School of Engineering

Dean: Jeffrey W. Holmes, MD, PhD
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs & Graduate Programs: Gregg M. Janowski, PhD
Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs: Zoe B. Dwyer, PhD
Associate Dean for Research: Timothy M. Wick, PhD

The School of Engineering is comprised of five departments: Biomedical Engineering; Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering; Electrical and Computer Engineering; Materials Science and Engineering; and Mechanical Engineering. The School offers seven programs leading to a master’s degree and six programs leading to a doctoral degree.

Graduate education at UAB's School of Engineering is about advancing your career, whether your goal is engineering practice, industrial research, further studies, or academia. The Masters of Engineering (MEng) and Masters of Science in Engineering Management (MSEM) emphasize specialized skills in engineering management, information management, leadership, construction, structures, sustainable smart cities, and safety. Our research-based master's of science and doctoral programs bring students and faculty together with medical professionals, practicing engineers, business leaders, and scientists to push the envelope and discover new, innovative solutions for the challenges of our world. The School of Engineering provides our students with the opportunities and challenges to change the world.

ASEM-Adv Safety Engineering Courses

ASEM 601. ASEM Seminar. 0 Hours.

Seminar focusing on student research and guest presentations of various topics of interest to safety and risk management engineers and safety professionals.

ASEM 610. Introduction to System Safety - Prevention through Design. 3 Hours.

Best practice in any business sector requires the pursuit of a triple bottom line - protecting people, planet, and profit. This course provides an overview of system safety in general and Prevention through Design in particular and explores their efficacy in helping companies achieve a bottom line that is socially, environmentally, and financially rewarding. Topics of inquiry include the processes of hazard analysis and risk assessment, the concept of "acceptable" risk, the safety decision hierarchy of controls, safety standards (the mandatory minimum vs. the voluntary best practice), safety as a cost control strategy, and the critical elements of a comprehensive, advanced safety program. Course content is presented within the framework of real-world case studies from a variety of industry sectors, including, but not limited to, manufacturing, utilities, and health care and includes several guest lectures by leaders in the profession. Students apply course content to their own business environment. Guest lecturers from diverse backgrounds will discuss their experiences in managing safety in the workplace. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. Course must be taken during the first semester.

ASEM 611. Hazard Analysis and Waste Elimination. 3 Hours.

Hazards have the potential to cause harm to people, planet, and profits. Hazard analysis is a process that begins with the identification of a hazard and proceeds into an estimate of the severity of harm or damage that could result if the potential is realized and a hazard-related incident occurs (ASSE TR-Z790.001 – 2009). This course examines engineering techniques utilized to systematically and logically identify and analyze hazards in the workplace. These techniques include preliminary hazard list (PHL), preliminary hazard analysis (PHA), system hazard analysis (SHA), subsystem hazard analysis (SSHA) and others. Students work in teams to use these techniques to retrospectively analyze a real-world disaster.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B]

ASEM 612. Engineering Risk. 3 Hours.

Engineering risk is defined both quantitatively and qualitatively as an estimate of the probability that a hazard-related incident will occur and of the severity of harm or damage that could result. This course provides students with tools to assess and reduce safety risks in their own company. These tools include risk assessment matrices, probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) measures, including event tree analysis, fault tree analysis, and other prevention through design concepts. The role of a structured, formalized decision analysis process in preventing serious injuries and fatalities is also explored. Students engage in a risk mitigation decision analysis project, which is specific to their company and/or business sector. Guest lecturers from diverse industries discuss their experiences in assessing and managing risk. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B]

ASEM 613. Human Performance and Engineering Design. 3 Hours.

Companies can miss important opportunities to eliminate waste if they rely primarily on training to prevent human error. This course explores the historical perspective on human error and serious injury. The course material will provide a solid understanding of the principles of occupational biomechanics and human tolerance to injury with focus on human anthropometry and mechanical work capacity. This course also includes studies of human reliability, static analysis of systems in equilibrium and mechanical systems, design and performance. Due to the quantity of back related injuries and related lost time in the workplace, back pain and injury is studied along with the effect of vibration on the human body. Real-world case studies provide for application of the engineering hierarchy of controls: hazard elimination, hazard substitution, engineering controls, warnings, administrative behavior controls, and personal protective equipment. The course also examines the design aspects of ergonomics, the biomechanical engineering basis of injury prevention, and the long term economic consequences of seemingly minor injuries. In semester projects, students perform incident investigations using biomechanical and other data. After gathering and analyzing data to determine injury causation, they will identify and re-design error-provocative environments in their own workplaces. Guest lecturers from diverse backgrounds will discuss their experiences with human performance and/or biomechanics. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B]

ASEM 614. Engineering Ethics and Acceptable Risk. 3 Hours.

This course explores the economic, social, and political consequences of safety risk and considers provocative real world dilemmas: What is acceptable risk? Are the fundamental canons of engineering ethics contrary to the concept of acceptable risk? What is the worth of human life? Students will conduct critical reviews of corporate safety and ethics policies from market leaders in all major industries as well as their own company. Real-world case studies provide the framework for exercises in resolving conflicts of interest and avoiding the dilemma of "whistle blowing." Guest lecturers from diverse backgrounds will discuss their experiences with ethics in the workplace. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently)

ASEM 615. Leading through Climates of Change. 3 Hours.

All progressive companies are moving toward greater sustainability - protecting people, planet, and profits. To guide their companies through these changes and integrate safety into the priorities at the executive level, safety engineers and professionals must have strong leadership skills. This course explores engineering leadership best practices, including the eight steps of transformational leadership - creating a sense of urgency, creating a guiding coalition, developing a vision and strategies, communicating the vision, empowering broad-based action, generating short term wins, consolidating gains and anchoring the culture. This course also explores the concept of Resilience Engineering and helps students understand the impacts of socio-technical risks. Guest lecturers from diverse industries discuss their experiences in managing change in today's global business environment. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B]

ASEM 616. Policy Issues in Prevention through Design. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of best practices in four major policy areas: (1) cost-benefit analysis; (2) corporate culture and the "HR Department"; (3) standards, codes, and regulations; and (4) strategic alliance development. Case studies are used to illuminate both the role of engineers and other safety professionals in shaping public policy on the local, national and international levels and the ethical challenges they encounter. The significance of an organization's corporate culture in developing and implementing advanced safety management plans is also explored. Students conduct "gap analyses" of their company's policies by comparing them to best practices and identifying unintended consequences of poor safety policy in their own business and industry sector. Students will engage in discussion board posts on contemporary policy issues and participate in exercises related to federal rulemaking. Guest lecturers from diverse backgrounds will discuss their experiences with policy issues. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B]

ASEM 617. Crisis Leadership and Safety-Critical Design. 3 Hours.

Unique technical and leadership skills are required to avert or manage a crisis. This course teaches students those skills in an experiential learning environment. Case studies of real-world industrial and environmental disasters provide the framework for exploring critical human-machine interfaces; crisis communication; coping with people in recovery and developing and implementing a business continuity response. Students will engage in discussion board posts and develop a Business Impact Analysis report for their work environment or business unit. Guest lecturers from diverse backgrounds will discuss their experiences in managing crisis events. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B]

ASEM 619. Capstone Project - Part 1. 3 Hours.

Bringing to bear the competencies acquired through the program, students develop a proposal, outline, schedule and rough draft of a comprehensive, advanced safety engineering and management plan for their business unit/specialty area that is consistent with the ANSI/AIHA Z10-2005, Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems standard. Judicious selection of the Capstone topic and of projects throughout the ASEM curriculum allows students to build on and use earlier course products to support their Capstone report. Live participation in a quarterly 1.25 hour online forum is required. Must be taken during the penultimate or final semester.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 611 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 612 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 613 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 614 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 615 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 616 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 617 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 618 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 628 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently)

ASEM 620. Capstone Project - Part 2. 3 Hours.

Students complete the development of their comprehensive, advanced safety engineering and management (ASEM) plan, including background information of the project, an ASEM plan (management and employee participation, planning, implementation and operation, evaluation and corrective action and management review), and rollout strategy. Students must submit completed report with detailed attachments, and orally present project highlights to the class in a live online classroom setting. Live participation in a quarterly 1.25 hour online forum is required.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 611 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 612 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 613 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 614 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 615 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 616 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 617 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 618 [Min Grade: B] and ASEM 628 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently)

ASEM 628. Electrical Systems Safety. 3 Hours.

There is a subset of occupational hazards characterized as low frequency, but with very high consequence (potential for catastrophic loss, fatality or permanent disabling injury). A mishap involving unintentional exposure or contact with electrical energy is one of the low frequency/high consequence exposures. We live in an electrical world, with electrical hazards embedded in nearly every aspect of daily living – at home, at work, in public places, and in recreational activities. This course explores hazards, risks and context of electrical mishaps coupled with a systems safety engineering approach to manage the risks. Course content is presented within the framework of real-world case studies from a variety of industry sectors, including, but not limited to, manufacturing, utilities, and health care and includes several guest lectures by leaders in the profession. Students apply course content to their own business environment. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required.
Prerequisites: ASEM 610 [Min Grade: B]

ASEM 690. Special Topics in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Special Topics.

ASEM 691. Individual Study in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Individual study.

BME-Biomedical Engineering Courses

BME 520. Implant-Tissue Interactions. 3 Hours.

An overview of implant biocompatibility including tissue histology, histopathology of implant response and the regulatory process for medical devices.

BME 524. Current Topics in Stem Cell Engineering. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for students interested in the field of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering using stem cells and stem cell derived cells. The course will introduce the role of stem cells in tissue growth and development, the theory behind the design and in vitro construction of tissue and organ replacements, and the applications of biomedical engineering principles to the treatment of tissue-specific diseases. Students will have hands on experience on culturing and analyzing stem cells, stem cell differentiation, analysis of functional and physiological properties of differentiated cells, and fabricating basic engineered-tissues.

BME 535. Tissue Engineering. 3 Hours.

Principles underlying strategies for regenerative medicine such as stem cell based therapy, scaffold design, proteins or genes delivery, roles of extracellular matrix, cell-materials interactions, angiogenesis, tissue transplantation, mechanical stimulus and nanotechnology.

BME 543. Medical Image Processing. 3 Hours.

Fundamental topics of medical image processing to practical applications using conventional computer software.

BME 550. Computational Neuroscience. 3 Hours.

This course examines the computational principles used by the nervous system. Topics include: biophysics of axon and synapse, sensory coding (with an emphasis on vision and audition), planning and decision-making, and synthesis of motor responses. There will be an emphasis on a systems approach throughout. Homework includes simulations.

BME 561. Bioelectric Phenomena. 3 Hours.

Quantitative methods in the electrophysiology of neural, cardiac and skeletal muscle systems.

BME 562. Cardiac Electrophysiology. 3 Hours.

Experimental and computational methods in cardiac electrophysiology, ionic currents, action potentials, electrical propagation, the electrocardiogram, electromechanical coupling, cardiac arrhythmias, effects of electric fields in cardiac tissue, defibrillation, and ablation.

BME 571. Continuum Mechanics of Solids. 3 Hours.

Matrix and tensor mathematics, fundamentals of stress, momentum principles, Cauchy and Piola-Kirchoff stress tensors, static equilibrium, invariance, measures of strain, Lagrangian and Eulerian formulations, Green and Almansistrain, deformation gradient tensor, infinitesimal strain, constitutive equations, finite strain elasticity, strain energy methods, 2-D Elasticity, Airy Method, viscoelasticity, mechanical behavior of polymers.

BME 572. Industrial Bioprocessing and Biomanufacturing. 3 Hours.

This course will introduces students to the growing industries related to biomedical, biopharmaceutical and biotechnology. It is targeted to offer the students marketable skills to work in a vital area of economic growth and also convey some of the challenges and opportunities awaiting.

BME 590. Special Topic in Biomedical Engineering. 1-3 Hour.

Special Topic in Biomedical Engineering.

BME 591. Individual Study in Biomedical Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

Individual Study in Biomedical Engineering.

BME 601. Seminar in Biomedical Engineering. 1 Hour.

Current topics in biomedical engineering technology and applications.

BME 617. Engineering Analysis. 3 Hours.

Advanced ordinary differential equations, transform techniques, scalar and vector field theory, partial differential equations (heat, wave, Laplace).
Prerequisites: MA 750

BME 623. Wound Healing. 3 Hours.

Study of principles of healing, methods to enhance, and clinical applications.

BME 630. Engineering Design and Commercialization. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the process of innovating medical technologies and better prepare them for a career in the medical technology industry. Students will learn aspects of biomedical product development from needs finding, invention, intellectual property, and regulatory processes.

BME 664. Neural Computation. 3 Hours.

This course examines the principal theoretical underpinnings of computation in neural networks. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the relationship between the different approaches: dynamical systems, statistical mechanics, logic, Kalman filters, and likelihood/Bayesian estimation.

BME 665. Computational Vision. 3 Hours.

This course approaches the study of biological and artificial vision from a theoretical perspective beginning with a comparative survey of visual systems and then examining vision algorithms and architectures.

BME 670. Quantitative Physiology. 3 Hours.

Study of physiological problems using advanced mathematical techniques. Topics covered include: mechanics, fluid dynamics, transport, electrophysiology of cell membranes, and control systems.
Prerequisites: BME 517 [Min Grade: C] or ME 661 [Min Grade: C] or ME 761 [Min Grade: C]

BME 672. Cellular Therapy. 3 Hours.

Introduction to research in cellular therapy, its clinical applications, and its potential for commercialization. Students will learn fundamental mechanisms, become familiar with the progress of several successful therapies that use human T cells and stem cells, and learn the challenges and opportunities for future biopharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

BME 673. Lab Rotation. 3 Hours.

Entering BME graduate students will work in the laboratories of 2 or 3 potential research mentors. The duration of each rotation period will be by mutual agreement between student and faculty but must be at least 4 weeks. The goal is for students to match with their primary research mentor by the end of the course.

BME 680. Biomolecular Modeling. 3 Hours.

Molecular modeling principles and applications. Students will perform hands-on exercises using molecular modeling tools and software. Students will learn the critical relationships among structure, function, and thermodynamic driving forces in structural biology and become able to utilize molecular modeling techniques to explore biological phenomena at the molecular level.

BME 690. Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering.

BME 691. Individual Study in Biomedical Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

Individual Study in Biomedical Engineering.

BME 693. Internship in Biomedical Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

BME 697. Journal Club. 1-3 Hour.

Journal Club.

BME 698. Non-Thesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

BME 699. Thesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

Prerequisites: GAC M

BME 701. Seminar in Biomedical Engineering. 1 Hour.

Current topics in biomedical engineering technology and applications.

BME 717. Engineering Analysis. 3 Hours.

Advanced ordinary differential equations, transform techniques, scalar and vector field theory, partial differential equations (heat, wave, Laplace).
Prerequisites: MA 750

BME 723. Wound Healing. 3 Hours.

Study of principles of healing, methods to enhance, and clinical applications.

BME 764. Neural Computation. 3 Hours.

This course examines the principal theoretical underpinnings of computation in neural networks. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the relationship between the different approaches: dynamical systems, statistical mechanics, logic, Kalman filters, and likelihood/Bayesian estimation.

BME 765. Computational Vision. 3 Hours.

This course approaches the study of biological and artificial vision from a theoretical perspective. We begin with a comparative survey of visual systems, and will examine vision algorithms and architectures.

BME 770. Quantitative Physiology. 3 Hours.

Study of physiological problems using advanced mathematical techniques. Topics covered include: mechanics, fluid dynamics, transport, electrophysiology of cell membranes, and control systems.
Prerequisites: BME 517 [Min Grade: C] or ME 661 [Min Grade: C] or ME 761 [Min Grade: C]

BME 772. Cellular Therapy. 3 Hours.

Introduction to research in cellular therapy, its clinical applications, and its potential for commercialization. Students will learn fundamental mechanisms, become familiar with the progress of several successful therapies that use human T cells and stem cells, and learn the challenges and opportunities for future biopharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

BME 773. Lab Rotation. 3 Hours.

Entering BME graduate students will work in the laboratories of 2 or 3 potential research mentors. The duration of each rotation period will be by mutual agreement between student and faculty, but must be at least 4 weeks. The goal is for students to match with their primary research mentor by the end of the course.

BME 780. Biomolecular Modeling. 3 Hours.

Molecular modeling principles and applications. Students will perform hands-on exercises using molecular modeling tools and software. Students will learn the critical relationships among structure, function, and thermodynamic driving forces in structural biology and become able to utilize molecular modeling techniques to explore biological phenomena at the molecular level.

BME 790. Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering.

BME 791. Individual Study in Biomedical Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

Individual Study in Biomedical Engineering.

BME 793. Internship in Biomedical Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

BME 797. Journal Club. 1-3 Hour.

Journal Club.

BME 798. Non-Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

BME 799. Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

Prerequisites: GAC Z

CE-Civil Engineering Courses

CE 515. Building Information Modeling (BIM). 3 Hours.

This class provides an introduction to the virtual world of design and construction. Topics covered include uses for technology, what is BIM, and have a focus on AutoCAD and Revit Software. An emphasis is placed on the use of these tools and their practical applications to the real world environment. Students are provided with the software through the Autodesk Student community and are required to complete a Multi-Step term Project.

CE 516. Mechanical Vibrations. 3 Hours.

Free and forced single-degree-of-freedom systems. Multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Damped, forced two-degree-of- freedom systems. Simple continuous systems. CE 215 (Dynamics) and E 220 (Mechanics of Solids) are prerequisites for this course.

CE 520. Advanced Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Variation of stress at point including determination of principal and maximum shear stresses. Basic problems involving symmetrical deformation; thickwall cylinders, spheres, and rotating disk. Torsions of noncircular sections. Curved beams. Failure Theories. Unsymmetrical bending and shear center. CE 220 (Mechanics of Solids) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 526. Foundation Engineering. 3 Hours.

Application of principles of soil mechanics to: determine bearing capacity and settlement of spread footings, mats, single piles and pile groups; site investigation, evaluate data from field and laboratory tests; estimation of stresses in soil masses; lateral resistance of piles and pile groups; retaining walls, sheetpiles and coffer-dams.

CE 530. Water Supply/Drainage Design. 3 Hours.

Water requirements; wastewater characteristics. Hydraulics and design of sewers; distribution, and reuse of water. Development of water supplies; design considerations. CE 337 (Hydraulics) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 531. Energy Resources. 3 Hours.

Overview of the various energy resources: oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, hydro, solar, geothermal, biomass, wind, and ocean energy resources, in terms of supply, distribution, recovery and conversion, environmental impacts, economies, policy, and technology. Concepts and opportunities for energy conservation; including electric power generation, changing role of electric utilities, transportation applications, and energy use in developing countries. Field trips.

CE 533. Solid and Hazardous Wastes Management. 3 Hours.

Overview of waste characterizations, regulations, and management options.

CE 534. Air Quality Modeling and Monitoring. 3 Hours.

Atmospheric pollutants; effects, reactions, and sources. Air pollution meteorology and dispersion modeling. Ambient monitoring. ME 250 (Introduction to Thermodynamic Sciences) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 537. Environmental Experimental Design and Field Sampling. 3 Hours.

Experimental design, sensitivity analyses, water sampling, and flow monitoring. Receiving water chemical reactions. Field investigations. CE 344 (Civil Engineering Analysis I) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 537L. Environmental Experimental Design and Field Sampling Lab. 0 Hours.

Lab experiences in environmental experimental design and field sampling.

CE 542. Hwy Materials and Construction. 3 Hours.

Properties of materials used in highway construction. Construction methods and management. CE 332 (Soil Engineering) and CE 345 (Transportation Engineering) are suggested prerequisites for this course.

CE 543. Pavement Design & Construction. 3 Hours.

Analysis of stresses and strains in pavement systems. Design and construction of flexible and rigid pavements, base courses and subgrades. Effects of loading on pavement life.

CE 544. Civil Engineering Analysis II. 3 Hours.

Sampling and experimental design. Hypotheses testing. Decision Analyses. Multiple regression analyses. Nonparametric methods. Analysis of experimental data in civil engineering research; regression, experimental design, non-parametrical analysis. CE 344 (Civil Engineering Analysis I) is suggested as a prerequisite for this course.

CE 553. Design of Wood Structures. 3 Hours.

This course will give students an understanding of structural wood materials, both sawn lumber and a number of engineered wood materials. The main objective of the course is to learn how to design wood structures using these materials, including the design of beams, columns, connections, roof diaphragms, and shear walls. The requirement of the National Design Specification for Wood Structures will be addressed.

CE 554. Design of Masonry Structures. 3 Hours.

Design and detailing of masonry structures. Nomenclature, properties, and specifications for components. Design of assemblages, simple masonry structures, unreinforced and reinforced elements, and complex masonry structures. CE 360 (Structural Analysis) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 556. Prestressed Concrete Design. 3 Hours.

Principles and concepts of design in prestressed concrete including elasticand ultimate strength analysis for flexural, shear, bond, and deflections. Principles of concordancy and linear transformation for indeterminate prestressed structures. CE 455 (Reinforced Concrete Design) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 557. Concrete Technology. 3 Hours.

Properties of concrete in relation to specifying, purchasing, and evaluating concrete materials. Fresh and hardened concrete properties. Concrete mix design procedures. Effects of finishing, curing, weather conditions, and various construction procedures. Ready mix concrete production and field placement techniques. Specifications writing to ensure good quality concrete and field inspection procedures. Case studies of problems in concrete construction. CE 222) (Civil Engineering Materials Laboratory) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 560. Structural Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Elastic beam deflections, beam columns, lateral torsional buckling, column stability, plastic design, plate bending, yield line theory.

CE 561. Introduction to the Finite Element Method. 3 Hours.

Concepts and applications of the finite element method. Development and applications of basic finite elements. Software use.

CE 562. Advanced Structural Analysis. 3 Hours.

Analysis of indeterminate structures using classical and matrix methods. Use of large-scale computer programs. A grade of C or better in CE 360 (Computer Methods in Civil Engineering) or its equivalent is required.

CE 564. Structural Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Closed form and numerical solutions to single-degree-of-freedom structural models. Analysis of multistory frames. Computer application and seismic analysis. Techniques of modal analysis.

CE 567. Wind and Seismic Loads. 3 Hours.

Methods for calculating loads on structures caused by extreme winds and earthquakes. Calculation of wind loads on various types of structures according to theory and codes. Determination of earthquake loads on structures using structural dynamics and codes. CE 360 (Structural Analysis) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 568. Bridge Engineering. 3 Hours.

Bridge loads, steel beam bridges, composite beam bridges, bridge bearings, reinforced and prestressed concrete slab and T-beam bridges, bridge evaluations and ratings, upgrade methodologies; computer applications. CE 450 (Structural Steel Design) and CE 455 (Reinforced Concrete Design) are prerequisites for this course.

CE 570. International Research Experience. 3 Hours.

The International Research Experience for Students (IRES) program provides the opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to participate in hands-on engineering research in an international setting. Students perform research on an approved topic related to civil engineering design in an international environment. Students select a topic, perform a detailed literature review, and work with mentors from UAB and the international host institution to develop research objectives and a detailed research plan. The course will culminate in a 6-8 week visit to the international host institution, during which time students will conduct hands-on research with their mentors and prepare final reports.

CE 575. Construction Safety and Health Management. 3 Hours.

This course covers various causes of construction accidents and the adopted strategies to prevent worksite injuries and illnesses. Other topics covered include workers' compensation, OSHA standards for the construction industry, economics of construction safety management, temporary structures, system safety, ergonomic applications, health hazards, and the development of a safety program.

CE 580. Introduction to Water and Wastewater Treatment. 3 Hours.

Physical unit operations, and chemical/biological unit processes for water and wastewater treatment. Design of facilities for treatment. Treatment and disposal of sludge. CE 236 (Environmental Engineering) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 585. Engineering Hydrology. 3 Hours.

Hydrologic principles including hydrology cycle, precipitation data, and stream-flow measurements. Applications to engineering problems; stream-flow analysis and watershed management.

CE 590. Special Topics in Civil Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

Special Topic in Civil Engineering.

CE 591. Individual Study in Civil Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

Individual Study in Civil Engineering.

CE 600. Sustainable Construction. 3 Hours.

Study of sustainable construction techniques and best practices. Provides an understanding of the interdependencies between planning, designing, building, operating, and demolishing the built environment and their impacts on the natural environment. Course topics will include: (1) issues of recourse efficiency, economics, ethics, waste, human health, environmental justice, and industrial ecology; (2) alternative practices that significantly reduce adverse environmental impacts of built infrastructure, and (3) explore past and present thinking of engineering practitioners in this newly emerging discipline.

CE 605. Project Management. 3 Hours.

Presents the theory and practice of project management as a distinct discipline with applications in time, cost, and performance management. Managerial, organizational, behavioral and cost benefit aspects of project management are covered, as well as various applied models for organizing, executing, and monitoring a project. Basic estimating techniques to determine cost and time for construction work packages are discussed followed by scheduling model techniques to include the Critical Path Method (CPM), Precedence Diagramming Method (PDM), Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT), and Gantt charts.

CE 607. Engineering Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

Course focuses on the entrepreneurial engineer--a new type of engineer who needs a broad range of business skills and knowledge above and beyond a strong science and engineering background. The course will introduce engineering students to the key aspects of engineering entrepreneurship including business planning, solving problems, risk taking, financing, marketing, and entrepreneurial leadership. The students will also be introduced to the many opportunities and challenges that accompany starting and operating an entrepreneurial venture. Entrepreneurial company leaders will present their experiences and share their leadership styles as part of the course.

CE 608. Green Building Design. 3 Hours.

Quantitative introduction to the principles of "Green Building Design". Provides students an understanding of the interdependencies between economics, technology, design, building occupation and the subsequent impact on the natural environment. Course will emphasize green building materials, new technologies, and sustainable construction methods. Course also includes LEED Case Studies (industrial, commercial, residential, and institutional examples).

CE 610. The Engineered Environment. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of environmental engineering as they apply to the construction of the built environment and contemporary issues faced by engineers in developing nations such as Egypt. Topics include air pollution, solid waste management, water treatment, environmental ethics, etc.

CE 612. Theory of Elasticity. 3 Hours.

Equations of linear reduction to plane stress, plane strain, and generalized plane strain. Airy and love stress functions in solution of problems.

CE 615. Theory of Elastic Stability. 3 Hours.

Static stability of bars, beams, trusses, and rigid frames. Dynamic stability of bars. Energy method applied to bucking problems. General theory of elastic stability. CE 220 (Mechanics of Solids) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 617. Theory of Plates and Shells. 3 Hours.

Linear theory and solutions of plates and various shapes. Large deflection theory and solutions of rectangular and circular plates. Membrane and bending theories of shells. Solutions of problems in conical, cylindrical, and spherical shell.

CE 621. Transportation Engineering Seminar. 1 Hour.

Seminar focusing on student research and guest presentations of various topics of interest to graduate transportation engineering students.

CE 622. Traffic Flow Theory. 3 Hours.

Microscopic and macroscopic traffic flow characteristics. Traffic flow analytical techniques including car-following models, traffic stream models, shock wave analysis. Queuing analysis and gap acceptance. Simulation models for network analysis. CE 345 (Transportation Engineering) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 623. Non-Motorized Transportation Design and Planning. 3 Hours.

Urban planning principles that support non-motorized transportation, local bicycle or pedestrian plans, non-motorized transportation safety related considerations, non-motorized transportation design including traffic calming techniques, procedures for capacity analysis of pedestrian facilities.

CE 624. Simulation Models for Transportation Applications. 3 Hours.

Basic concepts of simulation models for analysis and optimization of transportation systems. Experimentation with planning simulation models and traffic models for signal timing and capacity analysis. CE 345 (Transportation Engineering) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 625. Intelligent Transportation Systems. 3 Hours.

Legal, institutional and planning issues. System architecture, telecommunication techniques, Advanced User Services, intermodal systems, deployment programs, cost and benefit evaluation.

CE 631. Environmental Law. 3 Hours.

Law as it applies to the practicing environmental engineer. New and emerging regulations.

CE 632. Industrial Waste and Wastewater Treatment. 3 Hours.

Solid wastes and wastewaters from various industries. Assessment of treatability, system design, and equipment selection.

CE 633. Solid and Hazardous Waste Management. 3 Hours.

Provides students a quantitative introduction to solid and hazardous waste characterizations, international regulations, and management options. Course topics to include (1) Solid waste management hierarchy (reduce, reuse, recycle, recovery, responsible disposal); (2) Dry tomb landfill design; and (3) Hazardous waste identification and treatment/disposal.

CE 636. Stormwater Pollution Management. 3 Hours.

Quality and quantity of stormwater. Receiving water problems and sources of pollutants. Runoff quality and quantity characterizations. Erosion control. Selection and design of controls; regulations.

CE 638. Water and Wastewater Chemistry. 3 Hours.

Aquatic chemistry. Chemical behavior of pollutants in receiving waters. Fate of common pollutants. Chemical kinetics in natural waters. Photochemical reactions. Modeling of wastewater discharges.

CE 639. Sediment Sources and Controls. 3 Hours.

Erosion and sediment transport areas; design of common erosion control practices.

CE 640. Wastewater Treatment Engineering. 3 Hours.

Wastewater sources and characteristics. Design and operation of wastewater treatment facilities, including grit removal, oil and grease removal, dissolved air flotation, activated sludge process, trickling filters, and rotating biological contractors, stabilization ponds and aerated lagoons, anaerobic processes for wastewater treatment and sludge digestion. Ultimate disposal of wastewater residues and considerations of discharge criteria.

CE 641. Civil Engineering Seminar. 0 Hours.

Seminar focusing on guest presentations of various civil and environmental engineering topics of interest for CE Masters students. Mandatory enrollment once prior to graduation.

CE 646. Traffic Engineering Operations. 3 Hours.

Highway and Intersection capacity analysis, traffic signal timing and phasing, coordination, freeway operations, non-signalized traffic control techniques. CE 345 (Transportation Engineering) is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 648. Urban and Transportation Planning. 3 Hours.

Land use planning for transportation systems; trip generation, trip distribution, and traffic assignment. CE 345 (Transportation Engineering) or an equivalent is a prerequisite for this course.

CE 649. Engineering Liability. 3 Hours.

Laws related to liability for engineering design in the context of productsliability and construction projects; roles and liabilities between various parties involved in construction projects.

CE 650. Advanced Structural Steel. 3 Hours.

Beams, columns, tension members, and connections; current research. CE 450 (Structural Steel Design) or its equivalent is required.

CE 655. Advanced Reinforced Concrete. 3 Hours.

Beam, column, and slab actions; current research. CE 455 (Reinforced Concrete Design) or its equivalency is required.

CE 658. Engineering Management. 3 Hours.

Management techniques for the practicing engineer.

CE 663. Finite Element Methods. 3 Hours.

Theory and applications in structural mechanics. Plane stress, plane strain, axisymmetric problems, solids, plates, shells, nonlinear systems.

CE 681. Environmental Chemistry. 3 Hours.

Chemical equilibrium, acid/base, chemical concepts in pollutant behavior. Chemical kinetics, redox system, hydrolysis, pesticides, chemical wastes.

CE 682. Water Treatment Engineering. 3 Hours.

Water sources and characteristics. Design and operations of water treatment facilities. Topics Include lime softening operations, co-agulation, flocculation, clarification dissolved air flotation, filtration, disinfection, absorption, ion exchange and sludge management.

CE 683. Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes Lab. 3 Hours.

Construction and evaluation of bench-scale treatment processes. Treatability of water and wastewater. Coagulation of sedimentation, settleability of biological sludge, aerobic biological treatment, chemical treatment, water softening toxicity, disinfection, and sludge treatment processes.

CE 685. Engineering Hydrology. 3 Hours.

Hydrologic principles including hydrologic cycle, precipitation data, and stream-flow measurements. Applications to engineering problems; stream-flow analysis and watershed management. A grade of C or better in CE 337 (Hydraulics) or its equivalency is required.

CE 686. Engineering Hydrogeology. 3 Hours.

Groundwater movement, natural quality, contamination, and restoration. Physical and chemical properties of groundwater. Well hydraulics and flow net analyses. Prevention and control of groundwater contamination. CE 485 (Engineering Hydraulics) and MA 252 (Differential Equations) are required.

CE 687. Stormwater Detention Pond Design. 3 Hours.

Stormwater problems and control methods. Urban hydrology prediction procedures for drainage and water quality studies. Detention pond design basics, limitations and multiple benefits.

CE 688. Strategic Management and Leadership Applications in a Global Environment. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to prepare students to face the demanding management and leadership challenges facing construction and engineering industry leaders as competition becomes ever more globalized. The necessity to personally remain trained and relevant in the changing business environment is emphasized. Strong resume writing and oral interview skills are emphasized as a necessary skill for job seekers as well as job providers. Strategic planning, management and leadership in the built environment requires savvy leaders with exceptionally developed analytical and communications skills suitable for multi-disciplinary and multi-national ventures. Every individual and organization must continually innovate and reinvent to stay competitive. In a competitive environment, a strong working knowledge of the financial markets is essential and students are exposed to multiple lessons presented by financial industry practitioners. Students participate in a group project designed to reinforce the methodology associated with preparing and presenting a dynamic business plan. This course provides the opportunity for students to discuss and research these concepts and to recognize the necessity to think independently, challenge conventional thinking, and visualize alternatives.
Prerequisites: CE 669 [Min Grade: C]

CE 689. Building Information modeling (BIM) Techniques. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an overview of the evolution of BIM technology in the construction industry followed by hands-on training in the basic application of contemporary BIM software. Students will learn basic modeling skills and how to produce graphical presentations. Advanced applications of BIM technology are discussed and demonstrated. Students will be provided with BIM software and are required to complete a multi-step BIM model as a term project.
Prerequisites: CE 669 [Min Grade: C]

CE 690. Special Topics in (Area). 1-3 Hour.

Special Topics (Area).

CE 691. Individual Study in (Area). 1-4 Hour.

Individual Study (Area).

CE 692. CE Capstone Project. 3 Hours.

This course covers specific contemporary topics related to civil engineering practice and knowledge. Capstone project using case studies to apply skills, knowledge, techniques, and concepts developed in prior courses.

CE 693. Applied Research in CEE. 3-9 Hours.

Research tools, including elements of experimental design and proposal preparation. Effective communication, literature searches, and exploratory data analysis. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CE 695. International Construction Contracts/Liability. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of the fundamental aspects of the law that affects construction and engineering companies as well as the project owners. Particular emphasis is placed on contract forms and provisions related to liability for engineering design and construction companies, the roles of the typical participation in the process, and dispute resolution.

CE 697. Master's Project. 3-9 Hours.

A UAB Master's Project must demonstrate evidence of scholarly study and writing that ultimately contributes to the scientific knowledge base. This course is designed to allow students the opportunity to develop original ideas or seek to advance knowledge through theory, conceptualization, design, testing of tools, instruments, or procedures relevant to the practice of civil engineering.

CE 698. Non-Thesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

CE 699. Thesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

Prerequisites: GAC M

CE 712. Theory of Elasticity. 3 Hours.

Equations of linear reduction to plane stress, plane strain, and generalized plane strain. Airy and love stress functions in solution of problems.

CE 715. Theory of Elastic Stability. 3 Hours.

Static stability of bars, beams, trusses, and rigid frames. Dynamic stability of bars. Energy method applied to buckingproblems. General theory of elastic stability.

CE 717. Theory of Plates and Shells. 3 Hours.

Linear theory and solutions of plates of various shapes. Large deflection theory and solutions of rectangular and circular plates. Membrane and bending theories of shells. Solutions of problems in conical, cylindrical,and spherical shell.

CE 721. Transportation Engineering Seminar. 1 Hour.

Seminar focusing on student research and guest presentation of various topics of interest to graduate transportation engineering students.

CE 722. Traffic Flow Theory. 3 Hours.

Microscopic and macroscopic traffic flow characteristics. Traffic flow analytical techniques including car-following models, traffic stream models, shock wave analysis. Queuing analysis and gap acceptance. Simulation models for network analysis.

CE 723. Non-Motorized Transportation Design and Planning. 3 Hours.

Urban planning principles that support non-motorized transportation, local bicycle or pedestrian plans, non-motorized transportation safety related considerations, non-motorized transportation design including traffic calming techniques, procedures for capacity analysis of pedestrian facilities.

CE 724. Simulation Models for Transportation Applications. 3 Hours.

Basic concepts of simulation models for analysis and optimization of transportation systems. Experimentation with planning simulation models and traffic models for signal timing and capacity analysis.

CE 725. Intelligent Transportation Systems. 3 Hours.

Legal, institutional and planning issues related to Intelligent Transportation Systems. System architecture, telecommunication technologies. Advanced User Services, intermodal systems, deployment, cost benefit evaluation.

CE 731. Environmental Law. 3 Hours.

Law as it applies to the practicing environmental engineer. New and emerging regulations.

CE 732. Industrial Waste and Wastewater Treatment. 3 Hours.

Solid wastes and waste waters from various industries; assessment of treatability, system design, and equipment selection.

CE 736. Stormwater Pollution Management. 3 Hours.

Quality and quantity of stormwater. Receiving water problems and sources of pollutants. Runoff quality and quantity characterizations. Erosion control. Selection and design of controls; regulations.

CE 738. Water and Wastewater Chemistry. 3 Hours.

Aquatic chemistry. Chemical behavior of pollutants in receiving waters. Fate of common pollutants. Chemical kinetics in natural waters. Photochemical reactions. Modeling of wastewater discharges.

CE 739. Sediment Sources and Controls. 3 Hours.

Erosion and sediment transport in urban areas, design of common erosion control practices.

CE 740. Wastewater Treatment Engineering. 3 Hours.

Wastewater sources and characteristics. Design and operation of wastewater treatment facilities, including grit removal, oil and grease removal, dissolved air flotation, activated sludge process, trickling filters, and rotating biological contactors, stabilization ponds and aerated lagoons, anaerobic processes for wastewater treatment and sludge digestion. Ultimatedisposal of wastewater residues and considerations of discharge criteria.

CE 741. Civil Engineering Seminar. 0 Hours.

Seminar focusing on guest presentations on various civil and environmental engineering topics of interest for CE Ph.D. students. Mandatory enrollment at least once prior to graduation.

CE 749. Engineering Liability. 3 Hours.

Laws related to liability for engineering design in the context of productsliability and construction projects; roles and liabilities between various parties involved in construction projects.

CE 750. Advanced Structural Steel. 3 Hours.

Beams, columns, tension members, and connections; current research.

CE 755. Advanced Reinforced Concrete. 3 Hours.

Beam, column, and slab actions; current research.

CE 758. Engineering Management. 3 Hours.

Management techniques for practicing engineers.

CE 763. Finite Element Methods. 3 Hours.

Theory and applications in structural mechanics. Plane stress, plane strain, axisymmetric problems, solids, plates, shells, nonlinear systems.

CE 781. Environmental Chemistry. 3 Hours.

Chemical equilibrium, acid/base, chemical concepts in pollutant behavior. Chemical kinetics, redox system, hydrolysis, pesticides, chemical wastes.

CE 782. Water Treatment Engineering. 3 Hours.

Water sources and characteristics. Design and operation of water treatmentfacilities including lime softening operations, coagulation, flocculation, clarification, dissolved air flotation, filtration, disinfection, absorption, ion exchange, and sluge disposal.

CE 783. Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes Lab. 3 Hours.

Construction and evaluation of bench-scale treatment processes. Treatability of water and wastewater. Coagulation of sedimentation, settleability of biological sludge, aerobic biological treatment, chemical treatment, water softening toxicity, disinfection, and sludge treatment processes.

CE 786. Engineering Hydrogeology. 3 Hours.

Groundwater movement, natural quality, contamination, and restoration. Physical and chemical properties of groundwater. Well hydraulics and flow net analyses. Prevention and control of groundwater contamination.

CE 787. Stormwater Detention Pond Design. 3 Hours.

Stormwater problems and control methods. Urban hydrology prediction procedures for drainage and water quality studies. Detention pond design basics, limitations and multiple benefits.

CE 790. Special Topics in (Area). 1-3 Hour.

Special Topics(In Area).

CE 791. Individual Studies (In Area). 1-4 Hour.

Individual Studies(In Area).

CE 793. Applied Research in Civil and Environmental Eng.. 3 Hours.

Research tools, including elements of experimental design and proposal preparation. Effective communication, literature searches, and exploratory data analysis.

CE 797. CCEE Internship. 6 Hours.

Off-campus internship experience working with industries, utilities or government agencies.

CE 798. Non-Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

CE 799. Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

Prerequisites: GAC Z

CECM-Construction Egr Mgmnt Courses

CECM 669. Advanced Project Management. 3 Hours.

Skills generally required for sound project management in a variety of management settings are studied in addition to specific management issues typically associated with engineering and construction companies. Students are introduced to the Project Management Institute's Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). A discussion of corporate organizational structures and the evolving use of project management processes helps establish an appreciation for the role of a Project Manager. The elements of a project and the role and responsibilities of the Project Manager are studied in depth. Students are also acquainted with risk management concepts, financial, labor, safety, equipment, and contracting issues facing managers in the engineering and construction environment. Particular emphasis is placed on individual management strengths and weaknesses, team building, and characteristics of successful companies. One of the primary vehicles for discussion will be small case studies from real companies and the outside reading of one or two relevant topical books.

CECM 670. Construction Estimating and Bidding. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of typical construction delivery systems and the planning and contracting associated with each. A broad study of estimating methodologies ranging from rough "ball park" estimates to detailed unit pricing is presented focusing on labor, equipment, materials, subcontractors, job conditions, location, overhead, and profit. This course is intended to establish a basic understanding of the estimating process; and therefore, substantial course focus will be placed on the term group project.

CECM 671. Construction Liability & Contracts. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of the fundamental aspects of the laws that affect construction and engineering companies as well as the project owners. Particular emphasis is placed on contract forms and provisions related to liability for engineering design and construction companies, the roles of the typical participation in the process, and dispute resolution. Students will learn the importance of contract language negotiations and the impact of project risk transfer.
Prerequisites: CECM 669 [Min Grade: C] or CE 669 [Min Grade: C]

CECM 672. Construction Methods and Equipment. 3 Hours.

This course provides students a big-picture understanding of the construction methods employed to bring the concepts and designs of architects and engineers to physical reality. The International Building Code (IBC) is presented in the course material as are the fundamental principles of green building and sustainable design. Detailed study of typical building materials, design details, and construction methods are presented in a logical sequence. Students will understand the planning and deployment of equipment, materials, labor, and subcontractors using a variety of building material and system types. This course provides a necessary baseline of knowledge, vocabulary, and understanding of the role and activities of the designers, engineers, material suppliers, inspectors, and constructors in the commercial building process.

CECM 673. Project Planning and Control. 3 Hours.

This course provides a thorough understanding of the project scheduling process in construction planning and control. Students learn the relationship between the work breakdown structure, organization breakdown structure, and the activities used in developing project schedules. The Critical Path Method (CPM), Precedence Diagram Method (PDM), Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT), and Line of Balance (LOB) scheduling methods are discussed in detail to include hand calculations and powerful computer software products. The use of scheduling techniques for project control, resources constraint management, cash flow management, risk management, and project completion date management are investigated as is the importance of communications in the planning and monitoring/controlling processes. Students will experience hands on use with Primavera scheduling software.

CECM 674. Green Building Design/Construction. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the emerging trends in green building sustainable design and construction. The course will include instruction suitable to prepare students for the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED©) Green Associates certification exam.

CECM 675. Advanced Construction and Engineering Economics. 3 Hours.

This course provides an extensive overview of financial and managerial accounting concepts for non-financial managers. Students will learn the basic elements of accounting (Generally Accepted Accounting Practices (GAAP)). They will understand how typical financial records and financial statements are established for companies. Once the basics are understood, students will study how financial data is used for internal cost controlling, planning, and budgeting. Fundamental financial calculations associated with the time value of money, debt instruments, taxes, inflation, and cash flow estimates are emphasized. Students will be expected to demonstrate proficiency in the use of Excel business functions in solving financial problems.

CECM 676. Construction Project Risk Management. 3 Hours.

This course addresses the methodologies employed in the engineering and construction industries to assist in rational decision-making in the face of uncertainty. The course reviews the fundamentals of common probabilistic theories and models, data sampling, hypothesis testing and the basics of Bayesian Decision Theory. In addition, basic financial analysis tools will be reviewed. Theoretical models will then be applied to specific examples encountered in engineering and construction decision making with emphasis on engineering economics applications.

CECM 688. Construction Management and Leadership Challenges in the Global Environment. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to prepare students to face the demanding management and leadership challenges facing construction and engineering industry leaders as competition becomes ever more globalized. The necessity to personally remain trained and relevant in the changing business environment is emphasized. Strong resume writing and oral interview skills are emphasized as a necessary skill for job seekers as well as job providers. Strategic planning, management and leadership in the built environment requires savvy leaders with exceptionally developed analytical and communications skills suitable for multi-disciplinary and multi-national ventures. Every individual and organization must continually innovate and reinvent to stay competitive. Students participate in a group project designed to reinforce the methodology associated with preparing and presenting a dynamic business plan. This course will provide the opportunity for students to discuss and research these concepts and to recognize the necessity to think independently, challenge conventional thinking, and visualize alternatives.
Prerequisites: CECM 670 and CECM 675

CECM 689. Building Information Modeling (BIM) Techniques. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an overview of the evolution of BIM technology in the construction industry followed by hands-on training in the basic application of contemporary BIM software. Students will learn basic modeling skills and how to produce graphical presentations. Advanced applications of BIM technology will be discussed and demonstrated. Students will be provided with BIM software and will be required to complete a multi-step BIM model as a term project.

CESC-Sustainable Smart Cities Courses

CESC 600. Principles of Sustainable Development. 3 Hours.

The course will begin by discussing the concepts, viewpoints and fundamentals essential for understanding urban sustainable development agenda. This will be followed by the evaluation of international conferences and action items proposed by the scientific / professional community to advance sustainable smart cities development. You will review basic earth sciences to better evaluate the impact our anthropogenic activities have on the natural environment and therefore how to minimize adverse future outcomes. Throughout the course case studies of sustainable developments will be used to illustrate the value, challenges and limitations of this concept. In the end, you will possess the knowledge base needed to help advance sustainable smart cities development.

CESC 602. Introduction to Sustainable Smart Cities. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the issues surrounding sustainable development within cities and explores how the smart city concept can contribute to the urban sustainable development agenda. The course begins by considering the key characteristics of contemporary urbanization and the issues and challenges that these present for sustainability and urban environmental management. The meaning and nature of sustainability for cities will be discussed, followed by a consideration of the definitions of a smart city and a discussion of the key elements of a smart city including its contribution to both urban governance and the more effective and efficient management of natural resources. With reference to case studies the final part of the course will explore and evaluate the role that smart city processes and applications can play in enhancing the social, economic and environmental aspects of sustainable development within urban areas.

CESC 604. Low-Carbon and Renewable Energy Systems for Smart Cities. 3 Hours.

As the energy infrastructure is arguably the most important feature in any city energy efficiency and integration of renewable energy sources within urban areas are central to the smart city concept. This course will firstly explore why there is a need for the greater use of low carbon and renewable energy systems within cities, followed by an introduction to the range of low carbon and renewable energy technologies currently available. The course will then move on to introduce the concept of the smart grid and then explore the potential to integrate low carbon and renewable energy systems into smart grids in order to move towards cost-effective, efficient and more environmentally friendly energy provision within cities. Challenges and issues associated with the greater integration of low carbon and renewable energy systems into energy infrastructure within large urban areas will also be considered.

CESC 606. Managing Natural Resources and Sustainable Smart Cities. 3 Hours.

The course examines the challenges of resource use and management within the context of an urbanizing world, exploring how new concepts within the smart and sustainable city agenda may contribute to addressing these challenges. The course begins by considering contemporary patterns of resource use created by cities in the modern world at a variety of scales from the local to the global. New approaches in the form of ecosystem services and urban metabolism in relation to natural resource management are examined in terms of their contribution to developing a smart and sustainable city agenda. The course continues by exploring a selection of key natural resources challenges (e.g. water, energy, air quality and climate) and the development of new management approaches and strategies in these areas. The course concludes by examining the development of integrated environmental management systems and governance structures within which these new approaches can be implemented with reference to a series of case studies.

CESC 608. Green Infrastructure and Transportation. 3 Hours.

The course covers policy and technical issues related to sustainable transportation. The course begins by discussing the concepts, viewpoints and fundamentals essential for understanding sustainable transportation planning. Tools used to assess sustainability of transportation facilities and neighborhoods are introduced next. The course also presents design options in support of green infrastructure and transportation, including livable street design, and traffic calming applications. The course is expected to expand students' knowledge base on sustainable transportation issues and help them understand the concept of sustainable transportation toward the development of sustainable smart cities.

CESC 610. Health and Liveability. 3 Hours.

This course will address the multidisciplinary aspects of urban environmental quality and its impact on human well-being. It will provide a critical appreciation of the factors which influence health, well-being and quality of life within contemporary urban environments, demonstrate the importance of genomics and health informatics in developing strategies for improving the health and well-being of urban citizens, explore the importance of urban design and the contribution of the development of food smart cities in improving both urban health and liveability, and understand the increasingly important role of ICT in facilitating delivery of effective and responsive urban health, well-being and quality of life strategies.

CESC 612. Green Buildings. 3 Hours.

The course will begin by discussing the concepts, viewpoints and fundamentals essential for understanding green building and construction. Discussions will then be focused on how key stakeholders and their future collaborations can begin to incorporate sustainable construction practices for the betterment of the project (new construction and inventory rehabilitation). This will be followed by the evaluation of sustainable construction rating systems (LEED, BREEAM, etc.) and how they can be applied to occupied buildings throughout an urban environment. Modular case studies of sustainable construction projects (individual structures to entire community developments) will be used to illustrate the value, challenges and limitations of this concept. In the end, students will possess an expanded knowledge base needed to help advance sustainable smart cities development.

CESC 614. Smart Cities Technologies. 3 Hours.

Smart Technologies.

CESC 616. Big Data and Smart Cities. 3 Hours.

The world is becoming increasingly digitally interconnected and this instrumentation, data collection, interconnection, storage, and analysis can provide the capacity to radically transform how cities monitor, manage and enhance their environmental quality and liveability. This course will provide an introduction to what big data is and how it can contribute to the smarter, more sustainable management of cities. The course will begin by discussing the concepts of big data and the big data revolution, and an overview of the ways in which data can be captured, stored and analyzed. This will be followed by a consideration of how big data can be used by city managers to optimize: their use of physical and digital infrastructures; their sustainable use of natural resources; citizen service delivery; and citizen engagement, participation and urban governance. You will also be introduced to some of the challenges presented by big data, both the technological challenges and the ethical and social implications associated with collecting, storing and using big data. Throughout the course case studies of big data in action will be used to illustrate the value, challenges and limitations of big data in the smarter, more sustainable management of cities.

CESC 618. Research Methods and Project Planning. 3 Hours.

As a student of smart city processes and urban environmental management you need to understand the research process which enables you to take the knowledge and skills which you have learned and apply it to a specific urban sustainability / environmental management issue. This course is not intended to provide a training in research techniques, but rather to make you aware of a wide range of investigative and analytical methods and techniques using examples drawn from the areas of smart city approaches, urban sustainability and environmental management. Both quantitative and qualitative methodologies and primary and secondary data collection will be covered. You will be encouraged to reflect on the research process and its outcomes by critiquing research papers written from methodological standpoints. You will then apply this knowledge to create a viable research proposal for your own Sustainable Smart Cities Masters project. This proposal will require you to identify and justify for your chosen topic: (i) appropriate research questions, (ii) methodologies and data sampling / collection techniques, (iii) ethical and health and safety implications and, (iv) a timetable of action.

CESC 620. Sustainable Smart Cities Research Project. 0 Hours.

This course will develop skills in both research and technical writing in the area of applying and/or evaluating sustainable smart cities processes and policies to a specific urban environmental or sustainability issue. The research proposal produced as part of the Research Methods and Project Planning course will be implemented. This will involve further research into the relevant background and context of a chosen project topic, implementation and evaluation of appropriate methods for collecting and analyzing data, observations and information, the ability to present findings clearly and concisely, and appreciate their significance in relation to the smart city and sustainable urban management agendas. Research should be at the forefront of student's chosen sustainable smart cities research topic and be at a level similar to that required for acceptance and presentation at a national level conference or symposium on smart and sustainable cities. For students in relevant employment, projects may be carried out in your place of work subject to discussions between you, your employer/line manager, and your project supervisor.

CESE - Structural Engineering Courses

CESE 653. Wood and Masonry Design. 3 Hours.

Design of wood structures to meet the requirements of the National Design Specification including beams, columns, and shear walls. Design and detailing of masonry structures. Nomenclature, properties, and specifications for components. Design of assemblages and masonry elements in simple masonry structures.
Prerequisites: CE 455 [Min Grade: C]

CESE 656. Advanced Mechanics of Materials for Structural Engineering. 3 Hours.

This course will review the basic fundamentals of mechanics of materials and will extend the concepts to include 3 dimensional stress and strain, plastic behavior, energy methods, nonlinear behavior, fatigue and fracture, rectangular linear elastic plates, indeterminate structures and stability.

CESE 657. Advanced Design of Steel Structures. 3 Hours.

Design of major components in steel-framed buildings, including composite beams and slabs, beam-columns, moments connections, bracing members, bracing connections, and column base plates.

CESE 659. Advanced Reinforced Concrete. 3 Hours.

In this course students will study the behavior and design of continuous reinforced concrete structures submitted to gravity and lateral loads. The study will include biaxial loading of columns, continuous one-way beams and slabs two-way floor systems, and torsion loading.

CESE 660. Prestressed Concrete Behavior and Design. 3 Hours.

The course will explore the characteristics and design of pre-stressed concrete structural components to include elastic and ultimate strength analyses for flexural, shear, torsion, deflection, strand bond, and pre-stress loss.

CESE 662. Advanced Structural Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course explores the structural analysis of indeterminate structures using classical and approximate methods and structural analysis software. Specific emphasis is placed on the determination of forces in typical multistory, rectilinear frames subject to gravity and lateral loads. In addition to first order analysis, the course included analysis for second order effects and plastic analysis.

CESE 664. Bridge Engineering. 3 Hours.

This course includes the study of bridge loads, including moving load analysis; methods for approximate structural analysis, preliminary bridge design methods, and the structural design of bridge decks and girders.

CESE 665. Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering. 3 Hours.

This course includes the study of earthquake-induced vibrations of single and multi-degree-of-freedom systems, such as single and multistory frames. Emphasis will be placed on structural steel and reinforced concrete building frames. Response spectrum analysis will be investigated as well as building codes and static and dynamic lateral load force procedures.

CESE 676. Design of Structural Steel Connections. 3 Hours.

Design of bolted and welded steel connections, including shear, moment and brace connections using the AISC Specifications requirements and fundamental engineering principals. Design procedures will be discussed for various structural steel connections. The background and limitations of the design procedures will be reviewed and practical solutions will be provided.

CESE 690. Special Topics (Area). 1-3 Hour.

Special Topics (Area).

CESE 698. Non Thesis Research. 3 Hours.

No syllabus for non-thesis research hours.

EE-Electrical & Computer Egr Courses

EE 511. Facilities Engineering. 3 Hours.

General engineering project planning, applying codes and standards, preliminary design, economic forecasting, environmental planning/reports, site selection, population displacement, cash flow, specifications and plans.

EE 512. Practical Computer Vision. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals and applications of computer vision: image preprocessing, detection, segmentation, registration, classification and recognition, texture and color, visual tracking.

EE 518. Wireless Communications. 3 Hours.

Wireless communication system topics such as propagation, modulation techniques, multiple access techniques, channel coding, speech and video, coding, and wireless computer networks. EE 318 (Methods of System Analysis) is a prerequisite for this course.

EE 523. Digital Signal Processing. 3 Hours.

Digital filter analysis and design. FET algorithms. Applications of DSPs inengineering problems such as data acquisition, control, and I/O. Lecture and computer laboratory. EE 318 (Methods of Sytem Analysis) is a prerequisite for this course.

EE 526. Control Systems. 3 Hours.

Theory of linear, continuous-feedback control systems using complex frequency techniques. Block diagram manipulation, performance measures, stability, root locus, construction and locating roots (positive and negative feedback), gain adjustment, and altering dynamic properties. Discrete transforms using z-transform and z-plane root locus.

EE 527. Controls and Automation. 3 Hours.

Power control devices and applications. Relay logic and translation to other forms. Analog and digital computers. Proportional-integral-derivative(PID) control techniques. Modern laboratory instrumentation and man-machine interface software. Lecture and laboratory. EE 233 Engineering Programming Method), EE 318 (Methods of System Analysis), and EE 351 (Electronics) are prerequisites for this course.

EE 531. Analog Integrated Electronics. 4 Hours.

Advanced analysis and design using op-amps, with emphasis on error analysis and compensation. Applications include signal conditioning for instrumentation, instrumentation amplifiers, nonlinear and computational circuits, Butterworth and Chebyshev filter design, power amplifier design, voltage regulator design, and oscillators. A-to-D and D-to-A conversion methods. Laboratory exercises emphasizing design techniques. EE 351 (Electronics) is a prerequisite for this course. EE 318 (Methods of System Analysis) is a prerequisite or may be taken concurrently with the course.

EE 532. Introduction to Computer Networking. 3 Hours.

Introduction to computer networking and engineering standards related networking. Network hardware, Ethernet, token ring, ISDN, ATM, networking protocols including TCP/IP protocol suite, Internetworking, LANS, and typical applications.
Prerequisites: EE 134 [Min Grade: C] and EE 210 [Min Grade: C]

EE 533. Engineering Software Solutions. 3 Hours.

Project planning, specification, design, implementation and testing of software solutions for engineers. Waterfall model of development and agile development methods will be covered. Lecture and computer laboratory. Four projects. EE 333 (Engineering Programming using Objects) is a prerequisite for this course.

EE 534. Power and Radio-Frequency Semiconductor Electronics. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of integrated circuit design for radio-frequency and power converter circuits. Course contents will include basics of RF circuit theory, matching networks, high frequency MOS model, low-noise-amplifier, voltage controlled oscillator, fundamentals of power electronics, power semiconductor switches, steady-state equivalent circuit modeling, DC transformer model, basic AC equivalent circuit modeling, linearization and perturbation, etc. Will require accomplishing a computer aided design, simulation and chip layout of an integrated circuit design project.

EE 537. Introduction to Embedded Systems. 3 Hours.

Applications of microprocessors in engineering problems such as data acquisitions control, and real-time input/output.

EE 538. Computer Architecture. 3 Hours.

Advanced microprocessor topics including cache design, pipelining, superscalar architecture, design of control units, microcoding, and parallel processors. Comparison of advanced, contemporary microprocessors from Intel and IBM. EE 337 (Introduction to Microprocessors) is a recommended prerequisite for this course.

EE 543. Medical Imaging Processing. 3 Hours.

A lab-based introduction to processing analysis and display techniques for medical imaging.

EE 544. Real-Time Process & Protocols. 3 Hours.

Hands-on laboratory course covering topics in real-time computer systems such as algorithms, state-machine implementations, communication protocols, instrumentation, and hardware interfaces.

EE 547. Internet/Intranet Application Development. 3 Hours.

Focus on the development of applications and models using Internet/Intranet Technologies such as JavaScript, Conferencing systems, Dynamic HTML, server side scripting, multi-tier models and XML. Lecture and computer laboratory.
Prerequisites: EE 233 [Min Grade: C]

EE 548. Software Engineering Projects. 3 Hours.

Builds on the Object-Oriented concepts covered in EE 333. Coverage for Unified Modeling Language is expanded and design patterns are incorporated. Provides a project environment for implementation of systems using Object Oriented techniques.
Prerequisites: EE 333 [Min Grade: C]

EE 552. Digital Systems Design. 3 Hours.

Computer Design Automation using VHDL. Architectural, behavioral and logical descriptions of digital systems. Logic verification and simulation. Projects involve designing complex integrated circuits using modern DA tools. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisites: EE 337 [Min Grade: C]

EE 558. Medical Instrumentation. 3 Hours.

Fundamental operating principles, applications and design of electronic instrumentation used in measurement of physiological parameters. Class design project.
Prerequisites: EE 351 [Min Grade: C]

EE 561. Machinery II. 3 Hours.

Physical principles of DC machines. Mathematical analysis of generator designs using equivalent circuits and magnetization curves. Calculation of motor speed, torque, power, efficiency, and starting requirements. Solid-state speed control systems. EE 361 (Machinery I) is a prerequisite for this course.

EE 571. Power Systems I. 3 Hours.

Components of power systems. Performance of modern interconnected power system under normal and abnormal conditions. Calculation of inductive and capacitive reactances of three-phase transmission lines in steady stated. EE 351 (Electronics) is a prerequisite for this course.

EE 572. Power Systems II. 3 Hours.

Modeling of generators, transformers, and transmission lines for system studies. Introduction to symmetrical components. Calculation of short- circuit currents due to balanced and unbalanced faults. Determination of interrupting ratings of circuit breakers. Transient stability of power systems. Derivation of swing equation and solution by numerical method. Equal area criterion. Power system design project required.

EE 573. Protective Relaying of Power Systems. 3 Hours.

Operating principles of protective relays. Protection of transmission lines, generators, motors, transformers, and buses.

EE 574. Industrial Power Systems. 3 Hours.

One-line diagrams/load analysis. Medium and low voltage feeder design, voltage regulation, and short-circuit analysis. Selection of protective devices. Grounding and lightning protection. Term project.

EE 585. Engineering Operations. 3 Hours.

Economic, procedural, planning, and control aspects of engineering projects.

EE 590. Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering. 1-3 Hour.

Special Topic in Electrical or Computer Engineering.

EE 591. Individual Study in Electrical and Computer Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

Individual Study in Electrical Engineering.

EE 601. Electrical and Computer Engineering Seminar. 1-3 Hour.

Consists of research presentations and colloquia delivered by faculty, research assistants, and invited guests in various state-of-the-art and popular topics related to Electrical and Computer Engineering. Required of all full-time Electrical and Computer Engineering graduate students.

EE 605. Embedded Systems for Industrial Scholars. 3 Hours.

Embedded systems are commonplace in the integration age. From consumer applications to medical applications, embedded systems are within practically every system. Engineers developing all kinds of systems should be at least familiar with the possibilities available with embedded systems. This introductory course will cover basics of developing systems with embedded computing components. Various popular systems and languages will be exposed. Topics covered will include: Significance of embedded systems, embedded systems design, rapid system prototyping of embedded systems, use of FPGAs and other modern design strategies.

EE 610. Technical Communication for Engineers. 3 Hours.

A workshop-oriented course providing students with the opportunity to produce technical memoranda, a proposal, and a conference and/or refereed- journal paper and to make oral presentations related to these work products utilizing appropriate software presentation aids. Successful performance on a written pre-test required.

EE 616. Design of CMOS Analog Integrated Circuits. 3 Hours.

This course will cover basic building blocks of CMOS analog VLSI design, MOSFET theory, short channel device and nonlinear effects, current mirrors, current-reference generator, operational trans conductance amplifier, switched capacitor architecture, analog-to-digital converter and digital-to-analog converter. Students will be required to develop a computer aided design, simulation and chip layout of an analog integrated circuit design project.
Prerequisites: EE 605 [Min Grade: C] and EE 606 [Min Grade: C] and EE 607 [Min Grade: C] and EE 608 [Min Grade: C] and EE 609 [Min Grade: C] and EE 611 [Min Grade: C] and EE 612 [Min Grade: C] and EE 613 [Min Grade: C]

EE 621. Random Variables and Processes. 3 Hours.

Theory underlying analysis and design of communication, stochastic control, data gathering, and data analysis systems.
Prerequisites: EE 421 [Min Grade: C]

EE 622. Advanced Communication Theory. 3 Hours.

Analysis of performance of analog modulation techniques in presence of noise.
Prerequisites: EE 421 [Min Grade: C]

EE 623. Computer Vision. 3 Hours.

Advanced topics in computer vision: image segmentation, registration, and visual tracking. (EE 412:512 - Practical Computer Vision or EE 300 - Engineering Problem Solving + EGR 265 - Mathematical Tools for Engineering Problem Solving or other equivalent courses).

EE 624. Digital Communications. 3 Hours.

Design of digital communications systems.

EE 625. Information Theory and Coding. 3 Hours.

Channel models and block codes, block code ensemble performance analysis, convolutional codes and ensemble performance, sequential decoding of convolutional codes.

EE 626. Digital Image Processing. 3 Hours.

Digital image processing fundamentals, image transformations, image enhancement, image restoration, image compression, image segmentation, and image presentation.
Prerequisites: EE 318 [Min Grade: C]

EE 627. Wireless Communications. 3 Hours.

Wireless communication system topics such as propagation, modulation techniques, multiple access techniques, channel coding, speech and video coding, and wireless computer networks.

EE 628. Telecommunications I. 3 Hours.

Advanced topics.

EE 629. Telecommunications II. 3 Hours.

Advanced Topics.

EE 632. Introduction to Computer Networking. 3 Hours.

Computer networking fundamentals. Layered network model and correspondence to real systems. Discussion of Ethernet, Token Ring, TCP/IP, LAN, and other protocols. Exploration of the Internet and similar systems. Network application models. Simulation of networks.
Prerequisites: EE 333 [Min Grade: C] and EE 210 [Min Grade: C]

EE 633. Experiments in Computer Networking. 3 Hours.

Detailed exploration of particular issues in network protocols and network application models. Development of series of programs to explore the details of network protocols and network application models.

EE 634. Introduction to Neural Networks. 3 Hours.

Neural network topologies and learning algorithms with an emphasis on back propagation. Applications and limitations of networks. Designing networks for specific uses. Individual software project. A grade of C or better in EE 210 (Digital Logic) is required for this course.

EE 635. Telecommunication Systems. 3 Hours.

System organization and structure; data transmission.

EE 636. Advanced Digital Design. 3 Hours.

Large-scale class project. Sample topics include math coprocessors, text coprocessors, CRT controllers, and data encryption devices.

EE 637. Design of Modern Computer with Digital Integrated Circuits. 3 Hours.

This course will cover the basic design flow of digital computing chips. Students will be exposed to all levels of the chip design flow. The course will involve design projects that utilize the industry-grade software suite from Cadence. The course will use Silicon based Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) technology, which is current, for computer chip design. It will also briefly introduce two of the popular emerging technologies, Carbon based transistors and interconnects and 3-DimensionalICs. Requires a basic understanding of transistors and digital logic.

EE 639. Embedded Systems. 3 Hours.

Topics covering both hardware and software issues. Individual or group term project. Course is for MSEE and PhD in Computer Engineering.

EE 640. Object-Oriented Design. 3 Hours.

Study and practice of the object-oriented methodology for developing software designs. Implementation consequences. Application of object- oriented methodologies to specific problems using an object-oriented language. A grade of C or better in EE 333 (Engineering Programming using Objects) or other software design experience using C is required for this course.

EE 641. Modern Control Theory. 3 Hours.

State variable models for discrete-time systems. Sampled-data systems. State feedback and pole placement. State estimation. Control Systems (EE 426 ) is a suggested prerequisite for this course.

EE 642. Intelligent Systems. 3 Hours.

Organization and characteristics of intelligent systems. Optimization. Evolutionary algorithms. Neural network and fuzzy logic algorithms. Intelligent control.

EE 650. Software Engineering. 3 Hours.

Introduces classical software lifecycles and software development paradigms. Provides state-of-the-art practical experience in proposal development and software design. Develops integrated skills drawing experience from computer engineering, computer science, communication, systems engineering, and problem solving.

EE 651. Software Engineering Large Systems - I. 3 Hours.

Introduces advanced integrated software systems development paradigms. Notions of process and integrated system views are extensively covered. Modeling-in-the-large and modeling-in-the-small are discussed and related to levels in Object Oriented Design and Programming.

EE 652. Software Engineering Large Systems - II. 3 Hours.

Builds on the advanced integrated software systems development paradigms covered in EE 651/751. Components are introduced as elements of large system implementations. In the context of a design taxonomy, advanced Object Oriented design and development techniques are reviewed.

EE 653. Electronic Power Switching Circuits. 3 Hours.

Power semiconductor devices. Switching circuit analysis, AC voltage controllers, controlled rectifiers, DC-to-DC converters, inverters, and cyclo-converters.
Prerequisites: EE 351 [Min Grade: C]

EE 654. Mobile Computing. 3 Hours.

Fundamental and advanced concepts in mobile computing. Develop user interface, application logic, and backend services, using advanced integrated development environments. Individual and team projects. Programming required.

EE 655. Cloud Computing. 3 Hours.

This course covers fundamental and advanced concepts in cloud computing, including evaluation of current market offerings. Students will also design and implement systems integrating multiple cloud computing services.

EE 656. Introduction to Big Data Analytics. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the field of big data analytics, including technologies, and challenges, architecture and hypothesis testing.

EE 658. Machine Learning in Engineering. 3 Hours.

Machine learning includes the science, engineering, and techniques for developing solutions to complex problems without having to explicitly program the computers. Beginning with classification and linear regression, the course covers topics that include supervised and unsupervised learning, boosting, support vector machines, Neural Networks, Convolution Neural Networks, and Recurrent Neural Networks. The course provides students with the theoretical underpinnings of machine learning as well as the practical knowledge to design and implement solutions to problems in different domains. Students will be asked to work on biweekly assignments and to develop a course project demonstrating their understanding of the major concepts presented in this course.

EE 661. Advanced Synchronous Machines. 3 Hours.

Effects of synchronous machine design on generated voltage and harmonics. Time domain modeling and simulation of machine dynamics for transient stability analysis.

EE 662. Advanced Induction Machines. 3 Hours.

Time domain modeling of induction machines. Simulation of induction machine dynamics including motor starting transients.

EE 663. Control of Synchronous Machines. 3 Hours.

EE 671. Computer Applications in Power Systems. 3 Hours.

Analysis of power systems operation.

EE 672. Power System Overvoltages. 3 Hours.

Events causing overvoltages, and protection of system.

EE 673. Reliability of Power Systems. 3 Hours.

Component reliability using standard industrial techniques.

EE 674. Economic Operation and Control of Power Systems. 3 Hours.

Economic control of thermal generating stations and hydrothermal stations. Computer control of power systems.

EE 682. Electromagnetic Field Theory I. 3 Hours.

Application of Maxwell's equations to problems of electrical engineering; boundary-value problems, wave propagation, waveguides, radiation, and scattering; and surface waves.

EE 683. Complex Frequency Techniques in Process Control. 3 Hours.

S-plane techniques; characterization of processes; design of controllers.

EE 688. Enterprise Perspectives in Information Engineering. 3 Hours.

Technology entrepreneurship, business processes, measurement of information systems effectiveness and productivity, building a responsive information infrastructure. Business system analysis, design, and process redesign. Reengineering and information systems evolution. Electronic commerce technical design. Legal considerations and governmental regulations and requirements. Ethics. Information system engineering.

EE 690. Special Topics in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Special Topics in (Area).

EE 691. Individual Study in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Topic assigned with course.

EE 697. Graduate Project. 3 Hours.

Graduate project for Plan II Masters students.

EE 698. Non-Thesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

EE 699. Thesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

Thesis research.
Prerequisites: GAC M

EE 701. Electr & Comptr EGR Sem. 1-3 Hour.

Consists of research presentations and colloquia delivered by faculty, research assistants, and invited guests in various state-of-the-art and popular topics related to Electrical and Computer Engineering. Maximum of 3.0 credit hours applicable toward M.S.E.E. degree.

EE 716. Design of CMOS Analog Integrated Circuits. 3 Hours.

This course will cover basic building blocks of CMOS analog VLSI design, MOSFET theory, short channel device and nonlinear effects, current mirrors, current-reference generator, operational trans conductance amplifier, switched capacitor architecture, analog-to-digital converter and digital-to-analog converter. Students will be required to develop a computer aided design, simulation and chip layout of an analog integrated circuit design project.

EE 723. Computer Vision. 3 Hours.

Advanced topics in computer vision: Image segmentation, registration, and visual tracking. Linear algebra, PDE or basic computer vision (EE 412:512 - Practical Computer Vision or EE 300 - Engineering Problem Solving + EGR 265 - Mathematical Tools for Engineering Problem Solving or other equivalent courses).

EE 724. Digital Communications. 3 Hours.

Design of digital communications systems.

EE 725. Information Theory and Coding. 3 Hours.

Channel models and block codes; block code ensemble performance analysis; convolutional codes and ensemble performance; sequential decoding of convolutional codes.

EE 726. Digital Image Processing. 3 Hours.

Digital image processing fundamentals, image transformations, image enhancement, image restoration, image compression, image segmentation, and image presentation.
Prerequisites: EE 318 [Min Grade: C]

EE 727. Wireless Communications. 3 Hours.

Wireless communication system topics such as propagation, modulation techniques, multiple access techniques, channel coding, speech and video coding, and wireless computer networks.

EE 728. Telecommunications I. 3 Hours.

Advanced topics.

EE 729. Telecommunications II. 3 Hours.

Advanced Topics.

EE 732. Introduction to Computer Networking. 3 Hours.

Computer network fundamentals. Layered network OSI model and correspondence to real systems. Discussion of Ethernet, Token Ring, TCP/IP, LAN, and other protocols. Exploration of the Internet and similar systems. Network application models. Simulation of networks. Digital Logic(EE 210) and Introduction to Microprocessors (EE 337) are recommended prerequisites for this course.

EE 733. Experiments in Computer Networking. 3 Hours.

Detailed exploration of particular issues in network protocols and network application models. Development of series of programs to explore the details of network protocols and network application models.

EE 734. Introduction to Neural Networks. 3 Hours.

Neural network topologies and learning algorithms with an emphasis on back propagation. Applications and limitations of networks. Designing networks for specific uses. Individual software project. EE 426 (Control Systems) and a grade of C or better in EE 210 (Digital Logic) are prerequisites for this course.

EE 737. Design of Modern Computers with Digital Integrated Circuits. 3 Hours.

This course will be focused on teaching the basic design flow of digital computing chips. The students will be exposed to all levels of the chip design flow. The course will involve design projects that utilize an industry-grade software suite from Cadence. The course will use Silicon based Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) technology, which is current, for computer chip design. It will also briefly introduce two of the popular emerging technologies, Carbon based transistors and interconnects (3-DimensionalICs). Requires basic understanding of transistors and digital logic.

EE 740. Object-Oriented Design. 3 Hours.

Study and practice of the object-oriented methodology for developing software designs. Implementation consequences. Application of object-oriented methodologies to specific problems using an object-oriented language. Requires a knowledge of software design experience using C.

EE 742. Intelligent Systems. 3 Hours.

Organization and characteristics of intelligent systems. Optimization. Evolutionary algorithms. Neural network and fuzzy logic algorithms. Intelligent control.

EE 746. Batch Control. 3 Hours.

Theory, analysis, and synthesis of batch processing control systems.

EE 747. Distributed Control Systems. 3 Hours.

Application of distributed control to process, integration, and operator interfaces.

EE 748. Process Analyzers. 3 Hours.

Automated analytical techniques for identifying chemical process streams.

EE 750. Software Engineering. 3 Hours.

Introduces classical software lifecycles and software development paradigm. Provides state-of-the-art practical experience in proposal development and software systems design. Develops integrated skills drawing experience from computer engineering, computer science, communication, system engineering, and problem solving.

EE 751. Software Engineering Large Systems - I. 3 Hours.

Introduces advanced integrated software systems development paradigms. Notions of process and integrated system views are extensively covered. Modeling-in-the-large and modeling-in-the-small are discussed and related to levels in Object Oriented Design and Programming.

EE 752. Software Engineering Large Systems - II. 3 Hours.

Builds on the advanced integrated software systems development paradigms covered in EE 651/751. Components are introduced as elements of large system implementations. In the context of a design taxonomy, advanced Object Oriented design and development techniques are reviewed.

EE 754. Mobile Computing. 3 Hours.

Fundamental and advanced concepts in mobile computing. Develop user interface, application logic, and backend services, using advanced integrated development environments. Individual and team projects. Programming required.

EE 755. Cloud Computing. 3 Hours.

This course covers fundamental and advanced concepts in cloud computing, including evaluation of current market offerings. Students will also design and implement systems integrating multiple cloud computing services.

EE 756. Introduction to Big Data Analytics. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the field of big data analytics, including technologies, and challenges, architecture and hypothesis testing.

EE 758. Machine Learning in Engineering. 3 Hours.

Machine learning includes the science, engineering, and techniques for developing solutions to complex problems without having to explicitly program the computers. Beginning with classification and linear regression, the course covers topics that include supervised and unsupervised learning, boosting, support vector machines, Neural Networks, Convolution Neural Networks, and Recurrent Neural Networks. The course provides students with the theoretical underpinnings of machine learning as well as the practical knowledge to design and implement solutions to problems in different domains. Students will be asked to work on biweekly assignments and to develop a course project demonstrating their understanding of the major concepts presented in this course.

EE 761. Advanced Synchronous Machines. 3 Hours.

Effects of synchronous machine design on generated voltage and harmonics. Time domain modeling and simulation of machine dynamics for transient stability analysis.

EE 762. Advanced Induction Machines. 3 Hours.

Time domain modeling of induction machines. Simulation of induction machine dynamics including motor starting transients.

EE 763. Control of Synchronous Machines. 3 Hours.

Component reliability using standard industrial techniques.

EE 771. Computer Applications in Power Systems. 3 Hours.

Analysis of power systems operation.

EE 772. Power System Overvoltages. 3 Hours.

Events causing overvoltages, and protection of system.

EE 773. Reliability of Power Systems. 3 Hours.

Component reliability using standard industrial techniques.

EE 774. Economic Operation and Control of Power Systems. 3 Hours.

Economic control and operation of thermal generating stations and hydrothermal stations. Computer control of power systems.

EE 782. Multivariable Systems. 3 Hours.

Analysis and design of multiple-output, multiple-input control systems.

EE 788. Enterprise Perspectives in Information Engineering. 3 Hours.

Technology entrepreneurship, business processes, measurement of information systems effectiveness and productivity, building a responsive information infrastructure. Business system analysis, design, and process redesign. Reengineering and information systems evolution. Electronic commerce technical design. Legal considerations and governmental regulations and requirements. Ethics. Information system engineering.

EE 790. Special Topics in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Special Topics In (Area).

EE 791. Individual Study in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Individual Study In (Area).

EE 798. Non-Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

EE 799. Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

Prerequisites: GAC Z

EGR-Engineering Courses

EGR 500. Special Topics in (Study Away). 0-9 Hours.

Independent studies in various subject and/or service areas outside the state of Alabama or the continental United States.

EGR 510. ESL in Education. 1-6 Hour.

Course provides students an opportunity to help students in K-12 to analyze and solve problems using engineering concepts and design process to engage and excite them about engineering, science, and technology.

EGR 520. Engineers in Service and Learning in EiSAL. 0-6 Hours.

This course will allow engineering students the opportunity to communicate and live in other cultural environments allowing them to share interdisciplinary engineering design and analysis in a real-world setting. It will also allow them the opportunity to work in multi-cultural groups to solve a common problem.

EGR 540. Social Responsibility. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with an understanding of key social and economic concepts of global health that, together with an understanding of interprofessional collaboration and community partnerships, will enable them to participate in developing and implementing sustainable global health projects in collaboration with local and international community partners. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students who are enrolled in two co-requisite courses that are requirements for students participating in the interprofessional global health service learning program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

EGR 541. Interprofessional Collaboration (IPC) and Community Partnerships in Global Health. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with an understanding of principles of interprofessional collaboration and community partnerships that, together with key social and economic concepts of global health, enables them to participate in developing and implementing sustainable global health projects in collaboration with local and international community partners.

EGR 542. EGR Service Learning:Interprofessional Global Health Service Learning I: Project Planning. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with an opportunity to apply principles of interprofessional collaboration, community partnerships, and global health in the development of a plan to address a global health problem in collaboration with a community partner. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students who are enrolled in two co-requisite courses that are requirements for students participating in the global health service learning program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

EGR 550. Engineering Service Learning: Teaching Experiences. 1 Hour.

This course provides engineering students the opportunity to assist engineering faculty and students in a tutorial environment by serving as teaching assistants in engineering service courses.

EGR 590. Special Topics in Engineering. 1-3 Hour.

Special Topics in Engineering.

EGR 591. Individual Study in Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

Individual Study in Engineering.

EGR 601. ASEM Seminar. 0 Hours.

Seminar focusing on student research and guest presentations of various topics of interest to safety nd risk management engineers and personnel.

EGR 602. Methods for Engineering Practice I. 3 Hours.

First of two course sequence oriented toward introducing the student to modern methods in engineering practice including design methodologies to project management and risk analysis; mathematical and statistical methods; data analysis; reliability; fault detection and analysis; and safety analysis methods.

EGR 603. Methods for Engineering Practice II. 3 Hours.

Second of a practical two course sequence that are oriented toward introducing the student to modern methods in engineering practice including design methodologies to project management and risk analysis; mathematical and statistical methods; data analysis; reliability; fault detection and analysis; and safety analysis methods.

EGR 610. Introduction to System Safety - Prevention through Design. 3 Hours.

Best practice in any business sector requires the pursuit of a triple bottom line – protecting people, planet, and profit. This course provides an overview of system safety in general and Prevention through Design in particular and explores their efficacy in helping companies achieve a bottom line that is socially, environmentally, and financially rewarding. Topics of inquiry include the processes of hazard analysis and risk assessment, the concept of "acceptable" risk, the safety decision hierarchy of controls, safety standards (the mandatory minimum vs. the voluntary best practice), safety as a cost control strategy, and the critical elements of a comprehensive, advanced safety program. Course content is presented within the framework of real-world case studies from a variety of industry sectors, including, but not limited to, manufacturing, utilities, and health care and includes several guest lectures by leaders in the profession. Students apply course content to their own business environment. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. The EGR 610 forum is typically held on Sunday from 1:30-3:00 CDT. EGR 610 must be taken during the first semester.

EGR 611. Hazard Analysis & Waste Elimination. 3 Hours.

Hazards have the potential to cause harm to people, planet, and profits. Hazard analysis is a process that begins with the identification of a hazard and proceeds into an estimate of the severity of harm or damage that could result if the potential is realized and a hazard-related incident occurs (ASSE TR-Z790.001 – 2009). This course examines engineering techniques utilized to systematically and logically identify and analyze hazards in the workplace. These techniques include preliminary hazard list (PHL), preliminary hazard analysis (PHA), system hazard analysis (SHA), subsystem hazard analysis (SSHA) and others. Students work in teams to use these techniques to retrospectively analyze a real-world disaster. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. The EGR 611 forum is typically held on Sunday from 1:30-3:00 CDT.
Prerequisites: EGR 610 [Min Grade: C]

EGR 612. Engineering Risk. 3 Hours.

Engineering risk is defined both quantitatively and qualitatively as an estimate of the probability that a hazard-related incident will occur and of the severity of harm or damage that could result. This course provides students with tools to assess and reduce safety risks in their own company. These tools include risk assessment matrices, probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) measures, including event tree analysis, fault tree analysis, and other prevention through design concepts. The role of a structured, formalized decision analysis process in preventing serious injuries and fatalities is also explored. Students engage in a risk mitigation decision analysis project, which is specific to their company and/or business sector. Guest lecturers from diverse industries discuss their experiences in assessing and managing risk. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. The EGR 612 forum is typically held on Sunday from 1:30-3:00 CDT.
Prerequisites: EGR 610 [Min Grade: C] and EGR 611 [Min Grade: C]

EGR 613. Human Performance & Engineering Design. 3 Hours.

Companies can miss important opportunities to eliminate waste if they rely primarily on training to prevent human error. This course explores the historical perspective on human error and serious injury. The course material will provide a solid understanding of the principles of occupational biomechanics and human tolerance to injury with focus on human anthropometry and mechanical work capacity. This course also includes studies of human reliability, static analysis of systems in equilibrium and mechanical systems’ design and performance. Due to the quantity of back related injuries and related lost time in the workplace, back pain and injury is studied along with the effect of vibration on the human body. Real-world case studies provide for application of the engineering hierarchy of controls: hazard elimination, hazard substitution, engineering controls, warnings, administrative behavior controls, and personal protective equipment. The course also examines the design aspects of ergonomics, the biomechanical engineering basis of injury prevention, and the long term economic consequences of seemingly minor injuries. In semester projects, students perform incident investigations using biomechanical and other data. After gathering and analyzing data to determine injury causation, they will identify and re-design error-provocative environments in their own workplaces. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. The EGR 613 forum is typically held on Sunday from 1:30-3:00 CDT.
Prerequisites: EGR 610 [Min Grade: C]

EGR 614. Engineering Ethics & Acceptable Risk. 3 Hours.

This course explores the economic, social, and political consequences of safety risk and considers provocative real world dilemmas: What is acceptable risk? Are the fundamental canons of engineering ethics contrary to the concept of acceptable risk? What is the worth of human life? Students will conduct critical reviews of corporate safety and ethics policies from market leaders in all major industries as well as their own company. Real-world case studies provide the framework for exercises in resolving conflicts of interest and avoiding the dilemma of “whistle blowing.” Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. The EGR 614 forum is typically held on Sunday from 3:00-4:30 CDT.
Prerequisites: EGR 610 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

EGR 615. Leading through Climates of Change. 3 Hours.

All progressive companies are moving toward greater sustainability – protecting people, planet, and profits. To guide their companies through these changes and integrate safety into the priorities at the executive level, safety engineers and professionals must have strong leadership skills. This course explores engineering leadership best practices, including the eight steps of transformational leadership – creating a sense of urgency, creating a guiding coalition, developing a vision and strategies, communicating the vision, empowering broad-based action, generating short term wins, consolidating gains and anchoring the culture. Guest lecturers from diverse industries discuss their experiences in managing change in today's global business environment. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. The EGR 615 forum is typically held on Sunday from 3:00-4:30 CDT.
Prerequisites: EGR 610 [Min Grade: C]

EGR 616. Policy Issues in Prevention through Design. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of best practices in four major policy areas: (1) cost-benefit analysis; (2) corporate culture and the “HR Department”; (3) standards, codes, and regulations; and (4) strategic alliance development. Case studies are used to illuminate both the role of engineers and other safety professionals in shaping public policy on the local, national and international levels and the ethical challenges they encounter. The significance of an organization’s corporate culture in developing and implementing advanced safety management plans is also explored. Students conduct "gap analyses" of their company's policies by comparing them to best practices and identifying unintended consequences of poor safety policy in their own business and industry sector. Students will engage in discussion board posts on contemporary policy issues and participate in exercises related to federal rulemaking. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. The EGR 616 forum is typically held on Sunday from 3:00-4:30 CDT.
Prerequisites: EGR 610 [Min Grade: C]

EGR 617. Crisis Leadership & Safety-Critical Design. 3 Hours.

Unique technical and leadership skills are required to avert or manage a crisis. This course teaches students those skills in an experiential learning environment. Case studies of real-world industrial and environmental disasters provide the framework for exploring critical human-machine interfaces; crisis communication; coping with people in recovery and developing and implementing a business continuity response. Guest lecturers from diverse backgrounds will discuss their experiences in managing crisis events. Students will engage in discussion board posts and develop a Business Impact Analysis report for their work environment or business unit. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. The EGR 617 forum is typically held on Sunday from 3:00-4:30 CDT.
Prerequisites: EGR 610 [Min Grade: C]

EGR 618. Intrapreneurship & Calculated Risk Taking. 3 Hours.

Intrapreneurs are innovative change agents inside an existing corporation -- insider entrepreneurs. This course prepares students to become and/or identify effective intrapreneurs within their own business environment. Topics include the history of intrapreneurial success inside technology-based corporations and the fundamentals of recognizing opportunity and launching a new, promising enterprise within an existing business. Students also learn to recognize and effectively manage intrapreneurial risk, including the safety readiness of technology for the market place and the corporate "immune response" to new ideas and inside innovators. Case studies of real-world intrapreneurial success and failure provide a framework for group discussion and student exercises. Live participation in a weekly 1.5 hour online forum is required. The EGR 618 forum is typically held on Sunday from 3:00-4:30 CDT.
Prerequisites: EGR 610 [Min Grade: C]

EGR 619. Capstone Project - Part I. 3 Hours.

Bringing to bear the competencies acquired through the program, students develop a proposal, outline, schedule and rough draft of a comprehensive, advanced safety engineering and management plan for their business unit/specialty area that is consistent with the ANSI/AIHA Z10-2005, Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems standard. Judicious selection of the Capstone topic and of projects throughout the ASEM curriculum allows students to build on and use earlier course products to support their Capstone report. Live participation in a quarterly 1.25 hour online forum is required. Must be taken during the penultimate or final semester.
Prerequisites: EGR 610 [Min Grade: C] and EGR 611 [Min Grade: C] and EGR 612 [Min Grade: C] and EGR 613 [Min Grade: C] and EGR 614 [Min Grade: C] and EGR 615 [Min Grade: C] and EGR 616 [Min Grade: C] and EGR 617 [Min Grade: C]

EGR 620. Capstone Project-Part 2. 3 Hours.

Students complete the development of their comprehensive, advanced safety engineering and management (ASEM) plan that was begun in EGR 619, including background information of the project, an ASEM plan (management and employee participation, planning, implementation and operation, evaluation and corrective action and management review), and rollout strategy. Students must submit completed report with detailed attachments, and orally present project highlights to the class in a live online classroom setting. Live participation in a quarterly 1.25 hour online forum is required. EGR 620 must be taken during the final semester.
Prerequisites: EGR 610 [Min Grade: C] and EGR 611 [Min Grade: C] and EGR 612 [Min Grade: C] and EGR 613 [Min Grade: C] and EGR 614 [Min Grade: C] and EGR 615 [Min Grade: C] and EGR 616 [Min Grade: C] and EGR 617 [Min Grade: C]

EGR 642. Technical Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

EGR 690. Special Topics. 1-4 Hour.

EGR 695. Innovation-Commercialization Project. 3 Hours.

Through hands on activities, as well as mentorship by professional engineers and local industrial designers, the students will develop products ready for mass production.

EGR 696. Internship in Design and Commercialization. 3 Hours.

An internship is designed to provide real world experiences in a profession of interest. It enables correlation of classroom learning with application in industry; broadens understanding of the types of employment available in the field; helps students discover their individual interests; builds resume credentials for the students; and develops relationships between UAB and industry.

EGR 697. Engineering Grad Internship. 0-6 Hours.

Student works in a professional environment reflective of research interests pursuant to graduate degree.

EGR 710. Intro to Interdisciplinary EGR. 3 Hours.

Introduces current trends and cutting-edge research in areas related to engineering that require interdisciplinary approaches.

EGR 711. Methodology for IEGR Research. 3 Hours.

Presents a detailed perspective on methods of approach for interdisciplinary problems, including experimental design, laboratory experimentation, physical modeling, simulation, and analysis.

EGR 790. Special Topics. 1-4 Hour.

EGR 792. Interdisciplinary EGR Seminar. 1 Hour.

Discussions and presentations of research involving engineering in a number of disciplines. Required for graduate students in the interdisciplinary engineering Ph.D. program.

EGR 796. Journal Club in Interdisciplinary Engineering. 1 Hour.

Journal club to discuss current research and investigations in areas of interdisciplinary engineering.

EGR 797. Interdisciplinary Engineering Internship. 1-6 Hour.

Student works in a professional environment reflective of research interests pursuant to doctoral degree.

EGR 798. Non-Dissertation Research. 0-12 Hours.

EGR 799. Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

Prerequisites: GAC Z

IEM-Information Egr & Mgmnt Courses

IEM 601. Introduction to IEM. 1 Hour.

This course is an introduction to Information Engineering and Management with a focus on readiness for graduate study. Program requirements and expectations will be presented. Software and collaboration tools will be introduced. Library access and resources will be reviewed and teams will perform learning exercises to demonstrate proficiency with the available tools.

IEM 602. Leading Collaborative Teams. 1 Hour.

This course will focus on building, leading, and evaluating collaborative teams. Topics will include managing geographically-dispersed teams, team communication, accountability, running effective meetings, facilitation skills, building consensus, and handling common problems.
Prerequisites: IEM 601 [Min Grade: C]

IEM 603. Communication for Technology Executives. 1 Hour.

This course will address communication issues unique to organizational executives. Topics will include functioning as the public face of the organization, working with the media, when to seek professional advice, and effective crisis management.
Prerequisites: IEM 602 [Min Grade: C]

IEM 610. Communication for Technology Professionals. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on recognizing, developing, and putting into practice effective communication skills. Lectures provide insights into presentation structure, style, and content. Self-evaluation exercises combined with personal coaching will help clients improve their professional speaking and presentation skills.

IEM 611. Leading Technical Organizations. 3 Hours.

This course will use case studies, assigned readings, guest lecturers, research projects, and discussion of current issues in technology to develop executive-level behaviors and thought-processes as preparation for starting or leading a technology organization.

IEM 612. Project Leadership. 3 Hours.

This course teaches the fundamental concepts of leading projects. The course will consider all aspects of project leadership including the use of standard methodologies. Best practices will be reviewed along with practical insights based on real-world project leadership experience.

IEM 620. Technical Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to entrepreneurship that begins with the development of personal insights and work habits that are fundamental to success within any organization.

IEM 625. Technology and Innovation. 3 Hours.

This course examines technological innovation as an element of organizational strategy. Topics include the nature and management of innovation, aligning technical teams with overall organizational strategy, and the role of innovation in launching and sustaining technology ventures.

IEM 630. Systems Engineering. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the systems engineering lifecycle and its application to the design of complex systems. Topics include systems thinking, managing complexity, problem definition, solution design, solution implementation, quality assurance, and measuring effectiveness.

IEM 631. Operational Decision-Making. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the critical role of information and analytical methods in optimizing operational decisions. A core set of analytical tools will be presented and discussed. Topics will include decision analysis, optimization, modeling, simulation, and data analysis.

IEM 645. Financial Concepts for Entrepreneurs. 3 Hours.

This course introduces financial concepts including the interpretation of financial statements, managing cash flow, time value of money, capital budgeting, and investment analysis.

IEM 646. Strategic Planning. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the nature of strategic thinking and the challenges of achieving strategic alignment. Topics will include the strategic planning process and methods for assessing strategic success.

IEM 690. Special Topics in Area. 1-3 Hour.

Special Topics in (Area).

IEM 695. IEM Design Project. 3 Hours.

This course is focused upon a final design project that incorporates the technical and entrepreneurial coursework taken previously. Projects will be assessed based on their technical design and financial justification.

IEM 696. IEM Internship. 1-3 Hour.

This course is available for students needing to register for an internship course while enrolled in the IEM program.

ME-Mechanical Engineering Courses

ME 511. Intermediate Fluid Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Applications of fluid dynamic principles to engineering flow problems such as turbo-machinery flow and one-dimensional compressible flow. Vorticity, potential flow, viscous flow, Navier-Stokes solutions, and boundary layers. Introduction to Fluid Mechanics or equivalent is a recommended prerequisite for this course.

ME 521. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics Basics. 3 Hours.

Governing equations for fluid flows, classifications of flow regimes, and approaches to analyze fluid flow problems. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), mesh generation, boundary conditions, numerical solution of equations governing fluid flows, and visualization. Hands-on exercises using a commercial CFD solver.

ME 530. Vehicular Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the fundamentals of mechanics and analytical methods for modeling vehicle dynamics and performance. Topics include tire-road interaction modeling, vehicle longitudinal dynamics and traction performance, lateral dynamics, handling, stability of motion and rollover, as well as, contribution of the drivetrain system, steering system and suspension configurations to the dynamics of a vehicle. Software applications, projects, and exposure to hardware and systems are used to reinforce concepts. Dynamics or equivalent is a recommended prerequisite for this course.

ME 531. Introduction to Vehicle Drive Systems Engineering. 3 Hours.

Engineering fundamentals of mechanical and mechatronic, hybrid-electric, and electric drive systems. Applications to passenger cars and commercial vehicles. Drive system and component design, including main clutches and torque converters, transmissions, transfer cases,and drive axles. Introduction to plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles.
Prerequisites: ME 215 [Min Grade: C] and ME 370 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

ME 532. Introduction to Electric Vehicles. 3 Hours.

Introduction to fully electric and hybrid vehicle engineering. Mechatronic system and component design. Batteries and energy storage devices. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

ME 545. Combustion. 3 Hours.

Evaluation of the impact of fuel characteristics and operating conditions on the performance of coal-fired electric utility steam-raising plant and the prospects for continued reliance on coal as fuel for electric power generation. The phenomena emphasized are the behavior of turbulent jets; ignition, devolatilization and combustion of coal particles; radiative heat transfer and the effect of ash deposits on heat transfer; formation of air pollutants and their removal from combustion products; integrated gasification combined cycle; and capture and sequestration of carbon dioxide. Thermodynamics II, Introduction to Fluid Mechanics, and Introduction to Heat Transfer or equivalents are recommended prerequisites for this course.

ME 547. Internal Combustion Engines. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of reciprocating internal combustion engines: engine types, engine components, engine design and operating parameters, thermochemistry of fuel-air mixtures, properties of working fluids, ideal models of engine cycles, engine operating characteristics, gas-exchange processes, fuel metering, charge motion within the cylinder, combustion in spark-ignition and compression ignition engines.

ME 549. Power Generation. 3 Hours.

Application of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer to conversion of useful energy. Includes terrestrial and thermodynamic limitations, fossil fuel power plants, renewable energy sources, and direct energy direct energy conversion. Thermodynamics II or equivalent is a recommended prerequisite for this course.

ME 554. Heating, Ventilating & AC. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals and practice associated with heating, ventilating, and air conditioning; study of heat and moisture flow in structures, energy consumption, and design of practical systems. Introduction to Heat Transfer or equivalent is a recommended prerequisite for this course.

ME 555. Thermal-Fluid Systems Design. 3 Hours.

Comprehensive design problems requiring engineering decisions and code/Standard compliance. Emphasis on energy system components: piping networks, pumps, heat exchangers. Includes fluid transients and system modeling. Introduction to Heat Transfer is a recommended prerequisite for this course.

ME 556. Building Energy Modeling and Analysis. 3 Hours.

Computer modeling of energy use and thermal comfort in buildings using several software tools. Interpretation and analysis of the results. Implementing energy efficiency measures in the model and studying the effects on energy use.
Prerequisites: ME 242 [Min Grade: C] and ME 322 [Min Grade: C]

ME 564. Introduction to Finite Element Method. 3 Hours.

Concepts and applications of finite element method. Development and applications of basic elements used in engineering mechanics. Use of finite element analysis software. Application of finite element concept to several areas of mechanics. Mechanics of Solids or equivalent is a recommended prerequisite for this course.

ME 575. Mechanical Vibrations. 3 Hours.

Development of equations of motion for free and forced single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) systems. Multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Transient response, support motion and vibration isolation for SDOFs. Vibration absorbers, generalized mass and stiffness, orthogonality of normal modes, and root solving and Gauss elimination procedures. Chelosky decomposition and Jacobi diagonalization methods.

ME 577. Systems Engineering. 3 Hours.

Exposure to the field of systems engineering, mission design, requirements development, trade studies, project life cycle, system hierarchy, risk analysis, cost analysis, team organization, design fundamentals, work ethics, compare and evaluate engineering alternatives, systems thinking.

ME 578. Automated Manufacturing. 3 Hours.

Introduction to automated manufacturing technology. Components of automated systems (controllers, sensors and actuators) and automated manufacturing sub-systems (3D printer, CNC, robot and computer vision) will be studied in a lecture\lab environment with hands on activities. A basic understanding of engineering graphics and computer methods at the undergraduate level is required for this course.

ME 580. Instrumentation and Measurements. 3 Hours.

Thorough exploration of fundamental measurement concepts and techniques for data acquisition and validation. Explanation of important selection criteria for the identification and configuration of commercially available data acquisition devices. Students will get hands on experience following best practices for data acquisition (high speed vs low speed) relevant to their field of study or career. Many types of sensors, their underlying technology, and measurement techniques and will be discussed (i.e. accelerometers, load cells, Digital Image Correlation, etc.) to demonstrate best practices for sensor selection for a wide range of specialized applications.

ME 590. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering. 1-3 Hour.

Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering.

ME 591. Individual Study in Mechanical Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

Individual Study in Mechanical Engineering.

ME 611. Advanced Fluid Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Fundamental laws of motion for viscous fluid, classical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, inviscid flow solutions, laminar boundary layers, and stability criteria.

ME 613. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Review of governing equations of fluid dynamics, mathematical behavior of partial differential equations, basic aspects of discretization, basic CFD techniques, basic grid generation, coordinate transformations, advanced numerical schemes, future CFD methodology. A knowledge of a computer language is required.

ME 614. Advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Finite Volume Scheme, Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors, Method of Characteristics, Upwind Schemes, Flux Vector Splitting, Flux Difference Splitting, Explicit and Implicit Schemes, Flux Jacobians, Newton Method, Boundary Conditions, Weak Solutions, TVD, PISO Methods.

ME 615. Introduction to Turbulent Flows. 3 Hours.

Characteristics of turbulence, length and time scales, energy cascade, vorticity stretching, Reynolds averaging technique, Closure problem, Boussinesq hypothesis, Eddy viscosity concepts, introduction to zero-, one-, and two-equation models, Reynolds stress model.

ME 631. Dynammics and Mobility of Vehicles: Modeling and Simulation. 3 Hours.

The main goal of the course is to present advanced research and engineering knowledge in recent vehicle dynamics of road and off-road wheeled and track vehicles with an emphasis on vehicle longitudinal/lateral mobility and energy efficiency. Applications include vehicles for personal transportation, military vehicles, construction equipment and farm tractors. A unique feature of this course is its inverse vehicle dynamics approach. Another distinctive feature of the course is a mechatronics-based approach to modeling and simulation of multi-domain systems that include mechanical, electrical and electronics components such as sensors and actuators. Coupled and interactive dynamics of vehicle systems is presented, and a modeling process of vehicle operational properties is based on various equations of analytical and adaptive dynamics. Students will gain knowledge and analytical hands-on skills through innovative homework and a research project. Skills in one of programming software/languages are required (e.g., MATLAB/Simulink, ADAMS/Car, LabVIEW, etc.).

ME 632. Autonomous Wheel Power Management Systems: Theory and Design. 3 Hours.

The main goal of this course is to give detailed understanding, analytical knowledge and engineering experience in research, design and experimental study of autonomous wheel power management systems (AWPMS). The AWPMS are autonomous mechatronic and autonomously operated mechanical systems that distribute power among the drive wheels of vehicles. AWPMS include various configurations of torque vectoring systems, limited slip differentials and hydraulically controlled differentials, electronically-locking differentials, and positive engagement of the wheels. AWPMS that are operationally integrated with steering and suspension systems are also presented in the course. Characteristics of wheel power management systems for a specific vehicle application are proved in the course by using inverse vehicle dynamics formulation and requirements to vehicle energy efficiency, mobility, stability of motion, and turnability. Students will learn mechanical design principles for mechatronic systems and methods for developing control algorithms. Methods for experimental study of wheel power management systems and vehicles are also presented in the course; including 4x4 vehicle chassis dynamometer with individual wheel control and test setups. Students will exercise analytical skills and gain hands-on experience through innovative homework and a research project.

ME 640. Heat Conduction. 3 Hours.

Introduction to methods of solution for heat conduction problems. Topics include separation of variables in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, solution to the heat equation on semi-infinite and infinite domains, Duhamel's Theorem, use of Green's Function, and use of the Laplace Transform. A basic understanding of heat transfer at the undergraduate level is required for this course.

ME 641. Radiation Heat Transfer. 3 Hours.

Introduction to radiation heat transfer. Topics include radiation from black bodies and nonblack opaque surfaces, configuration factors for diffuse surfaces, radiation exchange in enclosures of diffuse-grey and specularly reflecting surfaces, radiation combined with conduction and convection, and energy transfer for absorbing, emitting and scattering media. A basic understanding of heat transfer at the undergraduate level is required for this course.

ME 642. Statistical Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Explanation of macroscopic thermodynamic and transport properties, based upon classical and quantum mechanical descriptions of elementary particles, atoms, and molecules. Analysis of the distributions of these objects over their allowed energy states and the relationships between those distributions and macroscopic properties. Thermodynamics II or equivalent is a recommended prerequisite for this course.

ME 650. Transport Phenomena. 3 Hours.

Laminar flow transports: momentum transfer (Couette/Poiseuille flows), energy transfer (free/forced convections and conductions), and mass transfer; equation of state, turbulence, chemical reactions, and numerical methods solving transport equations. Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and Introduction to Heat Transfer or equivalents are recommended prerequisites for this course.

ME 661. Math Methods in EGR I. 3 Hours.

Mathematical theory and solutions methods to problems in engineering including advanced ordinary differential equations; euigenvalue problems; multi-variable calculus and implicit functions; curve, surface ad volume representation and integration; Fourier integrals and transforms; separation of variables and transform techniques for solution of partial differential equations. Differential Equiations or equivalent is recommended as a prerequisite for this course.

ME 662. Math Methods in EGR II. 3 Hours.

Mathematical theory and solution methods to problems in engineering including Scalar and vector field theory advanced partial differential equations, analysis using complex variables, conformal mapping, complex integral calculus, Green's functions, perturbation methods, and variational calculus. Math Methods in EGR I or equivalent is recommended as a prerequisite for this course.

ME 663. Engineering Statistics. 3 Hours.

Introduction to applied statistics and probability for engineering and the physical sciences. Topics include introduction to probability, discrete and random variables and their distributions, joint probability distributions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, linear regression and correlation, design of experiments, and statistical quality control. A basic understanding of calculus and matrix algebra at the undergraduate level is required for this course.

ME 665. Computational Methods in EGR. 3 Hours.

Applications of computers to solution of problems in engineering, including matrices, roots of equations, solution of simultaneous equations, curve fitting by least squares, differentiation and integration, differential and partial differential equations. Differential Equations and Computational Engineering or equivalents are recommended prerequisites for this course.

ME 670. Intro to Continuum Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals and application of mechanics principles to problems in continuous media. Matrix and tensor mathematics, fundamentals of stress, kinematics and deformation of motion, conservation equations, constitutive equations and invariance, linear and nonlinear elasticity, classical fluids, linear viscoelasticity. Mechanics of Solids and Differential Equations or equivalents are recommended prerequisites for this course.

ME 672. Advanced Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Advanced topics in dynamics including complex motion analysis, generalized kinematic parameters, quasivelocities, and virtual displacements, direct and inverse dynamics approach, and fundamentals of systems with variable masses. Introduction to the modeling of mechatronic systems is presented through a consideration of mechanical,electrical and electronics components. Analytical and adaptive dynamics principles are taught as a basis for control algorithm development and mechatronic system design.

ME 677. Systems Engineering. 3 Hours.

This course will give students an initial exposure to the field of systems engineering as it applies to space missions. Students will learn key topics related to spacecraft and mission design, including requirements development, trade studies, the project life cycle, system hierarchy, risk analysis, and cost analysis. The concepts presented in this course will be demonstrated with examples from current NASA missions. The students will also be exposed to concepts regarding team organization, design fundamentals, and work ethics. They will learn that systems engineering is iterative and will develop judgment that will allow them to compare and evaluate engineering alternatives. They will learn to discuss systems engineering methods and processes as well as engage in systems thinking.

ME 679. Advanced Finite Element Analysis. 3 Hours.

Concepts and applications of finite element method. Development and applications of various elements used in engineering mechanics. Use of finite element analysis software. Application of finite element concept and model development to fluid, heat transfer, and solid mechanics problems. Introduction to Fluid Mechanics, Introduction to Heat Transfer, and Mechanics of Solids or equivalents are recommended prerequisites for this course.

ME 688. Fluid-Structure Interactions. 3 Hours.

Modeling and simulation of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena using computational methods. The Arbitrary Lagrangian Euleriean (ALE) formulation, a variety of interpolation methods, mesh movement and time mapping algorithms. Solution of FSI problems using interface codes.

ME 689. Enabling Technology Tools. 3 Hours.

Computational methods and tools for simulations and modeling of mechanical and biomedical applications. Numerical geometry, numerical mesh generation, and scientific visualization tools will be introduced and applied.

ME 690. Special Topics in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Special Topics in (Area).

ME 691. Individual Study in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Individual Study In (Area).

ME 693. Journal Club in Mechanical Engineering. 1 Hour.

JC.

ME 694. Seminars in Mechanical Engineering. 1 Hour.

Seminar.

ME 698. Non-Thesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

ME 699. Thesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

Prerequisites: GAC M

ME 711. Advanced Fluid Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Fundamental laws of motion for viscous fluid, classical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, inviscid flow solutions, laminar boundary layers, and stability criteria.

ME 713. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Review of governing equations of fluid dynamics, mathematical behavior of partial differential equations, basic aspects of discretrization, basic CFD techniques, basic grid generation, coordinate transformation, advanced numerical schemes, future CFD methodology. A knowledge of a computer language is required.

ME 714. Advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Finite Volume Scheme, Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors, Method of Characteristics, Upwind Schemes, Flux Vector Splitting, Flux Difference Splitting, Explicit and Implicit Schemes, Flux Jacobians. Newton Method, Boundary Conditions, Weak Solutions, TVD, PISD Methods.

ME 715. Introduction to Turbulent Flows. 3 Hours.

Characteristics of turbulence, length and time scales, energy cascade, vorticity stretching, Reynolds averaging techniques. Closure problem, Boussinesq hypothesis, Eddy viscosity concepts, introduction to zero-, one-and two-equation models, Reynolds stress model.

ME 731. Dynamics and Mobility in Vehicles: Modeling and Simulation. 3 Hours.

The main goal of the course is to present advanced research and engineering knowledge in recent vehicle dynamics of road and off-road wheeled and track vehicles with an emphasis on vehicle longitudinal/lateral mobility and energy efficiency. Applications include vehicles for personal transportation, military vehicles, construction equipment and farm tractors. A unique feature of this course is its inverse vehicle dynamics approach. Another distinctive feature of the course is a mechatronics-based approach to modeling and simulation of multi-domain systems that include mechanical, electrical and electronics components such as sensors and actuators. Coupled and interactive dynamics of vehicle systems is presented, and a modeling process of vehicle operational properties is based on various equations of analytical and adaptive dynamics. Students will gain knowledge and analytical hands-on skills through innovative homework and a research project. Skills in one of programming software/languages are required (e.g., MATLAB/Simulink, ADAMS/Car, LabVIEW, etc.).

ME 732. Autonomous Wheel Power Management Systems: Theory and Design. 3 Hours.

The main goal of this course is to give detailed understanding, analytical knowledge and engineering experience in research, design and experimental study of autonomous wheel power management systems (AWPMS). The AWPMS are autonomous mechatronic and autonomously operated mechanical systems that distribute power among the drive wheels of vehicles. AWPMS include various configurations of torque vectoring systems, limited slip differentials and hydraulically controlled differentials, electronically-locking differentials, and positive engagement of the wheels. AWPMS that are operationally integrated with steering and suspension systems are also presented in the course. Characteristics of wheel power management systems for a specific vehicle application are proved in the course by using inverse vehicle dynamics formulation and requirements to vehicle energy efficiency, mobility, stability of motion, and turnability. Students will learn mechanical design principles for mechatronic systems and methods for developing control algorithms. Methods for experimental study of wheel power management systems and vehicles are also presented in the course; including 4x4 vehicle chassis dynamometer with individual wheel control and test setups. Students will exercise analytical skills and gain hands-on experience through innovative homework and a research project.

ME 740. Heat Conduction. 3 Hours.

Introduction to methods of solution for heat conduction problems. Topics include separation of variables in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, solution to the heat equation on semi-infinite and infinite domains, Duhamel's Theorem, use of Green's Function, and use of the Laplace Transform. A basic understanding of heat transfer at the undergraduate level is required for this course.

ME 741. Radiation Heat Transfer. 3 Hours.

Introduction to radiation heat transfer. Topics include radiation from black bodies and nonblack opaque surfaces, configuration factors for diffuse surfaces, radiation exchange in enclosures of diffuse-grey and specularly reflecting surfaces, radiation combined with conduction and convection, and energy transfer for absorbing, emitting and scattering media. A basic understanding of heat transfer at the undergraduate level is required for this course.

ME 742. Statistical Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Explanation of macroscopic thermodynamic and transport properties, based upon classical and quantum mechanical descriptions of elementary particles, atoms, and molecules. Analysis of the distributions of these objects over their allowed energy states and the relationships between those distributions and macroscopic properties.

ME 750. Transport Phenomena. 3 Hours.

Laminar flow transports: momentum transfer (Couette/Poiseuille flows), energy transfer (free/forced convections and conductions), and mass transfer; equation of state, turbulence, chemical reactions, and numerical methods solving transport equations.

ME 761. Math Methods in EGR I. 3 Hours.

Mathematical theory and solutions methods to problems in engineering including advanced ordinary differential equations; euigenvalue problems; multi-variable calculus and implicit functions; curve, surface ad volume representation and integration; Fourier integrals and transforms; separation of variables and trsnform techniques for solution of partial differential equations. Differential Equiations or equivalent is recommended as a prerequisite for this course.

ME 762. Math Methods in EGR II. 3 Hours.

Mathematical theory and solution methods to problems in engineering including Scalar and vector field theory advanced partial differential equations, analysis using complex variables, conformal mapping, complex integral calculus, Green's functions, perturbation methods, and variational calculus. Math Methods in EGR I or equivalent is a recommended prerequistie for this course.

ME 763. Engineering Statistics. 3 Hours.

Introduction to applied statistics and probability for engineering and the physical sciences. Topics include introduction to probability, discrete and random variables and their distributions, joint probability distributions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, linear regression and correlation, design of experiments, and statistical quality control. A basic understanding of calculus and matrix algebra at the undergraduate level is required for this course.

ME 765. Computational Methods in EGR. 3 Hours.

Applications of computers to solution of problems in engineering, including matrices, roots of equations, solution of simultaneous equations, curve fitting by least squares, differentiation and integration, differential and partial differential equations. Differential Equations and Computational Engineering or equivalents are recommended prerequisites for this course.

ME 770. Intro to Continuum Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals and application of mechanics principles to problems in continuous media. Matrix and tensor mathematics, fundamentals of stress, kinematics and deformation of motion, conservation equations, constitutive equations and invariance, linear and nonlinear elasticity, classical fluids, linear viscoelasticity. Mechanics of Solids and Differential Equations or equivalents are recommended prerequisites for this course.

ME 772. Advanced Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Advanced topics in dynamics including complex motion analysis, generalized kinematic parameters, quasivelocities and virtual displacements, direct and inverse dynamics approaches, and fundamentals of systems with variable masses. Introduction to the modeling of mechatronic systems is presented through a consideration of mechanical,electrical and electronics components. Analytical and adaptive dynamics principles are taught as a basis for control algorithm development and mechatronic system design.

ME 777. Systems Engineering. 3 Hours.

This course will give students an initial exposure to the field of systems engineering as it applies to space missions. Students will learn key topics related to spacecraft and mission design, including requirements development, trade studies, the project life cycle, system hierarchy, risk analysis, and cost analysis. The concepts presented in this course will be demonstrated with examples from current NASA missions. The students will also be exposed to concepts regarding team organization, design fundamentals, and work ethics. They will learn that systems engineering is iterative and will develop judgment that will allow them to compare and evaluate engineering alternatives. They will learn to discuss systems engineering methods and processes as well as engage in systems thinking.

ME 779. Advanced Finite Element Analysis. 3 Hours.

Concepts and applications of finite element method. Development and applications of various elements used in engineering mechanics. Use of finite element analysis software. Application of finite element concept and model development to fluid, heat transfer, and solid mechanics problems. Introduction to Fluid Mechanics, Introduction to Heat Transfer, and Mechanics of Solids or equivalents are recommended prerequisites for this course.

ME 788. Fluid-Structure Interactions. 3 Hours.

Modeling and simulation of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena using computational methods. The Arbitrary Lagrangian Euleriean (ALE) formulation, a variety of interpolation methods, mesh movement and time mapping algorithms. Solution of FSI problems using interface codes.

ME 789. Enabling Technology Tools for Scientists and Engineers. 3 Hours.

Computational methods and tools for simulations and modeling of mechanical and biomedical applications. Numerical geometry, numerical mesh generation, and scientific visualization tools will be introduced and applied.

ME 790. Special Topics in ME. 1-6 Hour.

Special Topics in (Area).

ME 791. Individual Study in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Individual Study in (Area).

ME 794. Seminars in Mechanical EGR. 1 Hour.

Seminars in areas of mechanical engineering.

ME 796. IEGR Journal Club. 1 Hour.

Journal club to discuss current research and investigations in areas of interdisciplinary engineering.

ME 798. Non-Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

Research.

ME 799. Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

Research.
Prerequisites: GAC Z

MSE-Material Science & Egr Courses

MSE 501. Materials Processing. 3 Hours.

Processing of metals, glasses, ceramics, and composites. Powder, casting, welding, rapid solidification, and other advanced approaches.

MSE 505. Frontiers of Automotive Materials. 3 Hours.

Advanced lightweight automotive materials, manufacturing and modeling techniques. Technology advancements in cost-effective carbon, glass and related reinforcements; "green" and sustainable materials, crashworthiness and injury protection of occupants and pedestrians, metal castings, heavy truck, mass transit, fuel cell and hybrid vehicles. Students taking this class will receive a GATE certificate of training in automotive materials technologies upon successful completion.

MSE 508. Nanobiomaterials. 3 Hours.

Basic tools of nanotechnology, building blocks of nanostructured materials. Behavior of materials with nanoscale structures and their technological applications, including automotive, medical, and electronic applications. Introduction to biomaterials and nanobiomaterials, Concepts in tissue engineering with special focus on nanoscaffolds and nanoparticles in drug delivery.

MSE 509. Principles of Metal Casting. 3 Hours.

Production and evaluation of cast ferrous metals (gray iron, ductile iron, steel) and non-ferrous metals (brass, bronze, aluminum). Design of castings and molds. Laboratory on the gating, risering and molten metal treatment, analysis and handling techniques required to produce high quality castings. MSE 280 is recommended.
Prerequisites: MSE 280 [Min Grade: D]

MSE 509L. Principles of Metal Casting. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of MSE 509 and must be taken concurrently.

MSE 513. Composite Materials. 3 Hours.

Processing, structure, and properties of metal-, ceramic-, and polymer-matrix composite materials. Roles of interfacial bond strength, reinforcement type and orientation and matrix selection in physical and mechanical properties of composite materials.

MSE 525. Statistics and Quality. 3 Hours.

This course is arranged to reflect the sequential steps an engineer or scientist take to assess process capability and implement process improvement studies. There is a focus on connecting the theoretical equations to practical examples as well as interpreting and communicating of statistical results.

MSE 530. Polymeric Materials. 3 Hours.

Processing methods, structure/engineering/property relationships, and applications of polymeric materials.

MSE 530L. Polymeric Materials Lab. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of MSE 530 and must be taken concurrently.

MSE 533. Nondestructive Evaluation of Materials. 3 Hours.

Principles, applications, and limitations of ultrasonic vibrations, acoustic emission, radiographic, magnetic particle, eddy current, and other nondestructive testing methods. Intelligent sensors and health monitoring of real structures.

MSE 545. The Evolution of Engineering Materials. 3 Hours.

Past, present and future of engineering materials; how new materials and processing methods have impacted human society, from the Stone Age until today. Taught as a 3-week study abroad course in Germany, with visits to universities, industrial facilities, research labs, museums and selected cultural sites.

MSE 562. Composites Manufacturing. 3 Hours.

Principles of manufacturing and processing of polymeric matrix composites. Production techniques including filament winding, pultrusion, and liquid infusion techniques combined with design, environmental and manufacturing issues of polymer matrix composites.

MSE 564. Metals and Alloys. 4 Hours.

Microstructures, properties, heat treatment, and processing of ferrous and nonferrous materials.

MSE 564L. Metals and Alloys Lab. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of MSE 564 and must be taken concurrently.

MSE 565. Characterization of Materials. 4 Hours.

Theory and practice of materials characterization, with emphasis on optical metallography, quantitative metallography, scanning electron microscopy, crystallography, and x-ray diffraction. Specific application in metals and ceramics considered.

MSE 565L. Characterization of Materials Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of MSE 565 and must be taken concurrently with MSE 565.

MSE 570. Ceramic Materials. 4 Hours.

Structure, processing, properties, and uses of ceramic compounds and glasses. Mechanical, thermal, and electrical behavior of ceramic materials in terms of microstructure and processing variables.

MSE 570L. Ceramic Materials Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of MSE 570 and must be taken concurrently.

MSE 574. Metals and Alloys II. 3 Hours.

Production and physical metallurgy of ferrous and non-ferrous alloys including: steel alloys, inoculation and production of ductile, gray, compacted and malleable iron; advanced heat treatments of steel and iron; conventional and ultra-high strength aluminum alloys; wrought and cast copper alloys; wrought and cast magnesium alloys.

MSE 590. Special Topics in Materials Science & Engineering. 1-3 Hour.

Special Topics in Materials Science & Engineering.

MSE 591. Individual Study in Materials Science & Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

Individual Study in Materials Science & Engineering.

MSE 601. Materials Science and Engineering Seminar. 1 Hour.

Required of all full-time masters students.

MSE 602. Intro to Thermodynamics and Mechanics of Materials. 2 Hours.

This course is a survey of undergraduate level theory and application of the fundamental principles of mechanics of materials and thermodynamics. Understanding is based on the explanation of the physical behavior of materials under load and then modeling this behavior to develop the theory. Intended to provide the students with both the theory and application of the fundamental principles of thermodynamics of materials. Students must be graduate student in engineering, chemistry or physics.

MSE 603. Thermodynamics of Materials. 3 Hours.

Atomistic and classical approaches to the understanding of the thermodynamics of solids, phase transformations, chemical reactions, and alloy systems.

MSE 605. Introduction to Physical Materials. 2 Hours.

Overview of fundamental concepts of materials science and engineering, focusing on chemical and physical properties such as bonding, crystal structure and defects, diffusion, and phase diagrams.

MSE 606. Introduction to Manufacturing Engineering. 3 Hours.

Manufacturing is the process of transforming raw materials into products. Even the most optimized and controlled industrial processes are fraught with variability and inefficiencies, both of which can have a negative impact on profitability. This course will introduce students to the proven tools to characterize and optimize industrial processes. In addition, students will learn the statistical techniques to quantitative assess and detect changes to a process and make data-driven decisions to improve that process.

MSE 607. Measurement Systems Analysis. 3 Hours.

Whether in a manufacturing process, research & development lab or quality control, assessment and analysis of data used for decision making has roots in the equipment and procedures that make up a measurement system. Students will learn to critically assess the capability of measurements systems, gauges and analytical equipment used to collect data. Students will learn metrology, best practices, and statistical tools to quantitatively assess, as well as procedures to implement a Gage R&R study to improve a measurement system. In addition, students will learn effective communication strategies for presenting the results of statistical analysis.

MSE 608. Process Characterization and Advanced Statistical Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course centers on manufacturing processes and the inherent variability of all products. Product variability has origins at all input points in a process; raw materials, energy, time, human, etc. This course will expose engineers to the statistics to quantify and assess variability. In addition to statistical tools, we will delve deep into all phases of the DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analysis, Improve, and Control) methodology and the Lean/Six Sigma tools to identify, implement and document process improvements. An emphasis will be placed on the communication of these often-complicated statistics in an industrial setting. We will put these concepts into practice through completion of a final term paper. Students will be required to choose an industrial process and apply and communicate the concepts learned in this course.

MSE 610. Advanced Materials, Manufacturing and Applications Development. 3 Hours.

Introduction to advanced materials by design, near net-shape cost-effective manufacturing, synergistic knowledge of material properties, durability and function. Hands on activities related to extrusion-compression, fiber spinning, thermoset/thermoplastic materials, medical grade materials, intermediate forms and hybrid manufacturing. Integrated process and product development methodology. Student projects will involve manufacturing processes associated with mass production.

MSE 613. Mechanical Behavior of Materials. 3 Hours.

Microstructural effects on the deformation mechanisms responsible for mechanical behavior of engineering materials.

MSE 614. Process Quality Engineering. 3 Hours.

Application of the concepts and tools of total quality to develop, implement, and maintain an effective quality assurance system in a materials processing and manufacturing environment. Students will be exposed to probability models, statistical tools, linear and multiple regression, DOE, TQM and six sigma.

MSE 624. Physical Metallurgy. 3 Hours.

Course will consider the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic principles governing the behavior of metals and alloys, particularly with respect to their influence the formation and evolution of microstructure. Topics will include liquid-solid and solid-state phase transformations, nucleation, growth, solidification and diffusion.

MSE 628. Thermal Characterization. 3 Hours.

This lab-oriented course will be focused to give graduate students the theory and hands-on experience in operation, data acquisition and interpretation of widely used thermal characterization techniques such as differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), thermo gravimetric analyzer (TGA) , Simultaneous TGA-DTA, Thermo mechanical analyzer (TMA), Dynamic mechanic analyzer (DMA) and rheological and viscosity analyses of polymeric resins and composite materials. Exposure to the surface characterizations techniques such as contact angle goniometer for wettability, Fourier Transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) and X-ray-photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for surface chemical analyses and atomic force microscopy for roughness and morphology.

MSE 628L. Thermal Characterization Lab. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of MSE 628 and must be taken concurrently.

MSE 629. Polymer Structure and Morphology. 3 Hours.

Polymer structures and morphology and it's relationships with applications, multicomponent polymer systems (polymer blends, copolymers, micro and nanocomposites), liquid crystalline polymers, polymer crystals, oriented polymers, morphological aspects of deformation and advances in polymers (biomimetic and bioinspired polymer systems).

MSE 633. Advanced Mechanics of Deformation. 3 Hours.

Basics and intermediate mechanics of deflection of beams and columns, mechanics of impact, failure theories, plastic deformation of materials, fracture mechanics, fatigue, creep and vibration. The topics will be supported by industry relevant case studies. Suggested prerequisites included Mechanics of Solids (CE 220) and Mechanical Behavior (MSE 382).

MSE 635. Advanced Mechanics of Composites. 3 Hours.

Classical lamination theory, analysis and failure of reinforced composite material systems, anisotropic elasticity, stress analysis and design of laminated composites including 3D effects, stress concentrations, free-edge effects, hygrothermal behavior, adhesive and mechanical connections.

MSE 636. Engineering Fibers. 3 Hours.

Processing-microstructure-properties of different fibrous materials: natural polymeric fibers (jute, sisal, silk, etc.), synthetic polymeric fibers (aramid and polyethylene, etc.), metallic fibers, and high performance ceramic fibers (alumina and silicon carbide). Application of Weibull statistics to strength of fibrous materials, techniques of mechanical testing of fibers and applications of fibers in various fields.

MSE 638. Degradation of Materials. 3 Hours.

Basics of materials degradation- thermodynamics and kinetics - Pourbaix diagram, chemical and electrochemical reactions; Degradation types and mechanisms; Degradation of different material systems: Metals, alloys, ceramics and glasses, polymers and composites for versatile applications- structural, functional, energy and biomedical; Impact on materials properties; Investigation for materials degradation; Protection from degradation and materials design;Environmental and biological aspects; Societal impact.

MSE 667. Process Modeling/Simulation. 3 Hours.

Theory and practice of analytical methods and computational modeling for manufacturing processes of metals, ceramics, polymers and composites. Applications on processes such as metal cutting, welding, casting, massive forming, solidification, rapid prototyping, injection molding and resin transfer molding.

MSE 668. Applied Finite Element Analysis. 3 Hours.

Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is used widely for design optimization and failure prediction in automobile, energy, aerospace, and other industries. This course primarily looks at how practically to set up static structural models and get meaningful results. The focus will be on applying loading and boundary conditions, good meshes, convergence of results, and correct interpretation of results. Students will learn how to set up models using programs such as Pro/Engineer and ANSYS.

MSE 669. Degradation of materials. 3 Hours.

The course will introduce the thermodynamics and kinetics of materials degradation; degradation mechanisms and types; degradation of different material systems (metals, alloys, ceramics and glasses, polymers and composites) for multifaceted applications; protection from degradation and materials design; Environmental and biological aspects; societal impact.

MSE 670. Physical Characterization. 3 Hours.

Theory and practice of materials characterization, with emphasis on optical metallography, quantitative metallography, scanning electron microscopy, crystallography, and x-ray diffraction. Specific application in metals and ceramics considered.

MSE 670L. Physical Characterization Lab. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of MSE 670 and must be taken concurrently.

MSE 690. Special Topics In (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Special Topics in (Area).

MSE 690L. Special Topics in (Area) Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Special Topics in (Area) laboratory.

MSE 691. Individual Study in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Individual Study in (Area).

MSE 698. Non-Thesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

MSE 699. Thesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

Prerequisites: GAC M

MSE 701. Materials Science and Engineering Seminar. 1 Hour.

Materials Science and Engineering Seminar. Required of all full-time doctoral students.

MSE 702. Intro to Thermodynamics and Mechanics of Materials. 2 Hours.

This course is a survey of undergraduate level theory and application of the fundamental principles of mechanics of materials and thermodynamics. Understanding is based on the explanation of the physical behavior of materials under load and then modeling this behavior to develop the theory. Intended to provide the students with both the theory and application of the fundamental principles of thermodynamics of materials. Students must be graduate student in engineering, chemistry or physics.

MSE 703. Thermodynamics of Materials. 3 Hours.

Atomistic and classical approaches to the understanding of the thermodynamics of solids, phase transformations, chemical reactions, and alloy systems.

MSE 705. Introduction to Physical Materials. 2 Hours.

Overview of fundamental concepts of materials science and engineering, focusing on chemical and physical properties such as bonding, crystal structure and defects, diffusion, and phase diagrams.

MSE 710. Advanced Materials, Manufacturing and Applications Development. 3 Hours.

Introduction to advanced materials by design, near net-shape cost-effective manufacturing, synergistic knowledge of material properties, durability and function. Hands on activities related to extrusion-compression, fiber spinning, thermoset/thermoplastic materials, medical grade materials, intermediate forms and hybrid manufacturing. Integrated process and product development methodology. Student projects will involve manufacturing processes associated with mass production.

MSE 714. Process Quality Engineering. 3 Hours.

Application of the concepts and tools of total quality to develop, implement, and maintain an effective quality assurance system in a materials processing and manufacturing environment. Students will be exposed to probability models, statistical tools, linear and multiple regression, DOE, TQM and six sigma.

MSE 724. Physical Metallurgy. 3 Hours.

Course will consider the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic principles governing the behavior of metals and alloys, particularly with respect to their influence the formation and evolution of microstructure. Topics will include liquid-solid and solid-state phase transformations, nucleation, growth, solidification and diffusion.

MSE 728. Thermal Characterization. 3 Hours.

This lab-oriented course will be focused to give graduate students the theory and hands-on experience in operation, data acquisition and interpretation of widely used thermal characterization techniques such as differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), thermo gravimetric analyzer (TGA) , Simultaneous TGA-DTA, Thermo mechanical analyzer (TMA), Dynamic mechanic analyzer (DMA) and rheological and viscosity analyses of polymeric resins and composite materials. Exposure to the surface characterizations techniques such as contact angle goniometer for wettability, Fourier Transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) and X-ray-photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for surface chemical analyses and atomic force microscopy for roughness and morphology.

MSE 728L. Thermal Characterization Lab. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of MSE 728 and must be taken concurrently.

MSE 729. Polymer Structure and Morphology. 3 Hours.

Polymer structures and morphology and it's relationships with applications, multicomponent polymer systems (polymer blends, copolymers, micro and nanocomposites), liquid crystalline polymers, polymer crystals, oriented polymers, morphological aspects of deformation and advances in polymers (biomimetic and bioinspired polymer systems).

MSE 733. Advanced Mechanics of Deformation. 3 Hours.

Basics and intermediate mechanics of deflection of beams and columns, mechanics of impact, failure theories, plastic deformation of materials, fracture mechanics, fatigue, creep and vibration. The topics will be supported by industry relevant case studies. Suggested prerequisites included Mechanics of Solids (CE 220) and Mechanical Behavior (MSE 382).

MSE 735. Advanced Mechanics of Composites. 3 Hours.

Classical lamination theory, analysis and failure of reinforced composite material systems, anisotropic elasticity, stress analysis and design of laminated composites including 3D effects, stress concentrations, free-edge effects, hygrothermal behavior, adhesive and mechanical connections.

MSE 736. Engineering Fibers. 3 Hours.

Processing-microstructure-properties of different fibrous materials: natural polymeric fibers (jute, sisal, silk, etc.) synthetic polymeric fibers (aramid and polyethylene, etc.), metallic fibers, and high performance ceramic fibers (alumina and silicon carbide). Application of Weibull statistics to strength of fibrous materials, techniques of mechanical testing of fibers and applications of fibers in various fields.

MSE 738. Degradation of Materials. 3 Hours.

Basics of materials degradation- thermodynamics and kinetics - Pourbaix diagram, chemical and electrochemical reactions; Degradation types and mechanisms; Degradation of different material systems: Metals, alloys, ceramics and glasses, polymers and composites for versatile applications- structural, functional, energy and biomedical; Impact on materials properties; Investigation for materials degradation; Protection from degradation and materials design;Environmental and biological aspects; Societal impact.

MSE 767. Process Modeling/Simulation. 3 Hours.

Theory and practice of analytical methods and computation modeling for manufacturing processes of metals, ceramics, polymers and composites. Applications on processes such as metal cutting, welding, casting, massive forming, solidification, rapid prototyping, injection molding, and resin transfer molding.

MSE 768. Applied Finite Element Analysis. 3 Hours.

Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is used widely for design optimization and failure prediction in automobile, energy, aerospace, and other industries. This course primarily looks at how practically to set up static structural models and get meaningful results. The focus will be on applying loading and boundary conditions, good meshes, convergence of results, and correct interpretation of results. Students will learn how to set up models using programs such as Pro/Engineer and ANSYS.

MSE 769. Degradation of Materials. 3 Hours.

The course will introduce the thermodynamics and kinetics of materials degradation; degradation mechanisms and types; degradation of different material systems (metals, alloys, ceramics and glasses, polymers and composites) for multifaceted applications; protection from degradation and materials design; Environmental and biological aspects; societal impact.

MSE 770. Physical Characterization. 3 Hours.

Theory and practice of materials characterization, with emphasis on optical metallography, quantitative metallography, scanning electron microscopy, crystallography, and x-ray diffraction. Specific application in metals and ceramics considered.

MSE 770L. Physical Characterization Lab. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of MSE 770 and must be taken concurrently.

MSE 790. Special Topics in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Special Topics In (Area).

MSE 790L. Special Topics in (Area) Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Special Topics in (Area) Laboratory.

MSE 791. Individual Study in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Individual Study in (Area).

MSE 798. Non-Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

MSE 799. Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

Prerequisites: GAC Z

MSEM-Engineering Management Courses

MSEM 590. Special Topics in Engineering Management. 1-3 Hour.

Special Topics in Engineering Management.

MSEM 591. Individual Study in Engineering Management. 1-6 Hour.

Individual Study in Engineering Management.

MSEM 640. Systems Engineering. 3 Hours.

This course will explore systems engineering and systems thinking. Students will learn key topics related to engineering products and design, including requirements development, the project life cycle, system hierarchy, risk analysis, and cost analysis. They will learn that systems engineering is iterative and will develop judgment that will allow them to compare and evaluate engineering alternatives. They will learn to discuss systems engineering methods and processes as well as engage in systems thinking.

MSEM 650. Technical Project Management. 3 Hours.

Students will learn the common methodologies used to manage complex projects in technology organizations. They will learn how to successfully plan, schedule, budget, and complete projects. Topics will include the PMP, Six Sigma, Lean, and other methodologies. Students will take part in several class exercises that will allow them to use different project management skills. The format of the class will consist of lecture and general discussion. There will also be significant portions of class time dedicated to project based activities.

MSEM 660. Professional Development for Engineers. 3 Hours.

This course prepares students to make the transition from student to working engineer. Students will develop skills in personal branding, career planning, strategic career search, networking, teamwork, leadership, professional communications, time management, measuring value, and professional etiquette. In addition, students will learn how to find and develop opportunities and how to use social media to enhance and protect their personal brand.

MSEM 695. Engineering Management Design Project. 3 Hours.

This course is for students who already have a relevant job or internship and are part of the Master of Engineering Management program. The purpose of this course is to be a capstone program where the skills and concepts learned in the MSEM are applied to a real industry issue. This project will be performed in partnership with your current employer by defining a project on the job and working with MSEM faculty to meet core deliverables.

MSEM 696. Engineering Management Internship. 3 Hours.

This course is an internship and will be conducted in cooperation with an employer and the School of Engineering’s Director of Career Services. Students will work with an industry partner and then provide a final report.

Faculty

Alexander, J. Iwan, Dean and Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 2013, B.Sc. (University College Swansea, Wales, U.K.); Ph.D. (United World College of the Atlantic, Wales, U.K.); Ph.D. (Washington State)
Amthor, Franklin R., Professor of Psychology, 1981, B.S. (Cornell), Ph.D. (Duke)
Andrews, J. Barry, Professor Emeritus of Materials Science and Engineering, 1976, B.S. (UAB), M.E., PhD. (Florida), P.E. (Alabama), Polymer and Metal Matrix Composites, Solidification, Physical Metalurgy
Appleby, Don, Instructor Information Engineering Management; President, Incur Consulting, 2004, MSEE (UAB), Innovation, technology management, systems engineering
Bellis, Susan, Associate Professor (Physiology & Biophysics), The Role of Integrin Receptors in Human Biology and Disease
Berry, Joel L., Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering; Director of BME Undergraduate Program; Associate Director, UAB Science and Technology Honors Program, 2010, B.S., B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E. (UAB), Ph.D. (Wake Forest), Cardiovascular biomechanics and tissue engineering
Broome, James, Professor (Prosthodontics), Polymers, Adhesives, Physical and Mechanical Testing, Clinical Research
Brott, Brigitta, Associate Professor, Division of Cardiovascular Disease (Department of Medicine), Angiogenesis, cardiac angioplasty, coronary artery disease, cardiac catheterization, interventional cardiology and stents
Burgess, John O., Professor (Prosthodontics), DDS, Clinical trials, Caries models, Dental materials
Burke, Donald S. , Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering; Program Director, Advanced Safety Engineering and Management Program; Track Leader, Advanced Safety Engineering, Interdisciplinary Engineering PhD Program, 2013, B.S., Ph.D. (UAB)
Cadieux, Randy E., Instructor of Engineering, 2012, B.A. (New Hampshire), M.S. (Capitol College), MEng-ASEM (UAB)
Callahan, Dale, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Director, Information Engineering and Management; Associate Dean for Professional Programs and Industry Relations, 2000, B.E.E. (Auburn), M.B.A. (Auburn-Montgomery), M.S.E.E. (UAB), Ph.D. (Alabama), P.E. (Alabama), Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Social Media
Capriotti, Emidio, Assistant Professor, Division of Informatics (Pathology), Protein structural prediction by threading methods and building by homology, Molecular dynamics of protein systems, Protein folding kinetics
Chawla, Krishan Kumar, Professor Emeritus of Materials Science and Engineering, 1998, B.S. (Banaras Hindu, India), M.S., Ph.D. (Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Metal, Ceramic, and Polymer Matrix Composite Materials; Fibers; Foams
Cinnella, Pasquale, Professor of Mechanical Engineering; Undergraduate Program Director, 2017, B.S. (University of Bari, Italy), Ph.D. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University), Dynamics
Colburn, Christopher J., Adjunct Pofessor; Director, Environmental, Health and Safety, B.S. (University of Findlay), MEng-ASEM (UAB)
Conwell, Wes, Instructor, Information Engineering and Management, 2015, BSEE (UA), MBA (UAB), MSEE (UAB), Business Intelligence, Data Analytics, Management Information Systems
DeLucas, Lawrence J. , Professor (Optometry), Protein Crystal Growth
Deutsch, Georg, Professor (Radiology), Cognitive neuroscience and brain imaging
Dobbins, Allan C., Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 1996, B.Sc. (Dalhousie), B.S.E., M.S.E., Ph.D. (McGill), Human and machine vision, Neural computation, Brain imaging, Scientific visualization
Downs, J. Crawford, Professor (Ophthalmology) and Director, Center for Ocular Biomechanics and Biotransport, Experimental and computational ocular biomechanics, intraocular pressure and physiologic signal telemetry, and 3D histomorphometry
Dwyer, Zoe. B., Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs, 1999, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (UAB)
Eberhardt, Alan, Professor of Biomedical Engineering; Associate Chair of Education, Biomedical Engineering; Director of Master of Engineering in Design and Commercialization, 1991, B.S., M.S. (Delaware), Ph.D. (Northwestern), Solid Mechanics, Injury Biomechanics, Biomedical Implants, Analytical and Numerical Methods in Biomechanics
Esposito, Richard A., Research Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 2011, B.S. (Auburn), M.S. (Auburn; Samford), Ph.D. (UAB), P.G. (Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Mississippi, Tennessee),, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration; Power Generation
Etterer, Judith, MSPH, Adjunct Professor; Staff Assistant, BS (UNA), MSPH (UAB), Mine Safety and Health Administration
Fast, Vladimir G., Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 1997, B.S., M.S. Physics, Ph.D. in Biophysics (Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology), Optical imaging of electrical and ionic activity in the heart mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias and defibrillation
Fazio, Massimo A., Assistant Professor (Ophthalmology and Biomedical Engineering) , 2007, M.S.E., Ph.D. (University of Calabria, Italy), ocular tissue biomechanics with emphasis on in-vivo mechanical quantification of the neural damage caused by elevated intraocular pressure
Feldman, Dale S., Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 1985, B.S. (Northwestern), M.S. (Dayton), Ph.D. (Clemson), Biomaterials, Soft-tissue biomechanics, Polymeric implants
Fiveash, John, Associate Professor (Radiation Oncology), B.S. (University of Georgia), M.D. (Medical College of Georgia), Clinical trials of novel therapeutics in combination with radiation therapy, particularly in the treatment of brain and prostrate tumors; treatment planning research and education IMRT and IGRT
Floyd II, H. Landis, PE, CSP, CMRP, CRL Fellow IEEE, Adjunct Professor and Principal Consultant, Electrical Safety Group, Inc., retired from DuPont as Principal Consultant Electrical Safety and Technology & Global Electrical Safety Competency Leader, B.S. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University)
Foley, Robin D., Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 1990, B.S., M.S. (Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Ph.D. (Wisconsin-Madison), Materials Characterization, Physical Metallurgy, Metals Casting
Fouad, Fouad H., Chair, Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering; Director, UAB Sustainable Smart Cities Research Center; Interim Director, Civil Engineering Construction Management Online Master Program, 1981, B.S.C.E. (Alexandria, Egypt), M.S.C.E. (Texas), Ph.D. (Texas A&M), P.E. (Alabama, Texas), Structural Engineering, Reinforced Concrete, Concrete Materials
Gamlin, Paul, Professor of Vision Sciences, Ph.D. (State University of NY-Stony Brook), Studies of the neural bases of vision & eye movements
Gawne, Timothy J., Assistant Professor (Vision Sciences), B.S. (MIT), Ph.D. (USUHS), Information processing in the cerebral cortex, Gamma-band brain activity and neurotransmitter metabolism in schizophrenia, Visual cortical evoked potential
Genau, Amber L., Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 2010, B.S., M.S. (Iowa State); Ph.D. (Northwestern), Metal solidification and microstructure formation, Quantitative analysis of compolex three-dimensional structures, Ternary eutectic microstructures
George, David, Instructor, Information Engineering and Management, 2014, B.S. (UAB), MEng (UAB), Leadership, Project Management, Technology Management
Gilmer, Dianne, Instructor of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering; Co-Founder and Assistant Director of Online Civil Engineering Construction Management Master's Program, 2009, B.S. (Samford), MEng-CEM (UAB), Engineering Online Education, Learning Management System Applications, Student Retention in Online Learning Programs
Gladysz, Gary, Adjunct Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 2017, B.E. (Youngstown State University), M.S. (Ohio University), Ph.D. (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology), Materials Science and Engineering, Chemical Engineering; Syntactic Foams
Goldman, Jay, Distinguished Service Professor & Dean Emeritus, 2017, Ph.D. (Washington University in St. Louis)
Grant, Merida, Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurobiology), Neurobiology of stress as a risk factor for onset and maintenance of unipolar depression; Imaging alterations in brain morphology, physiology and connectivity associated with early life stress in adults; Peripheral physiology and conditioning paradigms
Griffin, John A. , Research Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 2011, B.S.Mt.E, M.S.Mt.E. (UAB), Metals Casting, Testing and Characterization, Nondestructive Evaluation
Grytz, Rafael, Assistant Professor (Ophthalmology), M.S.(Ruhr University Bochum, Germany), Ph.D., Ocular biomechanics and mechanobiology with emphasis on multi-scale approaches
Haider, Mohammad, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2011, Ph.D. (Tennessee-Knoxville), Low-power Sensor Electronics, Wireless Telemetry, and Wireless Power Transfer
Hill, M. Shane, Instructor, Information Engineering and Management, 2018, B.S. (UA), MEng (UAB), Six Sigma Black Belt, Innovation, Leadership, Systems Engineering, Strategic Management
Hill, T. Alan, Instructor, Information Engineering and Management, , 2018, BSME, MEng (UAB), Six Sigma Black Belt, Innovation, Leadership, Systems Engineering, Strategic Management
Hosch, Ian E., Assistant Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, 2012, B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E, Ph.D. (UAB), Structural Engineering, Engineering Mechanics, Geotechnical Engineering
Ideker, Raymond E., Professor, Division of Cardiovascular Disease (Department of Medicine), Study of Cardiac Arrhythmia, Cardioversion and Electrical Ablation for Treatment of Arrhythmia
Jannett, Thomas C., Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 1984, B.S.E., M.S.E. (UAB), Ph.D. (Auburn), Sensor Networks, Biomedical Instrumentation and Control Systems
Janowski, Gregg M., Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Associate Provost for Assessment and Accreditation, 1990, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (Michigan Technological), X-Ray Diffraction, Composite Materials, Physical Metallurgy, Structure-Processing-Property Relationships
Javed, Amjad, Assistant Professor (Cell Biology, Pathology), 2005, Ph.D. (University of Punjab, UMass Medical School), Genetic and molecular signaling for cellular differentiation and skeletogenesis
Johnson, Chris, Instructor, Information Engineering and Management, 2014, BS (UAB), MEng (UAB), Certified Project Management Professional, Communications, Information Technology Management, Project Management
Jololian, Leon, Associate Professor and Associate Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2017, Ph.D. (New Jersey Institute of Technology), Software Engineering, Internet of Things, Mobile and Cloud Computing, and Machine Learning
Jun, Ho-Wook, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2006, B.S., M.S. (Hanyang University, South Korea), Ph.D. (Rice), Biomimetic nanotechnology, Biomaterials, Tissue engineering
Kannappan, Ramaswamy, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2015, BPharm, MPharm (Tamilnadu DR. M.G.R. Medical University - India), Ph.D. (Niigata University - Japan), Aging cardiomyopathy, Cardiac stem cells
Keyser, Kent T., Professor (Vision Sciences), 1996, Ph.D. (State University of NY-Stony Brook), Neurotransmitters and receptors
Kiessling III, Edward H., MSME, MSISE, MSEE, PE, Adjunct Professor; Manager, Safety, Waulity, and Management Services, Marshall Space Flight Center – NASA
Kim, Harrison, Assistant Professor (Radiology), Ph.D., Breast, pancreatic, and brain cancer imaging
Kirby, Jason, Associate Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering; Director, Sustainable Smart Cities Program, 2005, B.S. (Auburn), M.S., Ph.D. (Alabama), Environmental Engineering, Water Resources, Hydraulics
Knapp, Michael, Adjunct Instructor, 2017, B.A. (James Madison), J.D. (Wake Forest), Construction Litigation and contracts
Koomullil, Roy P., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 2002, B.S. (Mahatma Gandhi University, India), M.S. (Indian Institute of Technology, India), Ph.D. (Mississippi State), High Performance Computing; Six Degrees of Freedom Simulation; Bio-medical Flow Modeling
Krishnamurthy, Prasanna, Associate Professo of Biomedical Engineering, BVSc, Ph.D. (Bangalore Veterinary College), MVSc (Indian Veterinary Research Institute), Cardiovascular pathophysiology, Stem cell biology, Cardiovascular regeneration and therapeutics, Wound healing, Diabetes
Lahti, Adrienne, Professor; Psych – Behavioral Neurobiology, 2006, M.D. (University of Liege, Belgium), Use of multimodal brain imaging techniques to study the neuropathology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and to evaluate the effects of psychotropic drugs on brain function and biochemistry; translational work aiming at bridging human brain imaging and postmortem studies
Lemons, Jack E. , Professor of Biomaterials; Professor of Surgery; Division Director, Orthopaedic Laboratory Research; Professor of Biomedical and Materials Engineering, 1968, Ph.D. (Florida), Biocompatibility profiles of surgical implant devices with an emphasis on the role(s) of element and/or force transfers along biomaterial-to-tissue interfaces
Lingasubramanian, Karthikeyan, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2011, Ph.D. (South Florida), Hardware Security, Reliability and Low Power Design for Digital VLSI Circuits and Systems
Littlefield, David L., Professor of Mechanical Engineering; Chair of Mechanical Engineering, 2005, B.S., M.S, Ph.D. (Georgia Tech), Computational Mechanics; Impact Mechanics and Shock Physics; Weapons Effects
Liu, Lei, Associate Professor (Optometry), Low vision visual function and rehabilitation
Liu, Xiaoguang (Margaret), Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2016, Chemical Engineering (Shangdong University, M.S. in Biochemical Engineering (Tianjin University), Ph.D. in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (The Ohio State University), Cellular therapy, antibody, anti-cancer, heart failure treatment, industrial biopharmaceutical and biotechnology, metabolic cell-process engineering, bioreactor, cell culture
MacDougall, Mary, Professor and Associate Dean for Research (Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery), Genetic dental diseases, Tooth development, Mineralized matrix, Gene regulation
Mahapatra, Majoj K., Assistant Professor of Materials Science Engineering, 2015, BTech (University of Calcutta - India), MTech (IT-BHU - India), Ph.D. (Virginia Tech), Ceramics and glasses for advanced energy systems, Structural ceramics, Solid waste immobilization, Chemistry-processing-structure-property relationship, Electrochemistry, Materials degradation
Marstrander, Jon, Instructor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2005, B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E. (UAB), P.E. (Alabama), Signal and Image Processing, Embedded Systems, and Field Programmable Gate Arrays
McCracken, Michael, Professor (General Dental Sciences), Dental implants, Biomimetic materials, Growth factors
McDaniel, David R., Research Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 2008, B.S. (US Air Force Academy), M.S. (George Washington University), Ph.D. (Colorado, Colorado Springs), High Performance Computing; Computational Fluid Dynamics; Multidisciplinary Air Vehicle Simulation
McDougall, Mary, Professor (Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery): Genetic dental diseases, tooth development, mineralized matrix, gene regulation
McGuire, Paul, Instructor, Information Engineering and Management, 2018, B.S., MEng (UAB), Certified Project Management Professional, Communications, Information Technology Management, Project Management
Monroe, Charles A., Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 2012, B.S. (Penn State), M.S., Ph.D. (Iowa), Metals Casting, Design for Manufacture, Process Modeling
Moradi, Lee, Professor of Mechanical Engineering; Director of Engineering and Innovative Technology Development, 1996, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (UAB), Vibrations; Systems Engineering; Finite Elements Method
Murphree, Allen J., Instructor; Student Relations Manager, 2014, B.Sc. (Southern Polytechnic State University), MEng (UAB), Engineering Online Education, Construction Project Risk Management
Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne, Professor (Cell Biology, Pathology), Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Extracellular Matrix Control of Cell and Growth Factor Function
Nabors, L. Burt, Professor (Neurology), 2000, M.D. (University of Tennessee Medical Science Center), Brain tumor treatment and research program
Nakhmani, Arie, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2011, B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D (Technion - Israel Institute of Technology), Computer Vision, Visual Tracking, Biomedical Image Analysis, Systems and Control
Nazari, Rouzbeh, Associate Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, 2019, B.S. (Isfahan), M.E. (City College of New York), M.S., Ph.D. (CUNY), Environmental Engineering, Water Resources, Coastal Resiliency
Nelson, Dalton S., Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 1994, B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E., (UAB), Ph.D. (UAH), P.E. (Alabama), Intelligent Control Systems, Medical Instrumentation, Software Systems and Algorithm Development
Nichols, Robert H., Research Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 2002, B.S. (Mississippi State), M.S., Ph.D. (Tennessee), Propulsion; Computational Fluid Dynamics; Turbulence Modeling
Ning, Haibin, Assistant Professor, 2010, B.E. (Central South University, China); M.S. (Guangxi University, China), Ph.D. (UAB), Polymer Matrix Composite Materials, Metal; Design and Modeling
Parpura, Vladimir, Associate Professor; Neurobiology, M.D. (University of Zagreb, Croatia), Ph.D. (Iowa State University), The role of glial cells in physiology of nervous system
Peters, Robert W., Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, 2001, B.S. (Northwestern), M.S., Ph.D. (Iowa State), P.E. (Indiana and Illinois), Environmental Engineering, Water and Wastewater Treatment, Hazardous Waste Treatment
Pillay, Selvum, Associate Professor and Chair of Materials Science and Engineering, 2007, Bach (M L Suttan Technikon), M.S.M.E. (Florida A&M), Ph.D. (UAB), Polymer Matrix Composites, Manufacturing and Processing, Design for Manufacture; R & D to Commercialization
Pogwizd, Steven, Professor, Division of Cardiovascular Disease (Department of Medicine), Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics
Pollard, Andrew, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 1996, B.S.E., M.S.E., Ph.D. (Duke), Cardiac electrophysiology, Computer simulations and Modeling of electrical signals of the heart
Ponce, Brent, Assistant Professor (Surgery), M.D. (Vanderbilt), Biomechanics of the shoulder, Topics pertinent in resident education
Pupulidy, Ivan, Adjunct Professor, M.S. (Lund University, Sweden), Ph.D. (Tilburg University, Netherlands)
Qiao, Aijun, Assisant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2017, B.A. (Gansu Agriculture University in China), M.S. (Shehezi University in China), Ph.D. (Chinese Academcy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tsinghua University), Obesity, Diabetes, Cardiovascular disease, Liver cancer
Qin, Gangjian, Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Engineering; Director of Molecular Cardiology Program, 1986, MD/MS (Tongji Medical University, China)
Rahemtulla, Firoz, Professor Emeritus (Prosthodontics); Connective tissue biochemistry, Oxidants and antioxidant enzymes, Salivary proteins, Peroxidases, Connective tissue biochemistry, Oxidants and antioxidant enzymes, Salivary proteins, Peroxidases
Robbin, Michelle, Professor (Radiology), M.D. (Mayo Medical School), Hemodialysis patient ultrasound, ultrasound contrast agents and vascular ultrasound
Rogers, Jack M., Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 1994, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (California-San Diego), Cardiac electrophysiology, Computer simulations, Signal analysis of cardiac arrythmias
Ross, Douglas H., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 2008, B.S. (Illinois), M.S., Ph.D. (UAB), Computer Aided Design; Undergraduate Education; Machine Design
Salama, Talat, Adjunct Professor of Civil Engineering and Construction Management, 2017, B.S. (Rutgers), M.S. (American University in Cairo), Ph.D. (Rutgers), Structural Health Monitoring, Instrumentation and Testing of Bridges, Rehabilitation of Structures, Finite Element Modeling
Santoro, Nick J., Research Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 2007, B.S., M.S. (Alabama), Power Generation; Thermal Dynamics; Internal Combustion Engines
Scripa, Rosalia, Professor Emeritus of Materials Science and Engineering; Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2017, B.S. (Alfred), M.S. (Penn State), Ph.D. (Florida), P.E. (Alabama), Structure and Properties of Glass and Ceramics, Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Electronic and Magnetic Materials, Growth and Characterization of II-VI Semiconducting Compounds
Segner, E. P. Jr., Professor Emeritus of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1990, B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E. (Texas), Ph.D. (Texas A&M), P.E. (Alabama, Texas, Oklahoma, Tennessee), Engineering Education, Engineering Mechanics, Structural Engineering
Segrest, Jere, Professor, Division of Gerontology/Geriatrics/Palliative Care (Department of Medicine), Plasma lipoprotein structure and function
Serra, Rosa, Professor (Cell, Devvelopment & Integrative Biology), 2002, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State), Mechanism of TGF-ß action in developmental and disease processes
Sethu, Palaniappan, Associate Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Engineering, 2013, M.Eng., M.S., Ph.D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), B.Tech (PSG College of Technology, India), Microfluidic cellular and molecular analysis, Physiologically relevant models of cardiac and vascular tissue, Nanotechnology based approaches to study sub-cellular signaling
Sherif, Muhammad M., Assistant Professor of Civil, Contstruction, and Environmental Engineering, 2019, B.S.C.E. (United Arab Emirates University), M.S.C.E. (Carnegie Mellon), Ph.D. (Virginia), Structural analysis and modeling; Innovative materials; Machine learning
Shivers, Charles H., Professor and Associate Director of Advanced Safety Engineering Management Program, 2017, B.S. (Auburn), M.E. (Texas A&M), Ph.D. (UA Huntsville)
Sicking, Dean L., Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 2012, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (Texas A&M), Crashworthiness Design; Sports Safety Equipment; Computational Mechanics
Silver, Carla, CSP, Adjunct Professor; Safety Engineer, Merck, 2017, B.S. (Atlantic Christian College), MEng-ASEM (UAB)
Simien, Daneesh, Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 2014, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (Rice University), Self Corrective and Response, "Smart" Nano Scale Composite Materials, Structure-Property Relationships of Polymer Composites Inclusive of Rheological and Electrical Properties, Nano Scale Sensors and Flexible Robust Electronics
Sisiopiku, Virginia P., Associate Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, 2002, B.S. (Aristotelian University of Thessaloniki), M.S., Ph.D. (Illinois-Chicago), Transportation Engineering, Traffic Engineering
Smith, William M., Professor Emeritus of Biomedical Engineering, 1994, B.S. (Oglethorpe), Ph.D. (Duke)
Song, Yuhua, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2006, B.S. (Jilin University of Technology), M.S. (Harbin University of Science and Technology), Ph.D. (Harbin Institute of Technology), Computational biomechanics, Computational biology, Multiscale modeling
Sorace, Anna, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2019, B.S. (Mississippi State University), M.S., Ph.D. (UAB), Cancer imaging, Drug delivery, Tumor microenvironment, Precision oncology
Stewart, Katherine M. E., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 2019, B.S. (Wilfrid Laurier University), M.S., Ph.D. (University of Waterloo), Synthesis and Modification of Polymeric Materials
Sullivan, Andrew, Assistant Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, 2009, B.S.C.E. (Pennsylvania), M.S.C.E. (UAB), P.E. (Alabama), Transportation Engineering, Traffic Operations
Taherian, Hessam, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 2010, B.S. (Isfahan University of Technology, Iran), M.S. (Amirkabir University of Technology, Iran), Ph.D. (Dalhousie, Canada)
Tanik, Murat M., Professor and Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 1998, B.S. (Middle East Technical), M.C.S., Ph.D. (Texas A&M), Software Systems Engineering, Quantum Information Theory, Embedded Systems
Thiruvanamalai, Valarmathi, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2017, B.S.c, M.B.B.S., M.D. (University of Madras in India), Ph.D. (All-India Institute of Medical Sciences in India), Stem Cell Biology, Stem Cell Genome Engineering, Functional Tissue Engineering, Regenerative Medicine
Thomas, Vinoy, Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 2007, B.S., M.S. (University of Kerala, India), Ph.D. (Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences & Technology, India), Polymeric Biomaterials and 3D Composite Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering, Nanomaterials and Nanodiamonds for Biomedical Applications, Green Materials Synthesis and Structure-Property Relationships
Uddin, Nasim, Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, 2001, B.S. (University of Engineering and Technology, Bangladesh), M.S. (Oklahoma-Norman), Ph.D. (SUNY Buffalo), P.E. (New York), Structural Engineering, Wind and Seismic Loads, Bridge Design
Vantsevich, Vladimir V., Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 2012, Dip.-Eng., Ph.D. (Belarusian National Technical University, Minsk, Belarus), D.Sc. (State Supreme Attestation Board, Moscow, Russia), Mechatronic Systems Design, Modeling and Control; Manned/Unmanned Ground Vehicle Dynamics and Design; Dynamics and Design of Robotic Manipulators
Vaughn, Gregg L., Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 1979, B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E, Ph.D. (Alabama), P.E. (Alabama), Digital Communication, Image Processing, Radiation Effects
Ver Hoef, Lawrence, Associate Professor (Neurobiology), M.D. (Wake Forest), Clinical neurophysiology/neuroimaging and magnetoencephalography
Visscher, Kristina, Assistant Professor (Neurobiology), 2009, Ph.D. (Washing University- St. Louis)
Waldron, Christopher, Associate Professor of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering; Director of Online Structural Engineering Master's Program, 2008, B.S.C.E. (Drexel); M.S.C.E., Ph.D. (Virginia Tech), P.E. (Commonwealth of Pennsylvania), Structural Engineering, Bridge Design, Engineering Mechanics
Walker, Harrison, Assistant Professor (Neurology), 2006, M.D. (UAB), Deep brain stimulation for the management of Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders
Walls, Kenneth C., Scientist I; Credentialed Course Instructor, 2008, B.S. (Brown), M.S., Ph.D. (UAB), Computational Structural Mechanics; Finite Elements Methods
Walsh, Peter M., Research Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 2002, B.S. (Robert College, Turkey), M.A. (Wesleyan), Ph.D. (Cornell), Carbon Dioxide Sequestration; Combustion in Industrial Furnaces and Electric Utility Boilers; Control of Air Pollutant Emissions from Combustion
Wick, Timothy M., Senior Associate Dean, School of Engineering; Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2005, B.S. (Colorado), Ph.D. (Rice), Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, Bioreactor design, Drug delivery
Willey, Christopher, Associate Professor (Radiation Oncology), 2008, M.D./Ph.D. (Medical University of South Carolina), Investigating kinase driven signal transduction cascades in a spectrum of biological systems, Bioinformatics for kinomics and personalized medicine, Systems biology approaches in glioblastoma multiforme
Zech, Wesley C., Professor of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering; Director of the Online Civil Engineering Construction Management Master's Program, 2019, B.S., M.E., Ph.D. (Buffalo), Construction Management, Construction Safety, Erosion and Sediment Control
Zhang, Chunxiang (Kevin), Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2017, M.D. (Qingdao University, China), Ph.D. (Guangdong Cardiovascular Insitute & AHO Training Center, China), Biomaterials, Tissue engineering
Zhang, Jianyi (Jay), Chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Engineering, T. Michael and Gilliam Goodrich Endowed Chair of Engineering Leadership, 2015, M.D. (Shanghai Medical University), M.S. (Tufts University), Ph.D. (University of Minnesota), Cardiac tissue engineering, NMR imaging, Heart failure
Zhang, Yuhua, Assistant Professor (Ophthalmology), Advanced retinal imaging technology
Zhou, LuFang, Assistant Professor, Division of Cardiovascular Disease (Department of Medicine), 2011, Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve), Pathophysiology and therapeutics of oxidative stress related to diseases of mitochondrial origin as it pertains to cardiovascular disease and diabetes
Zhou, Yang, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2019, B.S. (Fudan University in China), Ph.D. (Chinese Academy of Sciences), Cardiac reprogramming, Heart regeneration, Stem cells, Epigenetics
Zhou, Yong, Assistant Professor, Division of Pulmonary/Allergy/Critical Care (Department of Medicine), 2009, M.D. (Wuhan University, China), Myofibroblast differentiation and emphysema
Zhu, Wugiang, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 2015, M.D. in Clinical Medicine (Hubei Medical University in China), Ph.D. in Internal Medicine-Cardiology (Tongji Medical University, Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Chind), Ph.D. in Cellular and Integrative Physiology(Indiana), Cardiomyocyte cell cycle, Stem/Progenitor cell-mediated myocardial repair, Cardiovascular biomedical engineering