School of Nursing

Degree Offered: M.S.N.
Director (M.S.N.): Dr. Michele Talley
Phone: (205) 934-6647
Email: talleym@uab.edu
Director (Nurse Anesthesia) Dr. Susan P. McMullan
Phone (205) 934-6587
Email susanpmcm@uab.edu
Director (A.M.N.P.) Dr. Jennan Phillips
Phone (205) 996-9829
Email japhil@uab.edu
Degree Offered: D.N.P.
Director (D.N.P.): Dr. Linda Roussel
Phone: (205) 975-0249
Email: lroussel@uab.edu
Degree Offered Ph.D.
Director (Ph.D.): Dr. Karen Heaton
Phone: (205) 996-9467
Email: kharnp@uab.edu
Degree Offered: M.S.N.
Director (A.M.N.P.): Dr. Jennan Phillips
Phone: (205) 996-9829
E-mail: japhil@uab.edu

A.M.N.P. Program Description

The Accelerated Master’s Entry to Nursing Pathway (AMNP) is an alternate pathway into the existing master’s in nursing (MSN degree) for applicants who have a bachelor’s degree in a field other than nursing, who are not registered nurses, and who seek MSN preparation.

A.M.N.P. Admission Requirements

Admission is based on the applicant’s academic record and all application materials at the time of the application deadline. *All grades (UAB and other colleges/universities) from previous college course work must be posted on applicant’s UAB transcript by the application deadline. Courses in progress must be validated with a letter from the college or university students are attending.

  • Applicants must have earned a minimum of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college/university prior to beginning classes.
  • Upon receipt of ALL official transcripts, course work will be evaluated for advisement purposes regarding AMNP Foundational Courses.
  • GPA- The minimum cumulative AND foundational GPA for all AMNP applicants is 3.0 at the time of application.
  • Combined score of 297 on verbal and quantitative sections of the GRE; or score of 410 on the MAT; or score of 480 on the GMAT; Test scores submitted to UAB from the GRE, GMAT, or MAT must not be over 5 years old. 
  • International students must achieve a TOEFL examination score of at least 500;
  • Three (3) letters of professional reference attesting to the applicant's potential for graduate study.
  • A resume, outlining health care interest/experience, campus/community involvement, leadership and employment. Resumes should not be more than one page in length. Applicants are strongly encouraged to provide proof of work/volunteer experience in a healthcare setting as part of the application process. The healthcare work is to be documented by letters from a supervisor (on agency letterhead). Completion of a nursing skills course does not meet this criterion.
  • Interviews- Due to the competitive nature, not all candidates that qualify for admission will be invited for interviews.  Applicants will be notified within a month of the application submission deadline if they will be invited to participate in the interview round for continued consideration for admission. You will be given ample time to plan for a trip to campus if you are selected to be interviewed. Students will be notified within a month after the interviews of an admission decision.

A.M.N.P. Degree Requirements

The Program is divided into two phases: (I) the Pre-licensure phase and (II) the Master of Science in Nursing, MSN, specialty phase.  Students in the Phase I must be prepared to dedicate 40 hours or more a week to the coursework and clinical for this program.  Students find that it is not feasible for them to work while completing Phase I of this program. This is not a distance accessible program.  Students must successfully complete Phase I and Phase II of the program to earn a degree in nursing.

Phase I: The pre-licensure phase: 50 Credits, 1395 contact hours

Phase I consists of 12 months of full time study during which students complete the required courses and clinical experiences equivalent to a BSN degree in preparation to apply for licensure as a registered nurse. While this will be an intense learning experience, students will emerge with the knowledge and skills required to function as a registered nurse. Upon successful completion of Phase I requirements, the University Registrar at UAB will send a certified letter to the Alabama Board of Nursing stating that students have successfully completed requirements equivalent to a BSN degree and are eligible to take the National Certification Licensure Exam for RNs (NCLEX-RN). Students who successfully complete the NCLEX-RN may subsequently apply for licensure and subsequently apply for employment as a Registered Nurse.

Phase II: The Master of Science Specialty Phase:

Phase II consists of four or more semesters of part time study via distance education through the School of Nursing and clinical work as a registered nurse. The typical programs of study are listed on each of the specialty track’s individual fact sheet. The spring admission into a master’s specialty track will provide you with an estimate length to complete your Master of Science in Nursing degree. Successful completion of Phase II leads to a Master of Science in Nursing degree (MSN) with eligibility to take a board certification exam in most specialties. Only after successful completion of a board certification exam may the RN use the corresponding designation as part of their professional title.

A.M.N.P. Program Goals

The MSN program of study is designed to prepare nurses who: synthesize research, theoretical formulations, and principles of scientific inquiry to provide evidence-based practice; assume leadership in managing and evaluating continuous quality improvement processes; use information systems/technology to evaluate programs of care, outcomes of care and care systems; advocate and implement health care policies that improve access, equity, efficiency, and social justice in the delivery of health care; design innovative educational programs for patients, nursing staff, and nursing students using teaching and learning principles; provide ethical, culturally sensitive care in an advanced nursing role independently and collaboratively with professionals from multiple disciplines; monitor the quality of one's own nursing practice based on professional practice standards and relevant statutes and regulations; and apply theories and principles of marketing, economics, consultation, management, and leadership to comprehensively perform an advanced nursing role.

Degree Offered: M.S.N.
Director (M.S.N.): Dr. Michele Talley
Phone: (205) 934-6647
E-mail: talleym@uab.edu

 

Master of Science in Nursing

Program Description

The MSN curriculum is designed to prepare nurses for advanced generalist or specialty practice, advanced nursing roles, and doctoral study in nursing. Preparation for advanced study in nursing at the MSN level is available in a variety of specialties and advanced roles including Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Educator, Nursing Informatics, Nursing and Health Systems Administrator, and Clinical Nurse Leader. Students are admitted to master's study during the fall and spring terms. All nursing core courses and the majority of the master's specialties are offered in the distance accessible format.  The total number of clinical hours required varies depending on the option that is selected. Students must meet the full-time relevant clinical practice experience requirement of the specialty and have a current RN license in the state in which they will do their clinical practice prior to enrolling in the advanced practicum courses. Because only a limited number of applicants can be accommodated in a given academic year, some well-qualified applicants may not be offered admission.  In cases where there are more qualified applicants than slots available, the School of Nursing accepts the most qualified who apply.

Non-Degree Options at the MSN Level

Post MSN Nurse Practitioner Specialties MSN graduates who wish to take a designated program of study in preparation for sitting for one of the nurse practitioner certification examinations may apply for non-degree graduate status. This category is called the Post MSN Nurse Practitioner Option.  Applicants for the Post MSN NP Option are considered on an individual basis, depending on NP practice experience and previous coursework.  Applicants that are determined to be ineligible for the Post MSN NP Option will be encouraged to apply for a second MSN degree. 

Teaching Certificate for Post BSN Applicants-Additionally, applicants at the post-baccalaureate level may choose to seek certification to prepare for the faculty role.

Clinical Research Management Certificate option that allows both nursing students and non-nursing applicants to pursue a Clinical Research Management certificate (paper application. 

Registered Nurse First Assist (RNFA) Certificate for Post-Baccalaureate Applicants- A Registered Nurse First Assistant (RNFA) is prepared to practice in a variety of acute or critical care settings.  The RNFA, in collaboration with the surgeon, provides continuous and comprehensive patient care throughout the perioperative period. (on-line application)

M.S.N. Program Goals

The MSN program of study is designed to prepare nurses who: synthesize research, theoretical formulations, and principles of scientific inquiry to provide evidence-based practice; assume leadership in managing and evaluating continuous quality improvement processes; use information systems/technology to evaluate programs of care, outcomes of care and care systems; advocate and implement health care policies that improve access, equity, efficiency, and social justice in the delivery of health care; design innovative educational programs for patients, nursing staff, and nursing students using teaching and learning principles; provide ethical, culturally sensitive care in an advanced nursing role independently and collaboratively with professionals from multiple disciplines; monitor the quality of one's own nursing practice based on professional practice standards and relevant statutes and regulations; and apply theories and principles of marketing, economics, consultation, management, and leadership to comprehensively perform an advanced nursing role.

M.S.N. Admission Requirements

Requirements for admission for the MSN degree include the following:

  • BSN degree from a regionally accredited institution, equivalent to the one offered by the School of Nursing, UAB;
  • Cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale or on the last 60 semester hours; (Graduates of baccalaureate degree programs in countries other than the United States must have their baccalaureate degree transcripts evaluated by the Educational Credential Evaluators, Inc. OR The World Education Services Organization);
  • Combined score of 297 on verbal and quantitative sections of the GRE; or score of 410 on the MAT; or score of 480 on the GMAT; Test scores submitted to UAB from the GRE, GMAT, or MAT must not be over 5 years old.  Applicants with a 3.2 GPA or better may waive the Test Score requirement if they meet the criteria, please see: GRE/GMAT/MAT Waiver Process for degree seeking MSN students;
  • International students must achieve a TOEFL examination score of at least 550; and
  • Three (3) letters of professional reference attesting to the applicant's potential for graduate study.

Master of Science in Nursing-Nurse Practitioner

RequirementsHours
NUR 604Leadership in Advanced Nursing Practice Roles3
NUR 606Translating Evidence into Practice3
NUR 610Health Care Systems for Advanced Nursing Practice3
NUR 612Advanced Pathophysiology3
NUR 613Pharmacology and Therapeutics3
NUR 614Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning for Advanced Nursing Practice3
Total Hours18

Adult Gerontology Primary Care

RequirementsHours
NAH 618L Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization3
NAH 621Advanced Adult Gerontology Nursing I5
NAH 685LPracticum I: Adult/Gerontology Nurse Pracitioner3
NAH 622Advanced Adult Gerontology Nursing II4
NAH 686LPracticum II: Adult/Gerontology Nurse Practitioner3
NAH 623Advanced Adult Gerontology Nursing III5
NAH 692LResidency: Adult/Gerontology Nurse Practitioner4
Total Hours27

Dual Pediatric

RequirementsHours
NDP 618LFocus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization3
NPE 621Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care I5
NCC 621Advanced Pediatric Nursing I - Acute Care4
NPE 622Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care II3
NCC 622Advanced Pediatric Nursing II - Acute Care3
NDP 625Advanced Dual Option Pediatric Nurse Practitioner2
NPE 685LPracticum I: Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care3
NPE 686LPracticum II: Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care3
NCC 685LClinical Practicum I: Advanced Pediatric Nursing - Acute Care3
NCC 686LClinical Practicum II: Advanced Pediatric Nursing - Acute Care3
NDP 692LResidency: Dual Option Pediatric Nurse Practitioner4
Total Hours36

Pediatrics Primary Care

RequirementsHours
NPE 618L2
Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization
NPE 621Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care I5
NPE 685LPracticum I: Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care3
NPE 622Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care II4
NPE 686LPracticum II: Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care3
NPE 623Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care III5
NPE 692LPracticum III: Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care Residency4
Total Hours26

Pediatric Primary and Acute Care

RequirementsHours
NDP 618LFocus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization3
NPE 621Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care I5
NCC 621Advanced Pediatric Nursing I - Acute Care4
NPE 622Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care II4
NCC 622Advanced Pediatric Nursing II - Acute Care3
NDP 625Advanced Dual Option Pediatric Nurse Practitioner2
NPE 685LPracticum I: Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care3
NPE 686LPracticum II: Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care3
NCC 685LClinical Practicum I: Advanced Pediatric Nursing - Acute Care3
NCC 686LClinical Practicum II: Advanced Pediatric Nursing - Acute Care3
NDP 692LResidency: Dual Option Pediatric Nurse Practitioner4
Total Hours37

Master of Science in Nursing

RequirementsHours
NUR 604Leadership in Advanced Nursing Practice Roles3
NUR 606Translating Evidence into Practice3
NUR 610Health Care Systems for Advanced Nursing Practice3
NUR 612Advanced Pathophysiology3
NUR 613Pharmacology and Therapeutics3
NUR 614Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning for Advanced Nursing Practice3
Total Hours18

Adult Gerontology Occupational Health

RequirementsHours
NAH 618L Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization3
NUR 630Principles of Epidemiology3
NUR 671Principles and Practice of Occupational Toxicology and Disease4
NUR 674L3
Evaluation and Management of Occupational Health and Safety Programs
NAH 621Advanced Adult Gerontology Nursing I5
NAH 622Advanced Adult Gerontology Nursing II4
NAH 623Advanced Adult Gerontology Nursing III5
NAH 685LPracticum I: Adult/Gerontology Nurse Pracitioner3
NAH 686LPracticum II: Adult/Gerontology Nurse Practitioner3
NAH 692LResidency: Adult/Gerontology Nurse Practitioner4
ENH 621Fund of Industrial Hygiene3
ENH 670Fund of Occupational Safety3
ENH 6802
Field Interdisciplinary Studies
ENH 6814
Interdisciplinary Worksite Evaluations
Total Hours49

Adult Gerontology Acute Care NP

RequirementsHours
NCA 618LFocus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization3
NCA 621Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing Practice I5
NCA 685LAdult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing: Practicum I3
NCA 622Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing Practice II4
NCA 686LAdult Gero Acute Care Nursing: Practicum II3
NCA 623Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing Practice III5
NCA 692LResidency: Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing4
Total Hours27

Adult Gerontology Acute Care NP with Registered Nurse First Assistant 

RequirementsHours
NCA 618LFocus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization3
NCA 621Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing Practice I5
NCA 685LAdult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing: Practicum I3
NCA 622Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing Practice II4
NCA 686LAdult Gero Acute Care Nursing: Practicum II3
NCA 692LResidency: Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing4
NCA 623Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing Practice III5
NFA 620Surgical Techniques3
NFA 6215
Advanced Perioperative Nursing I
NFA 622Advanced Perioperative Nursing I: Practicum1-3
Total Hours36-38

Adult Gerontology-Oncology

RequirementsHours
NAH 618L Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization3
NAH 621Advanced Adult Gerontology Nursing I5
NAH 685LPracticum I: Adult/Gerontology Nurse Pracitioner3
NAH 622Advanced Adult Gerontology Nursing II4
NAH 686LPracticum II: Adult/Gerontology Nurse Practitioner3
NAH 623Advanced Adult Gerontology Nursing III5
NAH 692LResidency: Adult/Gerontology Nurse Practitioner4
ONC 621Advanced Practice Nursing for Oncology Care3
ONC 622Cancer Assess, Diag, Managemnt2
ONC 685LPracticum I - Oncology Nurse Practitioner2
ONC 623Effects Cancer & Cancer Therap3
ONC 686LPracticum II - Oncology Nurse Practitioner2
ONC 692LResidency - Oncology Nurse Practitioner2
Total Hours41

Adult Gerontology Primary Care with Women's Health Sub-specialty 

RequirementsHours
NAH 618L Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization3
NAH 621Advanced Adult Gerontology Nursing I5
NAH 685LPracticum I: Adult/Gerontology Nurse Pracitioner3
NAH 622Advanced Adult Gerontology Nursing II4
NAH 623Advanced Adult Gerontology Nursing III5
NAH 692L2
Residency: Adult/Gerontology Nurse Practitioner
NWH 631Women's Health for Advanced Nursing Practice I5
NWH 685LPracticum I: Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner3
NWH 632Women's Health for Advanced Nursing Practice II4
NWH 686L2-3
Practicum II: Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner
NWH 692L4-5
Residency: Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner
Total Hours40-42

Family NP Primary Care-Oncology 

RequirementsHours
NFH 618LFocus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization3
NFH 621Family Nurse Practitioner I5
NFH 685LPracticum I: Family Nurse Practitioner3
NFH 622Family Nurse Practitioner II4
NFH 686LPracticum II: Family Nurse Practitioner3
NFH 623Family Nurse Practitioner III5
NFH 692LResidency: Family Nurse Practitioner4
ONC 621Advanced Practice Nursing for Oncology Care3
ONC 622Cancer Assess, Diag, Managemnt2
ONC 685LPracticum I - Oncology Nurse Practitioner2
ONC 623Effects Cancer & Cancer Therap3
ONC 686LPracticum II - Oncology Nurse Practitioner2
ONC 692LResidency - Oncology Nurse Practitioner2
Total Hours41

Psychiatric-Mental Health Primary Care

RequirementsHours
NPN 618LFocus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization3
NPN 621Advanced Psychiatric Nursing I5
NPN 685LPracticum I: Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner3
NPN 622Advanced Psychiatric Nursing II5
NPN 686LPracticum II: Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner3
NPN 623Advanced Psychiatric Nursing III4
NPN 692LResidency: Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner4
Total Hours27

Women's Health

RequirementsHours
NWH 618LFocus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization3
NWH 631Women's Health for Advanced Nursing Practice I3-5
NWH 685LPracticum I: Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner1-3
NWH 632Women's Health for Advanced Nursing Practice II3-5
NWH 686LPracticum II: Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner2
NWH 633 Advanced Woman's Health Care Nursing III5
NWH 692LResidency: Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner4

Nurse Educator

RequirementsHours
NTC 660Foundations of Evidence-Based Nursing Education3
NTC 658Simulation and Classroom Technologies for Student Learning3
NTC 650Instructional Strategies For Teaching in Nursing3
NTC 652Program and Curriculum Development3
NTC 654Evaluation of Instruction in Nursing3
Total Hours15

Clinical Nurse Leader

RequirementsHours
NCL 618LFocus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization2
NCL 620Systems in Population-based Care I4
NCL 685LCNL Practicum I2
NCL 692LCNL Capstone Practicum5
Total Hours13

Master of Science in Nursing-Nursing Health Systems Administration

RequirementsHours
NUR 604Leadership in Advanced Nursing Practice Roles3
NUR 606Translating Evidence into Practice3
NUR 610Health Care Systems for Advanced Nursing Practice3
NHSA 616Nursing Financial Management4
NHSA 617LNursing Financial Management Practicum2
NHSA 618Human Resource Management3
NHSA 631Advanced Quality and Patient Safety4
NHSA 681L4
Advanced Quality and Patient Safety Practicum
NHSA 632Nursing and Health Systems Administration I4
NHSA 682LNursing and Health Systems Administration I Practicum2
NHSA 633Nursing and Health Systems Administration II4
NHSA 683LNursing and Health Systems Administration II Practicum2
Total Hours38

Additional Requirements

Candidates for the MSN degree must complete the following requirements: Completion of all coursework and clinical experiences based on the student's Program of Studies, with an overall GPA of 3.0 or better, and grades of B or better in all required courses in the School of Nursing.

Prospective students should use this checklist to obtain specific admissions requirements on how to apply to Graduate School.

Degree Offered: M.S.N.
Director (Nurse Anesthesia): Dr. Susan P. McMullan
Phone: (205) 934-6587
Email: susanpmcm@uab.edu
Website: www.uab.edu/na

Master of Science in Nurse Anesthesia

The Nurse Anesthesia program prepares the registered nurse in all aspects of nurse anesthesia practice at the graduate level. The sequence of student coursework combines the knowledge of basic health sciences, scientific methodology in anesthesia, and advanced preparation to include a state-of-the-art scientific paper. Completion of the prescribed coursework and clinical practice comprise the requirements for the degree. The graduate is eligible to take the National Certification Examination, which, upon passing, allows them to practice as a certified registered nurse anesthetist.

The Nurse Anesthesia Program has received a ten-year accreditation in 2010 by the Council on Accreditation (COA) of Nurse Anesthesia Programs.

Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs
222. South Prospect Ave.
Park Ridge, IL, 60068
Phone: (847) 692-7050
Website:
http://home.coa.us.com/accredited-programs/Pages/CRNA-School-Search.aspx

Regional Clinical Sites

Students in the Nurse Anesthesia Program (NAP) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) are admitted to one of 5 program components as selected by the student in their application. Students from all components attend classes on campus at UAB for the first ten months. The remainder of the program (clinical rotations) are based at the student's corresponding component site.

Alabama:

  • Birmingham
  • Dothan
  • Huntsville
  • Montgomery
  • Tuscaloosa

Professional Program Admission Requirements

Qualified candidates are graduates from an accredited registered nursing program with a baccalaureate degree in nursing. All coursework towards a BSN must be completed by December prior to the start of the Nurse Anesthesia program the following August. Applicants are required to provide proof of a valid professional RN license in the U.S. Only candidates with at least one year experience as an RN in a critical care setting are considered for admission. Acceptance will be based upon the student's academic ability, work experience, and aptitude for a career in nurse anesthesia. The candidate is expected to satisfy the following requirements:

  • a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (A = 4.0),
  • a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in science prerequisites,
  • a grade of C or better in each prerequisite course,
  • all sections of the GRE must be completed prior to application (verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning, and analytical writing)
  • a personal interview with the selection committee, and
  • if accepted, complete the UAB medical history questionnaire and physical, provide proof of required immunizations, and receive satisfactory screening by the UAB Medical Center Student Health Service.

Professional Program Prerequisites

(courses listed in semester credit hours):

Anatomy (3-4 semester credit hours)
Physiology (3-4 semester credit hours)
Microbiology (3-4 semester credit hours)
College Chemistry (3-4 semester credit hours)
Descriptive Statistics (3 semester credit hours)

Application Procedure

Applicants interested in the Nurse Anesthesia Program at University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Nurse Anesthesia should apply through NursingCAS. NursingCAS is the online, centralized application service for nursing programs. Visit www.nursingcas.org and click “Apply Here” to initiate your application. And then click on “Create Account” and complete the required fields in order to start your application. View this short instructional video on how to complete a NursingCAS application.

  • Early Decision Application Deadline: June 1st

The UAB Nurse Anesthesia Program has added an early decision application cycle.  Applicants with a desire to attend the UAB Nurse Anesthesia Program should submit the application with all required materials by June 1st for matriculation in Fall of the following year. The screening process for early decision is more stringent and only a few will be chosen. However, applications not chosen for early decision will automatically roll over to the regular admission cycle in September without penalty. If the application rolls over to the regular admission cycle, only applicable changes to the application need to be submitted by September 1st and no additional application fees will be assessed.

Criteria for acceptance: applicants with a desire to attend UAB Nurse Anesthesia Program, otherwise the criteria used for early acceptance is the same as for the regular application cycle though only the top candidates will be selected for the early decision cycle.

Criteria for maintaining status: early acceptance is contingent on completing one year of ICU experience; other contingencies may be assigned on an individual basis.

Professional Program Application Deadline

  • June 1st for early decision (August for fall following year)
  • July - Notification of interviews, interviews, and notification of decision
  • September 1st for regular admissions cycle
  • November - Notification of interview
  • December through February - interviews
  • Decision notification two weeks after interview
  • August - Students begin the program fall semester

UAB Nurse Anesthesia Program Supplemental Application

GPA Calculation Spreadsheet (MAC user please contact Ms. Stacey Smith (205) 934-7412, staceysmith@uab.edu)

Applicants are strongly encouraged to complete the GPA calculation spreadsheet and mail with your supplemental application.

Nurse Anesthesia Curriculum

The Nurse Anesthesia Program begins in the fall semester of each year. It comprises 67 semester hours of didactic instruction and 45 semester hours of clinical practicum and requires 27 months of full-time commitment. Students complete all foundation courses before beginning the clinical practicum, which starts after the first (ten) months of enrollment. The curriculum does not permit enrollment on a part-time basis.

Master of Science in Nursing-Nurse Anesthesia

RequirementsHours
NA 620Anesthesia Pharmacology I3
NUR 700Clinical Data Management and Analysis3
NUR 701Writing for Publication3
NUR 735Population Health in Advanced Practice Nursing3
NA 602Anatomy and Physiology for Nurse Anesthesia6
NA 631Biochemistry and Physics for Nurse Anesthetists4
NUR 729Evidence-Based Practice Design and Translation3
NUR 731Philosophical, Theoretical, and Conceptual Foundations for Advanced Practice Nursing3
NA 621Anesthesia Pharmacology II3
NA 670Anesthesia Pathophysiology I3
NA 640Anesthesia Principles I4
NUR 6142
Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning for Advanced Nursing Practice
NA 618LFocus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization2
NA 641Anesthesia Principles II3
NA 650Regional Anesthesia2
NA 671Anesthesia Pathophysiology II3
NUR 743Evidence-Based Practice Strategies3
NA 611LAnesthesia Practicum I2
NA 642 Anesthesia Principles III3
NA 645Professional Aspects of Anesthesia2
NUR 733Informatics for Advanced Practice Nursing3
NA 612L Anesthesia Practicum III (225 clinical hours)3
NUR 740Health Policy and Politics: Implications in Health Care3
NUR 742Program Evaluation and Methods3
NA 613L Anesthesia Practicum II (375 clinical hours)5
NA 795Critical Concepts I3
NUR 738LScholarly Project Development3
NA 711LAnesthesia Specialty Immersion I5
NA 796Critical Concepts II3
NUR 739LScholarly Practice Project4
NA 712LAnesthesia Specialty Immersion II ((375 clinical hours))5
NA 797Critical Concepts III3
NUR 739LScholarly Practice Project3
NA 713LAnesthesia Specialty Immersion III5
Total Hours111

Deadlines

Note: See summarized fact sheet for experience requirements.

Entry Date Deadline Notes
Fall 2014 June 1, 2013 Early decision
September 1, 2013 Regular admission cycle
Fall 2015 June 1, 2014 Early decision
September 1, 2014 Regular admission cycle

Funding

The School of Nursing at UAB has excellent scholarship, traineeship, fellowship and loan programs in which many students participate.  Please visit "funding" for more information.

Outcomes

Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Education

The Nurse Anesthesia Program not only provides students with coursework designed to learn the skills they need, the program also focuses on the theoretical and clinical aspects of anesthesia. Students spend much of their time in clinical settings receiving valuable experience.

Clinical experiences give students hands-on practice in the field of anesthesia. After their clinical experiences, nurse anesthesia graduates can:

  • evaluate and assess patients pre, post, and intraoperatively;
  • plan the anesthetic management and immediate pre and post-anesthesia management;
  • develop and implement an appropriate anesthesia plan designated for patients of all ages with a variety of pathological conditions;
  • recognize emergency patient conditions and perform skills required during emergency life support situations; and
  • recognize, evaluate, and prevent anesthesia complications.

Nurse Anesthesia students participate in several clinical assignments:

  1. First year students will receive their first assignments in May during their first year. The first schedule is designated as the summer semester schedule (first year student schedule) and extends from July through August.
  2. The second clinical schedule (fall semester schedule) extends from September through October.
  3. The second year clinical rotation schedule covers a 12-month period that begins in November and ends in October.
  4. One last schedule is made in September or October of the last semester in the program. This lists where graduate students will finish their clinical education during the month of November. Some students request this assignment be the site where they have accepted employment. A priority is placed on these requests and all attempts are made to fulfill them.

Graduate students who have begun their clinical rotations are designated on most program forms as SRNAs (student registered nurse anesthetists). SRNAs at clinical sites are under the direction of the Clinical Coordinator. The Clinical Coordinator is a CRNA clinical faculty who serves as the principal contact person for the program and is in charge of the SRNAs clinical training at a particular clinical site.

Clinical Coordinators, CRNAs and Anesthesiologists also serve the students by:

being available to render clinical assistance in the operating room suite or other areas where anesthesia services are required;

  • apprising the student of clinical responsibilities;
  • serving as a role model; and
  • providing evaluation and feedback to the students.
  • providing a variety of clinical rotations within the facility

Clinical rotations are adjusted in a manner that will address individual student needs. Students cannot be assigned to all affiliates, but the program will attempt to provide each student with equal types of clinical experience.

Degree Offered: D.N.P.
Director (D.N.P.): Dr. Linda Roussel
Phone: (205) 975-0249
E-mail: lroussel@uab.edu

 

Doctor of Nursing Practice

D.N.P. Program Description

The DNP is a practice-focused terminal degree to prepare graduates to practice at the highest level in specialty practice or to assume leadership positions in healthcare. Graduates of the DNP program will focus on providing care to populations and communities with an emphasis on improving quality and access to under served, diverse populations. The three components of the DNP are advanced clinical specialty practice, leadership, and practice inquiry. Graduates will employ abilities and skills in these areas to advocate for reasonable, rational, and data-driven health regulations, standards, and evidence-based practices; sustain collaborative and strategic relationships, promote innovative, effective health care programs; and form partnerships with diverse groups to address health disparities. In addition, graduates will be prepared to assume clinical faculty positions to address the critical nursing faculty shortage.

For most students, the Post-Master’s DNP curriculum will be a minimum of 34 credits, which includes the development of a practice or leadership focused project. This Scholarly Project is designed to synthesize scholarship in an advanced practice specialty or an area of healthcare leadership and serves as a capstone program experience. All courses are offered in a distance accessible format and students may develop the scholarly project under the direction of program faculty and onsite mentors. Applications will be accepted twice a year for the summer or fall term, to either a full or a part-time cohort. Students enrolled in the DNP program will be required to come on campus between the first and second year for a two to three day intensive experience.

D.N.P. Program Goals

The D.N.P. program of study is designed to prepare nurses who: evaluate policy, care delivery, and organizational systems for current and future health care needs; translate scientific, theoretical, and ethical principles into healthcare for individuals, families, and populations; incorporate knowledge of current and emerging health technologies to improve care delivery and organizational systems; advocate for social justice, equity, and ethical policies in healthcare; Demonstrate intra and inter-professional collaboration to address health disparities and to improve health care quality across diverse populations and cultures; assume complex leadership roles to advance clinical practice and healthcare delivery at the organizational and systems level and to improve health outcomes of individuals and populations, and assume complex leadership roles to advance clinical practice and healthcare delivery at the organizational and systems level and to improve health outcomes of individuals and populations.

D.N.P. Admission Requirements

Admission is competitive, based on an assessment of the ability of the applicant to complete the program of studies and on the appropriateness of the requested program of studies to the applicant's stated goals. Because only a limited number of applicants can be accommodated in a given academic year, some well-qualified applicants may not be offered admission. In cases where there are more qualified applicants than slots available, the School of Nursing accepts the most qualified applicants.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing to Doctor in Nursing Practice Pathway

Admissions Requirements (excluding Nurse Anesthesia)

  • A BSN from a regionally accredited institution, equivalent to the one offered by UAB School of Nursing.
  • Possess an unencumbered nursing license to practice nursing in the state where you plan to conduct your clinical practicum.
  • An undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.2 on a 4.0 scale either cumulatively or on the last 60 semester credit hours. A 3.5 or higher GPA is recommended.
  • (3) Letters of professional reference attesting to the applicant’s potential for graduate study
  • Some specialty tracks may require specific clinical practice experience prior to enrollment in a specialty courses.

For International Students:

  • Prospective international students are asked to first contact International Recruitment and Student Services at isss@uab.edu, (205), 934-3328, FAX 934-8664 to determine eligibility in order to submit an application into any academic program listed below.
  • All foreign transcripts evaluated by the Educational Credential Evaluators, Inc www.ece.org OR the World Education Services www.wes.org, sent from the evaluators directly to the School of Nursing
  • A degree equivalent to a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited educational institution in the United States
  • A score of 500 or higher on the Test of English as a Foreign Language, TOEFL
  • Standardized test score. A minimum combined score of 1000 on the verbal and quantitative sections of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
  • Possess an unencumbered nursing license to practice nursing in the state where you plan to conduct your clinical practicum

Doctor of Nursing Practice

RequirementsHours
NUR 700Clinical Data Management and Analysis3
NUR 701Writing for Publication3
NUR 729Evidence-Based Practice Design and Translation3
NUR 731Philosophical, Theoretical, and Conceptual Foundations for Advanced Practice Nursing3
NUR 733Informatics for Advanced Practice Nursing3
NUR 735Population Health in Advanced Practice Nursing3
NUR 737Interdisciplinary Leadership and Role Development for Practice Excellence3
NUR 738LScholarly Project Development3
NUR 739LScholarly Practice Project 11-7
NUR 740Health Policy and Politics: Implications in Health Care3
NUR 742Program Evaluation and Methods3
NUR 743Evidence-Based Practice Strategies3
Total Hours34-40
1

May be repeated, minimum 7 to graduate

Nurse Practitioner Concentration

RequirementsHours
NUR 612Advanced Pathophysiology3
NUR 613Pharmacology and Therapeutics3
NUR 614Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning for Advanced Nursing Practice3
NFH 618LFocus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization3
NFH 621Family Nurse Practitioner I5
NFH 622Family Nurse Practitioner II4
NFH 685LPracticum I: Family Nurse Practitioner3
NFH 623Family Nurse Practitioner III5
NFH 686LPracticum II: Family Nurse Practitioner3
NFH 692LResidency: Family Nurse Practitioner4
NUR 629: Adanced Practice Nursing Synthesis2
Total Hours38

Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Concentration

RequirementsHours
NUR 612Advanced Pathophysiology3
NUR 613Pharmacology and Therapeutics3
NUR 614Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning for Advanced Nursing Practice3
NNE 618LFocus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization3
NNE 621Advanced Neonatal Nursing I5
NNE 684LPracticum I: Neonatal Nurse Practitioner3
NNE 622Advanced Neonatal Nursing II4
NNE 685LPracticum II: Neonatal Nurse Practioner3
NNE 623Advanced Neonatal Nursing III5
NNE 692LResidency: Neonatal Nurse Practitioner4
Total Hours36

Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Concentration

RequirementsHours
NUR 612Advanced Pathophysiology3
NUR 613Pharmacology and Therapeutics3
NUR 614Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning for Advanced Nursing Practice3
NCA 618LFocus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization3
NCA 621Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing Practice I5
NCA 685LAdult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing: Practicum I3
NCA 622Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing Practice II4
NCA 686LAdult Gero Acute Care Nursing: Practicum II3
NCA 623Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing Practice III5
NCA 692LResidency: Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing4
Total Hours36

Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Concentration

RequirementsHours
NUR 612Advanced Pathophysiology3
NUR 613Pharmacology and Therapeutics3
NUR 614Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning for Advanced Nursing Practice3
NPE 618LFocus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization3
NPE 621Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care I5
NPE 685LPracticum I: Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care3
NPE 622Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care II4
NPE 686LPracticum II: Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care3
NPE 623Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care III5
NPE 692LPracticum III: Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care Residency4
Total Hours36

Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Concentration

RequirementsHours
NUR 612Advanced Pathophysiology3
NUR 613Pharmacology and Therapeutics3
NUR 614Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning for Advanced Nursing Practice3
NPN 618LFocus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization3
NPN 621Advanced Psychiatric Nursing I5
NPN 685LPracticum I: Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner3
NPN 622Advanced Psychiatric Nursing II5
NPN 686LPracticum II: Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner3
NPN 623Advanced Psychiatric Nursing III4
NPN 692LResidency: Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner4
Total Hours36

Master of Science in Nursing to Doctor of Nursing Practice Pathway

Admissions Requirements

  •  A master’s degree in an area of advanced nursing practice (nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, nursing administration, or nurse anesthetist) from a regionally accredited institution, equivalent to that in the UAB School of Nursing. Students must hold an advanced practice certification or be eligible to sit for advanced certification and pass their specific certification exam prior to completing 12 credit hours of coursework. Until advanced certification is achieved, students will be considered as a conditional admit.
  • A graduate grade point average of at least 3.0 overall (based on a 4.0 scale) or in the last 60 hours of earned credit.
  • Three favorable completed Evaluation Forms from persons who have knowledge of the applicant’s potential for success for graduate nursing studies and advanced-practice nursing.
  • Current professional certification as an advanced practice nurse where applicable.
  • Evidence of an unencumbered license as a (1) registered nurse, and (2) advanced nursing practice or eligibility in the state in which they plan to practice plus (3) CPR certification; all documents must be notarized if applicant is not a licensed nurse in Alabama.
  • Personal goal statement that is congruent with the program goals (300 words or less)
  • Resume or curriculum vitae.
  • A personal interview by phone or in person with a School of Nursing faculty member or designee may be requested to verify application data

Degree Requirements

RequirementsHours
NUR 700Clinical Data Management and Analysis3
NUR 701Writing for Publication3
NUR 729Evidence-Based Practice Design and Translation3
NUR 731Philosophical, Theoretical, and Conceptual Foundations for Advanced Practice Nursing3
NUR 733Informatics for Advanced Practice Nursing3
NUR 735Population Health in Advanced Practice Nursing3
NUR 737Interdisciplinary Leadership and Role Development for Practice Excellence3
NUR 738LScholarly Project Development3
NUR 739LScholarly Practice Project 11-7
NUR 740Health Policy and Politics: Implications in Health Care3
NUR 742Program Evaluation and Methods3
NUR 743Evidence-Based Practice Strategies3
Total Hours34-40
1

May be repeated, minimum 7 to graduate

Nurse Practitioner Concentration

RequirementsHours
NHSA 616Nursing Financial Management4
NHSA 617LNursing Financial Management Practicum3
NHSA 631Advanced Quality and Patient Safety3
Total Hours10

Additional Requirements

Candidates for the DNP degree must complete the following requirements: Completion of all coursework and clinical experiences based on the student's Program of Studies, with an overall GPA of 3.0 or better, and grades of B or better in all required courses in the School of Nursing.

Degree Offered: Ph.D.
Director (Ph.D.) Dr. David Vance
Phone: (205) 934-7589
E-mail: devance@uab.edu

Ph.D. Program Description

The Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing is designed to prepare professional nurses as scholars, leaders, and researchers who will make a substantive contribution to the body of knowledge for the discipline of nursing and thereby improve health outcomes for those who receive nursing care. The program of studies builds on preparation at the master's or baccalaureate level. Graduates are prepared for culturally effective leadership roles in research and science, education, health policy, and health care. Doctoral students have the opportunity to develop expertise and conduct research in a selected content area. In addition to structured coursework, the program builds upon a mentorship model which recognizes that research skills are learned most effectively by working with a faculty research mentor who provides opportunities to practice the use of research techniques and the design and execution of original research within a focused program of research. In addition to core program course requirements, students complete at least 12 credits of required courses and electives in a selected content area. The PhD program was initiated in 1999. Initiated in 2000, the Post-Bachelor's PhD Option allows individuals with baccalaureate degrees in nursing to complete the PhD in nursing without first obtaining a master's degree.

Ph.D. Program Goals

The PhD curriculum prepares graduates to examine models, concepts and theories for their application in expanding the body of nursing and health care knowledge to: contribute to nursing science and health care through research that is disseminated in professional publications and presentations to the scientific communities and health care consumers; to conduct health care investigations based upon scientifically sound conceptual and methodological decisions about research designs, measures, and analytic methods; to reflect a consistent commitment to scientific integrity in the design, conduct, and dissemination of research; to initiate and collaborate in interdisciplinary research and scholarly endeavors that contribute to health outcomes in a culturally effective manner; and to assume leadership roles in research and scholarship.

Ph.D. Admission Requirements

  • A Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree from an accredited institution in the United States, or approved by the Minister of Education for schools of nursing in foreign countries, equivalent to that in the UAB School of Nursing;
  • A minimum grade point average of 3.0 overall (based on a 4.0 scale) on all graduate level coursework; 
  • Completion of GRE within the past 5 years;
  • For applicants from non-English speaking countries: a satisfactory TOEFL score (minimum 550);
  • Computer literacy and access is required, with proficiency in word processing and e-mail correspondence, as well as familiarity and experience with the Internet. It is recommended that each student have their own personal computer meeting the specifications of the School of Nursing. (Specifications are available from the School of Nursing website);
  • Eligibility for licensure as a Registered Nurse in the United States;
  • A written goal statement which evidences congruence between the applicant’s research interests and School of Nursing faculty research;
  • At least one sample of independent written work (in English) that demonstrates the applicant’s scholarship potential. Representative examples include a paper, proposal, report, or publication;
  • A current curriculum vitae;
  • Three references from individuals with expertise to comment on the applicant’s capability for research and scholarship (for example, University professors, employers); at least one of the references must be from a doctorally prepared nurse, and;
  • A personal interview.

NOTE: For the Post-Baccalaureate PhD option, the corresponding requirements are:

  • A Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree from an accredited institution in the United States, or approved by the Minister of Education for schools of nursing in foreign countries, equivalent to that in the UAB School of Nursing;
  • A minimum grade point average of 3.0 overall (based on a 4.0 scale) on all undergraduate level coursework;
  • Completion of GRE within the past 5 years;
  • For applicants from non-English speaking countries: a satisfactory TOEFL score (minimum 550);
  • Computer literacy and access is required, with proficiency in word processing and e-mail correspondence, as well as familiarity and experience with the Internet. It is recommended that each student have their own personal computer meeting the specifications of the School of Nursing. (Specifications are available from the School of Nursing website);
  • Eligibility for licensure as a Registered Nurse in the United States;
  • A written goal statement which evidences congruence between the applicant’s research interests and School of Nursing faculty research;
  • At least one sample of independent written work (in English) that demonstrates the applicant’s scholarship potential. Representative examples include a paper, proposal, report, or publication;
  • A current curriculum vitae;
  • Three references from individuals with expertise to comment on the applicant’s capability for research and scholarship (for example, University professors, employers); at least one of the references must be from a doctorally prepared nurse, and;
  • A personal interview.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing must complete the following requirements:

  • Coursework and experiences based on the student's background and substantive area, with an overall GPA of 3.0 or better, and grades of B or better in all required courses on the approved program of studies;
  • A comprehensive examination administered upon completion of an individualized program of studies; and
  • A written dissertation demonstrating competence in research, individual inquiry, critical analysis using sophisticated statistical and/or qualitative techniques, and in-depth treatment of a health care problem in the selected content area. The investigation must make a genuine scientific contribution to knowledge, concepts, and theories in nursing. A final defense of the dissertation is required.

Postdoctoral Study

Postdoctoral studies in nursing are individually arranged based on a student's learning needs in specific areas of interest that match the strengths of the graduate faculty. The focus of postdoctoral study is on expanding and extending the student's knowledge base in nursing theory, practice, research, statistics and data management, and generally centers on a research effort of mutual interest to the student and faculty mentor.

CRM - Clinical Research Mgmnt Courses

CRM 670. Clinical Rsearch Ethics, Methods and Clinical Trials. 3 Hours.

This course provides clinical research personnel and advanced practice nurses with an introduction to historical, cultural, and ethical influences on clinical research, and introduces concepts related to good clinical practice guidelines. The course also addresses concepts of scientific integrity, scientific misconduct, the informed consent process, research methods and clinical trials.

CRM 671. Clinical Research Study Operations and Site Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides clinical research personnel and advanced practice nurses with an introduction to principles of study and site management for the development, implementation and evaluation of clinical research, and expands concepts related to good clinical practice guidelines.

CRM 672. An Overview of Teaching Principles for Clinical Research Coordinators and Healthcare Professionals. 3 Hours.

This course provides clinical research personnel and advanced practice nurses with an introduction and overview of teaching principles that are applicable to clinical and clinical research venues.

CRM 673. Current Issues in Clinical Research Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an opportunity to expand critical learning and application of clinical research management topics through review of current literature and use of available resources.
Prerequisites: (CRM 670 [Min Grade: C] and CRM 671 [Min Grade: C] and CRM 672 [Min Grade: C]) or (CRM 670 [Min Grade: C] and CRM 671 [Min Grade: C] and CRM 672 [Min Grade: C])

CRM 674L. Practicum Experiences in Clinical Research Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an opportunity to expand learning experiences that validate cognitive, affective and psychomotor skill sets of CRMs; and includes an opportunity to develop additional learning objectives and practicum experiences that will culminate in a project that fulfills learning goals.
Prerequisites: (CRM 670 [Min Grade: C] and CRM 671 [Min Grade: C] and CRM 672 [Min Grade: C] and CRM 673 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently) or (CRM 670 [Min Grade: C] and CRM 671 [Min Grade: C] and CRM 672 [Min Grade: C] and CRM 673 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

NA-Nursing Anesthesia Courses

NA 600. Research Methods and Statistics. 3 Hours.

This online course will introduce the student to clinical research methods and review concepts involved in descriptive and inferential Statistics. Topics covered include, overview of the research process, literature review, research hypothesis, research designs, sample selection, measurements methods, descriptive statistics, and inferential statistics.

NA 601. Gross Anatomy. 4 Hours.

Structure and function of human body examined through laboratory dissection, lecture, models, and preceptorials. Laboratory sessions complement lecture presentations through regional dissection of thorax, abdomen, pelvis, perineum, back, and extremities with special emphasis on head and neck. Emphasis on radiological anatomy and clinical correlations.

NA 602. Anatomy and Physiology for Nurse Anesthesia. 6 Hours.

This course is a study of histology, genetics, human anatomy and physiology, with an emphasis in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. NA 602 integrates the structure, function, and organization of nervous tissue from the cellular through gross anatomic aspects including central, peripheral, and autonomic portions of the system. The course includes a series of clinical correlation laboratory experiences, team-based learning projects, and lectures designed to support and augment basic science content.
Prerequisites: NA 620 [Min Grade: B]

NA 611L. Anesthesia Practicum I. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to provide a foundation in the basic principles and practice of nurse anesthesia. During this course, clinical experiences are designed to provide the student with development of anesthesia practice, and to apply knowledge of basic and advanced principles of anesthetic management in surgical specialty areas.
Prerequisites: NA 621 [Min Grade: B] and NA 640 [Min Grade: B] and NA 670 [Min Grade: B] and NA 618L [Min Grade: P]

NA 618L. Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization. 2 Hours.

The purpose of this course will be the study of specialty track specific topics. The focus of the course will be on providing foundational materials for specialized areas of advanced nursing practice. Emphasis is on exploring specific advanced nursing practice competencies.
Prerequisites: NUR 606 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 606 [Min Grade: B]

NA 620. Anesthesia Pharmacology I. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the nurse anesthesia student with knowledge of various non-anesthetic pharmacological agents and their anesthetic implications. During this course, students will learn pharmacological principles related to advanced practice nursing at the doctoral level.

NA 621. Anesthesia Pharmacology II. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the nurse anesthesia student with knowledge of various anesthetic pharmacological agents and their anesthetic implications. During this course, students will build upon knowledge gained from NA 620 and further master advanced pharmacological principles related to advanced practice nursing at the doctoral level.
Prerequisites: NA 602 [Min Grade: B] and NA 620 [Min Grade: B] and NA 631 [Min Grade: B]

NA 630. Nurse Anesthesia Biochemistry. 3 Hours.

Chemistry and metabolism of biologically important compounds and common pathways of metabolism. Regulation and chemical structure of electrolytes, pH balance, and biochemical nutrition.

NA 631. Biochemistry and Physics for Nurse Anesthetists. 4 Hours.

This course provides a solid chemistry biochemistry, and physics foundation that is necessary for the safe practice of nurse anesthesia. Students will gain an understanding of these sciences, their clinical relevance, and how they apply to human beings and anesthesia equipment. This course is foundational in nature and success will help the student prepare for upcoming clinical anesthesia management courses.
Prerequisites: NA 620 [Min Grade: B]

NA 640. Anesthesia Principles I. 4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide a beginning foundation for students to plan and implement safe anesthesia care in healthy patients. Te focus f this course is the study of scientific foundations of nurse anesthesia practice. The emphasis on designing and implementing individualized anesthesia care plans, principles of anesthesia induction, maintenance, emergence, anesthesia complications in the healthy patient, routine and difficult airway management, and the principles of nurse anesthesia role transition and practice standards.
Prerequisites: NA 602 [Min Grade: B] and NA 631 [Min Grade: B]

NA 641. Anesthesia Principles II. 3 Hours.

This course is for the student who has a foundation in the basic principles and practice of nurse anesthesia. During this course, students will learn anesthetic management principles for surgical specialty areas. Upon course completion the student will demonstrate master of related anatomic, physiologic,pathophysiologic, and pharmacologic principles for each of the surgical specialty areas in the context of advanced nursing practice at the doctorate level.
Prerequisites: NA 621 [Min Grade: B] and NA 670 [Min Grade: B] and NA 640 [Min Grade: B] and NA 618L [Min Grade: P]

NA 645. Professional Aspects of Anesthesia. 2 Hours.

Psychosocial, ethical and legal aspects, department organization and management, and history of anesthesia.

NA 646. Legal Issues and Practice Management. 1 Hour.

This online course review(s) the malpractice and quality assurance concerns in the practice of anesthesia. Emphasis on how to avoid malpractice suits through appropriate departmental quality assurance programs.

NA 650. Regional Anesthesia. 2 Hours.

The purpose of this course is the study of the theoretical and practical considerations involved in the administration and management of regional anesthesia and pain management. Related anatomy, physiology, and pharmacology will be reviewed as applied to the administration and management of regional anesthesia and pain management, using ultrasound and radiological techniques. Various regional anesthetics, both central and peripheral, are discussed as a component of a safe and effective anesthetic.
Prerequisites: NA 621 [Min Grade: B] and NA 640 [Min Grade: B] and NA 670 [Min Grade: B] and NA 618L [Min Grade: P]

NA 660. Obstetrical Anesthesia. 1 Hour.

Online course is of the basic concepts concerning physiological changes that accompany pregnancy and their implication on anesthesia management of pregnant patients.

NA 661. Anesthesia for Extremes of Age. 3 Hours.

This online course focuses on the principles of anesthetic management in the pediatric and geriatric patient.

NA 670. Anesthesia Pathophysiology I. 3 Hours.

This pathophysiology course is designed to promote the understanding and application of fundamental disease processes in clinical settings. General concepts of disease, including etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical significance are presented. These concepts are applied in a systems-oriented approach to disease processes affecting cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. Application of this knowledge to anesthetic plan development and implications of anesthesia on the disease process will be expected.
Prerequisites: NA 602 [Min Grade: B] and NA 631 [Min Grade: B]

NA 671. Anesthesia Pathophysiology II. 3 Hours.

This Pathophysiology course is designed to promote the understanding and application of fundamental disease processes in clinical settings. General concepts of disease, including etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical significance are presented. These concepts are applied in a systems-oriented approach to disease processes affecting musculoskeletal, renal, nervous, gastrointestinal, immune, hematological and endocrine systems. Application of this knowledge to anesthetic plan development and implications of anesthesia on the disease process, and vice versa, will be expected.
Prerequisites: NA 621 [Min Grade: B] and NA 640 [Min Grade: B] and NA 670 [Min Grade: B] and NA 618L [Min Grade: P]

NA 672. Clinical Practicum I. 6 Hours.

Operating room experience providing for application of theoretical principles of anesthesia management. Clinical course sequence provides anesthesia care for more complex surgical procedures.

NA 673. Clinical Practicum II. 11 Hours.

Operating room experience providing for application of theoretical principles of anesthesia management. Clinical course sequence provides anesthesia care for more complex surgical procedures.

NA 674. Clincial Practicum III. 12 Hours.

Operating room experience providing for application of theoretical principles of anesthesia management. Clinical course sequence provides anesthesia care for more complex surgical procedures.

NA 675. Clinical Practicum IV. 12 Hours.

Operating room experience providing for application of theoretical principles of anesthesia management. Clinical course sequence provides anesthesia care for more complex surgical procedures.

NA 676. Clinical Practicum V. 10 Hours.

Operating room experience providing for application of theoretical principles of anesthesia management. Clinical course sequence provides anesthesia care for more complex surgical procedures.

NA 680. Anesthesia for Surgical Specialties. 3 Hours.

Review of major surgical specialties with emphasis on orthopedic, neurological, ENT, head and neck, gynecological, thoracic, open heart/vascular, urological, transplant and plastic procedures. Advanced anesthetic management technique for specialized surgical procedures.

NA 695. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

Review of specialty concepts as presented in Anesthesia Pathophysiology I, Anesthesia Pathophysiology II, and Anesthesia for Surgical Specialties.

NA 696. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

Review of specialty concepts as presented in Anesthesia Pathophysiology I, Anesthesia Pathophysiology II, and Anesthesia for Surgical Specialties.

NA 697. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

Review of specialty concepts as presented in Anesthesia Pathophysiology I, Anesthesia Pathophysiology II, and Anesthesia for Surgical Specialties.

NA 698. Graduate Project. 2 Hours.

Critical review of literature for an anesthesia topic with preparation of a scholarly product for dissemination.

NA 702. Anatomy & Physiology for Nurse Anesthetists. 6 Hours.

This course is a study of histology, genetics, human anatomy and physiology, with an emphasis in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. NA 702 integrates the structure, function, and organization of nervous tissue from the cellular through gross anatomic aspects including central, peripheral, and autonomic portions of the system. The course includes a series of clinical correlation laboratory experiences, team-based learning projects, and lectures designed to support and augment basic science content.
Prerequisites: NA 720 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 700 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 701 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 735 [Min Grade: B]

NA 708L. Anesthesia Practicum I. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to provide a foundation in the basic principles and practice of nurse anesthesia. During this semester, clinical experiences are designed to provide the students with development of anesthesia practice, and to apply knowledge of basic and advanced principles of anesthetic management in surgical specialty areas.
Prerequisites: NA 721 [Min Grade: B] and NA 740 [Min Grade: B] and NA 770 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] and NA 718L [Min Grade: P]

NA 709L. Anesthesia Practicum II. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide a foundation in the basic principles and practice of nurse anesthesia. During this semester, clinical experiences are designed to provide the students with continues development of anesthesia practice, and to apply knowledge of basic and advanced principles of anesthetic management in surgical specialty areas.
Prerequisites: NA 708L [Min Grade: P] and NA 741 [Min Grade: B] and NA 750 [Min Grade: B] and NA 771 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 743 [Min Grade: B]

NA 710L. Anesthesia Practicum III. 5 Hours.

This course is designed to provide a foundation in the basic principles and practice of nurse anesthesia. During this semester, clinical experiences are designed to provide the students with continued development of anesthesia practice, and the apply knowledge of basic and advanced principles of anesthetic management in surgical specialty areas.
Prerequisites: NA 709L [Min Grade: P] and NA 742 [Min Grade: B] and NA 745 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 733 [Min Grade: B]

NA 711L. Anesthesia Specialty Immersion I. 5 Hours.

This course is designed to provide advanced clinical experiences requisite for preparation consistent with a doctoral evidence-based practice of nurse anesthesia. During this semester, clinical experiences are designed to provide the advanced student with clinical experiences to further their knowledge base towards a doctoral level.
Prerequisites: NA 710L [Min Grade: P] and NA 740 [Min Grade: B] and NA 742 [Min Grade: B]

NA 712L. Anesthesia Specialty Immersion II. 5 Hours.

This course is designed to provide advanced clinical experiences requisite for preparation consistent with a doctoral evidence-based practice of nurse anesthesia. During this semester, clinical experiences are designed to provide the advanced students with clinical experiences to further their knowledge base towards a doctoral level.
Prerequisites: NA 711L [Min Grade: P] and NA 795 [Min Grade: P] and NUR 738L [Min Grade: P]

NA 713L. Anesthesia Specialty Immersion III. 5 Hours.

This course is designed to provide advanced clinical experiences requisite for preparation consistent with a doctoral evidence-based practice of nurse anesthesia. During this semester, clinical experiences are designed to provide the advanced student with clinical experiences to further their knowledge base towards a doctoral level.
Prerequisites: NA 712L [Min Grade: P] and NA 796 [Min Grade: P] and NUR 739L [Min Grade: P]

NA 718L. Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization. 2 Hours.

The purpose of this course will be the study of specialty track specific topics. The focus of the course will be on providing foundational materials for specialized areas of advanced nursing practice. Emphasis is on exploring specific advanced nursing practice competencies.
Prerequisites: NA 702 [Min Grade: B] and NA 731 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 729 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 731 [Min Grade: B]

NA 720. Anesthesia Pharmacology I. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the nurse anesthesia student with knowledge of various non-anesthetic pharmacological agents and their anesthetic implications. During this course, students will learn pharmacological principles related to advanced practice nursing at the doctoral level.

NA 721. Anesthesia Pharmacology II. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the nurse anesthesia student with knowledge of various anesthetic pharmacological agents and their anesthetic implications. During this course, students will build upon knowledge gained from NA 720, and further master advanced pharmacological principles related to advanced practice nursing at the doctoral level.
Prerequisites: NA 702 [Min Grade: B] and NA 731 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 729 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 731 [Min Grade: B]

NA 731. Biochemistry & Physics for Nurse Anesthetists. 4 Hours.

This course provides a solid chemistry, biochemistry, and physics foundation that is necessary for the safe practice of nurse anesthesia. Students will gain an understanding of these sciences, their clinical relevance, and how they apply to human beings and anesthesia equipment. This course is foundational in nature and success will help the student prepare for upcoming clinical anesthesia management courses.
Prerequisites: NA 720 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 700 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 701 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 735 [Min Grade: B]

NA 740. Anesthesia Principles I. 4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide a beginning foundation for students to plan and implement safe anesthesia care in healthy patients. The focus of this course is the study of scientific foundations of nurse anesthesia practice. The emphasis on designing and implementing individualized anesthesia care plans, principles of anesthesia induction, maintenance, emergence, anesthesia complications ion the health patient, routine and difficult airway management, and the principles of nurse anesthesia role transition and practice standards.
Prerequisites: NA 702 [Min Grade: B] and NA 731 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 729 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 731 [Min Grade: B]

NA 741. Anesthesia Principles II. 3 Hours.

This course is for the student who has a foundation in the basic principles and practice of nurse anesthesia. During this course, students will learn anesthetic management principles for surgical specialty areas. Upon course completion the student will demonstrate mastery of related anatomic, physiologic, pathophysiologic, and pharmacologic principles for each of the surgical specialty areas in the context of advanced nursing practice at the doctorate level.
Prerequisites: NA 721 [Min Grade: B] and NA 740 [Min Grade: B] and NA 770 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] and NA 718L [Min Grade: B]

NA 742. Anesthesia Principles III. 3 Hours.

Students will learn anesthetics management principles for parturients, neonates, infants and children. During this course, students will learn anesthetic management principles for surgical specialty areas. Upon course completion the students will demonstrate mastery of related anatomic, physiologic, pathophysiologic, and pharmacologic principles across special populations in the context of advanced nursing practice at the doctorate level.
Prerequisites: NA 708L [Min Grade: P] and NA 741 [Min Grade: B] and NA 750 [Min Grade: B] and NA 771 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 743 [Min Grade: B]

NA 745. Professional Aspects. 4 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the foundation of the professional aspects of becoming a CRNA. The students will demonstrate understanding of the principles associated with the business of anesthesia including finance, practice management, as well as intra and inter-professional healthcare collaboration.
Prerequisites: NA 708L [Min Grade: P] and NA 741 [Min Grade: B] and NA 750 [Min Grade: B] and NA 771 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 743 [Min Grade: B]

NA 750. Regional Anesthesia. 2 Hours.

The purpose of this course is the study of the theoretical and practical considerations involved in the administration and management of regional anesthesia and pain management. Related anatomy, physiology, and pharmacology will be reviewed as applied to the administration and management of regional anesthesia and pain management, using ultrasound and radiological techniques. Various regional anesthesia, both central and peripheral, are discussed as a component of a safe and effective anesthetic.
Prerequisites: NA 721 [Min Grade: B] and NA 740 [Min Grade: B] and NA 770 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] and NA 718L [Min Grade: P]

NA 770. Anesthesia Pathophysiology I. 3 Hours.

This Pathophysiology course is designed to promote the understanding and application of fundamental disease processes in clinical settings. General concepts of disease, including etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical significance are presented. These concepts are applied in systems-orientate approach to disease processes affecting cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. Application of this knowledge to anesthetic plan development and implication of anesthesia on the disease process will be expected.
Prerequisites: NA 702 [Min Grade: B] and NA 731 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 729 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 731 [Min Grade: B]

NA 771. Anesthesia Pathophysiology II. 3 Hours.

This pathophysiology course is designed to promote the understanding and application of fundamental disease processes in clinical settings. General concepts of disease, including etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical significance are presented. These concepts are applied in a systems-oriented approach to disease processes affecting musculoskeletal, renal, nervous, gastrointestinal, immune, hematological and endocrine systems. Application of the knowledge to anesthetic plan development and implications of anesthesia on the disease process, and vice versa, will be expected.
Prerequisites: NA 721 [Min Grade: B] and NA 740 [Min Grade: B] and NA 770 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] and NA 718L [Min Grade: P]

NA 795. Critical Concepts I. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to foster academic development and integration of theoretical knowledge into clinical practice. The focus is on clinically relevant reviews and examinations of critical anesthesia concepts.
Prerequisites: NA 710L [Min Grade: P] and NA 740 [Min Grade: B] and NA 742 [Min Grade: B]

NA 796. Critical Concepts II. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to foster continued academic development and integration of theoretical knowledge into clinical practice. The focus is on increasingly advanced clinically relevant reviews and examinations of critical anesthesia concepts. The emphasis is on advanced critical thinking ability and the synthesis of anesthesia concepts.
Prerequisites: NA 711L [Min Grade: P] and NA 795 [Min Grade: P] and NUR 738L [Min Grade: P]

NA 797. Critical Concepts III. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to foster integration of advanced theoretical knowledge into complex scenarios in clinical practice. The focus is on the culmination of clinical review and examination of critical anesthesia concepts necessary for the beginning nurse anesthesia practitioner to demonstrate critical thinking and application of knowledge in the clinical practice setting. The emphasis is on development of complex critical thinking ability and the synthesis of anesthesia concepts.
Prerequisites: NA 712L [Min Grade: P] and NA 796 [Min Grade: P] and NUR 739L [Min Grade: P]

NAH-Nursing - Adult Health Courses

NAH 618L. Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course will be the study of specialty track specific topics. The focus of the course will be on providing foundational materials for specialized areas of advanced nursing practice. Emphasis is on exploring specific advanced nursing practice competencies.
Prerequisites: (NUR 606 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 606 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B])

NAH 621. Advanced Adult Gerontology Nursing I. 4-5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce essential concepts in the safe and effective provision of advanced practice nursing. The focus of this course is to prepare the student to implement the role of the Advanced Practice Nurse. The emphasis of this course is on the acquisition of the knowledge and skills necessary to deliver safe and effective care to adult/gerontology patients.
Prerequisites: NUR 610 [Min Grade: B] and (NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B])

NAH 622. Advanced Adult Gerontology Nursing II. 3-5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to integrate prior theoretical and practical knowledge for diagnoses and management of the health and illness of adult/gerontology patients. The focus of this course is on health promotion and disease prevention and management strategies from inter­ professional domains. The emphasis of this course is to examine current evidence that supports the delivery of safe and high quality evidence-based care to adult/gerontology patients.
Prerequisites: (NAH 621 [Min Grade: B] or NAH 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NAH 685L [Min Grade: P] or NAH 685L [Min Grade: P])

NAH 623. Advanced Adult Gerontology Nursing III. 5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to synthesize in-depth knowledge and theoretical concepts as related to advanced practice nursing. The focus of this course is on the utilization of complex models and systems of practice to deliver high quality evidence-based care to adults/gerontology patients. The emphasis of the course is on the critical analysis of the evidence for applications that optimize health outcomes.
Prerequisites: (NAH 622 [Min Grade: B] or NAH 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NAH 686L [Min Grade: P] or NAH 686L [Min Grade: P])

NAH 685L. Practicum I: Adult/Gerontology Nurse Pracitioner. 2-3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to demonstrate management strategies and apply selected practice models for the delivery of high quality care to adult/gerontology patients. The focus of this course is on the delivery of health care services to adult/gerontology patients. The emphasis of this course is on promoting the progression of competence within the Advanced Practice Nursing role.
Prerequisites: (NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B]) and NUR 610 [Min Grade: B]

NAH 686L. Practicum II: Adult/Gerontology Nurse Practitioner. 2-3 Hours.

The purposes of this course are to prioritize management strategies and apply selected practice models for delivery of care to adult/gerontology patients. The focus of this course is to provide the student with opportunities to integrate in depth diagnostic and management skills to provide care for adult/gerontology patients. The emphasis of this course is on the formulation and management of individualized treatment plans based on diagnostic findings and current practice models.
Prerequisites: (NAH 621 [Min Grade: B] or NAH 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NAH 685L [Min Grade: P] or NAH 685L [Min Grade: P])

NAH 692L. Residency: Adult/Gerontology Nurse Practitioner. 4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to enhance acquired management strategies and the use of best practice models in the delivery of high quality evidence-based care to adult/gerontology patients. The focus of this course is to evaluate progress toward achievement of professional competencies. The emphasis is on the incorporation of evidence and concepts from previous coursework and clinical practice to improve the health status of adult/gerontology patients.
Prerequisites: (NAH 622 [Min Grade: B] or NAH 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NAH 686L [Min Grade: P] or NAH 686L [Min Grade: P])

NBB-Nursing - Biobehavioral Courses

NBB 760. Biobehavioral Foundations in Nursing Research. 3 Hours.

Focuses on biobehavioral interactions among psychological and cognitive domain, social and environmental domain and biology as they affect health outcomes. The emphasis will be placed on the theories and concepts of each domain of biobehavioral interactions.

NBB 761. Biobehavioral Research: State of the Sciences. 3 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth exploration and critical analysis of current biobehavioral interaction research including conceptual and methodological issues. Examines the effectiveness of interventions on biobehavioral domains and health outcomes and identifies future directions for research.

NBB 762. Biobehavioral Research Seminar. 1-3 Hour.

Focuses on in-depth understanding of a selective area of biobehavioral research. Biological interactions with psychological, cognitive, social and environmental domains will be included in relation to actual and potential health outcomes. Current understanding in a selective area of biobehaviorlal research will be critically analyzed for conceptual and methodological issues.

NCA-Nursing - Critical Care Courses

NCA 616. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures for Advanced Acute Care Nursing Practice. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the student with opportunities to obtain advanced knowledge of and to learn advanced clinical skills in diagnostic or therapeutic procedures related to the role of the advanced practice nurse in acute and critical care. Specific content and skills in this course will focus on procedures associated with diagnostic and evaluative monitoring of acutely or critically ill patient. COREQ: NCA 621.

NCA 617. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures II for Advanced Nursing Practice. 1 Hour.

This course is designed to provide the student with opportunities to obtain advanced knowledge of and to learn advanced clinical skills in diagnostic or therapeutic procedures related to the role of the advanced practice nurse in acute and critical care. Specific content and skills in this course will focus on therapeutic procedures commonly used in the acute and critical care setting. COREQ: NCA 622.
Prerequisites: NCA 616 [Min Grade: B]

NCA 618L. Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course will be the study of specialty track specific topics. The focus of the course will be on providing foundational materials for specialized areas of advanced nursing practice. Emphasis is on exploring specific advanced nursing practice competencies.
Prerequisites: (NUR 606 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 606 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B])

NCA 621. Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing Practice I. 4-5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce essential concepts in the safe and effective provision of advanced practice nursing. The focus of this course is to prepare the student to implement the role of the Advanced Practice Nurse. The emphasis of this course is on the acquisition of the knowledge and skills necessary to deliver safe and effective care to the emancipated minor (age 13 and older), adult, and geriatric populations.
Prerequisites: (NUR 610 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 610 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B])

NCA 622. Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing Practice II. 3-4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to integrate prior theoretical and practical knowledge for diagnoses and management of the health and illness of the emancipated minor (age 13 and older), adult, and geriatric populations. The focus of this course is on health promotion and disease prevention and management strategies from inter-professional domains. The emphasis of this course is to examine current evidence that supports the delivery of safe and high quality evidence-based care of the emancipated minor (age 13 and older), adult, and geriatric populations.
Prerequisites: (NCA 621 [Min Grade: B] or NCA 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NCA 685L [Min Grade: P] or NCA 685L [Min Grade: P])

NCA 623. Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing Practice III. 3-5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to synthesize in-depth knowledge and theoretical concepts as related to advanced practice nursing. The focus of this course is on the utilization of complex models and systems of practice to deliver high quality evidence-based care to the emancipated minor (age 13 and older), adult, and geriatric populations. The emphasis of the course is on the critical analysis of the evidence for applications that optimize health outcomes.
Prerequisites: (NCA 622 [Min Grade: B] or NCA 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NCA 686L [Min Grade: P] or NCS 686L [Min Grade: P])

NCA 685L. Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing: Practicum I. 1-3 Hour.

The purpose of this course is to demonstrate management strategies and apply selected practice models for the delivery of high quality care to the emancipated minor (age 13 and older), adult, and geriatric populations. The focus of this course is on the delivery of health care services to the emancipated minor (age 13 and older), adult, and geriatric populations. The emphasis of this course is on promoting the progression of competence within the Advanced Practice Nursing role.
Prerequisites: (NUR 610 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 610 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B])

NCA 686L. Adult Gero Acute Care Nursing: Practicum II. 3 Hours.

The purposes of this course are to prioritize management strategies and apply selected practice models for delivery of care to the emancipated minor (age 13 and older), adult, and geriatric populations. The focus of this course is to provide the student with opportunities to integrate in depth diagnostic and management skills to provide care for the emancipated minor (age 13 or older), adult, and geriatric populations. The emphasis of this course is on the formulation and management of individualized treatment plans based on diagnostic findings and current practice models.
Prerequisites: (NCA 621 [Min Grade: B] or NCA 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NCA 685L [Min Grade: P] or NCA 685L [Min Grade: P])

NCA 692L. Residency: Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nursing. 3-6 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to enhance acquired management strategies and the use of best practice models in the delivery of high quality evidence-based care to the emancipated minor (age 13 or older), adult, and geriatric population. The focus of this course is to evaluate progress toward achievement of professional competencies. The emphasis is on the incorporation of evidence and concepts from previous coursework and clinical practice to improve the health status of the emancipated minor (age 13 or older), adult, and geriatric population.
Prerequisites: (NCA 622 [Min Grade: B] or NCA 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NCA 686L [Min Grade: P] or NCA 686L [Min Grade: P])

NCC-Nursing - Child/Adolescent Courses

NCC 613. Acute & Continuing Care Pediatric Pharmacology. 1 Hour.

This course is a supplementary course for Acute and Continuing Care Nurse Practitioner students to provide them with information necessary to safely and competently prescribe medications for infants, children and adolescents. It complements the infromation provided in NUR 613 Pharmacology and Therapeutics but focues on the unique physiologic and metabolic characteristics of this population.

NCC 618L. Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course will be the study of specialty track specific topics. The focus of the course will be on providing foundational materials for specialized areas of advanced nursing practice. Emphasis is on exploring specific advanced nursing practice competencies.
Prerequisites: (NUR 606 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 606 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B])

NCC 621. Advanced Pediatric Nursing I - Acute Care. 4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce essential concepts in the safe and effective provision of advanced practice nursing. The focus of this course is to prepare the student to implement the role of the Advanced Practice Nurse. The emphasis of this course is on the acquisition of the knowledge and skills necessary to deliver safe and effective care to children, adolescents and their families.
Prerequisites: NUR 616L [Min Grade: P] or NUR 616L [Min Grade: P]

NCC 622. Advanced Pediatric Nursing II - Acute Care. 2-4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to integrate prior theoretical and practical knowledge for diagnoses and management of the health and illness of children, adolescents and their families. The focus of this course is on health promotion and disease prevention and management strategies from inter-professional domains. The emphasis of this course is to examine current evidence that supports the delivery of safe and high quality evidence-based care to children, adolescents and their families.
Prerequisites: (NCC 621 [Min Grade: B] or NCC 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NCC 685L [Min Grade: P] or NCC 685L [Min Grade: P])

NCC 623. Advanced Pediatric Nursing III - Acute Care. 4-5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to synthesize in-depth knowledge and theoretical concepts as related to advanced practice nursing. The focus of this course is on the utilization of complex models and systems of practice to deliver high quality evidence-based care to children, adolescents and their families. The emphasis of the course is on the critical analysis of the evidence for applications that optimize health outcomes.
Prerequisites: (NCC 622 [Min Grade: B] or NCC 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NCC 686L [Min Grade: P] or NCC 686L [Min Grade: P])

NCC 685L. Clinical Practicum I: Advanced Pediatric Nursing - Acute Care. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to demonstrate management strategies and apply selected practice models for the delivery of high quality care to children, adolescents and their families. The focus of this course is on the delivery of health care services to children, adolescents and their families. The emphasis of this course is on promoting the progression of competence within the Advanced Practice Nursing role.
Prerequisites: NUR 616L [Min Grade: P] or NUR 616L [Min Grade: P]

NCC 686L. Clinical Practicum II: Advanced Pediatric Nursing - Acute Care. 3 Hours.

The purposes of this course are to prioritize management strategies and apply selected practice models for delivery of care to children, adolescents and their families. The focus of this course is to provide the student with opportunities to integrate in depth diagnostic and management skills to provide care for children, adolescents and their families. The emphasis of this course is on the formulation and management of individualized treatment plans based on diagnostic findings and current practice models.
Prerequisites: (NCC 621 [Min Grade: B] or NCC 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NCC 685L [Min Grade: P] or NCC 685L [Min Grade: P])

NCC 688L. Child/Adolescent Acute and Continuing Care Nurse Practitioner Practicum III. 2 Hours.

This course prepares the student in the Pediatric Nurse Practitioner role. The student develops the Pediatric NP role with patients/clients by providing pediatric health care services to clients (i.e. individuals, families, groups) emphasizing the promotion of health and the prevention of disease throughout the course of clinical experiences over two or three academic terms. Further, the student continues to apply knowledge and current research findings to the management of actual and potential health problems, which include common diseases and human responses to disease. It is anticipated that the student will be increasingly independent and skilled as each clinical experience progresses, allowing him/her to become more proficient and to contribute to the management of more complex health problems. The following elements are integrated into the course: critical thinking, professional presentations, research utilization, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity and social issues. The advanced practice role emphasis in this course encompasses a trajectory of the nurse practitioner experience from novice to beginning expert, including interdisciplinary collaboration, coach, educator, consultant roles. Prerequisite: NCC 622 and NCC 686L. Corequisite: NCC 623.
Prerequisites: (NCC 622 [Min Grade: B] and NCC 686L [Min Grade: P]) or (NCC 622 [Min Grade: B] and NCC 686L [Min Grade: P])

NCC 692L. Clinical Practicum III: Advanced Pediatric Nursing - Acute Care. 3-6 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to enhance acquired management strategies and the use of best practice models in the delivery of high quality evidence-based care to children, adolescents and families. The focus of this course is to evaluate progress toward achievement of professional competencies. The emphasis is on the incorporation of evidence and concepts from previous coursework and clinical practice to improve the health status of children, adolescents and their families.
Prerequisites: (NCC 622 [Min Grade: B] or NCC 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NCC 686L [Min Grade: P] or NCC 686L [Min Grade: P])

NCH-Nursing -Child Health Courses

NCH 760. Child Health Theories and Concepts. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on selected theories and concepts related to child health, child health nursing and child health nursing education. Emphasis will be on the theoretical underpinnings of the theories and concepts, major theorists associated with the theories and concepts, measurement strategies and instruments, and implications for research, education, and practice.

NCH 761. Emerging Issues in Child-Health Nursing. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on emerging issues in child health, child health nursing and child health nursing education. Emphasis is on current thought, state of the science and research related to topics which affect the health and lives of infants, children, and adolescents. Pivotal MCH, public health resources and the latest research and information will be used to guide discussion.

NCL-Nursing-Clinical Nur Lead Courses

NCL 618L. Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization. 2 Hours.

The purpose of this course will be the study of specialty track specific topics. The focus of the course will be on providing foundational materials for specialized areas of advanced nursing practice. Emphasis is on exploring specific advanced nursing practice competencies.
Prerequisites: (NUR 606 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 606 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B])

NCL 620. Systems in Population-based Care I. 4 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the student with opportunities to integrate in-depth knowledge of theoretical and practical concepts required to measure and improve healthcare quality, outcomes and safety. The student will focus on 5 roles required for the beginning Clinical Nurse Leader: Clinician, Member of Profession, Interdisciplinary Healthcare Team Manager, Outcomes Manager and Lifelong Learner. The course explores theories of change, complexity, horizontal and lateral leadership, microsystems and decision-making and their relationship to nursing and the health care system. The following elements are integrated into this course: critical thinking, research, scholarly writing, scientific integrity, ethics, cultural diversity, and social issues.
Prerequisites: (NUR 600 [Min Grade: C] and NUR 643 [Min Grade: C] and NUR 518L [Min Grade: P])

NCL 621. Systems in Population-based Care II. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the student with opportunities to develop additional knowledge of theoretical and practical concepts required to measure and improve healthcare quality, outcomes and safety. The student will focus on the four additional roles required for the beginning Clinical Nurse Leader: Information Manager, Systems Analyst/Risk Manager, Advocate, and Educator. The student will be expected to expand proficiency of previously learned Clinical Nurse Leader roles: Clinician, Member of a Profession, Team Manager, Outcomes Manager and Lifelong Learner. At the completion of this course the student will have explored all of the nine CNL roles as defined by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's White Paper. The following elements are integrated into this course: critical thinking, research, scholarly writing, professional presentation, scientific integrity and ethics, cultural diversity, and social issues. Prerequisite: NCL 620 and NCL 685L. Corequisite: NCL 686L.
Prerequisites: NCL 620 [Min Grade: B] and NCL 685L [Min Grade: P] and (NUR 512 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 612 [Min Grade: B])

NCL 685L. CNL Practicum I. 2-3 Hours.

This course provides the student, at an introductory level, the opportunity to observe and apply in a clinical setting five of the nine CNL role functions: Clinician, Member of a Profession, Team Manager, Outcomes Manager and Lifelong Learner. The student will use these skills to focus on improving quality of care and patient safety. The student will be expected to utilize principals of critical thinking, evidence based research, scientific integrity and ethics, cultural diversity, and social issues to achieve above objectives. Prerequisite: NUR 600 and NUR 643. Corequisite: NCL 620.
Prerequisites: NUR 600 [Min Grade: C] and NUR 643 [Min Grade: C]

NCL 686L. CNL Practicum II. 2 Hours.

Building on the preceding practicum, this course provides the student the opportunity to observe and apply in a clinical setting the remaining four of the CNL role functions. This course will focus on the student developing the CNL roles of information manager, systems analyst/risk manager, advocate, and educator. The student will be expected to expand proficiency of the previous CNL roles of clinician, professional, interdisciplinary team manager, outcomes manager and lifelong learner. The student will use this knowledge and skill to evaluate, design and implement interventions to improve quality of care and patient safety. At the completion of this course the student will have explored all of the nine CNL roles as defined by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's White Paper. Prerequisite: NCL 620 and NCL 685L. Corequisite: NCL 621.
Prerequisites: NCL 620 [Min Grade: B] and NCL 685L [Min Grade: B]

NCL 692L. CNL Capstone Practicum. 5 Hours.

This course provides the student the opportunity to integrate and apply in an intensive clinical rotation the nine CNL roles. The student will be expected to expand their proficiency in the roles of advocate, professional, team manager, information manager, systems analyst/risk manager, clinician, outcomes manager, educator and lifelong learner. The student will use these skills to design, implement, evaluate, and disseminate plans of care to improve quality and patient safety. At the completion of this course the student will demonstrate, at novice level, the nine CNL roles as defined by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's White Paper.
Prerequisites: NCL 620 [Min Grade: B] and NCL 685L [Min Grade: P]

NCS-Nursing - Clinical Spec Courses

NCS 616. Foundations of Clinical Nurse Specialist Practice. 1 Hour.

This graduate speciality course is designed to give the Clincial Nurse Specialist student the theoretical underpinnings of the role of the CNS. Parameters of Clincial Nurse practice will be explored through discussion and in-class simulations of practice dilemmas. Course work will include information on the background of the Clinical Nurse Specialist, information on the logistics of advanced practice as it relates to the CNS role, and information on devising assessment strategies for practice problems. This course includes integration of critical thinking, scholarly writing, human diversity, ethics, health care economics and social issues.

NCS 617. Phenomenon of Concern to Advanced Practice Nurses. 1 Hour.

This graduate specialty course focuses on phenomena of concern to advanced practice nurses and is designed to give the Clinical Nurse Specialist student the theoretical underpinnings of selected non-disease based causes of illness. Clinical/didactic information regarding symptoms, functional problems, and risk behaviors will be included to assist the student operationalize the role of the CNS in the patient/client sphere of influence, the nurse/nursing service sphere of influence, and the organization sphere of influence.

NCS 685L. Prac I: Clinical Specialization in Adult Health Nursing. 1,2 Hour.

This course is the first clinical practicum in the Clinical Nurse Specialist option. The student is provided the opportunity to develop the CNS role with a focus on the care of non-disease based etiologies of symptoms, functional problems, and risk behaviors among patients/ clients within a defined specialty. This practicum may include experiences in outpatient or inpatient settings. The student is expected to design evidence-based interventions for acute and/or chronic health problems commonly occurring within a defined specialty area. The following elements are integrated into this course: critical thinking, health promotion and disease prevention, research, ethics, cultural diversity, and social issues. Students arrange their own clinical sites with assistance/approval from clinical faculty. Prerequisite: NUR 614L. Corequisite: NCA 621.
Prerequisites: (NUR 612 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 612 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B])

NCS 686L. Practicum II: Clinical Specialization in Adult Health Nursing. 1-2 Hour.

This course further prepares the student in the Clinical Nurse Specialist role. The student continues to apply knowledge and current research findings to the management of selected acute and chronic health problems commonly occurring in the target population. While focusing on the care of acutely ill clients, the student develops the CNS role with nursing personnel through identifying and defining problems and opportunities; identifying and articulating factors contributing to resource management needs and outcomes; developing innovative solutions; and evaluating the effect of solutions. Students arrange their own clinical sites with assistance/approval from clinical faculty. Prerequisite: NCA 621 and NCS 685L. Corequisite: NCA 622.
Prerequisites: (NCS 685L [Min Grade: P] or NCS 685L [Min Grade: P]) and (NCA 621 [Min Grade: B] or NCA 621 [Min Grade: B])

NCS 687L. Practicum III: Clinical Specialization in Adult Health Nursing. 1-2 Hour.

This course further prepares the student in the Clinical Nurse Specialist role. The student continues to apply knowledge and current research findings to the management of selected acute and chronic health problems commonly occurring in the target population. While focusing on the care of acutely ill clients, the student develops the CNS role with nursing personnel through identifying and defining problems and opportunities; identifying and articulating factors contributing to resource management needs and outcomes; developing innovative solutions; and evaluating the effect of solutions. An Objective Structured Patient Experience held during this course will determine if the student can progress into 6 hours of the final residency course, NCA 692L. Students arrange their own clinical sites with assistance/approval from clinical faculty. Prerequisite: NCS 686L. Corequisite: NCA 623.
Prerequisites: (NCA 622 [Min Grade: B] or NCA 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NCS 686L [Min Grade: P] or NCS 686L [Min Grade: P])

NCS 692L. Residency in Clinical Specialization. 2-4 Hours.

This course is the culminating experience for the student to practice in the role of the CNS. This course emphasizes the application of previously learned theories and knowledge from nursing and other disciplines. The student will implement the role of the CNS to manage the health care of adult clients, teaching, nurses and clients, discussing employment issues and evaluating products for use in clinical practice. Students arrange their own clinical sites with assistance/approval from clinical faculty. A comprehensive examination is given during this residency course. Failure to pass the comprehensive examination will delay graduation. Prerequisite: NCA 623 and NCA 687L.
Prerequisites: (NCA 623 [Min Grade: B] and NCS 687L [Min Grade: P]) or (NCA 623 [Min Grade: B] and NCS 687L [Min Grade: P])

NCV-Nursing - Cardiovascular Courses

NCV 630. Advanced Cardiovascular Nursing. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide a conceptual base for student to diagnose and treat human responses to actual and/or potential cardiovascular health problems with concomitant biophysical, psychological, sociocultural and spiritual environmental variables. Emphasis is placed on patients with cardiovascular health problems and the selection and utilization of concepts and theories relevant to advanced cardiovascular nursing. Political influences on cardiovascular health are explored. May be taken as an elective.

NCV 631. Electrocardiography for Advanced Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

Concepts presented in the course include the biophysical, psychological, developmental, and adaptive nature of the human being as it relates to the formation, function, and regulation of the cardiac electrical system. Concepts of cardiovascular adaptation to biophysical and psychosocial variables are emphasized. Explanations for electrophysiologic and electrocardiographic phenomena are offered, as are nursing and medical interventions for cardiac electrical abnormalities. Content focuses on the concepts of electrophysiology and electrocardiography, interpreting cardiac electrical abnormalities, and analyzing the various medical and nursing therapies for the electrical abnormalities and their applications to the practice of advanced nursing. May be taken as an elective.

NDP-Nursing - Dual Pediatric Courses

NDP 613. Dual Option Pediatric Pharmacology. 2 Hours.

This course is a supplement to the current pharmacology course, NUR 613, required of all MSN Advanced Practice students. The content is specific to infants, children and adolescents with their unique physiologic and metabolic characteristics. Pre or corequisite: NUR 613,.
Prerequisites: NUR 613 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently) or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently)

NDP 618L. Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course will be the study of specialty track specific topics. The focus of the course will be on providing foundational materials for specialized areas of advanced nursing practice. Emphasis is on exploring specific advanced nursing practice competencies.
Prerequisites: (NUR 606 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 606 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B])

NDP 621. Dual Option Pediatric I. 4-5 Hours.

This course provides a theoretical and practical base for students to diagnose and manage primary, acute, and continuing health problems of children and adolescents. Content includes management strategies from the domains of nursing, medicine, and pharmacological therapeutics, and emphasizes direct care to children, adolescents and their families. This course utilizes an on-line lecture/discussion and case study format to assist the student in the clinical assessment and decision-making to provide direct patient care to children, adolescents and their families within the scope of practice of primary and acute care child/adolescent nurse practitioners. The student is expected to apply the concepts and theories discussed in class to the care of children and adolescents during the clinical course taken in conjunction with this course. The following elements are integrated into this course: critical thinking, crisis management, health promotion and disease prevention, research, ethics, cultural diversity, cultural competence, and social issues.
Prerequisites: NUR 613 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently) or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently) and (NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B])

NDP 622. Dual Option Pediatric II. 3-5 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the students with opportunities to integrate in-depth knowledge of management of acute and continuing health care problems, family crises, case management, education and consultation roles and skills and procedures required by children, adolescents and their families who experience chronic, complex and life-threatening health problems. Students will have the opportunity to develop strategies to present information about acute and continuing health care problems to peers and colleagues. The following elements are incorporated into the course: critical thinking, crisis management, health promotion and disease prevention, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity, cultural competence, social issues and professional role development.
Prerequisites: (NDP 621 [Min Grade: B] or NDP 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NDP 685L [Min Grade: P] or NDP 685L [Min Grade: P])

NDP 623. Dual Option Pediatric III. 4-5 Hours.

This course provides a theoretical and practical base for students to diagnose and manage chronic health problems of children and adolescents. Additionally, students will be provided with opportunities to integrate in-depth knowledge of management of chronic health care problems, family crises, case management, education and consultation roles and skills and procedures required by children, adolescents and their families who experience chronic, complex health problems. Content includes management strategies from the domains of nursing, medicine, and pharmacological therapeutics, and emphasizes direct care to children, adolescents and their families. This course utilizes an on-line lecture/discussion and case study format to assist the student in the clinical assessment and decision-making to provide direct patient care to children, adolescents and their families within the scope of practice of primary and acute care pediatric nurse practitioners. Students will have the opportunity to develop strategies to present information about chronic health care problems to peers and colleagues. The student is expected to apply the concepts and theories discussed in class to the care of children and adolescents during the clinical course taken in conjunction with this course. The following elements are integrated into this course: critical thinking, crisis management, health promotion and disease prevention, research, ethics, cultural diversity, cultural competence, and social issues.
Prerequisites: (NDP 622 [Min Grade: B] or NDP 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NDP 686L [Min Grade: P] or NDP 686L [Min Grade: P])

NDP 624. Dual Option Pediatric IV. 3-5 Hours.

This course provides a theoretical and practical base for students to diagnose and manage critical illnesses in children and adolescents. Additionally, students will be provided with opportunities to integrate in-depth knowledge of management of critical health care problems, family crises, case management, education and consultation roles and skills and procedures required by children, adolescents and their families who experience critical and complex health problems. Content includes management strategies from the domains of nursing, medicine, and pharmacological therapeutics, and emphasizes direct care to children, adolescents and their families. This course utilizes an on-line lecture/discussion and case study format to assist the student in the clinical assessment and decision-making to provide direct patient care to children, adolescents and their families within the scope of practice of primary and acute care pediatric nurse practitioners. Students will have the opportunity to develop strategies to present information about critical health care problems to peers and colleagues. The student is expected to apply the concepts and theories discussed in class to the care of children and adolescents during the clinical course taken in conjunction with tthis course. The following elements are integrated into this course: critical thinking, crisis management, health promotion and disease prevention, research, ethics, cultural diversity, cultural competence, and social issues.
Prerequisites: NDP 623 [Min Grade: B] and NDP 687L [Min Grade: P]

NDP 625. Advanced Dual Option Pediatric Nurse Practitioner. 2 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to synthesize in-depth knowledge and theoretical concepts as related to advanced practice nursing. The focus of this course is on the utilization of complex models and systems of practice to deliver high quality evidence-based care to primary and acute care pediatric patients and their families. The emphasis of the course is on the critical analysis of the evidence for applications that optimize health outcomes.
Prerequisites: NCC 622 [Min Grade: C] and NCC 686L [Min Grade: C]

NDP 685L. Dual Option Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Practicum I. 3 Hours.

This course prepares the student in the Dual Option Pediatric Nurse Practitioner role. The student develops the NP role with patients/clients by providing health care to individual children, adolescents, families, and groups at any point of the continuum of health statuses in acute and continuing care settings. The student continues to apply knowledge and current research findings to the management of actual and potential health problems, which include acute and chronic health problems and human responses to disease in children, adolescents and their families. The following elements are integrated into the course: critical thinking, professional presentations, research utilization, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity, cultural sensitivity and social issues. The advanced practice role emphasis in this course provides experiences for the developing Dual Option Pediatric Nurse Practitioner including interdisciplinary collaboration, case management, educator, and consultant roles.

NDP 686L. Dual Option Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Practicum II. 3 Hours.

This course prepares the student in the Pediatric Nurse Practitioner role. The student develops the Pediatric NP role with patients/clients by providing pediatric health care services to clients (Le. (i.e. individuals, families, groups) emphasizing the promotion of health and the prevention of disease throughout the course of clinical experiences over two or three academic terms. Further, the student continues to apply knowledge and current research findings to the management of actual and potential health problems, which include common diseases and human responses to disease. It is anticipated that the student will be increasingly independent and skilled as each clinical experience progresses, allowing him/her to become more proficient and to contribute to the management of more complex health problems. The following elements are integrated into the course: critical thinking, professional presentations, research utilization, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity and social issues. The advanced practice role emphasis in this course encompasses a trajectory of the nurse practitioner experience from novice to beginning expert, including interdisciplinary collaboration, coach, educator, consultant roles.
Prerequisites: (NDP 621 [Min Grade: B] or NDP 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NDP 685L [Min Grade: P] or NDP 685L [Min Grade: P])

NDP 687L. Dual Option Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Practicum III. 3 Hours.

This course prepares the student in the Pediatric Nurse Practitioner role. The student develops the Pediatric NP role with patients/clients by providing pediatric health care services to clients (i.e. individuals, families, groups) emphasizing the promotion of health and the prevention of disease throughout the course of clinical experiences over two or three academic terms. Further, the student continues to apply knowledge and current research findings to the management of actual and potential health problems, which include common diseases and human responses to disease. It is anticipated that the student will be increasingly independent and skilled as each clinical experience progresses, allowing him/her to become more proficient and to contribute to the management of more complex health problems. The following elements are integrated into the course: critical thinking, professional presentations, research utilization, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity and social issues. The advanced practice role emphasis in this course encompasses a trajectory of the nurse practitioner experience from novice to beginning expert, including interdisciplinary collaboration, coach, educator, consultant roles.
Prerequisites: (NDP 622 [Min Grade: B] or NDP 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NDP 686L [Min Grade: P] or NDP 686L [Min Grade: P])

NDP 688L. Dual Option Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Practicum III. 3 Hours.

NDP 688L prepares the student in the Dual Option Pediatric Nurse Practitioner role. The student develops the NP role with patients/clients by providing health care to individual children, adolescents, families, and groups at any point of the continuum of hearlth statuses in acute and continuing care settings. The student continues to apply knowledge and current research findings to the management of actual and potential health problems, which include acute and chronic health problems and human responses to disease in children, adolescents and their families. The following elements are integrated into the course: critical thinking, professional presentations, research ulitization, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity, cultural sensitivity and social issues. The advanced practice role emphasis in this course provides experiences for the developing Dual Option Pediatric Nurse Practitioner including interdisciplinary collaboration, case management, educator, and consultant roles.
Prerequisites: (NDP 621 [Min Grade: B] or NDP 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NDP 685L [Min Grade: P] or NDP 685L [Min Grade: P]) and (NDP 622 [Min Grade: B] or NDP 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NDP 686L [Min Grade: P] or NDP 686L [Min Grade: P]) and (NDP 623 [Min Grade: B] or NDP 623 [Min Grade: B]) and (NDP 687L [Min Grade: P] or NDP 687L [Min Grade: P])

NDP 692L. Residency: Dual Option Pediatric Nurse Practitioner. 4 Hours.

This course prepares the student in the Pediatric Nurse Practitioner role to be a beginning expert in the diagnosis and management of pediatric patient problems. In the residency, the student is expected to continue to grow toward becoming an independent practitioner, specializing in the care of children. The student further develops the pediatric NP role with patients/clients by providing pediatric health care services to clients (i.e. individuals, families, groups) emphasizing the promotion of health and the prevention of disease. Further, the student continues to apply knowledge and current research findings to the management of actual and potential health problems, which include common diseases and human response to disease.
Prerequisites: (NCC 622 [Min Grade: B] or NCC 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NCC 686L [Min Grade: P] or NCC 686L [Min Grade: P])

NFA - RN First Assist Courses

NFA 620. Surgical Techniques. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the expanded functions unique to the RNFA role during operative and invasive procedures. The course includes the recommended content of the Core Curriculum for the RN First Assist and is designed to develop the beginning knowledge and skills needed for safe RNFA practice. Surgical practice and techniques such as sterile technique, positioning and draping, using instruments and medical devices, providing exposure, handling and cutting tissue, providing hemostasis, and suturing will be emphasized in a (hands on) laboratory experience. The course will be taught in a blended distance accessible format and on campus 4-5 day intensive session in an animal surgical laboratory. This format will enable each student to apply surgical principles and techniques to a swine surgical model. Students without operating room experience will be required to take the 4 credit hours (5 day intensive) and students with operating room experience will take 3 credit hours (4 day intensive). Admission to the ACNP/RNFA graduate program or RNFA post masters option required.

NFA 621. Advanced Perioperative Nursing I. 3 Hours.

This course prepares the advanced perioperative student to develop a theoretical knowledge base for advanced perioperative nursing. The course includes the recommended content of the Core Curriculum for the RN First Assist and is designed to develop the theoretical knowledge needed for safe RNFA practice. Content includes an in depth review of anatomy and physiology of surgical client, and prevention of injury. Knowledge of comprehensive perioperative nursing, which serve as the foundation for critical, technical, and clinical decision making in RNFA role at the advanced level. Selective literature, which evidences best practice strategies of the RNFA role and considerations of vulnerable populations requiring surgical interventions, will also be examined in selective surgical specialties. The following elements are integrated into the course: critical thinking, research utilization, ethics, human diversity, and social issues. The advanced perioperative practice role emphasis in this course continues the trajectory of the RNFA as a beginning expert and includes role components such as interdisciplinary collaborator, educator, and consultant. Admission to the ACNP/RNFA graduate program or RNFA post masters option required.

NFA 622. Advanced Perioperative Nursing I: Practicum. 1-3 Hour.

This course prepares the advanced perioperative student to function in the expanded role of first assistant to the surgeon. In this practicum, the student is expected to continue to grow toward becoming a competent advanced perioperative nurse, specializing in problems requiring surgical interventions and management and the full scope of RNFA practice. Further, the student continues to apply, knowledge and current research findings to the management of actual and potential health problems, which include common surgical diseases and human responses to disease. The following elements are integrated into the course: critical thinking, research utilization, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity, and awareness of social and professional issues. The advanced perioperative practice role emphasis in this course continues the trajectory of the RNFA as a beginning expert and includes role components such as interdisciplinary collaborator, educator, and consultant. Prerequisite: NFA 620 and NFA 621.
Prerequisites: (NFA 620 [Min Grade: B] and NFA 621 [Min Grade: B]) or (NFA 620 [Min Grade: B] and NFA 621 [Min Grade: B])

NFH-Nursing - Family Courses

NFH 618L. Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course will be the study of specialty track specific topics. The focus of the course will be on providing foundational materials for specialized areas of advanced nursing practice. Emphasis is on exploring specific advanced nursing practice competencies.
Prerequisites: (NUR 606 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 606 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B])

NFH 621. Family Nurse Practitioner I. 3-5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce essential concepts in the safe and effective provision of advanced practice nursing. The focus of this course is to prepare the student to implement the role of the Advanced Practice Nurse. The emphasis of this course is on the acquisition of the knowledge and skills necessary to deliver safe and effective care to pediatric, adult and elderly populations.
Prerequisites: (NUR 612 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 612 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B]) and NUR 610 [Min Grade: B]

NFH 622. Family Nurse Practitioner II. 3-4 Hours.

The purposes of this course are to prioritize management strategies and apply selected practice models for delivery of care to pediatric, adult and elderly populations. The focus of this course is to provide the student with opportunities to integrate in depth diagnostic and management skills to provide care for pediatric, elderly and adult populations. The emphasis of this course is on the formulation and management of individualized treatment plans based on diagnostic findings and current practice models.
Prerequisites: (NFH 621 [Min Grade: B] or NFH 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NFH 685L [Min Grade: P] or NFH 685L [Min Grade: P])

NFH 623. Family Nurse Practitioner III. 5 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the student with opportunities to integrate in-depth knowledge of health assessment and management skills to provide care for clients with commonly occuring chronic and complex health problems with diverse cultures over the life span. Students will also have the opportunity to develop strategies to market the nurse practitioner role, to creat a specific practice position and to explore strategies to market their role in family health care. The following elements are integrated into the course: critical thinking, health promotion and disease prevention, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity and social issues and professional role development.
Prerequisites: NFH 622 [Min Grade: B]

NFH 623L. Family Nurse Practitioner III. 5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to synthesize in-depth knowledge and theoretical concepts as related to advanced practice nursing. The focus of this course is on the utilization of complex models and systems of practice to deliver high quality evidence-based care to pediatric, adult, and elderly populations. The emphasis of the course is on the critical analysis of the evidence for applications that optimize health outcomes.
Prerequisites: (NFH 622 [Min Grade: B] or NFH 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NFH 686L [Min Grade: P] or NFH 686L [Min Grade: P])

NFH 685L. Practicum I: Family Nurse Practitioner. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to demonstrate management strategies and apply selected practice models for the delivery of high quality care to pediatric, adult and elderly populations. The focus of this course is on the delivery of health care services to pediatric, adult and elderly populations. The emphasis of this course is on promoting the progression of competence within the Advanced Practice Nursing role.
Prerequisites: (NUR 612 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 612 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B])

NFH 686L. Practicum II: Family Nurse Practitioner. 3 Hours.

The purposes of this course are to prioritize management strategies and apply selected practice models for delivery of care to pediatric, adult and elderly populations. The focus of this course is to provide the student with opportunities to integrate in depth diagnostic and management skills to provide care for pediatric, adult and elderly populations. The emphasis of this course is on the formulation and management of individualized treatment plans based on diagnostic findings and current practice models.
Prerequisites: (NFH 621 [Min Grade: B] or NFH 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NFH 685L [Min Grade: P] or NFH 685L [Min Grade: P])

NFH 692L. Residency: Family Nurse Practitioner. 3-6 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to enhance acquired management strategies and the use of best practice models in the delivery of high quality evidence-based care to pediatric, adult and elderly populations. The focus of this course is to evaluate progress toward achievement of professional competencies. The emphasis is on the incorporation of evidence and concepts from previous coursework and clinical practice to improve the health status of pediatric, adult and elderly populations.
Prerequisites: (NFH 622 [Min Grade: B] or NFH 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NFH 686L [Min Grade: P] or NFH 686L [Min Grade: P])

NFH 721. Advanced Family Nursing I. 5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce essential concepts in the safe and effective provision of advanced practice nursing. The focus of the course is to prepare the student to implement the role Doctor of Nursing Practice prepared Advanced Practice Nurse. The emphasis of this course is on the acquisition of the knowledge and skills necessary to deliver safe and effective care to pediatric adult and elderly populations.
Prerequisites: NUR 612 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] and (NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B]) and NFH 618L [Min Grade: P]

NFH 722. Advanced Family Nursing II. 4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to integrate prior theoretical and practical knowledge for diagnoses and management of the health and illness for pediatric, adult and elderly populations in the role of the Doctor of Nursing Practice prepared Advanced Practice Nurse. The focus of this course is on the health promotion and disease prevention and the management of strategies form inter-professional domains. The emphasis of this course is to examine current evidence that supports the delivery of safe and high quality evidence-based care of pediatric, adult and elderly populations.
Prerequisites: NFH 721 [Min Grade: B] and NFH 618L [Min Grade: P]

NFH 760. Family Health/Caregiving Across The Lifespan. 3 Hours.

The reciprocal relationship between family functioning and health is well known. The family plays an important and substantial role in the well-being of individuals and in turn, family relationships and functioning are significantly influenced by the health behaviors and status of family members. Families continue to be the major source of caregiving across the lifespan and a rapidly growing body of research speaks to the positive and negative correlates of family caregiving for persons with crisis, chronic or terminal health problems. The study of caregiving within the context of the family lifespan offers the student an opportunity to understand health and illness within a framework of human development, interaction, and adaptation, as well as cultural and gender norms.

NFH 761. Theory Development In Family Health And Caregiving. 3 Hours.

This is a survey course in which students develop skill in evaluating selected theories for their current or potential relevance to research on family health, individual health in the context of the family, and family caregiving processes in health and illness. Students become conversant with a range of family and caregiving theories toward the goal of assessing their relevance for further knowledge development in family health and caregiving processes. Students will evaluate whether empirical findings refute or support traditionally accepted or theoretically based knowledge; they will review empirical literature to draw conclusions regarding emerging theories, associated constructs and hypotheses; and they will propose testable theoretically-derived hypotheses and theoretically-driven family focused interventions aimed at altering health status of families.

NFH 762. Family Research Methods. 3 Hours.

This course provides the student with the opportunity to develop skill in the critical analysis and application of family research methods as a foundation for conducting family research. In this course, students analyze and apply research findings and acquire and apply the knowledge necessary to implement family research studies. Students examine the utilization of exploratory, descriptive, longitudinal, and experimental designs in family studies, apply techniques for strengthening designs and address instrumentation, sampling, data collection, and analysis issues particular to family research. Experience is gained in instrument evaluation and selection, decision-making regarding level of variable formation, model validation through multiple measurement, and selection of appropriate statistical tests to capture the complexity and dynamic nature of the family.

NGN-Nursing - Gerontological Courses

NGN 630. Advanced Practice Gerontology Nursing. 2 Hours.

This course is desigend to provide students in all advanced practice nursing tracks with the ability to integrate knowledge of gerontology and geriatrics with other specialy knowledge concerning the management of health care of adults. The emphasis in the course is on providing students with the background to apply this knowledge with elders and their families.

NGN 631. Gerontology and Geriatrics for Advanced Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to integrate knowledge of gerontology and geriatrics with previously acquired knowledge concerning the management of health care of adults. It is the required support course for students in the gerontological nurse practitioner option and may be taken as an elective by students in other options. In this course students acquire knowledge of gerontology and geriatrics that is relevant to the nursing and medical management of health care of elders. This knowledge is applied in the required clinical course.

NGN 632. Chronic Health Conditions for Advanced Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

This is a required support course for students in the gerontological nurse practitioner option, and may be taken as an elective by students in other options. In this course students acquire knowledge of a variety of clinical topics that are relevant to the nursing and medical management of health care of persons with complex chronic disorders such as urinary/fecal incontinence, chronic wounds and psychiatric disorders. The course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to integrate knowledge of selected chronic conditions with previously acquired knowledge concerning the management of health care of patients.

NGN 685L. Practicum I: Gerontological Nurse Practitioner. 2 Hours.

This is the first of two gerontological practica courses for the dual adult/Gerontological Nurse Practitioner specialty. In selected clinical settings students are expected to integrate the knowledge and competencies gained from foundation courses and didactic content to further develop the Gerontological Nurse Practitioner role. This course allows the student to develop the role by providing health care services to individuals, families, and groups, while emphasizing the promotion of health and prevention of disease. The student addresses the management of actual and potential health problems including common diseases and human responses to diseases. The following elements are integrated into the course: critical thinking, professional presentations, research utilization, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity, and social issues. Prerequisite: NUR 614L. Corequisite: NAH 621.
Prerequisites: NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B]

NGN 686L. Practicum II: Gerontological Nurse Practitioner. 2 Hours.

This is the second of two gerontological practica courses for the dual adult/Gerontological Nurse Practitioner specialty. In selected clinical settings students are expected to integrate the knowledge and competencies gained from foundation courses and didactic content to further develop the Gerontological Nurse Practitioner role. This course allows the student to develop the role by providing health care services to individuals, families, and groups, while emphasizing the promotion of health and prevention of disease. It is anticipated that the student will be increasingly independent and skilled as the clinical experience progresses, allowing the student to contribute more toward the management of health problems. The advanced practice role emphasis in this course encompasses a trajectory of the nurse practitioner experience from novice to beginning expert, and includes role components such as interdisciplinary collaborator, coach, educator, and consultant. The following elements are integrated into the course: critical thinking, professional presentations, research utilization, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity, and social issues. Prerequisite: NAH 621 and NGN 685L. Corequisite: NAH 622.
Prerequisites: (NAH 621 [Min Grade: B] and NAH 658L [Min Grade: P]) or (NAH 621 [Min Grade: B] and NAH 621 [Min Grade: P])

NGN 692L. Residency: Gerontological Nurse Practitioner. 1-4 Hour.

This course is the third of three clinical practicum courses and is designated as the culminating practical experience for Gerontology nurse practitioner students. This course encourages the student to apply knowledge and theories from the core courses as well as previous clinical and clinical support courses. A comprehensive examination is given during this residency course. Failure to pass the comprehensive examination will delay graduation. Students arrange their own clinical sites with assistance/approval from clinical faculty. Prerequisite: NGN 686L.
Prerequisites: NAH 686L [Min Grade: P] or NAH 686L [Min Grade: P]

NGN 731. Advanced Practice Gerontological Nursing I. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide DNP students who are already adult, adult acute, and/or family nurse practitioners and who are delivering care to a majority of gerontological patients, with an advanced theoretical and empirical knowledge of aging. This level of specialized gerontological nursing knowledge is beyond what would be obtained in an acute, adult, or family nurse practitioner program. The content in NGN 731Q and NGN 732Q satisfies the ANCC didactic requirements for a secondary certification as a gerontological nurse practitioner under the alternative eligibility requirements. This course and NGN 732Q should be considered for students interesting in a secondary licensure and is not intended for initial licensure as an advanced practice gerontological nurse. Documentation of clinical hours required by the ANCC is incumbent upon the student, not the UASON. Questions concerning the alternative eligibility requirements may be addressed by course faculty or by the ANCC registrar.

NGN 732. Advanced Practice Gerontological Nursing II. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide DNP students who are already adult, adult acute, and/or family nurse practitioners and who are delivering care to a majority of gerontological patients, with an advanced theoretical and empirical knowledge of aging. This level of specialized gerontological nursing knowledge is beyond what would be obtained in an acute, adult, or family nurse practitioner program. The content in NGN 731Q and NGN 732Q satisfies the ANCC didactic requirements for a secondary certification as a gerontological nurse practitioner under the alternative eligibility requirements. This course and NGN 731Q should be considered for students interesting in a secondary licensure and is not intended for initial licensure as an advanced practice gerontological nurse. Documentation of clinical hours required by the ANCC is incumbent upon the student, not the UASON. Questions concerning the alternative eligibility requirements may be addressed by course faculty or by the ANCC registrar.

NHSA-Nursing and Health Admin Courses

NHSA 616. Nursing Financial Management. 4 Hours.

Nurse leaders play an important role in managing the financial responsibilities for providing high quality care. This course explores health care economics and health care policy as it applies to access, costs, and quality, current and future mechanisms for financing health care services, and organization and unit level budgeting principles. Content will include creating, monitoring, and analyzing a budget, interpreting financial information, and capital budgeting. Corequisite: NHSA 617L.

NHSA 617L. Nursing Financial Management Practicum. 2-3 Hours.

This course provides a practical base for students to apply financial concepts in a health care organization. Students will work with healthcare administrators to create, monitor, and/or analyze budgets, examine revenue cycle for opportunities for improvement, and develop a business case for a new product or service. Students arrange their own clinical site(s) with assistance/approval from clinical faculty.

NHSA 618. Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides a theoretical basis for students to learn and apply human resources and organizational concepts, theories, and behaviors. The course will facilitate the individual growth and development of the nurse leader. Content includes human resource management issues; recruitment and retention; staff development; roles clarification; leadership development and succession planning; teamwork and collaborative practice; conflict management; performance management; cultural competence and the work environment; personnel policies, standards, and laws; and decision making and governance models. Students will begin developing a professional portfolio. Successful completion of field experience is required.

NHSA 620. Nursing and Health Systems Administration I. 3 Hours.

This course provides a theoretical base for students to develop the role of nursing and health systems administrator at the unit level. Emphasis is placed on the development of the knowledge and skills necessary for implementing the management role. Students will develop specific administrative competencies to include the ability to: understand self and others, communicate effectively, develop subordinates, manage conflict, monitor personal and individual performance, manage projects, delegate effectively, manage time and stress, foster a productive work environment, live with change, and build and maintain a power base. Content builds on the theoretical foundations of leadership, organizational behavior, and capital management applied to the structure of nursing and health organizations, patient care delivery and classification systems, staffing, budgeting, quality standards and improvement, risk management, leadership development, strategic planning, and change management. The following elements are integrated into this course: critical thinking, research, scholarly writing, professional presentation, scientific integrity and ethics, cultural diversity, and social issues. The role emphasis of this course is that of beginning nurse manager. Prereq: Admission to the Nursing and Health Systems Administration option.
Prerequisites: NUR 601 [Min Grade: B] and (MBA 609 [Min Grade: C] or HCO 615 [Min Grade: C]) and (MBA 632 [Min Grade: C] or HA 631 [Min Grade: C]) and NUR 602 [Min Grade: C]

NHSA 621. Nursing and Health Systems Administration II. 2,4 Hours.

This course provides a theoretical and experiential base for students to develop and implement the role of nursing and health systems administrator at the division/ department level. Emphasis is placed on the synthesis of knowledge and skills from the disciplines of nursing and business management that is necessary to apply when assuming the middle management role. Students will develop specific administrative competencies to include the ability to manage collective performance, design and organize projects, negotiate agreement and commitment, and create change. Content includes analysis of administrative roles and functions, strategies for coordination of quality care within and across departments and systems, strategies for service as an expert resource, business planning, cost and productivity, redesigning practice to achieve goals, models of practice and service delivery, utilization of consultants, managing product/service lines, and utilization of research for improving nursing processes and patient care outcomes. The following elements are integrated into this course: critical thinking, research, scholarly writing, professional presentation, scientific integrity and ethics, cultural diversity, and social issues. The role emphasis of this course is that of mid-level manager. Prerequisite: NHSA 620. Corequisite: NHSA 685L.
Prerequisites: NHSA 620 [Min Grade: B]

NHSA 622. Nursing and Health Systems Administration III. 2 Hours.

This course continues to provide a theoretical and experiential base for students to develop and implement the role of nursing and health systems administrator at the executive level. Through seminar discussion and with an executive level preceptor, emphasis is placed on the application, synthesis, and integration of knowledge and skills necessary for effective and efficient management of human and material resources, while incorporating the ethical, social, legal, financial, and economic aspects of health care delivery, health policy, and regulatory requirements for both staff and the organization. Students will develop specific administrative competencies to include the ability to manage organizational performance, manage across functions, present ideas, think creatively, and develop a vision, mission, strategic plan, and set goals. Content includes health care regulation and policy, practice plans and financing, internal and external environmental influences on nursing and health care systems, information system development and management, quality improvement, and managed care systems. The following elements are integrated into this course: critical thinking, research, scholarly writing, professional presentation, scientific integrity and ethics, cultural diversity, and social issues. The role emphasis of this course is that of chief nurse executive. Prerequisite: NHSA 621 and NHSA 685L. Corequisite: NHSA 686L.
Prerequisites: NHSA 621 [Min Grade: B]

NHSA 630. Health Services Marketing Management. 3 Hours.

The redesign of healthcare organizations has mandated larger spans of control for nurse managers with expertise and leadership skills in organizational, human resource, and financial management. The need for the integration of clinical skills with business know-how has been fueled by a more diverse work force with direct responsibility for non-nursing staff, an increased emphasis on customer service and risk management, and the ability to design and implement care delivery models that extend beyond the walls of the organization into the community and its stakeholders. Health systems across the country (and internationally), including home health agencies, managed care entities, public and private sector hospitals, long-term and ambulatory care facilities, and insurance companies, are searching for advanced level nurses for management and executive level positions.

NHSA 631. Advanced Quality and Patient Safety. 3-4 Hours.

This course examines current issues in quality improvement and patient safety activities. The course includes a review of past and current efforts, tools, and theories of quality assessment, assurance, utilization management, and measuring and improving outcome. In addition, the course looks at new initiatives to improve quality and safety through regulation, reporting and financial incentives.

NHSA 632. Nursing and Health Systems Administration I. 2-4 Hours.

This course provides a theoretical base for students to develop the role of nursing and health systems administrator. Emphasis is placed on development of knowledge and skills necessary for implementing the management role. Students will develop specific administrative competencies to include the ability to: understand self and others; communicate effectively, develop subordinates, manage conflict, monitor personal, individual, and team performance, manage projects, delegate effectively, manage time and stress, foster a productive work environment, live with change, and build and maintain a power base. Content builds on the theoretical foundations of leadership, organizational behavior, financial management, patient care delivery, quality standards and improvement, risk management, leadership development, and change management. The following elements are integrated into this course: critical thinking, research, scholarly writing, professional presentation, scientific integrity and ethics, cultural diversity, and social issues. The role emphasis of this course is for entry and mid-level nurse leaders. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nursing and Health Systems Administration option.
Prerequisites: NHSA 616 [Min Grade: B] and NHSA 617L [Min Grade: P] and NHSA 618 [Min Grade: B] and NHSA 631 [Min Grade: B] and NHSA 681L [Min Grade: P]

NHSA 633. Nursing and Health Systems Administration II. 4 Hours.

This course offers a theoretical base for students to develop and implement the role of nursing and health systems administrator at the service line/division or higher level. Emphasis is on the synthesis of knowledge and skills from multiple disciplines including nursing and business necessary when assuming a mid-level to senior level leadership role. A primary focus of this course is to develop the nurse leader as an expert to influence patient care, systems and community outcomes in a variety of settings such as ambulatory clinics, long-term care, acute care, community, managed care and policy-making. Content includes strategic management, health care policy and regulation, internal and external environmental assessments, disaster preparedness, and organizational and professional accountability. The following elements are integrated into this course: critical thinking, research, scholarly writing, professional presentation, scientific integrity and ethics, cultural diversity, and social issues. The role emphasis of this course is mid-level to senior level leadership roles. Prerequisite: NHSA 632 and NHSA 682L. Corequisite: NSHA 683L.
Prerequisites: NHSA 632 [Min Grade: B] and NHSA 682L [Min Grade: P]

NHSA 640. Economics for Nursing. 3 Hours.

Nurses care for people and caring is the central concept of modern nursing. Yet caring takes many forms, including caring about the economics of services provided. Changes in payment systems, organizational structure and the U.S.healthcare market have led to new interests in the economics of care delivery. Nurses play a major role in this care delivery, as clinicians, administrators and scholars. Topics for the completely on-line course include a basic introduction to economics as it applies to nursing, the nursing labor and service markets and critical professional economic issues facing nursing today.

NHSA 681L. Advanced Quality and Patient Safety Practicum. 2-3 Hours.

This course provides an experiential base for students to develop and implement the role of nursing and health systems quality and outcomes manager within a healthcare organization. Students will analyze outcomes measurement and quality improvement in a health care setting from a strategic perspective and engage, as leaders and participants, in efforts to improve the quality of health services. Students arrange their own clinical sites with assistance/approval from clinical faculty. Co-requisite: NHSA 631Q Advanced Quality and Patient Safety.

NHSA 682L. Nursing and Health Systems Administration I Practicum. 2-4 Hours.

This course is the third of four required practicum courses for the nursing and health systems administration student. Students in this course will synthesize theoretical concepts for administration practice and apply knowledge and skills obtained in masters core courses and prerequisite support courses to meet the objectives of the course. Students will arrange their own clinical site(s) with assistance/approval from clinical faculty. Co-requisite: NHSA 632Q Nursing and Health Services Administration I. Prerequisite: NHSA 616, NHSA 617L, NHSA 618, NHSA 631 and NHSA 681L. Corequisite: NHSA 632.
Prerequisites: NHSA 616 [Min Grade: B] and NHSA 617L [Min Grade: P] and NHSA 618 [Min Grade: B] and NHSA 631 [Min Grade: B] and NHSA 681L [Min Grade: P]

NHSA 683L. Nursing and Health Systems Administration II Practicum. 2 Hours.

This course is the last of four practicum courses for the nursing and health-systems administration student. Students in this course will synthesize theoretical concepts for administration practice and apply knowledge and skills obtained in masters core courses and prerequisite support courses to meet the objectives of the course. Emphasis is placed on the synthesis of knowledge and skills from the disciplines of nursing and business management that is necessary to apply when assuming a mid- or senior level management/leadership role. Students will arrange their own clinical sites with assistance/approval from clinical faculty. Prerequisite: NHSA 632 and NHSA 682L. Corequisite: NHSA 633.
Prerequisites: NHSA 632 [Min Grade: B] and NHSA 682L [Min Grade: P]

NHSA 685L. Nursing and Health Systems Administration Practicum I. 1-2 Hour.

This course is the first of two required application courses for the nursing and health-systems administration student. Students in this course will synthesize theoretical concepts for administration practice and apply knowledge and skills obtained in masters core courses and prerequisite support courses to meet the objectives of the course. Students arrange their own clinical sites with assistance/approval from clinical faculty. Prerequisite: NHSA 620. Corequisite: NHSA 621.
Prerequisites: NHSA 620 [Min Grade: B]

NHSA 686L. Nursing and Health Systems Administration/Quality Management Practicum II. 4 Hours.

Nursing and Health Systems Administration/Quality and Outcomes Management in Health Systems: This course provides an experimental base for students to develop and implement the role of nursing and health systems administrator and quality and outcomes manager at the executive level. Emphasis is placed on the synthesis of knowledge and skills from the disciplines of nursing and business management that is necessary to apply when assuming a management and leadership role. Students will analyze outcomes measurement and quality improvement in a health care setting from a strategic perspective and engage, as leaders and participants, in efforts to improve the quality of health services. Students arrange their own clinical sites with assistance/approval from clinical faculty. Prerequisite: NHSA 621 and NHSA 685L. Corequisite: NHSA 622.
Prerequisites: NHSA 621 [Min Grade: B] and NHSA 685L [Min Grade: P]

NMD - Nursing - Diabetes Mnmgt Courses

NMD 621. Advanced Management of Diabetes I. 3 Hours.

A variety of management strategies will be presented from multiple healthcare disciplines. The perspectives of the multi-disciplinary team in assisting persons to achieve self-care goals is an important theme throughout this course as are the current controversies, issues, and research findings underlying present approaches to treatment and patient/family education. Topics presented are based on the curriculum blueprint of the American Diabetes Educators Program recommendations for the ANCC/AADE Advanced Diabetes Management certification examination for clinical nurse specialist and/or nurse practitioners. The topics addressed in this course include: recognition of early signs of diabetes mellitus, self glucose monitoring, diabetes among: minorities, and those residing in rural settings. Pre-req: NUR 600, NUR 614, NCA 621 and NCA 685L or equivalent or ANCC certifcation as a Nurse Practitioner.

NMD 622. Advanced Management of Diabetes II. 3 Hours.

This online course is the second in a program of study focusing on advanced diabetes management across the lifespan. Two didactic and three clinical courses are offered that will provide a multi-disciplinary framework for the identification of those at risk for or who already possess the metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, frank type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus and/or the associated complications. A variety of management strategies will be presented from multiple healthcare disciplines. The perspectives of the multi-disciplinary team in assisting persons to achieve self-care goals is an important theme throughout this course as are the current controversies, issues, and research findings underlying present approaches to treatment and patient/family education. Topics presented are based on the curriculum blueprint of the American Diabetes Educators Program recommendations for the ANCC/AADE Advanced Diabetes Management certification examination for clinical nurse specialist and/or nurse practitioners. Topics presented will be based on the curriculum of the American Diabetes Educators Program recommendations for the Certified Diabetes Educator. These topics include: family planning, gestational diabetes, poly cystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), orthopedic sequelae of diabetes, transplantation, glucose monitoring, insulin pump and other advanced diabetes technologies, diabetes in: rural minorities, elderly, children; diabetes in persons with disabilities, insurance issues, cultural issues, economic issues, mood disorders, eating disorders, hypoglycemia, pain management, foot care, risks of ESRD, hypertension, obesity, dental concerns and provider reimbursement issues regarding diabetes education services.Prerequisite: NMD 621 and NMD 685L or ANCC certification as a nurse practitioner.
Prerequisites: NMD 621 [Min Grade: B] or NMD 621 [Min Grade: B]

NMD 685L. Practicum I: Advanced Management of Diabetes. 3 Hours.

NMD 685L allows the student to begin the development of the Advanced Diabetes Management role by providing health care services to clients across the lifespan (i.e., individuals, families, groups) in a variety of settings and emphasizing the promotion of health and the prevention of disease. Further, the student applies knowledge and current research findings to the management of actual and potential health problems, which include common diseases and human responses to disease. It is anticipated that the student will be increasingly independent and skilled as each clinical experience progresses, allowing him/her to become proficient and to contribute to the management of more complex health problems. The following elements are integrated into the course: critical thinking, professional presentations, research utilization, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity and awareness of social and professional issues. The advanced practice role emphasis in this course begins the trajectory of the NP experience from novice to beginning expert, and includes role components such as interdisciplinary collaborator, coach, teacher, manager, researcher, and consultant. .Students arrange their own clinical sites with assistance/approval from clinical faculty. Corequisite: NMD 621.

NNE-Nursing - Neonatal Courses

NNE 613. Neonatal Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the analysis and utilization of principles of pharmacology and pharmacokinetics for the purpose of planning, implementing, and evaluating theraputic pharmacological interventions within the specified population. The unique characteristics of the neonatal population, related to therapeutic needs, as well as drug absorption, metabolism and excretion are defined.

NNE 614L. Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning for Advanced Nursing Practice. 4 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with an advanced level of skill and knowledge in critical thinking, procedures and skills, and diagnostic reasoning for conducting health assessments and planning care for wholistic, adaptive human beings. The following elements are integrated into the course: professional presentations, critical thinking, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity and social issues.Pre or Corequisite: NUR 612.
Prerequisites: NUR 612 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently) or NUR 612 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently)

NNE 618L. Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course will be the study of specialty track specific topics. The focus of the course will be on providing foundational materials for specialized areas of advanced nursing practice. Emphasis is on exploring specific advanced nursing practice competencies.
Prerequisites: (NUR 606 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 606 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B])

NNE 621. Advanced Neonatal Nursing I. 3-5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce essential concepts in the safe and effective provision of advanced practice nursing. The focus of this course is to prepare the student to implement the role of the Advanced Practice Nurse. The emphasis of this course is on the acquisition of the knowledge and skills necessary to deliver safe and effective care to neonates, infants, and young toddlers up to two years of age.
Prerequisites: (NUR 612 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 612 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B])

NNE 622. Advanced Neonatal Nursing II. 4-5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to integrate prior theoretical and practical knowledge for diagnoses and management of the health and illness of neonates, infants, and young toddlers up to the age of two. The focus of this course is on health promotion and disease prevention and management strategies from inter-professional domains. The emphasis of this course is to examine current evidence that supports the delivery of safe and high quality evidence-based care to neonates, infants, and young toddlers up to the age of two.
Prerequisites: (NNE 621 [Min Grade: B] or NNE 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NNE 684L [Min Grade: P] or NNE 684L [Min Grade: P])

NNE 623. Advanced Neonatal Nursing III. 4-5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to synthesize in-depth knowledge and theoretical concepts as related to advanced practice nursing. The focus of this course is on the utilization of complex models and systems of practice to deliver high quality evidence-based care to neonates, infants, and young toddlers up to the age of two. The emphasis of the course is on the critical analysis of the evidence for applications that optimize health outcomes.
Prerequisites: (NNE 622 [Min Grade: B] or NNE 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NNE 685L [Min Grade: P] or NNE 685L [Min Grade: P])

NNE 684L. Practicum I: Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. 2-3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to demonstrate management strategies and apply selected practice models for the delivery of high quality care to neonates, infants, and young toddlers up to the age of two. The focus of this course is on the delivery of health care services to neonates, infants, and young toddlers up to the age of two. The emphasis of this course is on promoting the progression of competence within the Advanced Practice Nursing role.
Prerequisites: (NUR 612 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 612 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B])

NNE 685L. Practicum II: Neonatal Nurse Practioner. 2-3 Hours.

The purposes of this course are to prioritize management strategies and apply selected practice models for delivery of care to neonates, infants, and toddlers up to the age of two. The focus of this course is to provide the student with opportunities to integrate in depth diagnostic and management skills to provide care for neonates, infants, and toddlers up to the age of two. The emphasis of this course is on the formulation and management of individualized treatment plans based on diagnostic findings and current practice models.
Prerequisites: (NNE 621 [Min Grade: B] or NNE 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NNE 684L [Min Grade: P] or NNE 684L [Min Grade: P])

NNE 686L. Practicum III: Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. 1-3 Hour.

This course is the second of two practicum courses that will be followed by a residency. In selected clinical settings, students are expected to integrate the knowledge and competencies gained from foundation courses to begin to further develop the NNP Role. Students and faculty cooperatively arrange clinical sites. Prerequisite: NNE 622 and NNE 685L. Corequisite: NNE 623.
Prerequisites: NNE 622 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently) or NNE 622 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently)

NNE 692L. Residency: Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. 1-6 Hour.

The purpose of this course is to enhance acquired management strategies and the use of best practice models in the delivery of high quality evidence-based care to neonate, infant, and young toddler up to the age of two. The focus of this course is to evaluate progress toward achievement of professional competencies. The emphasis is on the incorporation of evidence and concepts from previous coursework and clinical practice to improve the health status of neonate, infant, and young toddler up to the age of two.
Prerequisites: (NNE 622 [Min Grade: B] or NNE 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NNE 685L [Min Grade: P] or NNE 685L [Min Grade: P])

NNE 785L. Practicum II: Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. 3 Hours.

The purposes of this course are to prioritize management strategies and apply selected practice models for delivery of care to neonates. The focus of this course is to provide the student with opportunities to integrate in-depth diagnostic, management, and leadership skills in the role of the Doctor of Nursing Practice prepared Advanced Practice Nurse to provide care for neonates. The emphasis of this course is on the formulation and management of individualized treatment plans based on diagnostic findings and current practice models.
Prerequisites: NNE 722 [Min Grade: B] and NNE 784L [Min Grade: P]

NNI-Nursing - Informatics Courses

NNI 621. Conceptual Basis for Informatics Practice. 3 Hours.

This course is based on the concepts underpinning nursing informatics practice as delineated in the American Nurses Association s Scope and Standards of Nursing Informatics Practice. Students will explore theories of adult education, communication, systems, decision making, human-computer interaction and the concepts of data, information and knowledge. They will have the opportunity to learn how these theories and concepts are utilized in informatics practice.Prerequisite: NUR 643.
Prerequisites: NUR 643 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

NNI 622. The Information System Life Cycle. 3 Hours.

This offering is designed to be the culminating course of the nursing informatics specialist curriculum. This course ties together all previous course work together in an application based review of the information system life cycle from systems analysis to system evaluation and maintenance. The course is designed to be taken in conjunction with a clinical experience in which the student will be exposed to aspects of the hands on application of course content.
Prerequisites: NUR 643 [Min Grade: C] and NNI 621 [Min Grade: B]

NNI 625. Organizational Process and Behavior. 3 Hours.

This course will assist the Nurse Informatician to understand and evaluate how organizations change and innovate with new information technologies to compete in the marketplaces, collaborate with partners, serve customers, motivate employees, and improve operations. This course provides the students with the opportunities to: learn the main theoretical perspectives on managing IT change through innovations: familiarize with current best practices and models of change of innovation through IT: and develop innovation skills in various organizational settings and within the framework of project management.
Prerequisites: (NUR 610 [Min Grade: C] or NUR 610 [Min Grade: C]) and (NHSA 631 [Min Grade: C] or NHSA 631 [Min Grade: C])

NNI 685L. Nursing Informatics: Practicum I. 2 Hours.

This course provides an experimental base for students to develop and implement the role of the informatics nurse specialist. Emphasis is placed on the synthesis and application of the theories and concepts that provide the basis of informatics practice. Students will develop the ability to collaborate in multidisciplinary groups, identifying areas for the design and implementation of administrative and clinical technological applications. Students will spend 100 hours during the semester working with a clinical informatics specialist in practice.Students and faculty cooperatively arrange clinical sites. Prerequisite: NNI 621.
Prerequisites: NNI 621 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently)

NNI 686L. Nursing Informatics: Practicum II. 2 Hours.

This course provides an experimental base for students to develop and implement the role of the informatics nursing specialist at the organizational level. Students will be paired with a nursing informatics specialist working on aspects of system analysis, design, implementation and evaluation. This experience requires the student synthesize knowledge gained in all previous courses in the curriculum. This course includes 100 hours of clinical practice and is designed to function as the clinical capstone to the NNI curriculum.A comprehensive examination is given during this residency course. Failure to pass the comprehensive examination will delay graduation. Students and faculty cooperatively arrange clinical sites. Prerequisite: NNI 685L.
Prerequisites: NNI 621 [Min Grade: B]

NOH-Nursing -Occupational Hlth Courses

NOH 625. Principles and Practice of Occupational Safety, Ergonomics, and Industrial Hygiene. 4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce major concepts from occupational safety, ergonomics, and industrial hygiene and the collaborative relationship among occupational health and safety professionals. Emphasis is on exploring risk factors in disciplines to control injury and illness in the national and international workplace. Students will also develop an appreciation of the history of occupational health along with an understanding of legal and regulatory influences on worker populations.

NPA-Nursing - Palliative Care Courses

NPA 621. Advanced Palliative Care Nursing I. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide a theoretical and practical foundation for students to diagnose and manage the health needs of the patient and family in the delivery of palliative care across the life span. The focus of the course is on interdisciplinary, holistic palliative care management strategies. The emphasis of the course is on critical thinking, research, ethics, cultural competence, disease management, complication prevention and healthcare delivery as they apply to chronic disease management and quality of life for the palliative care patient and family.
Prerequisites: (NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B])

NPA 622. Advanced Palliative Care Nursing II. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with opportunities to integrate in-depth knowledge of health assessment and management skills to provide care for clients with commonly occurring chronic and complex health problems as well as palliative care problems. The focus of the course is the development of strategies to market the nurse practitioner role, to create a specific practice position, and to explore strategies to market palliative care and their role in family health care. The emphasis of the course is on critical thinking, health promotion, disease prevention, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity and social issues, professional role development, education and marketing.
Prerequisites: NPA 621 [Min Grade: B] or NPA 621 [Min Grade: B]

NPA 626. Palliative Care for Advanced Nursing Practice I. 3 Hours.

This course provides a theoretical and practical foundation for students to diagnose and manage the health needs of the palliative care patient and family in the delivery of culturally competent care across the life span. Content includes multidisciplinary management strategies to holistic healthcare delivery as it applies to administration of culturally competent palliative care. This course will utilize discussion, online activities for application of class content, readings, lecture and guest lecture approach to supplement text readings and online delivery of didactic content. The students are expected to apply culturally competent and palliative care theories to clinical assessment and decision-making strategies in order to provide direct patient care to the palliative care patient and family. Prerequisite: NUR 614L. Corequisite: NPA 685L.
Prerequisites: NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] and NUR 613 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently) or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently)

NPA 627. Palliative Care for Advanced Nursing Practice II. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the student with opportunities to integrate in-depth knowledge of health assessment and management skills to provide care for patients with commonly occurring palliative care problems. Students will also have the opportunity to develop strategies to market the advanced practice nurse role, to create a specific practice position and to explore strategies to market their role in health care. The following elements are integrated into the course: critical thinking, health promotion, disease prevention and palliative care, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity and social issues and professional role development. Corequisite: NPA 686L.
Prerequisites: (NPA 626 [Min Grade: B] or NPA 626 [Min Grade: B])

NPA 685L. Practicum: Advanced Palliative Care. 2-4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is for the student to develop the Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner role by providing health and palliative care services to clients across the lifespan, families, and groups while emphasizing the promotion of health, the prevention of disease and the palliative care for life altering conditions. The focus of the course is on application of knowledge and current research findings to the management of actual and potential health problems, which include common diseases and human responses to disease. The emphasis of this course encompasses a trajectory of the nurse practitioner experience from novice to beginning expert, and includes role components such as interdisciplinary collaborator, coach, educator, and consultant.
Prerequisites: (NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B]) and NPA 621 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently) or NPA 621 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently) or NPA 622 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently) or NPA 622 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently)

NPA 686L. Practicum: Culturally Competent Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner II. 3 Hours.

This course allows the student to develop the Culturally Competent Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner role by providing health and palliative care services to clients across the lifespan, families and groups while emphasizing the promotion of health, the prevention of disease and palliative care for life altering conditions throughout the course of clinical experiences over two academic terms. Further, the student continues to apply knowledge and current research findings to the management of actual and potential health problems, which include common diseases and human responses to disease. An Objective Structured Patient Experience held during this course will determine if the student can progress into 6 hours of the final residency course, NCA 692L. Students arrange their own clinical sites with assistance/approval from clinical faculty. Prerequisite: NPA 621 and NPA 685L. Corequisite: NPA 622.
Prerequisites: NPA 685L [Min Grade: P] or NPA 685L [Min Grade: P]

NPA 692L. Residency: Culturally Competent Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner. 3-6 Hours.

This course prepares the student in the Culturally Competent Palliative Nurse Practitioner role to be a beginning expert in the diagnosis and management of client's health problems. During residency, the student is expected to continue growth toward becoming an independent practitioner, specializing in the culturally competent care of clients from across the lifespan. The student further develops the Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner role with patient/clients by providing health care services to clients (i.e. individuals, families, groups) emphasizing the promotion of health, prevention of disease and/or palliation of symptoms of life-altering diseases. A comprehensive examination is given during this residency course. Failure to pass the comprehensive examination will delay graduation. Students arrange their own clinical sites with assistance/approval from clinical faculty. Prerequisite: NPA 622 and NPA 686L.
Prerequisites: (NPA 627 [Min Grade: B] or NPA 627 [Min Grade: B]) and (NPA 685L [Min Grade: P] or NPA 685L [Min Grade: P]) and (NPA 686L [Min Grade: P] or NPA 686L [Min Grade: P])

NPE-Nursing - Pediatrics Courses

NPE 613. Primary Care Pediatric Pharmacology. 1 Hour.

This course is a supplement course for Primary Care Practitioner students to provide them with information necessary to safely and competently prescribe medications for infants, children and adolescents. It complements the information provided in NUR 613 Pharmacology and Therapeutics but focuses on the unique physiologic and metabolic characteristics of this population.Pre or corequisite: NUR 613.
Prerequisites: NUR 613 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently) or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently)

NPE 618L. Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course will be the study of specialty track specific topics. The focus of the course will be on providing foundational materials for specialized areas of advanced nursing practice. Emphasis is on exploring specific advanced nursing practice competencies.
Prerequisites: (NUR 606 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 606 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B])

NPE 621. Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care I. 4-5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce essential concepts in the safe and effective provision of advanced practice nursing. The focus of this course is to prepare the student to implement the role of the Advanced Practice Nurse. The emphasis of this course is on the acquisition of the knowledge and skills necessary to deliver safe and effective care to primary care pediatric patients and their families.
Prerequisites: (NUR 612 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 612 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B])

NPE 622. Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care II. 2-4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to integrate prior theoretical and practical knowledge for diagnoses and management of the health and illness of primary care pediatric patients and their families. The focus of this course is on health promotion and disease prevention and management strategies from inter-professional domains. The emphasis of this course is to examine current evidence that supports the delivery of safe and high quality evidence-based care to primary care pediatric patients and their families.
Prerequisites: (NPE 621 [Min Grade: B] or NPE 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NPE 685L [Min Grade: P] or NPE 685L [Min Grade: P])

NPE 623. Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care III. 4-5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to synthesize in-depth knowledge and theoretical concepts as related to advanced practice nursing. The focus of this course is on the utilization of complex models and systems of practice to deliver high quality evidence-based care to primary care pediatric patients and their families. The emphasis of the course is on the critical analysis of the evidence for applications that optimize health outcomes.
Prerequisites: (NPE 622 [Min Grade: B] or NPE 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NPE 686L [Min Grade: P] or NPE 686L [Min Grade: P])

NPE 685L. Practicum I: Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care. 2-3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to demonstrate management strategies and apply selected practice models for the delivery of high quality care to primary care pediatric patients and their families. The focus of this course is on the delivery of health care services to primary care pediatric patients and their families. The emphasis of this course is on promoting the progression of competence within the Advanced Practice Nursing role.
Prerequisites: (NUR 612 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 612 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B])

NPE 686L. Practicum II: Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care. 2-3 Hours.

The purposes of this course are to prioritize management strategies and apply selected practice models for delivery of care to primary care pediatric patients and their families. The focus of this course is to provide the student with opportunities to integrate in depth diagnostic and management skills to provide care for primary care pediatric patients and their families. The emphasis of this course is on the formulation and management of individualized treatment plans based on diagnostic findings and current practice models.
Prerequisites: (NPE 621 [Min Grade: B] or NPE 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NPE 685L [Min Grade: P] or NPE 685L [Min Grade: P])

NPE 687L. Practicum III: Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner. 2 Hours.

This course prepares the student in the Pediatric Nurse Practitioner role. The student develops the Pediatric NP role with patients/clients by providing pediatric health care services to clients (i.e. individuals, families, groups) emphasizing the promotion of health and the prevention of disease throughout the course of clinical experiences over two or three academic terms. Further, the student continues to apply knowledge and current research findings to the management of actual and potential health problems, which include common diseases and human responses to disease. It is anticipated that the student will be increasingly independent and skilled as each clinical experience progresses, allowing him/her to become more proficient and to contribute to the management of more complex health problems. The following elements are integrated into the course: critical thinking, professional presentations, research utilization, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity and social issues. The advanced practice role emphasis in this course encompasses a trajectory of the nurse practitioner experience from novice to beginning expert, including interdisciplinary collaboration, coach, educator, consultant roles. Prerequisite: NPE 622 and NPE 686L. Corequisite: NPE 623.
Prerequisites: (NPE 622 [Min Grade: B] and NPE 686L [Min Grade: P]) or (NPE 622 [Min Grade: B] and NPE 686L [Min Grade: P])

NPE 692L. Practicum III: Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Primary Care Residency. 1-6 Hour.

The purpose of this course is to enhance acquired management strategies and the use of best practice models in the delivery of high quality evidence-based care to primary care pediatric patients and their families. The focus of this course is to evaluate progress toward achievement of professional competencies. The emphasis is on the incorporation of evidence and concepts from previous coursework and clinical practice to improve the health status of primary care pediatric patients and their families.
Prerequisites: (NPE 622 [Min Grade: B] or NPE 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NPE 686L [Min Grade: P] or NPE 686L [Min Grade: P])

NPN-Psyc Mental Hlth Nur Prac Courses

NPN 613. Psychopharmacology for Advanced Practice Nursing. 3 Hours.

This course will provide advanced knowledge of psychobiological information in conjunction with the use of psychopharmacological interventions with patients. This course will focus on the pharmacokinetics and clinical management including prescription of medications for psychiatric disorders. Prerequisite: NUR 613, NPN 621 and NPN 685L.
Prerequisites: (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] and NPN 621 [Min Grade: B] and NPN 685L [Min Grade: P]) or (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] and NPN 621 [Min Grade: B] and NPN 685L [Min Grade: P])

NPN 618L. Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course will be the study of specialty track specific topics. The focus of the course will be on providing foundational materials for specialized areas of advanced nursing practice. Emphasis is on exploring specific advanced nursing practice competencies.
Prerequisites: (NUR 606 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 606 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B])

NPN 621. Advanced Psychiatric Nursing I. 4-5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce essential concepts in the safe and effective provision of advanced practice psychiatric nursing. The focus of this course is to prepare the student to implement the role of the Psychiatric Advanced Practice Nurse. The emphasis of this course is on the acquisition of the knowledge and skills necessary to deliver safe and effective care to a psychiatric population across the lifespan.
Prerequisites: (NUR 612 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 612 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 616L [Min Grade: P] or NUR 616L [Min Grade: P])

NPN 622. Advanced Psychiatric Nursing II. 3-5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to integrate prior theoretical and practical knowledge for diagnoses and management of the health and illness of psychiatric patients across the lifespan. The focus of this course is on health promotion and disease prevention and management strategies for psychiatric patients from inter-professional domains. The emphasis of this course is to examine current evidence that supports the delivery of safe and high quality evidence-based care to psychiatric patients across the lifespan.
Prerequisites: (NPN 621 [Min Grade: B] or NPN 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NPN 685L [Min Grade: P] or NPN 685L [Min Grade: P])

NPN 623. Advanced Psychiatric Nursing III. 4-5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to synthesize in-depth knowledge and theoretical concepts as related to advanced practice psychiatric nursing. The focus of this course is on the utilization of complex models and systems of practice to deliver high quality evidence-based care to psychiatric patients across the lifespan. The emphasis of the course is on the critical analysis of the evidence for applications that optimize health in psychiatric patients across the lifespan.
Prerequisites: (NPN 622 [Min Grade: B] or NPN 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NPN 686L [Min Grade: P] or NPN 686L [Min Grade: P])

NPN 685L. Practicum I: Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner. 3 Hours.

The purposes of this course are to prioritize management strategies and apply selected practice models for delivery of care to psychiatric and substance use patients across the lifespan. The focus of this course is to provide the student with opportunities to integrate in depth diagnostic and management skills to provide care for psychiatric patients across the lifespan. The emphasis of this course is on the formulation and management of individualized treatment plans based on diagnostic findings and current practice models.
Prerequisites: (NUR 612 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 612 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 616L [Min Grade: P] or NUR 616L [Min Grade: P])

NPN 686L. Practicum II: Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to demonstrate management strategies and apply selected practice models for the delivery of high quality care to psychiatric patients across the lifespan. The focus of this course is on the delivery of health care services to psychiatric patients across the lifespan. The emphasis of this course is on promoting the progression of competence within the Advanced Practice Nursing role.
Prerequisites: (NPN 621 [Min Grade: B] or NPN 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NPN 685L [Min Grade: P] or NPN 685L [Min Grade: P])

NPN 692L. Residency: Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner. 1-6 Hour.

The purpose of this course is to enhance acquired management strategies and the use of best practice models in the delivery of high quality evidence-based care to psychiatric patients across the livespan. The focus of this course is to evaluate progress toward achievement of professional competencies in advanced practice psychiatric nursing. The emphasis is on the incorporation of evidence and concepts from previous coursework and clinical practice to improve the health status of psychiatric patients across the lifespan.
Prerequisites: (NPN 622 [Min Grade: B] or NPN 622 [Min Grade: B]) and (NPN 686L [Min Grade: B] or NPN 686L [Min Grade: B])

NPP- NUR - Pediatric Pulmonary Courses

NPP 685. Interdisciplinary Pediatric Pulmonary Care I. 3 Hours.

This course provides the trainee with the opportunity to analyze ideas, concepts and theories relative to the delivery of healthcare to pediatric pulmonary patients. Emphasis will be focused on the acquisition of in-depth knowledge of all aspects of the well child. Chronic respiratory disease is presented as the model to demonstrate the effects of chronic illness of the child and family. Trainees are introduced to basic respiratory anatomy and physiology, diagnostic procedures and various treatment modalities. Throughout the term, trainees will be expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired to selected clinical assignments.

NPP 686. Interdisciplinary Pediatric Pulmonary Care II. 3 Hours.

NPP 686 provides the traninee with the opportunity to analyze ideas, concepts and theories relative to the delivery of healthcare to pediatric pulmonary patients. Emphasis will be focused on the acquisition for in-depth knowledge of all aspects of the well child. Chronic respiratory disease is presented as the model to demonstrate the effects of chronic illness on the child and family. Trainees are introduced to basic respiratory anatomy and physiology, diagnostic procedures and various treatment modalities. Throughout the term, trainees will be expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired to selected clinical assignments.

NPR-NUR Promo/Protect/Rest Hlt Courses

NPR 760. Conceptual Foundations for Promoting, Protecting, and Restoring Health. 3 Hours.

This course will be focused on theories, concepts and research related to promoting, protecting and restoring health. Students are expected to analyze cultural, social, racial and gender influences on health and research related to health promotion, protection and restoration.

NPR 761. Interventions to Promote, Protect, and Restore Health. 3 Hours.

This course will be focused on in-depth exploration and critical analysis of current intervention research including conceptual and methodological issues. In addition, the course will be focused on designing research to evaluate the outcomes of interventions designed to promote, protect or restore health on individuals or community groups.

NRM-Nursing - Research Methods Courses

NRM 750. Foundations of Quantitative Research. 3 Hours.

This course is a survey of quantitative research methods and the first required research core course in the PhD doctoral nursing program. The course is designed to prepare PhD doctoral nursing students with the research knowledge and skills to: (1) critically evaluate research; (2) use the process of research to examine questions identified in one's own nursing practice; and (3) contribute to expansion of nursing's knowledge base. This course will include integration of the following elements and/or activities: critical thinking, critique and synthesis of quantitative research literature in a focused area of interest, scholarly writing, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity, and social issues. Students will apply criteria for the critique of research to assess the design, methods and validity of research findings. Students will be exposed to various critique frameworks for both quantitative and qualitative research. Strategies for conducting both systematic and integrated reviews will be addressed. The advanced practice role emphasis of this course is that of investigator, research collaborator, and content expert in a selected practice field.

NRM 752. Responsible Conduct of Research. 2 Hours.

This course will examine a wide range of historical and modern treatises that have shaped ethical practices and medical ethical theories both in the United States and globally. The course will emphasize comparing and contrasting various world views of ethical research practice from a cultural and global perspective. The content will focus on ethical principles such as respect for persons, autonomy, justice and rights-based codes. In addition, the expectations and regulations of Institutional Review Boards will be examined with an emphasis on developing effective strategies to expedite approval of student research applications. In addition, students will complete and provide proof of current completion of the UAB IRB training course as an initial pass/fail learning activity. This course will also include integration of the following elements and/or activities: critical thinking, informatics, collaboration, scholarly writing, preparing/giving professional presentations, theory evaluation and application, human diversity, cultural competence, global concerns and health disparity issues. The advanced role emphasis of this course is that of investigator, research collaborator, and content expert in a selected practice field.

NRM 761. Research in Children with Chronic Health Conditions. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an understanding of the ethical developmental and regulatory considerations necessary for the responsible conduct of research in children with chronic illness. The focus of this course is on critical evaluation of published research in populations of children with chronic illness, understanding of scientific and methodological considerations necessary when conducting research involving children, and development of a mock research proposal focused on a question of importance to the field that addresses processes necessary to assure appropriate protection of pediatric research participants. Inter-professional enrollment on this course is encouraged.

NRM 770. Designs for Nursing Studies I. 3 Hours.

Designs For Nursing Studies I. In this course, special emphasis is placed upon the beginning phases of the research process, including formulation of research questions/aims, integration of theory and/or conceptual framework in the development of research, the critique and review of knowledge that support an identified area of research, and the discussion of the type of research design. Cultural implications and ethical standards for research will be addressed.

NRM 771. Methods/Measurement In Nursing Research. 3 Hours.

Instrumentation in nursing research involves measurement of biological, psychological and/or sociological aspects of human systems. This course is an overview of the theories, principles and techniques that yield reliable and valid measurement of human systems. Opportunities will be provided to evaluate the psychometric properties of selected measures and strategies. This course is designed to aid the student in writing the measurement section of a research proposal in the focal area. 999999.

NRM 772. Designs of Nursing Studies II. 3 Hours.

Designs for Nursing Studies II. This course focuses on sampling, collection of data, data analysis plans, presentation of findings, conclusions in various research designs and the reintegration of the findings into the body of knowledge in an indentified area of research. Ethical and cultural issures relateded to the conduct of research will be addressed. Students will develope a research proposal.

NRM 773. Qualitative Research Methods. 4 Hours.

This core course focuses on sampling, design, analysis plans, presentation of results, findings, and conclusions in various research designs and the reintegration of the findings into the body of knowledge in an identified area of research. Ethical and cultural issues related to the conduct of research are also examined.

NRM 774. Designs and Methods for Research of Vulnerable Populations With Health Disparities. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for doctoral level students in nursing and other health-related disciplines. Special emphasis is placed on critical analysis of health disparities research, and the integration of theory and empirical evidence in designing studies of vulnerable populations such as minorities and other underserved populations. Issues of race, gender, age, ethnicity, social class and cultures are examined in relation to research design and successful implementation of research studies. Intervention approaches commonly used in health disparities research will be evaluated and ethical issues of relevance to vulnerable populations will be explored.

NRM 775. Research on Applied Cognitive Neuroscience for Health Professionals. 3 Hours.

This elective course for the PhD program provides the student with knowledge in the fundamentals of behavioral neuroscience and cognitive psychology as it relates to intervention studies and research designs. The student has an opportunity to practice cognitive assessment, develop behavioral intervention plans, and design research studies involving such knowledge.

NRM 777. Mixed Methods Research I: Introduction to the Field. 3 Hours.

The course will provide students with an introduction to the field of mixed methods research. The course will focus on understanding what constitutes mixed methods research, its fundamental principles, and the main trends, issues, and debates involved in the application of this research approach. Students will examine the process of mixed methods research, including its definition, rationale for using it, the key characteristics, major design applications, and means of assessing the quality of mixed methods inferences. In addition, students will learn how the mixed methods research process is shaped by personal, interpersonal, and social contexts and how mixed methods intersects with other quantitative and qualitative research approaches and designs.
Prerequisites: (NRM 750 [Min Grade: B] or NRM 750 [Min Grade: B]) and (NRM 773 [Min Grade: B] or NRM 773 [Min Grade: B])

NRM 778. Mixed Methods Research II: Designing and Conducting a Mixed Methods Study. 3 Hours.

Building on the foundation knowledge received in Mixed Methods Research I, the course will provide students with knowledge and skills of designing and conducting mixed methods studies in social and health sciences. The topics will include types of research problems addressed, specification of mixed methods purpose statements and research questions, types of mixed methods designs, data collection and analysis strategies within mixed methods designs, and procedures for reporting and evaluating mixed methods studies. Students will get applied knowledge of choosing an appropriate mixed methods design, following the steps in designing and conducting a mixed methods study, and visually presenting mixed methods procedures employed in the study. Students will develop a proposal for a mixed methods study with the major emphasis on the study methodology.
Prerequisites: (NRM 750 [Min Grade: B] or NRM 750 [Min Grade: B]) and (NRM 773 [Min Grade: B] or NRM 773 [Min Grade: B]) and (NRM 777 [Min Grade: B] or NRM 777 [Min Grade: B])

NRM 779. Mixed Methods Application in Community-Based Action Research. 3 Hours.

The course will provide students with a detailed overview of how mixed methods can be applied in designing and conducting community-based action research studies. The topics will include: community-based action research, its purposes and cross-disciplinary utilization; a mixed methods methodological framework for action research; steps in designing and conducting mixed methods action research studies in community settings; specific types of mixed methods action research designs; sampling, data collection, analysis, validation, and evaluation of mixed methods action research projects. Students will get applied knowledge of choosing an appropriate mixed methods action research design, of applying the steps to designing and conducting a mixed methods action research study, and visually presenting the procedures employed in the study. Students will develop a proposal for a mixed methods action research study with the major emphasis on the study methodology.

NRM 780. Application of Research Design Principles I. 3 Hours.

In this course, special emphasis is placed upon the beginning phases of the research process, including formulation of research questions/aims, integration of theory and/or conceptual framework in the development of research, the critique and review of knowledge that support an identified area of research, and the discussion of the type of research design. Cultural implications and ethical standards for research will be addressed.
Prerequisites: (NRM 750 [Min Grade: B] or NRM 750 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 755 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 755 [Min Grade: B])

NRM 781. Quantitative Measurement in Research. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the knowledge of how to best measure bilogical, psychological and/or sociological variables within individuals, families, and/or systems. This course includes an overview of the theories, principles and techniques that yield effective operationalization in order to obtain valid and reliable measurements.
Prerequisites: NRM 750 [Min Grade: B]

NRM 782. Application of Research Design Principles II. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on proposal development to include design, sampling, data collection, and data analysis plans for a focal area of interest. Ethical and cultural issues related to the conduct of research will be addressed.
Prerequisites: NRM 780 [Min Grade: B] and NRM 783 [Min Grade: B] and NST 778 [Min Grade: B] and NST 758 [Min Grade: B]

NRM 783. Foundations of Qualitative Research. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to examine research traditions that guide the collection and analysis of qualitative data in the development of science. Included are naturalistic, conceptual, interpretive and analytical research methods such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, descriptive inquiry and narrative inquiry.
Prerequisites: NUR 751 [Min Grade: B] and NRM 750 [Min Grade: B]

NRM 784. Qualitative Research: A Grounded Theory Approach. 3 Hours.

This course will provide students with in-depth knowledge of the historical origins, philosophical and theoretical foundations, methodological principles and applications of a grounded theory qualitative research approach. Students will explore types of research problems addressed, specification of the purpose statement and research questions, sampling, data collection and analysis strategies, establishing credibility and trustworthiness, and procedures for reporting a grounded theory study. The course will provide a structured field experience of designing and conducting a small-scale grounded theory study. The use of qualitative research software NVivo for data organization, management and analysis will be emphasized.

NRM 785. Qualitative Research: Analysis and Interpretation. 3 Hours.

The course will provide students with applied knowledge of data analysis and interpretation in qualitative inquiry. Students will understand the nature of qualitative data and explore different approaches to qualitative data analysis. The course will provide a structured experience of learning how to analyze, interpret, display and report qualitative data and results within five basic approaches to qualitative inquiry (narrative, case study, ethnography, grounded theory, and phenomenology). Students will develop basic skills in using qualitative research software NVivo for data organization, management and analysis.

NRM 786. Qualitative Research: Case Study and Ethnographic Approaches. 3 Hours.

The course will provide students with in-depth knowledge of the historical origins, philosophical and theoretical foundations, methodological principles and applications of case study and ethnographic qualitative research approaches. Students will explore types of research problems addressed, specification of the purpose statement and research questions, sampling data collection and analysis strategies, establishing credibility and trustworthiness, and procedures for reporting a case study and ethnography. The course will provide a structured field experience of designing and conducting a small-scale case study or an ethnographic study. The use of qualitative research software NVivo for date organization, management and analysis will be emphasized.

NRM 787. Qualitative Research: A Phenomenological Approach. 3 Hours.

The course will provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the historical origins, philosophical and theoretical foundations, methodological principles and applications of a phenomenological qualitative research approach. Students will explore types of research problems addressed, specification of the purpose statement and research questions, sampling, data collection and analysis strategies, establishing credibility and trustworthiness, and procedures for reporting a phenomenological study. The course will provide a structured field experience of designing and conducting a small scale phenomenological study. The use of qualitative research software NVivo for data organization, management and analysis will be emphasized.

NRM 798L. Research Immersion. 3-6 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide the student the opportunity to participte as a member of an established and funded research team. Research team members will mentor students taking part in relevant research experiences. Students will be expected to participate in various research activities including, but not limited to, research team meetings, consent of study participants, intervention implementation, data collection, data base management, data analysis, and manuscript preparation. Students will apply concepts and principles from research core courses in their research immersion experience. As part of an established funded research team, students will explore various research team roles and responsibilities. Additionally, students will take the opportunity to learn about and participate in various components of the UAB research enterprise. Through the research immersion experiences, students will learn about sources and mechanisms of research funding and strategies for dissemination of research findings. As appropriate, students will participate as a member of an established funded research team in preparation and dissemination of reports of research findings. Students will also have the opportunity to work with research team members in analysis, interpretation of findings and in the development manuscripts, research presentations and posters for dissemination.
Prerequisites: NRM 750 [Min Grade: B] and NRM 752 [Min Grade: B]

NST- NUR - Statistical Methods Courses

NST 758. Inferential Statistics I. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide an underpinning for the understanding of statistical methods and findings. Students will gain an understanding of common statistical models and applications of probability, sampling distributions, parametric and non-parametric one and two sample tests, confidence intervals, applications of analysis of two-way contingency table data, simple linear regression, and simple analysis of varience.
Prerequisites: NST 778 [Min Grade: B]

NST 772. Data Mining and Statistical Learning I. 3 Hours.

NST 772 is an elective course for PhD students. This is the first course in a two-course series that provides further exposition of advanced statistical analysis and data mining techniques for students interested in doing research that involves considerable quantitative analysis in their dissertation and/or future professional work.

NST 773. Data Mining/Stats Learning II. 3 Hours.

NST 773 is an elective course for PhD students. This is the second course in a two-course series that provides further exposition of advanced statistical analysis and data mining techniques for students interested in doing research that involves considerable quantitative analysis in their dissertation and/or future professional work.
Prerequisites: NST 772 [Min Grade: B] or NST 772 [Min Grade: B]

NST 775. Introduction to Statistical Software Packages: SPSS and SAS. 2 Hours.

Special emphasis of this laboratory course will be on the use of the statistical packages, SAS and SPSS, in the creation of the data files, data entry, manipulation of data, descriptive analysis and selected statistical techniques.

NST 776. Linear Models For Clinical Nursing Research. 3 Hours.

Linear Models For Clinical Nursing Research. This course is designed as a survey course on the application of advanced General Linear Model and related techniques in health care research. The course will focus on application to research questions of importance to nursing, with an emphasis on practice-related problems.

NST 777. Multivariate Statistical Methods For Clinical Nursing Research. 3 Hours.

Multivariate Methods For Clinical Nursing Research. This course is designed as a survey course on the application of multivariate techniques in health care research. The course will focus on application of multivariate statistical methods to nursing-related research questions, with emphasis on interpretation within clinical nursing research problems.

NST 778. Data Management. 2 Hours.

A hands-on exposure to data management with common statistical software packages, including concepts of types of variables, data entry and cleaning, importing and converting datasets, merging and concatenating datasets, sorting, sub-setting, and producing reports and descriptive statistics.

NST 779. Statistical Modeling I - Linear Models. 3 Hours.

This course is designed as a survey course on the application of General Linear Models and Logistic Regression, with emphasis on health-related problems. These techniques are covered in detail including appropriate diagnostic and remedial measures.
Prerequisites: NST 758 [Min Grade: B]

NST 780. Statistical Model II - Topics in Multivariate Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course will extend concepts introduced in NST 779: Statistical Modeling I - Linear Models into multivariate applications. This course is designed as a survey course on the application of common multivariate methods, with emphasis on health-related data.
Prerequisites: NST 779 [Min Grade: B]

NTC-Nursing - Teaching Courses

NTC 618L. Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization. 2 Hours.

The purpose of this course will be the study of specialty track specific topics. The focus of the course will be on providing foundational materials for specialized areas of advanced nursing practice. Emphasis is on exploring specific advanced nursing practice competencies.
Prerequisites: (NUR 606 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 606 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B])

NTC 650. Instructional Strategies For Teaching in Nursing. 3 Hours.

This course is required for students in the Teacher in Nursing Certificate program and maybe chosen as an elective course by other graduate students. The content is general and applicable to a variety of teaching situations and learners. The course is an introduction to a systematic approach to developing and implementing adult learning experiences. This course emphasizes the application of a systematic approach (assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating) to the design of an educational unit. The focus will be on assessing learning needs, identifying learning objectives, selection of resources, and development of teaching strategies for different learner populations.

NTC 652. Program and Curriculum Development. 3 Hours.

This course is a required for students in the Teaching Nursing Certificate program and may be chosen as an elective course by other graduate students. The content is general and applicable to course, educational program, and/or curriculum development. The course is an introduction to the educational development process. This course emphasizes the basic components of program/curriculum development, philosophy, goals, planning learning experiences, implementing learning experiences, and evaluation of the curriculum or an educational program. The focus is on an understanding of program/curriculum determinants (learning, knowledge, man, society) and their impact on curriculum and educational program planning. The impact of philosophy, organizing framework, goals, learning experiences, and evaluation on curricular and program design and development will be discussed.

NTC 654. Evaluation of Instruction in Nursing. 3 Hours.

This course is a required for students in the Teacher in Nursing Certificate program and may be chosen as an elective course by other graduate students. The content is general and applicable to a variety of health related educational settings and learners. This course is an introduction to educational testing and measurement, teaching effectiveness, and clinical performance appraisal. This course provides an overview of evaluation techniques that enable nurses to plan and implement a variety of education related evaluation approaches, including test construction, item analysis, teaching effectiveness, and clinical performance appraisals. Emphasis will be placed on classroom and clinical evaluation of learning and on the use of technology for evaluation purposes. Prereq: Admission to Graduate Studies in the School of Nursing or as a non-degree post-baccalaureate student or by permission of instructor;knowledge of statistics and writing measurable educational ofjectives int eh domains of knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

NTC 656. WebCT for Instructors and Designers. 3 Hours.

Provides students with an advanced level of skill and knowledge of WebCT. Students are introduced to WebCT tools in a sequence that will permit development of a new course using WebCT as a learning management system.This course is offered only when sufficient interest by students is generated.

NTC 658. Simulation and Classroom Technologies for Student Learning. 2-3 Hours.

Designed to introduce graduate nursing students to the use of technology and simulation in nursing education. Students will be introduced to simulationas an educational strategy addressing issues related to the development implementation and evaluation of simulations. The use of technology available to enhance the educational environment will also be explored. Students will analyze advantages and disadvantages of various technologies and determine appropriate application of these technologies.

NTC 660. Foundations of Evidence-Based Nursing Education. 3 Hours.

Designed to prepare graduate nursing students to understand the concepts fundamental to nursing education. Students will be expected to analyze the effects of student and faculty diversity, legal and ethical issues, evidence-based practice on nursing education.

NTC 683L. Teaching Practicum in Nursing. 1-3 Hour.

This course is a required practicum for students in the Teacher in Nursing Certificate program and may be taken as an elective course by other graduate students who are concurrently enrolled in one or more NTC courses. The practicum provides an opportunity for students to concurrently or retrospectively implement the knowledge and skills acquired in NTC 650, NTC 652, and NTC 654 to selected teaching (classroom and clinical) situations. This course provides opportunities for students to integrate previously or concurrently acquired knowledge concerning teaching, curriculum, and/or evaluation into selected classroom and clinical situations. This practicum course allows students to assume limited responsibilities in classroom and clinical teaching while under the guidance of an instructor and/or preceptor. Students will be expected to meet all the course objectives upon completion of the three credit hour practicum. The practicum should involve both didactic and clinical teaching.Students arrange their own clinical sites with assistance/approval from clinical faculty. Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Studies in the School of Nursing or as a non-degree post-baccalaureate student. Prerequisite: NTC 650, NTC 652, and NTC 654.
Prerequisites: (NTC 650 [Min Grade: C] and NTC 652 [Min Grade: C] and NTC 654 [Min Grade: C]) or (NTC 650 [Min Grade: C] and NTC 652 [Min Grade: C] and NTC 654 [Min Grade: C])

NTC 692L. Residency: Nurse Educator. 3-6 Hours.

A comprehensive examination is given during this residency course. Failure to pass the comprehensive examination will delay graduation. Students arrange their own clinical sites with assistance/approval from clinical faculty. Prerequisite: NTC 650, NTC 652 and NTC 654.
Prerequisites: (NTC 650 [Min Grade: B] or NTC 650 [Min Grade: B]) and (NTC 652 [Min Grade: B] or NTC 652 [Min Grade: B]) and (NTC 654 [Min Grade: B] or NTC 654 [Min Grade: B])

NTC 760. Transitions to Academic Nursing Education. 3 Hours.

This course provides content relevant to the role of the nurse educator in an academic setting. The course includes information on nurse educator competencies, trends in higher education, the nature of our students in the 21st century, and strategies for building a successful nurse-educator career, including building collegial relationships and integrating the teaching, research, and service missions of the university into one position. This course may be included in a program of study as an elective, or taken as a non-degree student. NTC 760 may also be taken by students in the Nurse Educator track in the MSN program.

NUR-Nursing Courses

NUR 501. Foundations of Professional Nursing. 4 Hours.

This course focuses on the practice of professional nursing as an evidence-based, goal-directed activity for assisting patients to achieve optimal health by meeting basic human needs, providing holistic care, and engaging in health promotion. Concepts of communication, interpersonal relationships, and nursing process as clinical decision-making strategies are introduced. Chronic and long-term internal and external environmental variables that affect the health of adults are explored. The professional roles of caregiver and advocate are developed in diverse learning experiences.

NUR 502L. Foundations of Clinical Practice. 3 Hours.

In this practicum component of Foundations of Professional Nursing, students are guided in the application of content studied in the theoretical portion of the course. Competencies needed by the nurse generalist in the care of adult patients are introduced and practiced. Critical thinking and clinical decision-making skills utilized by the nurse caregiver are emphasized in diverse health care settings.

NUR 503. Nursing Care of Older Adults. 3 Hours.

NUR 503 focuses on the unique needs of older adult patients who require nursing care in a variety of healthcare settings. The older adult as a heterogeneous, holistic person is emphasized in light of current and future health care needs. Concepts of healthy aging and care in the preventive, restorative, acute, and chronic domains are explored. The professional role of the nurse as advocate is developed in diverse learning activities.Prerequisite: NUR 505, NUR 506L, ,NUR 515 and NUR 516L. Corequisite: NUR 507, NUR 508L, NUR 509, NUR 510L, NUR 517 and NUR 518L.
Prerequisites: NUR 513 [Min Grade: C] and NUR 505 [Min Grade: C] and NUR 506L [Min Grade: P]

NUR 504L. Concepts and Skills for Professional Nursing. 2 Hours.

NUR 504L provides basic nursing skills that will form the foundation for more complex knowledge and skills in subsequent nursing courses. Current nursing trends, legal, ethical (e.g., confidentiality, documentation), quality, safety, and health concepts are reinforced throughout the course. The role of caregiver is presented as an integral part of the health care team. Learning experiences occur in the nursing skills laboratory. Although knowledge and skills in this course are focused on the adult population, many of the concepts are transferable to care of patients across the lifespan. Admission to the School of Nursing is required.

NUR 505. Nursing Care of Adults. 4 Hours.

This course focuses on patients across the adult lifespan who require nursing care in chronic and acute health care settings. Internal and external environmental variables that have implications for interventions that promote risk reduction and health are examined. Emphasis is placed on evidence-based clinical decision-making in promoting health, meeting physiological needs, and providing holistic care during illness and at end of life. The professional roles of the nurse are further developed in increasingly complex learning experiences.

NUR 506L. Clinical Practice With Adult Patients. 4 Hours.

In this practicum, students apply content learned in the companion theory course, Nursing Care of Adults. Competencies needed by the nurse generalist in the care of adult patients are developed in increasingly complex learning experiences. Critical thinking, clinical decision-making, and leadership skills utilized by the nurse caregiver in a variety of health care settings are emphasized.

NUR 507. Promoting Healthy Childbearing and Childrearing Families. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the practice of professional nursing as an evidence-based, goal-directed activity for assisting childbearing and childrearing families to achieve optimal health by meeting basic human needs, providing holistic care, and engaging in health promotion. Concepts of communication, interpersonal relationships, and nursing process as a clinical decision-making strategy are reinforced. Chronic and acute internal and external environmental variables that affect the health of women during pregnancy, neonates, children, and adolescents are explored. The professional roles of caregiver and educator are developed in diverse learning experiences.

NUR 508L. Clinical Practice with Childbearing and Childrearing Families. 3 Hours.

In this practicum, students apply content learned in the companion theory course, Promoting Healthy Childbearing and Childrearing Families. Competencies needed by the nurse generalist in the care of childbearing and childrearing families are developed in increasingly complex learning experiences. Critical thinking, clinical decision-making, and leadership skills utilized by the nurse caregiver in primary and secondary healthcare settings are emphasized.

NUR 509. Nursing in Communities. 2 Hours.

In this theory course, students will analyze theories, processes, issues, demographic data, and epidemiological trends that affect population aggregates within communities. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge of professional roles to promote nursing care focused on illness and injury prevention, health promotion, health maintenance, health education and coordination of care for aggregate groups in diverse community settings.

NUR 510L. Clinical Practice in Communities. 2 Hours.

In this practicum course, students will apply community and public health concepts in the care of individuals, families, groups, and communities in diverse clinical settings. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge of professional roles to promote nursing care focused on illness and injury prevention, health promotion, health maintenance, health education and coordination of care for aggregation groups in diverse community settings.

NUR 512. Pathophysiology for the Advanced Generalist. 3 Hours.

NUR 512 is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to build upon existing knowledge of basic physiology. Emphasis is placed on the use of critical thinking to apply physiologic principles in explaining adaptations to pathogenic changes in the systems discussed. Admission to the School of Nursing is required. Corequisite: NUR 501, NUR 502L, NUR 504L, NUR 513 and NUR 514L.

NUR 513. Pharmacology and Therapeutics for the Advanced Generalist. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the analysis and utilization of principles of pharmacology, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics for the purpose of planning, implementing and evaluating therapeutic pharmacological interventions. The unique characteristics of special populations related to therapeutic needs, as well as drug absorption, metabolism and excretion are defined. Corequisite: NUR 501, NUR 502L, NUR 504L, NUR 512 and NUR 514L.

NUR 514L. Health Assessment for the Advanced Generalist. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the advanced generalist nursing student with the skills and knowledge to support critical thinking and diagnostic reasoning while conducting health assessments and planning nursing care for holistic, adaptive human beings across the lifespan. The following elements are integrated into the course: critical thinking, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity, and social issues.

NUR 515. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing. 2 Hours.

Content in this course will emphasize communication and therapeutic nursing interventions for patients experiencing mental disorders. The course focuses on the use of critical thinking and clinical decision-making skills in the promotion, maintenance and restoration of optimum mental health of individuals and families. Emphasis is placed on the independent and collaborative roles of nursing in identifying risk factors for mental disorders, assessing mental health status, and designing and implementing psychobiological and psychosocial interventions associated with expected therapeutic outcomes.

NUR 516L. Clinical Practice in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing. 2 Hours.

This clinical course focuses on promotion, maintenance, and restoration of mental health of individuals and families. Clinical experiences provide students with opportunities to utilize skills in the therapeutic use of self, critical thinking, and nursing process with patients in psychiatric mental health clinical settings.

NUR 517. Leadership in Professional Nursing. 4 Hours.

This course focuses on leadership and management theories and models, resource allocation and management, delegation, conflict resolution, legal implications of practice, managed care, evaluation of practice, continuous quality improvement, healthcare systems, and contemporary issues in the workplace. Students assimilate the above information to use as a basis for practicing the leadership role in the companion residency course.
Prerequisites: NUR 505 [Min Grade: C] and NUR 506L [Min Grade: P] and NUR 515 [Min Grade: C] and NUR 516L [Min Grade: P]

NUR 518L. Synthesis Practicum in Nursing. 4 Hours.

This course focuses on direct and indirect clinical performance in the areas of nursing process and leadership, evidence-based practice, and the demonstration of professional nursing role behavior as the transition is made from student role to a practicing nurse professional.
Prerequisites: NUR 505 [Min Grade: C] and NUR 506L [Min Grade: P] and NUR 515 [Min Grade: C] and NUR 516L [Min Grade: P]

NUR 530. Pharmacology and Disease Process for the Advanced Generalist I. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce pathophysiological and pharmacokinetic concepts and processes. The course emphasizes the application of principles of pathophysiology and pharmacotherapies related to homeostasis and regulation, oxygenation, protection and movement.

NUR 531. Pharm & Disease Pro Adv Gen II. 3 Hours.

Emphasis is on the application of principles of pathophysiology and pharmacotherapies to the concepts of homeostasis and regulation, oxygenation, protection and movement, and reproduction.

NUR 533. Spirituality in Health Care. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on spirituality, including a greater understanding of different spiritual traditions, personal spiritual development, and the incorporation of spirituality into professional practice. The content will examine spirituality and health from the perspective of the major world religions and spiritual practices. The impact of spirituality on illness and healing will be examined. Spiritual care, including assessment and selected interventions, legal and ethical issues will be discussed with respect to individuals and families of varying developmental stages, socio-cultural backgrounds, and life situations. Students will be challenged to explore their own spirituality and its impact on their personal and professional lives. A foundation in computer utilization and accessing resources through use of the internet is strongly recommended.

NUR 534. Living With Loss. 3 Hours.

This course includes loss, grief, body-image changes, loss due to chronic conditions, and loss of life in childhood and adulthood explored from the viewpoint of a health-care professional.

NUR 549. Synthesis Review Course. 1 Hour.

The purpose of this course is to prepare the student to successfully complete the NCLEX examination. The course focuses on all professional nursing roles. Emphasis is on the synthesis of knowledge from all nursing courses as well as humanities, and the social, behavioral, and natural sciences.

NUR 557. Leadership and Management in Professional Nursing for RNs. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on leadership and management theories and models, resource allocation and management, delegation, conflict resolution, legal implications of practice, managed care, evaluation of practice, continuous quality improvement, healthcare systems, and contemporary issues in the workplace. Emphasis is placed on the integration of all professional role behaviors, application of research, and leadership/management skills. For students enrolled in 557, this course is a transition course into the RN-MSN option for baccalaureate degree RN Mobility students. Evaluation methods for the course will be different from those used for students enrolled in NUR 457.
Prerequisites: NUR 574 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently) and NUR 597 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

NUR 574. Transition to Professional Nursing Practice for RNs. 4 Hours.

Using an online format, this course is designed to enhance the registered nurse's knowledge of the role of the professional nurse in meeting the healthier needs of society. Historical, legal, political, and ethical issues affecting the profession will be examined. The relationship between selected issues, trends, and theories and professional nursing practice will be analyzed. Students will examine behaviors related to various roles of the professional nurse, including caregiver, teacher, advocate, research consumer, and counselor. Additionally, this course addresses communication skills necessary to a professional nurse including writing and computer literacy. For students enrolled in NUR 574, this course is a transition course into the RN-MSN option for post-baccalaureate degree RN Mobility students.

NUR 587. Supplemental Academic Course for Support (SACS). 1-3 Hour.

The purpose of this distance-accessible course is to introduce a structured format for students to review nursing concepts and processes related to a specific patient population. The course focuses on the role of the nurse as caregiver. Emphasis is on test-taking strategies and the review of didactic content to strengthen the student's knowledge base.

NUR 597. Community and Public Health Nursing for RNs. 4 Hours.

This course is designed for RN students to build on existing clinical expertise and knowledge, broaden exposure to different roles of the professional nurse in the areas of community and public health, and apply knowledge learned throughout the BSN curriculum to meet the needs of population aggregates. Emphasis is on professional nurse role development focused on illness and injury prevention, health promotion, health education, public health preparedness and advocacy for population aggregates across the life span. For students enrolled in NUR 597, this course is a transition course into the RN-MSN option for post-baccalaureate degree RN Mobility students.
Prerequisites: NUR 574 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

NUR 600. Research and Statistics for Advanced Practice. 4 Hours.

This course is designed to prepare master¿s students with the research knowledge and skills to (1) use current research findings to improve practice, (2) use the process of research to examine questions identified in nursing practice, and (3) participate in collaborative research. This course will include integration of the following elements: critical thinking, current technologies for data management and statistical analysis, scholarly writing, scientific integrity and ethics and human diversity. Statistical procedures examined will include univariate and bivariate statistics, parametric and nonparametic procedures and selected epidemiological measures. Prerequisite: Under-graduate statistics.
Prerequisites: NUST A or MA 180 [Min Grade: C] or PY 214 [Min Grade: C] or MA 480 [Min Grade: C] or QM 214 [Min Grade: C] or JS 120 [Min Grade: C] or (NUR 517 [Min Grade: C] and NUR 518L [Min Grade: P])

NUR 601. Role Development for Advanced Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to prepare graduate nursing students to understand the concepts of advanced nursing practice and advanced practice nursing. Students will be expected to differentiate between advanced nursing practice and the practice of other nurses and health care providers. Concepts from a variety of models and theories from nursing and other disciplines will be discussed, and examples of how these concepts may be applied in advanced nursing practice will be offered. The concept of cultural competence will be explored as will its application when interacting with people from diverse ethnic and racial groups.

NUR 602. Issues Affecting Advanced Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

This course prepares graduate nursing students to incorporate management and leadership skills in the practice arena. The health care environment and culture, selected organizational, economic, and financial theories, strategic planning, change theory, health care marketing and information and quality management will be explored in the context of contemporary issues such as bioterrorism and health care policy and regulation. This course will also include integration of the following elements: critical thinking, scholarly writing, research, theory evaluation and application, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity and social issues.

NUR 603. Primary Health Care in Low Resource Countries. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for the Advanced Health Care Provider who plans to deliver primary health care in countries considered to be low resource areas as designated by the World Health Organization. These students will study the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of infectious and parasitic diseases throughout the global community. In addition, nutritional deficiencies and obstetric problems will be reviewed. Emphasis will be placed on those health problems which are not common in high resource countries. Implementation of the World Health Organization's Integrated Management standards will be included in the study of each disease as they apply to adults adolescents, and children. Potential personal safety issues for world travelers, and information designed to alleviate these issues will be studied. Each student will focus on a specific country or global area for a more in-depth learning experience.

NUR 604. Leadership in Advanced Nursing Practice Roles. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the foundation for an in-depth understanding of advanced nursing practice leadership. The focus of the course is on the principles and standards of advanced nursing practice. The emphasis of the course is on inter-professional collaboration in healthcare.

NUR 605. Research for Evidence-Based Practice. 3 Hours.

This core course is designed to prepare master¿s nursing students with the research knowledge and skills to (1) use current research findings to improve practice, (2) use the process of research to examine questions identified in one's own nursing practice, (3) develop an evidence-based advanced nursing practice, and (4) contribute to expansion of nursing's knowledge base. This course will also include integration of the following elements and/or activities: critical thinking, informatics, current technologies for data management and statistical analysis, collaboration, scholarly writing, preparing/giving professional presentations, theory evaluation and application, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity, and social issues. The advanced-practice role emphasis of this course is that of investigator, research collaborator, and content expert in a selected practice field. A graduate course in inferential statistics and a solid foundation in computer utilization and accessing scientific sources by internet is required.

NUR 606. Translating Evidence into Practice. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to evaluate and interpret evidence that supports application in practice. The focus of the course will be on the management and analysis of health care evidence and translation for practice. The emphasis of the course will be on evidence-based practice, safety and quality, informatics, emerging technologies, data management, applied statistics, evaluation and trend analysis.
Prerequisites: (NUR 604 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 604 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 737 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 612 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 612 [Min Grade: B]) and MA 180 [Min Grade: C] or MA 480 [Min Grade: C] or PY 214 [Min Grade: C] or PY 216 [Min Grade: C] or QM 214 [Min Grade: C] or JS 120 [Min Grade: C] or (NUR 517 [Min Grade: C] and NUR 518L [Min Grade: C])

NUR 607. Interprofessional Global Health Service Learning I. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with an opportunity to apply principles of interprofessional collaboration, community partnerships,and global health in the development of a plan to address a global health problem in collaboration with a community partner. Students apply concepts and theories related to global health, interprofessional collaboration, team building, community partnerships, and the ecological framework developing a plan to address a specific global health problem with a community partner. The course focuses on planning a service learning project that will benefit a community partner. The project is planned and carried through by an interprofessional team. The course is primarily experiential, with students' time spent on planning the project and learning leadership and project planning skills.

NUR 608. Interprofessional Collaboration (IPC) and Community Partnerships in Global Health. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with an understanding of principles of interprofessional collaboration and community partnerships that, together with key social and economic concepts of global health, enables them to participate in developing and implementing sustainable global health projects in collaboration with local and international community partners. Working in interdisciplinary teams, students apply concepts and theories related to global health, interprofessional collaboration, team building, community partnerships, and the socioecological framework to develop a plan to address a specific global health problem with a community partner.

NUR 609. Radiology for Advanced Practice. 3 Hours.

This course provides nurse practitioners and other mid-level providers with an introduction to radiography. The course provides the novice the opportunity to incorporate radiographic studies into working through a differential diagnosis. The course utilizes various common radiographic techniques including plain films, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

NUR 610. Health Care Systems for Advanced Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students an opportunity to evaluate health care systems that influence advanced nursing practice. The focus of the course is on organizational theories of business practice and health care economics. The emphasis of the course is on the incorporation of business, legal, political, and organizational concepts in advanced nursing practice.
Prerequisites: NUR 606 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 613 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently)

NUR 611. Management of Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 and 2). 3 Hours.

This course will provide a multi-disciplinary framework for the identification of those at risk or who already possess the metabolic syndrome, frank type 2 diabetes mellitus and its complications. A variety of management strategies will be presented from the perspectives of multiple healthcare disciplines. The perspectives of the multi-disciplinary team in assisting persons to achieve self-care goals are an important theme throughout this course as are the current controversies, issues and research findings underlying present approaches to treatment and patient/family education.

NUR 612. Advanced Pathophysiology. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to build upon existing knowledge of basic physiology and pathophysiology. Emphasis is placed on the use of critical thinking to apply physiologic principles in explaining adaptations to pathogenic changes in the systems discussed.

NUR 613. Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on analysis and utilization of principles of pharmacology and pharmacokinetics for the purpose of planning, implementing, and evaluating therapeutics pharmacological interventions. The unique characteristics of special populations related to therapeutic needs, as well as drug absorption, metabolism, and excretion, are defined.

NUR 614. Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning for Advanced Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with an advanced level of skill and knowledge in critical thinking and diagnostic reasoning for conducting health assessments and planning care for holistic, adaptive human beings. The following elements are integrated into the course: professional presentations, critical thinking, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity, and social issues.

NUR 614L. Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning for Advanced Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with an advanced level of skill and knowledge in critical thinking and diagnostic reasoning for conducting health assessments and planning care for holistic, adaptive human beings. The following elements are integrated into the course: professional presentations, critical thinking, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity, and social issues.Pre or corequisite: NUR 612.
Prerequisites: NUR 612 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently) or NUR 612 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently)

NUR 615. Sexuality Issues in Health and Illness: A Lifespan Approach. 3 Hours.

This course includes the ethical, social, biological, and psychological concepts of human sexuality.

NUR 616L. Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization. 2 Hours.

The purpose of this course will be the study of specialty track specific topics. The focus of the course will be on providing foundational materials for specialized areas of advanced nursing practice. Emphasis is on exploring specific advanced nursing practice competencies.
Prerequisites: (NUR 606 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 606 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B])

NUR 617. Interprofessional Ethical Issues in Clinical Genetics. 2 Hours.

This course will incorporate basic knowledge of clinical genetics and build knowledge of ethical and legal issues related to genetics. The course focuses on interprofessional collaboration and team development of solutions and approaches for cases from clinical practice. Examination of clinical genetic competencies according to professional standards is highlighted.

NUR 618L. Clinical Diagnostic Reasoning. 4 Hours.

A modular organ system approach utilizing case studies will be used to pull together basic principles from pathophysiology, pharmacology and physical/health assessment to develop clinical diagnostic reasoning skills necessary for the nurse practitioner. This course is designed to provide students with an advanced level of skill and knowledge in critical thinking and diagnostic reasoning to apply in the subsequent clinical nursing courses. Students will utilize the knowledge and skills learned in NUR 618QL as they diagnose and manage the care of clients with acute, chronic, and episodic health problems throughout the life span.

NUR 619. Health Issues in Culturally Diverse Populations in the United States. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an overview of health issues and health disparities confronting culturally diverse populations in the United States. The course also addresses genetic, cultural, historical and demographic factors that influence these health issues and disparities, implications for culturally effective health care, and for development of health policy.

NUR 620. Social Responsibility in Global Health. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with an understanding of key social and economic concepts of global health that, together with an understanding of interprofessional collaboration and community partnerships, will enable them to participate in developing and implementing sustainable global health projects in collaboration with local and international community partners. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students who are enrolled in two co-requisite courses that are requirements for students participating in the interprofessional global health service learning program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Working in interdisciplinary teams, students apply concepts and theories related to global health, interprofessional collaboration, team building, community partnerships, and the socioecological framework to develop a plan to address a specific global health problem with a community partner.

NUR 630. Principles of Epidemiology. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to provide the advanced practice nurse with a working knowledge of epidemiology and biostatistics as they relate to nursing practice. Additionally, phenomena along the wellness continuum will be discussed. The Natural History of Disease Model will be applied to the study of health and illness in human populations.
Prerequisites: NUR 600 [Min Grade: C]

NUR 633. Growth and Development. 3 Hours.

The content of this course is centered on major theories of development including physiological, psychoanalytic, social, stimulus-response, cognitive and moral. Current areas and findings of research are investigated and research designs and methods are critiqued. Self-selected in depth studies are made and shared. Contributions of the study of development to the functional practice of nursing are demonstrated.

NUR 634. Perspectives in Global Health Leadership. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of global aspects of health care leadership. The course will focus on identification of characteristics of global health care leaders, leadership theories, and strategies to develop one's own personal leadership abilities. The course will provide students with a unique opportunity to interact with health care leaders from countries around the world, and develop projects related to an aspect of global health care leadership of interest to each student.

NUR 637. Genetic Principles and Issues. 3 Hours.

NUR 639. Complementary Therapies and Integrative Hlth Care. 3 Hours.

The focus of this elective course is on holistic nursing utilizing complementary and alternative therapies and integrative health care as an emerging paradigm in the health care arena. This course will examine both the concepts of integrative health care and major complementary therapies, including theoretical basis and research support, actions, uses, contraindications, and side effects. The socio-cultural, economic, legal and ethical issues associated with complementary therapies will be included as well as standards for practice and available resources. Students will be encouraged to explore ways in which they can counsel patients regarding complementary therapies as well as potential inclusion of the therapies in their own practice.

NUR 641. Herbals and Nutritional Supplements. 3 Hours.

NUR 642. Health Education and Social Welfare in a Global Community. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a cross-cultural experience in which they will spend time in a selected global community while learning about health, educational and social welfare issues. Students will participate in pre-trip seminar in Birmingham or on-line prior to travel. The seminar(s) will focus on an overview of the course, a model of assessing culture and an overview of selected global community's culture. Students will also participate in seminars on a variety of health, education and social welfare topics provided by the course instructor and by resource persons from the selected global community.

NUR 643. Introduction to Nursing Informatics. 3 Hours.

The organizing framework for this course is based on the three concepts that form the theoretical basis of nursing informatics, data, information and knowledge. Students will explore how data can be organized into information for the generation of knowledge through the design, selection and implementation of clinical information systems. The course has two sections: theory and laboratory. The theoretical content will focus on the collection, organization, analysis and dissemination of information in nursing and healthcare. Laboratory work will familiarize the student with computer applications designed to manage nursing and healthcare information.

NUR 644. Principles of Developmental Care Newborn Infants. 3 Hours.

Provides students with an overview of principles of individualized developmental care for newborns and infants. The course also addresses principles of family-centered care as a key component of developmental care. Students review concepts and theories related to molecular biology, fetal, infant and family development, psychology and sociology in assessing and planning care to promote optimal development of high risk infants and families. Students explore roles of nurses and other interdisciplinary team members in developmental care are assessed, and develop plans to promote organizational change in order to incorporate developmental care principles in a clinical setting.

NUR 645. Sleep Across the Lifespan I. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with knowledge and skills required for: 1) screening, diagnosing, and treatment of adults (age 13 and beyond) with sleep disturbances and disorders, 2) understanding the articulation between physiologic, social, cultural, and environmental influences on sleep, sleep disturbances, and sleep disorders, 3) critical analysis of sleep, sleep disturbances and sleep disorders and how they relate to public policy, and law, 4) strategies for health promotion related to sleep, and 5) views of knowledge development, and scientific progress in sleep disturbances and disorders among diverse groups of adults.

NUR 667. Psychosocial Aspects of Evidence-Based Practice in Chronic Illness. 3 Hours.

This course is organized around the concepts of evidence-based practice, psychosocial nursing and chronic illness. The chronic illness trajectory across the individual s and family s life span and the needs of vulnerable populations with attention to disparity of care and cultural competence of involved health care providers is included. This course is designed to provide the undergraduate student with the basic knowledge and skills needed to provide evidence-based interventions and the graduate student to analyze needs for development of interventions to address the psychosocial needs of those with chronic illness.

NUR 670. Occupational Health Management Principles. 1 Hour.

This course provides the student with a working knowledge of management topics specific to planning, directing, and evaluating occupational health services.

NUR 671. Principles and Practice of Occupational Toxicology and Disease. 4 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to build upon existing knowledge of physiology and pathophysiology. Emphasis is placed on the use of critical thinking to assess risk, determine effects, and plan strategies to minimize effects of toxicant exposure and occupational diseases in worker populations.

NUR 674L. Evaluation and Management of Occupational Health and Safety Programs. 1,2 Hour.

The aim of NUR 674QL is to provide the occupational health student with a working knowledge of program planning and managerial processes in occupational settings. This graduate course is designed to give the master¿s student an opportunity to actively explore factors which influence the delivery of occupational health and safety services and to critically evaluate the role functions of managers of those services. Decision-making processes related to financial management and resource allocation, along with management of health and safety programs, will be emphasized. Planning for and implementing a worksite occupational health and safety intervention in industry at the aggregate level will be a major part of the course.

NUR 686. Honors Seminar III: Project Implementation. 3 Hours.

This required course for Honors Program students provides opportunities for implementation of an innovatie evidence-based practice strategy which integrates human responses to health and illness and professional practice roles. Course content includes clinical or research experiences in innovative practice approaches, discussions of implications for evidence-based practice and professional nursing roles, and guidelines for preparation of manuscript and presentations. Professional expectations include dissemination of findings through a public forum and collaboration with agencies for integration of findings into practice.

NUR 690. Independent Study in Nursing. 1-6 Hour.

Course allows concentration on a selected topic of interest relevant to the Program of Studies.

NUR 691. Independent Study in Clinical Nursing. 1-6 Hour.

Course provides for clinical learning activities which are in addition to the activities in the regular clinical sequence of a given option. Students apply or test out theories and knowledge obtained in established or independent study theory courses.

NUR 692. Clinical Practicum in Genetics. 1-2 Hour.

Course provides students with the opportunity to apply concepts related to Genetic Principles and Issues in a clinical practicum experience. Students will work with an approved preceptor in a clinical site that provides genetic services to prenatal clients and in a site that serves children with known or suspected genetic disorders. Students will conduct genetic assessments, apply the nursing process to develop culturally-appropriate and ethical plans of care, participate as a member of an interdisciplinary team and use genetic counseling principles in interactions with families and children who have known or suspected genetic problems. Students will also implement an educational program related to genetics for nurses in a clinical or community setting.

NUR 697. Department of Transportation Medical Examiner Certification Review Course. 1 Hour.

The purposes of this course are to: (1) introduce and asssist the student to gain mastery of the regulations and guidelines set forth by the U.S. Department of Transportation related to medical fitness for duty determination of commercial motor vehicle drivers; and (2) provide the student with an opportunity to demonstrate competency in conducting a DOT medical examination in the laboratory setting.

NUR 698. Research Practicum. 1-2 Hour.

This graduate course is designed to give the master¿s nursing student an opportunity to actively participate in the research process. This practicum course allows students to assume limited responsibilities in the development, execution, and/or dissemination of a research study by performing selected roles within the research team. It is acknowledged that given the limited time allotted to the practicum, students may only have the opportunity to participate in one phase of a study due to the extended period usually required to initiate and conduct a study, or to compile the data to present results to target audiences. This course may include integration of the a wide range of experiences such as: using informatics, data management, using statistical analysis software programs, scholarly writing, and preparing or giving presentations to professional or lay audiences. The advanced practice role emphasis of this course is that of investigator and research collaborator.

NUR 699. Thesis Research. 1-4 Hour.

The thesis is the result of original research work undertaken by the student and the interpretation of those results. The document should also demonstrate the candidates¿ acquaintance with the literature of the field and with proper selection and execution of research methodology. The physical form of the thesis must comply with published departmental and university guidelines for theses and dissertations. The student works under the guidance of a major professor with a committee of faculty members. However, the obligations of research, accuracy, writing, and quality rest with the student. A public defense of this work is expected. A minimum of four hours of credit is required for completion of thesis hours, although a variable number of hours may be taken per term as necessary. The advanced practice role emphasis of this course is that of investigator, research collaborator, and author.
Prerequisites: GAC M

NUR 700. Clinical Data Management and Analysis. 3 Hours.

This required course provides students with the knowledge base to understand, collect, manage, and measure clinical data. Students will explore data collection and management processes, levels of measurement, basic statistics, and measurement for improvement in order to effectively use clinical data. Data entry exercises employed through analytical tools and statistical software packages will allow the students to practice and apply the basic data management and analysis skills needed for the evaluation of clinical data and evidence-based practice.

NUR 701. Writing for Publication. 3 Hours.

This course concerns the development of skills in writing, editing, and preparing manuscripts for publication from initial idea to submission of a publishable manuscript. The course emphasizes a writing process that encourages productivity and collegial peer review. Legal and ethical aspects of authorship prepare students for responsible practices expected of scholars. Students should have mastered basic writing skills, e.g., grammar, syntax, and computer skills, prior to enrolling in this course.

NUR 706. Theory Building in Nursing. 4 Hours.

This course focuses on the nature of knowledge in practice disciplines with an emphasis on philosphy of science as an underpinning for knowledge development and research; approaches to theory, statement, and conceptual development, and criteria for evaluation of theory. Students examine a variety of sources regarding the nature and modes of theory, model, and concept development in practice disciplines. They select research literature in their substantive area for isolation of concepts, theories, and research contexts to assess congruence between theoretical and operational systems, and suggest ways to remedy problems. They interpret research reports in their substantive area from a theory develpment and testing perspective, providing a visual schematic representation of their analysis. Through group interation, they formulate conclusions about the state of the art and forecast directions for theory development as a basis for practice. Each student develops a personal philosophy of science. Admission to PhD program in nursing or permission of instructor.

NUR 729. Evidence-Based Practice Design and Translation. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with models for evidence-based practice (EBP) design and improvement translation. Students learn to formulate clinical questions in answerable format, and search for and identify best research evidence. The focus of the course is to evaluate and critically appraise evidence for rigor and applicability to the clinical problem and is designed to improve clinical outcomes. Students will translate the evidence into practice environments for safe, high-quality care. Students will gain access to information that will support optimal clinical decision-making. Improvement translation sciences will also be introduced.
Prerequisites: NUR 700 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 700 [Min Grade: B]

NUR 730. Current Topics in Nursing. 1-3 Hour.

A special topic seminar with variable focus.

NUR 731. Philosophical, Theoretical, and Conceptual Foundations for Advanced Practice Nursing. 3 Hours.

This required core course in the Doctorate of Nursing Practice program provides an understanding of the use of theory and conceptual foundation to guide the complexity of specialty nursing practice at the doctoral level. The content is derived from the philosophical and scientific underpinnings of nursing, natural, and psycho-social sciences.(on-line) (Essential I).
Prerequisites: NUR 701 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 701 [Min Grade: B]

NUR 732. Design and Statistical Methods for Advanced Practice Nursing. 3 Hours.

This required core course for the Doctorate of Nursing Practice program provides the student with the basis to search, retrieve, and manipulate statistical data. The focus of this course is on quantitative and qualitative methodologies, research design, and data analysis. The content provides essential knowledge for evaluation of research to guide evidence-based practice at the highest level. (Essential III).

NUR 733. Informatics for Advanced Practice Nursing. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the collection, organization, analysis, and dissemination of information in nursing and health care. Students are introduced to the specialty of nursing informatics, the information system life-cycle, telemedicine, and the use of technology to enhance nursing care delivery and patient safety. Also, students learn how to design, use, and manipulate large and small patient databases for the analysis of patient outcomes. (Essential IV).
Prerequisites: NUR 729 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 729 [Min Grade: B]

NUR 734L. Advanced Experiential Clinical Course. 1-6 Hour.

This course provides the opportunity for DNP students to demonstrate excellence in providing complex care and leadership in healthcare settings.

NUR 735. Population Health in Advanced Practice Nursing. 3 Hours.

This course for the Doctor of Nursing Practice program prepares the student to implement specialty population-based disease prevention and health promotion activities to achieve national and international goals of improving worldwide health status. The course focuses on a spectrum of issues affecting health, which include emerging infectious diseases, emergency preparedness, disparities in health and healthcare services, and the impact of behavior and lifestyle choices on health. 3 credit hours (Essentials V and VII).

NUR 736. Application of Best Practices. 3-4 Hours.

This course prepares the student to evaluate interdisciplinary clinical and health systems for best practices and outcomes in a specialty area. Students acquire the knowledge, skills and tools to support, promote, and implement evidence-based specialty practice in nursing and health care delivery systems to improve health outcomes. Emphasis is on the synthesis, critique, and application of evidence to support quality clinical and organizational practices.
Prerequisites: NUR 731 [Min Grade: C] and NUR 732 [Min Grade: C]

NUR 737. Interdisciplinary Leadership and Role Development for Practice Excellence. 3 Hours.

This course is a required core DNP course that focuses on organizational and systems leadership and knowledge and skills critical to role development in independent and inter- and intra-disciplinary practice. Content includes communication, conflict resolution, collaboration and negotiation, leadership, and team functioning to maximize success in the establishment of safe, effective patient-centered care in complex environments.

NUR 738L. Scholarly Project Development. 2-3 Hours.

NUR 738L is a 3-hour seminar designed to assist the student in selecting an area of interest within a practice specialization, and in demonstrating professional competencies related to that area of interest. The student will document previously acquired abilities and competencies in a professional portfolio. Students will participate in the seminar to obtain guidance, be involved in discussion, and receive peer suggestions about the portfolio and project plans.
Prerequisites: (NUR 729 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 729 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 743 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 743 [Min Grade: B])

NUR 739L. Scholarly Practice Project. 1-7 Hour.

This required course is the capstone clinical course in all advanced practice tracks. The student presents evidence of achievements and competencies in a professional portfolio. The practice residency is completed in a specialty area of the student's choice. One credit hour of each semester of the residency is devoted to classroom seminar. The seminar focuses on the aspects of the final practice project and interventions that promote health, prevent illness and disability, and alleviate health disparities. Small group sessions are formed for students who are at similar stages of completion of the course requirements. The final project is selected and planned by the student and the advisor, and is implemented during this course. The student completes the project, evaluates the outcomes, disseminates the findings, and makes a formal, scholarly presentation to faculty and peers. (Essentials I, VIII).
Prerequisites: NUR 738L [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently) or NUR 738L [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

NUR 740. Health Policy and Politics: Implications in Health Care. 3 Hours.

This required core course in the Doctor of Nursing Practice program focuses on the basic principles of health policy and the influence of the political process as a systematic approach to health care in the United States and internationally. The course prepares students to assume complex leadership roles in order to advance specialty practice and health. This course focuses on the unique challenges of engaging and influencing health care policy in the U.S. and internationally. It is designed to develop skills, techniques, and approaches to the critical analysis of health policy proposals, health policies, and related issues from the perspective of consumers, nursing, other health professions, and other stakeholders in policy and public forums. The health policy framework is analyzed from a governmental, institutional, and organizational perspective. (Essentials I, II, III and V).

NUR 741. Cancer Prevention and Control Training Program (CPCTP): Research Intensive. 2 Hours.

Grants process and proposal writing in healthcare research using NIH predoctoral and postdoctoral applications. Strategies for successful proposal preparation include the production of elements required in PHS-398 research grant proposal.

NUR 742. Program Evaluation and Methods. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to synthesize knowledge related to translational/implementation science models and strategies to improved health outcomes. The emphasis in the course is the use of program evaluation as a strategic planning tool to achieve positive changes in health status, to initiate quality improvement, to engage in risk anticipation, management and to facilitate organizational and system level changes.
Prerequisites: (NUR 700 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 700 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 729 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 729 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 743 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 743 [Min Grade: B])

NUR 743. Evidence-Based Practice Strategies. 3 Hours.

This course is a required core Doctor of Nursing Practice Program course, which expands on foundational evidence-based practice concepts to refine a problem statement and derive a searchable and answerable clinical question. Content includes conducting a systematic review of the literature to guide the selection of methods, strategies, tools and metrics needed to complete a successful scholarly project. The course also addresses targeted strategies for disseminating evidence associated with scholarly projects.
Prerequisites: NUR 729 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 731 [Min Grade: B]

NUR 744. Program Evaluation and Methods. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to synthesize knowledge related to translational/implementation science models and strategies to improve health outcomes. The emphasis in the course is the use of program evaluation as a strategic planning tool to achieve positive changes in health status, to initiate quality improvement, to engage in risk anticipation, management and to facilitate organizational and system level changes.
Prerequisites: NUR 700 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 729 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 743 [Min Grade: B]

NUR 750. Quantitative Research Methods. 3 Hours.

This course is a survey of quantitative research methods and the first required, research core course in the doctoral nursing program. The course is designed to prepare doctoral nursing students with the research knowledge and skills to: (1) use current research findings to improve practice, (2) use the process of research to examine questions identified in one's own nursing practice, and (3) contribute to expansion of nursing's knowledge base. This course will also include integration of the following elements and/or activities: critical thinking, synthesis of quantitative research literature, scholarly writing, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity, and social issues. The advanced practice role emphasis of this course is that of investigator, research collaborator, and content expert in a selected practice field. Students must have a solid foundation in computer utilization and accessing scientific sources by Internet.

NUR 751. Philosophical Foundations of Science. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the concept of truth, and scientific worldviews used to confirm or refute truth over the course of history and during specific periods of social and political contexts. The overall desired student outcome of students participating in the course is demonstrated skill in analysis and application of diverse approaches to knowledge development to research.

NUR 752. Responsible Conduct of Research: A Cross-Cultural Perspective. 2 Hours.

This course will examine a wide range of historical and modern treatises that have shaped ethical practice in the dominant western culture as well as medical ethical theories in other cultures. The course will emphasize comparing and contrasting various world views of ethical research practice from a cultural and global perspective. The content will focus on the pillars of liberal political theory which include respect for persons, autonomy, justice and rights-based codes. In addition, the expectations and regulations of Institutional Review Boards will be examined with an emphasis on developing effective strategies to anticipate procedural problems and expedite approval of student research applications. In addition, students will complete and provide proof of current completion of the UAB IRB training course (within 12 months) as an initial pass/fail learning activity. This course will also include integration of the following elements and/or activiities: critical thinking, informatics, collaboration, scholarly writing, preparing/giving professional presentations, theory evaluation and application, human diversity, cultural competence, global concerns and health disparity issues. The advanced role emphasis of this course is that of investigator, research collaborator, and content expert in a selected practice field.

NUR 753. Nursing as a Scientific Discipline. 2 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of the processes of knowledge development and contributions of nursing to scientific knowledge. The course focuses on multiple ways of knowing and strategies for expanding knowledge to meet changing societal needs. Students will have an opportunity to appraise different modes of inquiry that contribute to knowledge development as well as integrate different scientific perspectives into a trajectory of research within nursing and multidisciplinary contexts.

NUR 754. Issues in Leadership and Health Policy. 3 Hours.

This graduate core course is designed to prepare doctoral nursing students with adanced theory in health care leadership and analysis of health policy: (1) examine theories of leadershp behavior to improve the delivery and or provision of nursing care, (2) examine aspects of leadership in policy analysis and advocacy, (3) develop an evidence-based foundation for practice as a nursing leader and (4) contribute to the improvement of patient care across the health care continuum through leadership. This course will also include integration of the following elements and /or activities: critical thinking, informatics, current technologies for information retrieval and data management, collaboration, scholarly writing, preparing/giving professional presentations, theory evaluation and application, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity, cultural competence and health disparity issues. The advanced role emphasis of this course is that of research team leader, academic administrator, health policy advocate and content expert in a selected practice field. Admission to the Doctorate of Philosophy (PhD) Program of the School of Nursing.

NUR 755. Critical Analysis of Theories, Models, and Frameworks. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to identify the underlying concepts and theories that will serve as the basis of conducting research in a focused area. Through literature review and discussion students will challenge each other to link the most relevant theory(s) including physiological, behavioral, and other theories of health and illness to their developing research questions. Students will perform a concept analysis relevant to their proposed area of research focus in order to begin to understand the complexity and issues of measurement and testing that they will face as they undertake rigorous study.
Prerequisites: NUR 751 [Min Grade: B] and NUR 753 [Min Grade: B]

NUR 756. Applied Statistical Analysis Techniques. 4 Hours.

This required core course in the Doctor of Philosophy program is intended to provide the student with the basis to search, retrieve, and manipulate statistical data. It provides an underpinning for the understanding of research methods and findings, and supports clinical scholarship practice.

NUR 757. Health Services Research in Nursing. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce health services research to a nursing audience. Students will gain an understanding of the domains of health services research, to include organizational systems research, patient outcomes research, improvement science, and program evaluation through analyzing studies that seek to answer contemporary problems in our health care system, particularly as they apply to nursing aspects of patient care. They will have the opportunity to identify critical problems in health care delivery, pose research questions and hypotheses, explore existing and innovative indicators and sources of data, and develop skill in analyzing such data. Students will also develop an appreciation for the broad implications of health services research in nursing.

NUR 758. Research and Health Policy. 3 Hours.

This graduate core course is designed to prepare PhD nursing students for designing research and translating evidence so as to influence health policy. This course will include integration of the following elements and/or activities: critical thinking, informatics, current technologies for information retrieval and data management, collaboration, scholarly writing, preparing/giving professional presentations, theory evaluation and application, scientific integrity and ethics, human diversity, cultural competence and health disparity issues.

NUR 759. Writing the Career Development Grant Proposal. 1 Hour.

The purpose of this course is to prepare PhD students in the foundations of writing grants for external funding. The Course addresses the grants process and proposal writing in healthcare research using the NIH pre-doctoral application as a template. Strategies for successful proposal preparation including development of elements required in NIH research grant proposal are covered.
Prerequisites: NRM 750 [Min Grade: B](Can be taken Concurrently) and NRM 752 [Min Grade: B]

NUR 760. Scientific Dissemination. 1 Hour.

The purpose of this course is to provide the student an understanding of why dissemination is essential for scientific advancement, with particular emphasis on peer-reviewed journals. To accomplish this, students will be provided with the basic components of writing a peer-reviewed manuscript for publication. Students will be provided a framework for how to generate a detailed outline for a scientific manuscript. Topics to be addressed include but are not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, referencing guidelines (e.g., Endnote), and strategies for improving dissemination productivity. Additional topics to be addressed include: rules and responsibilities of authorship, copyright and conflict of interest, how to select a journal (i.e., impact factors, pros and cons of open access journals), the role of the editor and reviewers, the importance of adhering to journal guidelines and instructions, how and why to contact the editor, how to negotiate electronic submission portals, the peer-review process, how to respond to journal reviewers' feedback, and monitoring production details after the article is accepted (i.e., reviewing galley proofs, communication with production staff).

NUR 790. Independent Study in Nursing. 1-9 Hour.

Independent Study in Nursing.

NUR 791. Independent Study in Clinical Nursing. 1-9 Hour.

Independent Study in Clinical Nursing.

NUR 797. Writing the Dissertation. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to guide students in the development of an internally consistent dissertation research proposal that can be successfully defended as they progress toward candidacy. In addition, students will explore strategies for discussing research results and their contributions to the state of the science and theory development. Students are to work closely with their dissertation chair and members of their dissertation committee while developing the proposal.
Prerequisites: NRM 781 [Min Grade: B] or (NRM 783 [Min Grade: B] and NRM 798L [Min Grade: B])

NUR 798. Research Practicum. 1-9 Hour.

Research Practicum. The research practicum is a series of course credits taken throughout the student's doctoral coursework to provide continuous experience under the supervision of the mentor.

NUR 799. Dissertation Research. 1-9 Hour.

Dissertation Research - Prerequisites: Comprehensive Examination and admission to candidacy.
Prerequisites: GAC Z

NWH-Nursing - Womens Health Courses

NWH 618L. Focus on Advanced Nursing Practice Specialization. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course will be the study of specialty track specific topics. The focus of the course will be on providing foundational materials for specialized areas of advanced nursing practice. Emphasis is on exploring specific advanced nursing practice competencies.
Prerequisites: NUR 606 [Min Grade: B]

NWH 631. Women's Health for Advanced Nursing Practice I. 3-5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce essential concepts in the safe and effective provision of advanced practice nursing. The focus of this course is to prepare the student to implement the role of the Advanced Practice Nurse. The emphasis of this course is on the acquisition of the knowledge and skills necessary to deliver safe and effective care to women.
Prerequisites: (NUR 612 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 612 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 613 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 613 [Min Grade: B]) and (NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614L [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B] or NUR 614 [Min Grade: B])

NWH 632. Women's Health for Advanced Nursing Practice II. 3-5 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to integrate prior theoretical and practical knowledge for diagnoses and management of the health and illness of women. The focus of this course is on health promotion and disease prevention and management strategies from inter-professional domains. The emphasis of this course is to examine current evidence that supports the delivery of safe and high quality evidence-based care to women.
Prerequisites: NWH 631 [Min Grade: B] or NWH 631 [Min Grade: B]

NWH 685L. Practicum I: Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner. 1-3 Hour.

The purpose of this course is to demonstrate management strategies and apply selected practice models for the delivery of high quality care to women. The focus of this course is on the delivery of health care services to women. The emphasis of this course is on promoting the progression of competence within the Advanced Practice Nursing role.
Prerequisites: (NAH 621 [Min Grade: B] or NAH 621 [Min Grade: B]) and (NAH 685L [Min Grade: P] or NAH 685L [Min Grade: P]) and (NWH 631 [Min Grade: B] or NWH 631 [Min Grade: B])

NWH 686L. Practicum II: Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner. 2 Hours.

The purposes of this course are to prioritize management strategies and apply selected practice models for delivery of care to women. The focus of this course is to provide the student with opportunities to integrate in depth diagnostic and management skills to provide care for women. The emphasis of this course is on the formulation and management of individualized treatment plans based on diagnostic findings and current practice models.
Prerequisites: (NWH 632 [Min Grade: B] or NWH 632 [Min Grade: B]) and (NWH 685L [Min Grade: P] or NWH 685L [Min Grade: P])

NWH 692L. Residency: Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner. 4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to refine management strategies and best practice models in the delivery of high quality care to women. The focus of this course is to evaluate progress toward achievement of professional competencies. The emphasis is on incorporation of evidence and concepts from previous coursework and clinical practice to improve the health status of women.
Prerequisites: NWH 686L [Min Grade: P] or NWH 686L [Min Grade: P]

Faculty

Azuero, Andres, Associate Professor of Nursing, 2008, B.Sc. (University de Los Andes), M.B.A. (Louisiana State), Ph.D. (UAB)
Bakitas, Marie A., Professor and Marie O'Korean Endowed Chair, 2012, B.S.N. (Bridgeport); M.S. (Boston); DNSc (Yale)
Bertalan, Rebecca A., Instructor of Nursing, 2011, B.S.N. (Mt. Saint Mary's); M.S.N. (Wyoming)
Blakely, Kala K., Instructor of Nursing, 2011, B.S., M.S.N., D.N.P. (UAB); B.S.N. (Palme Beach Atlantic)
Bowen, Pamela, Assistant Professor of Nursing, 2005, B.S.N. (UAB), B.A. (Faulkner), M.S.N., Ph.D. (UAB)
Britt, Sylvia E., Assistant Professor of Nursing, 2007, B.S.N. (Medical College of Georgia), M.S.N., D.S.N. (UAB)
Buys, Katie Crawford, Instructor of Nursing, 2011, B.S.N. (Samford); M.S.N., M.P.H., D.N.P. (UAB)
Childs, Gwendolyn, Assistant Professor of Nursing, 2007, B.S.N. (Lander), M.S.N. (Medical College of Georgia), Ph.D. (South Carolina)
Coles, Karen M., Instructor of Nursing, 1993, B.S.N. (Michigan State); M.S.N., D.N.P. (UAB)
Combs, Bryan P., Instructor of Nursing, 2013, B.S. (Kentucky); M.S. (LSU); M.S.N., M.S.N. (UAB)
Courture, Marla, Instructor of Nursing, 2010, B.S.N., M.S.N. (Pittsburgh)
Currie, Erin, Assistant Professor, 2014, B.S.N. (Florida State); M.S.N., Ph.D. (UAB)
Debiasi, Laura B., Instructor of Nursing, 2012, B.S., M.P.H., B.S.N., M.S.N., D.N.P. (UAB)
DeLuca, Shannon, Instructor of Nursing, 2012, B.S.N. (North Carolina-Charlotte), M.S.N. (UAB)
Dunn, Donna Campbell, Assistant Professor, 2002, B.S. (Birmingham Southern); M.S.N. (Vanderbilt); Ph.D. (UAB)
Durand, Simone, Instructor of Nursing, 2014, B.S. (Spring Hill); M.S. (Southern Misissippi); B.S.N., M.S.N. (UAB)
Enah, Comfort, Assistant Professor of Nurisng, 2009, B.S.N. (Berea College), M.S.N., Ph.D. (Cincinnati)
Etheridge, Sherita, Instructor of Nursing, 2008, B.S.N. (UNA), M.S.N. (UAB)
Fogger, Susanne, Associate Professor of Nursing, 2010, B.S.N. (Wayland Baptist University), M.S.N., D.N.P. (South Alabama)
Frank, Jennifer S., Instructor of Nursing, 2012, B.A. (Trinity); Ph.D. (Cornell)
Harper, Doreen, Professor and Dean of Nursing, 2005, B.S.N. (Cornell), M.S.N. (Catholic), Ph.D. (Maryland)
Harris, Yolanda, Instructor of Nursing, 2011, B.S.N. (Samford), M.S.N. (UAB)
Heaton, Karen, Assistant Professor of Nursing, 2008, BSN (UAB), MSN (Louisville) Ph.D. (Kentucky)
Hess, Annette, Assistant Professor of Nursing, 1984, B.S.N. (Auburn), M.S.N. (Troy State), Ph.D. (UAB)
Hicks, Todd, Assistant Professor, 2012, B.S., B.S.N. (Auburn); M.N.A., D.N.P. (UAB)
Hodges, Ashley, Assistant Professor of Nursing; Interim Assistant Dean for Graduate Clinical Programs, 2009, B.S.N. (Alabama), M.A. (Seton Hall), M.S.N., Ph.D. (UAB)
Hogewood, Connie M., Instructor of Nursing, 2014, B.G.S., B.S.N., M.S.N. (Samford)
Holland, Aimee Chism, Associate Professor, 2010, B.S., M.S. (Alabama); M.S.N. (Vanderbilt); D.N.P. (UAB)
Hyde, Michael T., Instructor of Nursing, 2012, B.S.N., M.S.N. (Alabama)
Jablonski, Rita S., Associate Professor of Nursing, 2012, B.S.N. (Holy Family), M.S.N. (La Salle), Ph.D. (Virginia)
Jennings, Matthew, Instructor of Nursing, 2009, B.A. (Augusta State); M.Ed. (Troy State)
Johnson, Karmie M., Instructor of Nursing, 2012, B.S., B.A., M.S.N. (UAB); B.S.N. (South Alabama)
Jukkala, Angela, Associate Professor of Nursing, 2006, B.S.N. (Bemidji State), M.S., Ph.D. (Minnesota)
Keltner, Norman, Professor of Nursing, 1990, B.S.N., M.S.N. (Fresno State), Ed.D. (San Francisco)
Kempf, Mirjam, Associate Professor of Nursing, 2010, M.P.H., (UAB), Ph.D. (Institute for Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, Julius-Maximilians-Universtat)
Kranz, Clare, Instructor of Nursing, 2015, B.S.N., M.S.N. (UAB)
Ladores, Sigrid, Assistant Professor, 2014, B.S.N., M.S.N. (Pennsylvania); Ph.d. (Central Florida)
Loan, Lori A., Assistant Professor, 2015, B.S.N. (Pacific Lutheran); M.S.N., Ph.D. (Washington)
McGhan, Gwen E., Assistant Professor, 2015, B.N., M.N. (Minatoba); Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State)
McGuinness, Teena, Professor of Nursing; Interim Chair Community Health, Outcomes and Systems, 2007, B.S.N. (Old Dominion), M.S. (Virginia Commonwealth), Ph.D. (Pittsburgh)
McLain, Rhonda, Assistant Professor of Nursing; Assistant Dean for Undergraduate and Prelicensure Programs, 2005, B.S.N. (College of Mt. St. Joseph), M.N. (Emory), D.S.N. (UAB)
McMullan, Susan Perry, Associate Professor, 2014, B.S.N. (Michigan); M.S.N. (Rush); Ph.D. (Rutgers)
McPeters, Steadman, Instructor of Nursing, 2014, A.S.N. (Snead State); B.S.N., D.N.P. (UAH); M.S.N. (UAB)
Meneses, Karen, Professor of Nursing; Associate Dean of Research, 2007, B.S. (Georgetown), M.S., Ph.D. (Boston College)
Miltner, Rebecca S., Assistant Professor of Nursing, 2010, B.S.N. (Georgia), M.S.N. (Wisconsin), Ph.D. (Maryland)
Mitchell, Dana, Instructor of Nursing, 2009, B.S.N. (Alabama); M.S.N., D.N.P. (UAB)
Moneyham, Linda, Professor of Nursing; Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, 2007, B.S.N. (Berea College), M.S.N. (Kentucky), D.S.N. (Indiana)
Moss, Jacqueline, Professor of Nursing; Chair, Adult/Acute Health Chronic Care & Foundations, 2011, B.S.N., M.S.N (Georgia State) Ph.D. (Maryland)
Murphy, Danny L., Instructor of Nursing, 1988, B.S. (Wayland Baptist); M.E.N.G. (UAB)
Nicholson, Chance William, Instructor of Nursing, 2010, B.S., B.S.N. (Southern Mississippi); M.S.N. (UAB)
Pair, Lisa Stewart, Instructor of Nursing, 2013, B.S.N. (Alabama); M.S.N. (UAB)
Parris, Kaitrin, Instructor of Nursing, 2014, B.S.N. (William Carey); M.S.N. (Phoenix); D.N.P. (Case Western)
Patrician, Patricia, Professor of Nursing; Banton Professorship, 2008, B.S.N. (Wilkes), M.S.N. (Texas), M.S. (U.S. Army War College), Ph.D. (Pennsylvania)
Patton, Susan, Professor, 2014, B.S.N. (Memphis); M.S.N. (Arkansas); D.N.S. (Tennessee)
Phillips, Jennan, Assistant Professor of Nursing, 2008, B.S.N. (Samford), M.S.N., D.S.N. (UAB)
Polson, Shannon, Instructor of Nursing, 2010, B.A. (West Georgia); M.S.N. (UAB)
Pryor, Erica, Associate Professor of Nursing, 2000, B.S.N. (UAH), M.S.N. (UAB), Ph.D. (Emory)
Raju, Dheraj A., Assistant Professor, 2011, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (Alabama)
Rice, Marti, Professor of Nursing, 1997, B.S.N. (Creighton), M.S.N. (Medical College of Georgia), Ph.D. (Georgia State)
Robinson, Cheryl, Associate Professor of Nursing, 2011, B.S.N. (Alabama), M.S.N. (Colorado), D.N.S. (LSU)
Roche, Cathy C., Associate Profesor, 2011, B.S.N. (Alabama); M.S.N. (Colorado); D.N.S. (LSU)
Roussel, Linda, Professor of Nursing, DNP Program Coordinator, 2013, B.S.N. (Williams Cary), M.S.N. (Southern Mississippi), Ph.D. (UAB)
Sample, Nevette, Instructor of Nursing, 2014, B.A. (Duke); M.S.H.A. (UAB)
Selleck, Cynthia, Professor and Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs & Partnerships, 2010, B.S.N., (Emory), M.S.N. (Vanderbilt), D.S.N. (UAB)
Sharpe, Elizabeth, Assistant Professor, 2013, B.S. (Temple); B.S.N. (Florida Atlantic); M.S.N. (Vanderbilt); D.N.P. (Northeastern)
Shirley, Maria R., Interim Chair, Acute, Chronic & Continuing Care, 2013, B.S.N. (Florida State); M.S.N. (Texas Women's); M.B.A. (Tulane); Ph.D. (Indiana)
Sipples, Rebecca L., Assistant Professor, 2014, B.S. (Connecticut); M.S.N. (Yale); D.N.P. (MGH Institute of Health Professions)
Smith, Glenda, Assistant Professor of Nursing, 2006, B.S.N., (North Carolina Central), M.S.N. (Vanderbilt), D.S.N. (Texas-Houston Health Science Center)
Somerall, William, Assistant Professor, 2010, B.A. (Auburn); M.A., M.D. (UAB)
Speck, Patricia, Professor, 2014, B.S.N., M.S.N., D.N.Sc. (Tennessee System)
Stanley, Glenda, Instructor of Nursing, 2015, B.H.S. (Kentucky); M.A. (Moorehead State)
Turner-Henson, Anne, Professor of Nursing, 1982, B.S.N. (Medical College of Georgia), M.N. (Emory), D.S.N. (UAB)
Vance, David, Associate Professor of Nursing; Ph.D. Program Coordinator, 2004, B.S. (Virginia Tech), M.S. (New Orleans), M.G.S. (Miami), Ph.D. (UAB)
Weaver, Kendra S., Instructor of Nursing , 2014, B.S.N. (Mississippi Medical Center), M.S.N. (UAB)
White, Tracie L. , Instructor of Nursing, 2011, B.S.N. (Binghampton); M.S.N. (UAB)
Wilson, Marisa, Associate Professor, 2015, B.A. (Notre Dame); M.H.Sc., D.N.Sc. (Johns Hopkins)
Wingo, Nancy P., Instructor of Nursing, 2007, M.A. (Auburn); Ph.D. (UAB)
Woodfin, Kaitlen, Instructor of Nursing, B.S.N. (Auburn); M.S.N. (UAB)
Wright, E. Laura, Assistant Professor (Nurse Anesthesia)