Biomedical Engineering

Prospective students should use this checklist to obtain specific admissions requirements on how to apply to Graduate School.

Biomedical Engineering (PhD, MSBME, MSBME with Certificate in Technology Commericialization and Entrepreneurship)

Degrees Offererd: PhD, MSBME, MSBME with Certificate in Life Sciences Entrepreneurship
Phone: (205) 996-6936
E-mail: uabbmegrad@uab.edu
Website: www.uab.edu/bme

Additional Information

Deadline for Entry Term(s): Fall
Deadline for All Application Materials to be in the Graduate School Office: December 15
Number of Evaluation Forms Required: Three
Entrance Tests GRE (TOEFL is also required for international applicants whose native language is not English)
Comments Students are rarely admitted for the Spring term

For detailed information, contact Dr.Ho-Wook Jun, Associate Professor, BME Graduate Program Director, UAB Department of Biomedical Engineering, 1825 University Blvd., Shelby Biomedical Research Building, 806 Birmingham, AL 35294-2182.

Telephone (205) 996-6936
E-mail uabbmegrad@uab.edu
Web www.uab.edu/bme

Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering

A minimum GPA of 3.20 is required.

Plan I - 30 with Thesis

RequirementsHours
BME 517Engineering Analysis3
or ME 661 Math Methods in EGR I
BME 670Quantitative Physiology3
BST 621Statistical Methods I3
BME Elective 500-6973
Life Science Elective at the 500+ level3
BME/EGR/Math/Life Science Elective at the 500+ level3
BME Seminar3
Seminar in Biomedical Engineering
BME 698Non-Thesis Research3
Thesis Research6
Master s Degree Thesis Research
Total Hours30

Plan II - 33 hours

RequirementsHours
BME 517Engineering Analysis3
or ME 661 Math Methods in EGR I
BME 670Quantitative Physiology3
BST 621Statistical Methods I3
BME Elective 500-6973
BME/EGR/MA/Life Science Elective at the 500+ level 19
Life Science 500+ level3
BME Seminar3
Seminar in Biomedical Engineering
BME 698Non-Thesis Research6
Total Hours33
1

 BME 698 may be taken for this elective

PhD Program

The PhD degree prepares students for careers in industry and academics. Students entering the doctoral program will possess a BS, MS, or be currently enrolled in the DMD/PhD or MD/PhD program at UAB.

Admission to the PhD program is competitive, and successful applicants will usually present scores of at least 156 on the verbal and at least 159 on the quantitative sections of the GRE General Test. Typical students have a graduate GPA of 3.5 or greater and have a significant research experience. Students admitted to the doctoral program typically receive a competitive stipend that usually includes payment of tuition.

Students can be admitted to the PhD program with a BS degree in a field of biomedical engineering or closely-related discipline. Students with undergraduate degrees in the physical sciences, life sciences, or mathematics can also be considered to admission. Students entering the PhD program with a BS are required to complete at least 72 semester hours of graduate work, including 48 semester hours of graduate coursework, and a minimum of 24 hours of dissertation research (BME 799) earned over at least two semesters in candidacy. All students are required to take BME 517 Engineering AnalysisBME 770 Quantitative Physiology, at least one Biostatistics course (BST 621 Statistical Methods I), GRD 717 Principles of Scientific Integrity and 6 semesters of BME seminars (BME 701 Seminar in Biomedical Engineering). The remaining coursework should be a combination of life sciences, biomedical engineering, or mathematics elective courses that provide sufficient breadth and depth to gain the necessary graduate level, interdisciplinary knowledge to complete dissertation research.  Three peer-reviewed first-author publications are required for completion of the PhD in the Department of Biomedical Engineering.

Students can be admitted to the PhD program following completion of a Master's Degree in BME or closely-related discipline. Students entering the PhD program with a MS are required to complete at least 51 semester hours of graduate work beyond the Master's degree including 27 semester hours of coursework and 24 hours of dissertation research (BME 799) earned over at least two semesters in candidacy. All students are required to take BME 517 Engineering AnalysisBME 770 Quantitative Physiology, BST 621 Statistical Methods I, GRD 717 Principles of Scientific Integrity, if not taken as part of their Master's program, and three semesters of BME 701 BME Seminar.  The remaining coursework should be a combination of life sciences, biomedical engineering, or mathematics elective courses that provide sufficient breadth and depth to gain the necessary graduate level, interdisciplinary knowledge to complete dissertation research. A total of three first-author original research articles in peer-reviewed journals based on the student's dissertation research are required for completion of the PhD in the BME Department. If one article was published as part of the MSBME degree, then two articles are required for the PhD degree.

Courses

BME 508. Biofluids. 3 Hours.

Application of fluid mechanics in blood flow in the circulatory system; cardiovascular fluid mechanics, wall shear stress and the development of atherosclerosis, viscoelastic behavior of the arteries, Non-Newtonian character of blood.

BME 517. Engineering Analysis. 3 Hours.

Solutions to engineering problems involving ordinary and partial differential equations; Laplace transform, power series, Bessel functions, Legendre polynomials, Fourier series, Fourier integral and transform, Sturm-Liouville and separation of variables.

BME 520. Implant-Tissue Interactions. 3 Hours.

An overview of implant biocompatibility including tissue histology, histopathology of implant response and the regulatory process for medical devices.

BME 535. Tissue Engineering. 3 Hours.

Principles underlying strategies for regenerative medicine such as stem cell based therapy, scaffold design, proteins or genes delivery, roles of extracellular matrix, cell-materials interactions, angiogenesis, tissue transplantation, mechanical stimulus and nanotechnology.

BME 542. Principles of Medical Imaging. 3 Hours.

Types of radiation used in medical imaging, physics of interaction of ionizing radiation with matter, bremsstrahlung, attenuation coefficients, Compton scatter, nuclear disintegration of radionuclides, generation of medical radionuclides.

BME 543. Medical Image Processing. 3 Hours.

Fundamental topics of medical image processing to practical applications using conventional computer software.

BME 550. Computational Neuroscience. 3 Hours.

This course examines the computational principles used by the nervous system. Topics include: biophysics of axon and synapse, sensory coding (with an emphasis on vision and audition), planning and decision-making, and synthesis of motor responses. There will be an emphasis on a systems approach throughout. Homework includes simulations.

BME 554. Introduction to Pharmaceutical Engineering. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce the science and biopharmaceutical principles of drug delivery to undergraduate students of Biomedical Engineering. Graduate students of BME, Pharmacology & Toxicology, and Chemistry are also eligible to take it as an elective course.

BME 561. Bioelectric Phenomena. 3 Hours.

Quantitative methods in the electrophysiology of neural, cardiac and skeletal muscle systems.

BME 562. Cardiac Electrophysiology. 3 Hours.

Experimental and computational methods in cardiac electrophysiology, ionic currents, action potentials, electrical propagation, the electrocardiogram, electromechanical coupling, cardiac arrhythmias, effects of electric fields in cardiac tissue, defibrillation, and ablation.

BME 571. Continuum Mechanics of Solids. 3 Hours.

Matrix and tensor mathematics, fundamentals of stress, momentum principles, Cauchy and Piola-Kirchoff stress tensors, static equilibrium, invariance, measures of strain, Lagrangian and Eulerian formulations, Green and Almansistrain, deformation gradient tensor, infinitesimal strain, constitutive equations, finite strain elasticity, strain energy methods, 2-D Elasticity, Airy Method, viscoelasticity, mechanical behavior of polymers.

BME 575. Quantitative Biomechanics of Injury and Rehabilitation. 3 Hours.

Students will learn the material, mechanical, electrophysiological and energetic principles of human movement. Students will learn about the healthy nonimpaired system and compare to systems impaired by injury or disability for applications in rehabilitation.

BME 590. Special Topic in BME. 3 Hours.

Special topics in biomedical areas.

BME 598. Biomedical Product Development. 3 Hours.

Design and development issues of the medical product industry. Consideration of the impact of legal, regulatory and marketing issues, business ethics and economics will be addressed.

BME 601. Seminar in Biomedical Engineering. 1 Hour.

Current topics in biomedical engineering technology and applications.

BME 623. Wound Healing. 3 Hours.

Study of principles of healing, methods to enhance, and clinical applications.

BME 630. Engineering Design and Commercialization. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the process of innovating medical technologies and better prepare them for a career in the medical technology industry. Students will learn aspects of biomedical product development from needs finding, invention, intellectual property, and regulatory processes.

BME 664. Neural Computation. 3 Hours.

This course examines the principal theoretical underpinnings of computationcomputation in neural networks. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the relationship between the different approaches: dynamical systems, statistical mechanics, logic, Kalman filters, and likelihood/Bayesian estimation.

BME 665. Computational Vision. 3 Hours.

This course approaches the study of biological and artificial vision from atheoretical perspective. We begin with a comparative survey of visual systems, and will examine vision algorithms and architectures.

BME 670. Quantitative Physiology. 3 Hours.

Study of physiological problems using advanced mathematical techniques. Topics covered include: mechanics, fluid dynamics, transport, electrophysiology of cell membranes, and control systems.
Prerequisites: BME 517 [Min Grade: C] or ME 661 [Min Grade: C] or ME 567 [Min Grade: C] or ME 761 [Min Grade: C]

BME 676. Fracture Mechanics. 3 Hours.

This course is geared for graduate students in a mechanics curriculum with an interest in advanced techniques and concepts in fracture mechanics. The course covers linear elastic fracture mechanics, including fatigue crack growth, and nonlinear elastic fracture mechanics. Experimental and computational methods are also introduced.

BME 680. Biomolecular Modeling. 3 Hours.

We will teach molecular modeling principles and applications in this course. Throughout the course, students are offered hands-on exercises in molecular modeling tools and software. The course will help students understand the critical relationship among structure, function, and thermodynamic driving forces in structural biology, and be able to utilize molecular modeling techniques to explore biological phenomena at the molecular level.

BME 690. Special Topics in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

BME 691. Individual Study in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

BME 693. Internship in Biomedical Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

BME 697. Journal Club in (Area). 1-3 Hour.

Journal Club in Medical Imaging.

BME 698. Non-Thesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

BME 699. Master s Degree Thesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

Prerequisites: GAC M

BME 701. Seminar in Biomedical Engineering. 1 Hour.

Current topics in biomedical engineering technology and applications.

BME 723. Wound Healing. 3 Hours.

Study of principles of healing, methods to enhance, and clinical applications.

BME 764. Neural Computation. 3 Hours.

This course examines the principal theoretical underpinnings of computation in neural networks. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the relationship between the different approaches: dynamical systems, statistical mechanics, logic, Kalman filters, and likelihood/Bayesian estimation.

BME 765. Computational Vision. 3 Hours.

This course approaches the study of biological and artificial vision from a theoretical perspective. We begin with a comparative survey of visual systems, and will examine vision algorithms and architectures.

BME 770. Quantitative Physiology. 3 Hours.

Study of physiological problems using advanced mathematical techniques. Topics covered include: mechanics, fluid dynamics, transport, electrophysiology of cell membranes, and control systems.
Prerequisites: BME 517 [Min Grade: C] or ME 661 [Min Grade: C] or ME 567 [Min Grade: C] or ME 761 [Min Grade: C]

BME 776. Fracture Mechanics. 3 Hours.

This course is geared for graduate students in a mechanics curriculum with an interest in advanced techniques and concepts in fracture mechanics. The course covers linear elastic fracture mechanics, including fatigue crack growth, and nonlinear elastic fracture mechanics. Experimental and computational methods are also introduced.

BME 780. Biomolecular Modeling. 3 Hours.

We will teach molecular modeling principles and applications in this course. Throughout the course, the students are offered hands-on exercises in molecular modeling tools and software. The course will help students understand the critical relationship among structure, function, and thermodynamic driving forces in structural biology, and to be able to utilize molecular modeling techniques to explore biological phenomena at the molecular level.

BME 790. Special Topics in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

BME 791. Individual Study in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

BME 793. Internship in Biomedical Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

BME 797. Journal Club in Medical Imaging. 1-3 Hour.

Journal Club in (Area).

BME 798. Non-Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

BME 799. Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

Prerequisites: GAC Z

Faculty

Bellis, Susan, Associate Professor (Physiology & Biophysics), The Role of Integrin Receptors in Human Biology and Disease
Berry, Joel L., Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering; Director of BME Undergraduate Program; Associate Director, UAB Science and Technology Honors Program, 2010, B.S., B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E. (UAB), Ph.D. (Wake Forest), Cardiovascular biomechanics and tissue engineering
Broome, James, Professor (Prosthodontics), Polymers, Adhesives, Physical and Mechanical Testing, Clinical Research
Brott, Brigitta, Associate Professor, Division of Cardiovascular Disease (Department of Medicine), Angiogenesis, cardiac angioplasty, coronary artery disease, cardiac catheterization, interventional cardiology and stents
Burgess, John O., Professor (Prosthodontics), DDS, Clinical trials, Caries models, Dental materials
Capriotti, Emidio, Assistant Professor, Division of Informatics (Pathology), Protein structural prediction by threading methods and building by homology, Molecular dynamics of protein systems, Protein folding kinetics
DeLucas, Lawrence J. , Professor (Optometry), Protein Crystal Growth
Deutsch, Georg, Associate Professor (Radiology), Cognitive neuroscience and brain imaging
Dobbins, Allan C., Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 1996, B.Sc. (Dalhousie), B.S.E., M.S.E., Ph.D. (McGill), Human and machine vision, Neural computation, Brain imaging, Scientific visualization
Downs, J. Crawford, Professor (Ophthalmology) and Director, Center for Ocular Biomechanics and Biotransport, Experimental and computational ocular biomechanics, intraocular pressure and physiologic signal telemetry, and 3D histomorphometry
Eberhardt, Alan, Professor of Biomedical Engineering; Associate Chair of Education, Biomedical Engineering; Director of Master of Engineering in Design and Commercialization, 1991, B.S., M.S. (Delaware), Ph.D. (Northwestern), Solid Mechanics, Injury Biomechanics, Biomedical Implants, Analytical and Numerical Methods in Biomechanics
Fast, Vladimir G., Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 1997, B.S., M.S. Physics, Ph.D. in Biophysics (Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology), Optical imaging of electrical and ionic activity in the heart mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias and defibrillation
Fathallah-Shaykh, Hassan, Professor of Neurology; Mathematics; Integrative, Developmental and Cell Biology; Biomedical, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering, 2008, M.D. (American University of Beirut), Ph.D. (Illinois at Chicago), Mathematical Biology, Systems biology of cancer, Dynamics of molecular networks, Biological rhythms
Feldman, Dale S., Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 1985, B.S. (Northwestern), M.S. (Dayton), Ph.D. (Clemson), Biomaterials, Soft-tissue biomechanics, Polymeric implants
Fiveash, John, Associate Professor (Radiation Oncology), Clinical trials of novel therapeutics in combination with radiation therapy, particularly in the treatment of brain and prostrate tumors; treatment planning research and education IMRT and IGRT
Gamlin, Paul, Ph.D., Professor; Vision Sciences, Studies of the neural bases of vision & eye movements
Gawne, Timothy J., Assistant Professor (Vision Sciences), Information processing in the cerebral cortex, Gamma-band brain activity and neurotransmitter metabolism in schizophrenia, Visual cortical evoked potential
Grant, Merida, Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurobiology), Neurobiology of stress as a risk factor for onset and maintenance of unipolar depression; Imaging alterations in brain morphology, physiology and connectivity associated with early life stress in adults; Peripheral physiology and conditioning paradigms
Grytz, Rafael, Assistant Professor (Ophthalmology), Ocular biomechanics and mechanobiology with emphasis on multi-scale approaches
Ideker, Raymond E., Professor, Division of Cardiovascular Disease (Department of Medicine), Study of Cardiac Arrhythmia, Cardioversion and Electrical Ablation for Treatment of Arrhythmia
Javed, Amjad, Assistant Professor (Cell Biology, Pathology), Genetic and molecular signaling for cellular differentiation and skeletogenesis
Jun, Ho-Wook, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2006, BS, MS (Hanyang University, South Korea), Ph.D. (Rice), Biomimetic nanotechnology, Biomaterials, Tissue engineering
Kannappan, Ramaswamy, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2015, BPharm, MPharm (Tamilnadu DR. M.G.R. Medical University - India), Ph.D. (Niigata University - Japan), Aging cardiomyopathy, Cardiac stem cells
Keyser, Kent T., Professor (Vision Sciences), Neurotransmitters and receptors
Kim, Harrison, Assistant Professor (Radiology), Breast, pancreatic, and brain cancer imaging
Lahti, Adrienne, M.D.; Professor; Psych – Behavioral Neurobiology, Use of multimodal brain imaging techniques to study the neuropathology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and to evaluate the effects of psychotropic drugs on brain function and biochemistry; translational work aiming at bridging human brain imaging and postmortem studies
Lemons, Jack E. , Professor of Biomaterials; Professor of Surgery; Division Director, Orthopaedic Laboratory Research; Professor of Biomedical and Materials Engineering, 1968, Ph.D. (Florida), Biocompatibility profiles of surgical implant devices with an emphasis on the role(s) of element and/or force transfers along biomaterial-to-tissue interfaces
Liu, Lei, Associate Professor (Optometry), Low vision visual function and rehabilitation
Liu, Xiaoguang (Margaret), Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2016, Chemical Engineering (Shangdong University, M.S. in Biochemical Engineering (Tianjin University), Ph.D. in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (The Ohio State University), Cellular therapy, antibody, anti-cancer, heart failure treatment, industrial biopharmaceutical and biotechnology, metabolic cell-process engineering, bioreactor, cell culture
MacDougall, Mary, Professor and Associate Dean for Research (Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery), Genetic dental diseases, Tooth development, Mineralized matrix, Gene regulation
McCracken, Michael, Professor (General Dental Sciences), Dental implants, Biomimetic materials, Growth factors
McDougall, Mary, Professor (Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery): Genetic dental diseases, tooth development, mineralized matrix, gene regulation
Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne, Professor (Cell Biology, Pathology), Extracellular Matrix Control of Cell and Growth Factor Function
Nabors, L. Burt, Professor (Neurology), Brain tumor treatment and research program
Parpura, Vladimir, M.D., Associate Professor; Neurobiology, The role of glial cells in physiology of nervous system
Pogwizd, Steven, Professor, Division of Cardiovascular Disease (Department of Medicine), Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics
Pollard, Andrew, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 1996, B.S.E., M.S.E., Ph.D. (Duke), Cardiac electrophysiology, Computer simulations and Modeling of electrical signals of the heart
Ponce, Brent, Assistant Professor (Surgery), Biomechanics of the shoulder, Topics pertinent in resident education
Qin, Gangjian, Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Engineering; Director of Molecular Cardiology Program, 1986, MD/MS (Tongji Medical University, China)
Rahemtulla, Firoz, Professor Emeritus (Prosthodontics); Connective tissue biochemistry, Oxidants and antioxidant enzymes, Salivary proteins, Peroxidases
Robbin, Michelle, Professor (Radiology), Hemodialysis patient ultrasound, ultrasound contrast agents and vascular ultrasound
Rogers, Jack M., Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 1994, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (California-San Diego), Cardiac electrophysiology, Computer simulations, Signal analysis of cardiac arrythmias
Segrest, Jere, Professor, Division of Gerontology/Geriatrics/Palliative Care (Department of Medicine), Plasma lipoprotein structure and function
Serra, Rosa, Professor (Cell, Devvelopment & Integrative Biology), Mechanism of TGF-ß action in developmental and disease processes
Sethu, Palaniappan, Associate Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Engineering, 2013, M.Eng., M.S., Ph.D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), B.Tech (PSG College of Technology, India), Microfluidic cellular and molecular analysis, Physiologically relevant models of cardiac and vascular tissue, Nanotechnology based approaches to study sub-cellular signaling
Smith, William M., Professor Emeritus of Biomedical Engineering, 1994, B.S. (Oglethorpe), Ph.D. (Duke)
Song, Yuhua, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2006, B.S. (Jilin University of Technology), M.S. (Harbin University of Science and Technology), Ph.D. (Harbin Institute of Technology), Computational biomechanics, Computational biology, Multiscale modeling
Ver Hoef, Lawrence, Associate Professor (Neurobiology), Clinical neurophysiology/neuroimaging and magnetoencephalography
Visscher, Kristina, Assistant Professor (Neurobiology)
Walker, Harrison, Assistant Professor (Neurology), Deep brain stimulation for the management of Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders
Wick, Timothy M., Professor and Chair of Biomedical Engineering; Senior Associate Dean, School of Engineering, 2005, B.S. (Colorado), Ph.D. (Rice), Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, Bioreactor design, Drug delivery
Willey, Christopher, Associate Professor (Radiation Oncology), Investigating kinase driven signal transduction cascades in a spectrum of biological systems, Bioinformatics for kinomics and personalized medicine, Systems biology approaches in glioblastoma multiforme
Zhang, Yuhua, Assistant Professor (Ophthalmology), Advanced retinal imaging technology
Zhou, LuFang, Assistant Professor, Division of Cardiovascular Disease (Department of Medicine), Pathophysiology and therapeutics of oxidative stress related to diseases of mitochondrial origin as it pertains to cardiovascular disease and diabetes
Zhou, Yong, Assistant Professor, Division of Pulmonary/Allergy/Critical Care (Department of Medicine), Myofibroblast differentiation and emphysema
Zhu, Wugiang, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2015, M.D. in Clinical Medicine (Hubei Medical University in China), Ph.D. in Internal Medicine-Cardiology (Tongji Medical University, Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Chind), Ph.D. in Cellular and Integrative Physiology(Indiana)