PHL-Philosophy Courses

Courses

PHL 100. Introduction to Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Introductory survey of philosophy, its nature, methods and problems. Topics typically include, among others, existence of God, freedom, knowledge, right and wrong. Classical and/or contemporary readings. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.

PHL 115. Contemporary Moral Issues. 3 Hours.

Survey of contemporary moral problems and dilemmas; introduction to methods and concepts of moral philosophy. Topics may include abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, economic justice, homosexuality, animal rights, and respect for nature. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.

PHL 116. Bioethics. 3 Hours.

Moral problems and dilemmas in medicine and health professions; elementary methods and concepts of moral philosophy. Problems typically include, among others, AIDS and human and animal experimentation. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.

PHL 120. Practical Reasoning. 3 Hours.

Survey of skills in critical thinking and scientific reasoning, including the ability to identify different kinds of arguments, recognize common fallacies of reasoning, and evaluate analogical, causal, and statistical arguments. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.

PHL 125. Introduction to Ethics. 3 Hours.

Elements of moral philosophy. Moral objectivity; connections among morality, rationality, and religion; nature and significance of moral value. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.

PHL 135. The Rule of Law. 3 Hours.

Law and legal institutions and processes, with emphasis on civil law. Development of legal ideas in such areas as torts, contracts, and property law. Role and history of legal institutions within political framework. Covers many topics addressed in the first year of law school. Relations between courts and legislatures. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.

PHL 203. Philosophy of Religion. 3 Hours.

Religion; its nature, justification, and significance. God, evil, religious experience, faith, and reason. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.

PHL 204. Philosophy and Christianity. 3 Hours.

What Christians believe and why they believe it; foundations of Christian philosophical thought. Christian concepts of God, Christ, salvation, atonement, faith, and ethics.

PHL 205. Existentialism. 3 Hours.

What Existentialists believe and why they believe it; foundations of Existentialist philosophical thought. Existentialist concepts of freedom, commitment, anxiety, and authenticity.

PHL 215. History of Moral Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Socrates to present, focusing on historical development of moral tradition that has shaped Western society. Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hobbes, Hume, Kant, Mill, Nietzsche, and others.

PHL 216. Intermediate Bioethics. 3 Hours.

An in-depth examination of selected issues in Bioethics. Usually 3-4 topics will be selected from the general areas of Death and Dying, Ethical Issues at the Beginning of Human Life, Research Ethics, Justice and Medical Finance, Genetics, and the Doctor-Patient Relationship.
Prerequisites: PHL 116 [Min Grade: C]

PHL 220. Introduction to Symbolic Logic. 3 Hours.

Modern theory of deductive inference. Emphasis on recognizing valid forms of reasoning. Truth-function theory and some beginning concepts of quantification theory. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course.

PHL 230. Social and Political Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Survey of contemporary debates concerning fundamental principles of political life. Topics typically include justification of political authority, the proper role of government in society, economic justice, freedom and rights, and the free enterprise system. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.

PHL 232. Classical Political Thought. 3 Hours.

Development of western political thought from Plato to Augustine; Theories of major political thinkers.

PHL 233. Modern Political Theory. 3 Hours.

Development of Western political thought from the earlymodern era to contemporary debates in works of Machiavelli to Mill. Theories of major political thinkers.

PHL 239. Classical Thought of India China and the West. 3 Hours.

Conceptions of self, society, and natural world.

PHL 240. History of Philosophy: Socrates Plato and Aristotle. 3 Hours.

Origins and development of Western philosophic tradition, with emphasis on writings of Plato and Aristotle. Concepts of knowledge, reality, and the good life.

PHL 270. Science, Knowledge, and Reality. 3 Hours.

Science; its nature, scope, and significance. Scientific reasoning; science as social institution; ethical issues in science.

PHL 290. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

In-depth examination of one or more problems, authors, or ideas of historical or current interest.

PHL 291. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

In-depth examination of one or more problems, authors, or ideas of historical or current interest.

PHL 292. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

In-depth examination of one or more problems, authors, or ideas of historical or current interest.

PHL 293. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

In-depth examination of one or more problems, authors, or ideas of historical or current interest.

PHL 309. Teaching Practicum. 3 Hours.

Teaching experience in philosophy courses, supervised by a faculty member. Student must have previously taken the course for which the student will work within. Permission of Director of Undergraduate Studies required. Pass/Fail.

PHL 311. Philosophy of Science. 3 Hours.

Philosophical issues concerning the nature of science. Topics may include philosophical debates about scientific evidence; scientific explanation; empiricism, instrumentalism, and realism; the problems of induction; the demarcation problem; theories and models; laws and mechanisms; reduction; causation and explanation; observables vs. unobservables; ethical issues in science; and the social structure and impact of science.

PHL 312. Philosophy of Biology. 3 Hours.

This course surveys issues in contemporary philosophy of biology and some closely related issues. Much of the focus will be on philosophical issues concerning evolutionary biology, but issues in developmental biology, molecular biology, and immunology will also be considered. No background in biology is required. Philosophical issues involving evolution and ethics, nature vs. nurture, evolution and psychology, biological mechanisms and models, species and human nature, evolution and intelligent design, and natural selection and chance will be discussed.

PHL 314. Philosophy and Feminism. 3 Hours.

Feminism; conceptual foundations, scope, and applications. Problems typically include, among others, feminist concepts of gender, reasoning, knowledge, and ethics. Prerequisite: One previous PHL course or permission of instructor.

PHL 315. Ethics: Theories of Good and Evil. 3 Hours.

Morality; its nature, principles, and scope. Normative and critical problems in moral philosophy; moral obligation. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.

PHL 335. Philosophy of Law. 3 Hours.

Theories of the nature of law (natural law, realism, positivism, critical legal theory); interpretation of precedents, statutes, and Constitution; Constitutional protections such as freedom of speech and religion and the right of privacy; selected issues in criminal and civil law. Ethics and Civic responsibility are significant components of this course.

PHL 341. History of Philosophy: Descartes to Hume. 3 Hours.

Philosophy in modern era, focusing on continental rationalism and British empiricism; emphasis on theories of knowledge and reality; science, religion, and modernism. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required. Writing is a significant component of this course.

PHL 342. History of Philosophy: Kant and 19th Century. 3 Hours.

Western philosophic tradition from Kant through end of nineteenth century. Kant, Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Mill, among others.
Prerequisites: PHL 100 [Min Grade: C] or PHL 115 [Min Grade: C] or PHL 116 [Min Grade: C] or PHL 215 [Min Grade: C]

PHL 343. History of Philosophy: Twentieth Century. 3 Hours.

Major movements and problems of twentieth century philosophy. Moore, Russell, Wittgenstein, and Quine, among others.

PHL 348. American Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Major philosophers of classical American period; Pierce, James, and Dewey. Origins and nature of American pragmatism. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.

PHL 350. Philosophy of Language. 3 Hours.

Language; its nature, structure, and uses. Reference, meaning, communication, and interpretation; Russell, Wittgenstein, Chomsky, and Quine, among others. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.

PHL 372. Minds and Machines. 3 Hours.

Artificial intelligence; its philosophical foundations and implications. Topics may include mind-body problem, nature of intelligence, machine models of mind, computational processes, and mental representation. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.

PHL 375. Philosophy of Mind. 3 Hours.

Mind; its nature, forms, and functions. Concepts of mind/body, consciousness, rationality, and personal identity; free will. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required. Writing is a significant component of this course.

PHL 390. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

This course is a seminar whose content may be different each time it is taught. It provides instructors with the opportunity to deal with topics that may not be considered in any other course or which may be treated in another course but only at an introductory level. Topics may include: special topics in some area of philosophy, interdisciplinary issues, and important work or works by a great philosopher.

PHL 391. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

This course is a seminar whose content may be different each time it is taught. It provides instructors with the opportunity to deal with topics that may not be considered in any other course or which may be treated in another course but only at an introductory level. Topics may include: special topics in some area of philosophy, interdisciplinary issues, and important work or works by a great philosopher. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.

PHL 392. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

This course is a seminar whose content may be different each time it is taught. It provides instructors with the opportunity to deal with topics that may not be considered in any other course or which may be treated in another course but only at an introductory level. Topics may include: special topics in some area of philosophy, interdisciplinary issues, and important work or works by a great philosopher. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.

PHL 393. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

This course is a seminar whose content may be different each time it is taught. It provides instructors with the opportunity to deal with topics that may not be considered in any other course or which may be treated in another course but only at an introductory level. Topics may include: special topics in some area of philosophy, interdisciplinary issues, and important work or works by a great philosopher.

PHL 394. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

This course is a seminar whose content may be different each time it is taught. It provides instructors with the opportunity to deal with topics that may not be considered in any other course or which may be treated in another course but only at an introductory level. Topics may include: special topics in some area of philosophy, interdisciplinary issues, and important work or works by a great philosopher.

PHL 395. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

This course is a seminar whose content may be different each time it is taught. It provides instructors with the opportunity to deal with topics that may not be considered in any other course or which may be treated in another course but only at an introductory level. Topics may include: special topics in some area of philosophy, interdisciplinary issues, and important work or works by a great philosopher.

PHL 396. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

This course is a seminar whose content may be different each time it is taught. It provides instructors with the opportunity to deal with topics that may not be considered in any other course or which may be treated in another course but only at an introductory level. Topics may include: special topics in some area of philosophy, interdisciplinary issues, and important work or works by a great philosopher.

PHL 397. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

This course is a seminar whose content may be different each time it is taught. It provides instructors with the opportunity to deal with topics that may not be considered in any other course or which may be treated in another course but only at an introductory level. Topics may include: special topics in some area of philosophy, interdisciplinary issues, and important work or works by a great philosopher.

PHL 398. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

This course is a seminar whose content may be different each time it is taught. It provides instructors with the opportunity to deal with topics that may not be considered in any other course or which may be treated in another course but only at an introductory level. Topics may include: special topics in some area of philosophy, interdisciplinary issues, and important work or works by a great philosopher.

PHL 399. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

This course is a seminar whose content may be different each time it is taught. It provides instructors with the opportunity to deal with topics that may not be considered in any other course or which may be treated in another course but only at an introductory level. Topics may include: special topics in some area of philosophy, interdisciplinary issues, and important work or works by a great philosopher.

PHL 402. Neuroethics. 3 Hours.

Ethical issues related to neuroscience and other sciences of the mind. Topics typically include: privacy and side effects of brain technologies; neuroscientific threats to free will; moral responsibility and mental illness; emotion and reason in moral judgment; cognitive enhancement and personality change; ethically sound research practices. A previous course in Philosophy is recommended. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.

PHL 405. Epistemology: Theories of Knowledge. 3 Hours.

Human knowledge; its nature, sources, and limits. Concepts of truth, objectivity, evidence, and belief. Two previous PHL courses or permission of instructor required. Writing is a significant component of this course.

PHL 408. Metaphysics. 3 Hours.

Reality; its basic elements, principles of existence and identity, and appearance and reality. Concepts of cause, matter, mind, realism, and anti-realism. Two previous PHL courses or permission of instructor required.

PHL 435. Philosophy of Law. 3 Hours.

Theories of the nature of law (natural law, realism, positivism, critical legal theory); interpretation of precedents, statutes, and Constitution; Constitutional protections such as freedom of speech and religion and the right of privacy; selected issues of criminal and civil law. Requires additional work not required in PHL 335. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.

PHL 441. History of Philosophy: Descartes to Hume. 3 Hours.

Philosophy in modern era, focusing on continental rationalism and British empiricism; emphasis on theories of knowledge and reality; science, religion, and modernism. Writing is a significant component of this course.

PHL 442. Hist of PHL:Kant and 19th Cent. 3 Hours.

Western philosophic tradition from Kant through end of nineteenth century. Kant, Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Mill, among others. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.
Prerequisites: PHL 100 [Min Grade: D] or PHL 115 [Min Grade: D] or PHL 116 [Min Grade: D] or PHL 215 [Min Grade: D]

PHL 443. History of Philosophy: Twentieth Century. 3 Hours.

Major movements and problems of twentieth century philosophy. Moore, Russell, Wittgenstein, and Quine, among others. Two previous PHL courses or permission of instructor required.

PHL 470. Philosophical Problems in the Natural and Social Sciences. 3 Hours.

Nature and uses of science. Concepts of explanation, confirmation, scientific law, and theory; special problems in sciences. Two previous PHL courses or permission of instructor required.

PHL 490. Philosophy Seminar. 3 Hours.

In-depth survey of either a topic or individual author of current interest. A systematic survey using previous course work in the main areas of philosophy to produce a substantial paper. Emphasis on detailed analysis of the structure of arguments and standards for empirical evidence where relevant. Proper standards for citation and attribution. Course fulfills capstone requirement for Seniors.

PHL 491. Philosophy Seminar. 3 Hours.

In-depth survey of either a topic or individual author of current interest. A systematic survey using previous course work in the main areas of philosophy to produce a substantial paper. Emphasis on detailed analysis of the structure of arguments and standards for empirical evidence where relevant. Proper standards for citation and attribution. This course fulfills the capstone requirement for seniors.

PHL 492. Philosophy Seminar. 3 Hours.

In-depth survey of either a topic or individual author of current interest. A systematic survey using previous course work in the main areas of philosophy to produce a substantial paper. Emphasis on detailed analysis of the structure of arguments and standards for empirical evidence where relevant. Proper standards for citation and attribution. This course fulfills the capstone requirement for seniors.

PHL 493. Philosophy Seminar. 3 Hours.

In-depth survey of either a topic or individual author of current interest. A systematic survey in the main areas of philosophy to produce a substantial paper. Emphasis on detailed analysis of the structure of arguments and standards for empirical evidence where relevant. Proper standards for citation and attribution.

PHL 494. Philosophy Seminar. 3 Hours.

In-depth survey of either a topic or individual author of current interest. A systematic survey in the main areas of philosophy to produce a substantial paper. Emphasis on detailed analysis of the structure of arguments and standards for empirical evidence where relevant. Proper standards for citation and attribution.

PHL 499. Directed Studies. 1-3 Hour.

Special arrangement opportunity for in-depth study. Permission of Instructor Only.