratory1
PH 201College Physics I4
PH 202College Physics II4
PH 221General Physics I4
PH 222General Physics II4

Core Competency

Demonstrate the ability to apply mathematical skills and quantitative reasoning to solve problems and interpret information.

RequirementsHours
Core Curriculum Courses in Which Introduced
FR 101Introductory French I4
MA 105Pre-Calculus Algebra3
MA 106Pre-Calculus Trigonometry3
MA 107Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry4
MA 109Survey of Calculus3
MA 110Finite Mathematics3
PHL 120Practical Reasoning3
PHS 101Physical Science4
SPA 201Intermediate Spanish I3
Core Curriculum Courses In Which Practiced and Reinforced
MA 125Calculus I4
MA 126Calculus II4
MA 227Calculus III4
MA 252Introduction to Differential Equations3
MA 260Introduction to Linear Algebra3
PH 201College Physics I4
PH 202College Physics II4
PH 221General Physics I4
PH 222General Physics II4

Core Competency

Demonstrate the ability to reason and evaluate information within the context of the social and behavioral sciences and to use this ability to further one's understanding of the social, economic, and political environment.

RequirementsHours
Core Curriculum Courses in Which Introduced
AAS 200Introduction to African-American Studies3
ANTH 101Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
ANTH 106Introductory Archaeology3
ENV 108Human Population and the Earth s Environment3
ENV 109Laboratory in Environmental Science1
ITS 101Introduction to International Studies3
PHL 100Introduction to Philosophy3
PHL 115Contemporary Moral Issues3
PHL 116Bioethics3
PHL 120Practical Reasoning3
PHL 125Introduction to Ethics3
PSC 101Introduction to American Government3
PSC 102Introduction to Comparative Politics3
PY 101Introduction to Psychology3
SOC 100Introduction to Sociology3
WS 100Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies3
Core Curriculum Courses In Which Practiced and Reinforced
ANTH 120Language and Culture3
EC 210Principles of Microeconomics3
EC 211Principles of Macroeconomics3
HY 102Western Civilization II3
HY 105World History 1600 to the Present3
HY 121The United States Since 18773
PHL 203Philosophy of Religion3
PSC 221American State and Local Government3
PY 212Developmental Psychology3
SOC 245Contemporary Social Problems3

Core Competency

Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary and/or historical issues.

RequirementsHours
Core Curriculum Courses in Which Introduced
AAS 200Introduction to African-American Studies3
ANTH 101Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
ANTH 106Introductory Archaeology3
ANTH 120Language and Culture3
CMST 105Introduction to Human Communication3
ENV 108Human Population and the Earth s Environment3
ENV 109Laboratory in Environmental Science1
HY 101Western Civilization I3
HY 102Western Civilization II3
HY 104World History to 16003
HY 105World History 1600 to the Present3
HY 120The United States To 18773
HY 121The United States Since 18773
ITS 101Introduction to International Studies3
PHL 100Introduction to Philosophy3
PHL 115Contemporary Moral Issues3
PHL 116Bioethics3
PHL 120Practical Reasoning3
PHL 125Introduction to Ethics3
PY 101Introduction to Psychology3
SOC 100Introduction to Sociology3
WS 100Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies3
Core Curriculum Courses In Which Practiced and Reinforced
EH 217World Literature I: Before 16603
EH 218World Literature II: 1660-Present3
EH 221British and Irish Literature I: Before 18003
EH 222British and Irish Literature II: 1800-Present3
EH 223American Literature I: Before 18653
EH 224American Literature II: 1865-Present3
PHL 203Philosophy of Religion3
PSC 221American State and Local Government3
PY 212Developmental Psychology3
SOC 245Contemporary Social Problems3

Writing, quantitative literacy (QL), and ethics & civic Responsibility (ECR) are introduced in the freshman year, reinforced in a range of mid-curricular courses designated as writing, QL, and/or ECR courses (identified as such in course listings under each program), and integrated into the capstone course in discipline-specific ways.

Writing (W)

Effective communication skills are fundamental to competent functioning across the undergraduate curriculum and in life beyond graduation. Improving writing contributes to the development of other communication competencies, such as reading and public speaking. Writing is crucial to critical thinking and effective problem-solving, as well as for the communication of knowledge. The ability to write effectively is a key skill that contributes to professional advancement, successful personal relationships, and responsible civic involvement. Writing designated courses are shown with a “W” designation in their course description. To foster this essential competency, every program ensures that its majors take a minimum of two W courses between the First Year Experience and the Capstone.

Learning Outcomes for Writing include:

  1. Respond to an assigned topic in a way that shows responsible concern for an identified audience.
  2. Write a logical argument that makes an unambiguous claim, marshals reasonable and appropriate evidence, and takes seriously the perspectives of others by fairly presenting and responding to alternative claims.
  3. Incorporate external sources pertinent to the argument and document such sources accurately and appropriately, demonstrating academic integrity when referencing the ideas of others.
  4. Demonstrate an appropriate level of competence in grammar, usage, and mechanics.
  5. Accurately use the writing conventions appropriate to the discipline.

Quantitative Literacy (QL)

Quantitative literacy is fundamental to solving quantitative problems that occur in school, life, and work, and in communicating solutions to those problems to others. Quantitative literacy builds on mathematics, but unlike "pure math" it emphasizes the application of quantitative methods in a wide variety of contexts. Quantitatively literate students are able to understand and, as necessary, interpret a problem in quantitative terms and then solve it using appropriate methods. Like verbal literacy, quantitative literacy is critical to effective citizenship, communication, and personal and social responsibility. Quantitative Literacy courses are shown with a “QL” designation in their course description. To foster this essential competency, every program ensures that its majors take a minimum of two QL courses between the First Year Experience and the Capstone.

Learning Outcomes for Quantitative Literacy:

  1. Compute using arithmetic and algebra, work with units of measurement, translate verbal descriptions into mathematical form, and/or evaluate the reasonableness of quantitative assertions.
  2. Interpret and construct tables, graphs, and schematic representations of relationships among objects and concepts.
  3. Draw conclusions based on probabilities, costs, benefits, and risks.
  4. Use quantitative evidence as a basis for reasoning, problem-solving, and argument
  5. Design empirical research, evaluate research designs, and analyze data to draw conclusions about research hypotheses.
  6. Communicate quantitative information using numbers and words appropriate to the audience.

Ethics and Civic Responsibility (ECR)

The role of a university is to prepare students to function effectively and engage responsibly in both the academic community and post-graduation life. Ethical decisions should be academic, personal, and professional goals for everyone. Effective and responsible living depends upon the ability of individuals to strive for excellence, to make informed and ethical decisions, to accept responsibility for one’s choices, and to practice good citizenship as part of multiple larger social units. Ethics and Civic Responsibility courses are shown with an “ECR” designation in their course description. To foster this essential competency, every program ensures that its majors take a minimum of two ECR courses between the First Year Experience and the Capstone.

Learning Outcomes for Ethics and Civic Responsibility:

  1. Understand and practice ethical reasoning and decision-making
  2. Be knowledgeable about contemporary events and issues
  3. Understand civic responsibility
  4. Understand the role and value of diversity

Capstone Requirement

UAB’s undergraduate programs culminate in a capstone requirement. The capstone provides a summative opportunity for students to draw upon, synthesize, and apply what they have learned to an original project and/or real life application. Depending on the discipline, the capstone may involve such components as collaborative projects, internships, service learning, fieldwork, independent research, community outreach, and/or thesis writing. In every case capstones include a set of well-defined learning outcomes, significant writing, and integration of discipline-specific competencies in quantitative literacy and in ethics and civic responsibility. Most importantly the capstone provides an enriching bridge experience for students between their undergraduate education and post-graduation lives.

Freshman students entering UAB in fall 2009 or after must successfully complete the capstone course or experience required by their major program or school in order to graduate. All students graduating in 2013 or later must complete a capstone requirement.