Mechanical Engineering

Interim Chair: Kathy Lu, PhD

Degree Offered Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering
Accreditation The Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, https://www.abet.org, under the commission’s General Criteria and Program Criteria for Mechanical and Similarly Named Engineering Programs.
Website https://www.uab.edu/engineering/me/undergraduate
Program Director Pasquale Cinnella, PhD
Email pc1@uab.edu
Phone 205-934-8460

Mechanical engineering is a broad-based discipline that embraces the two major areas of mechanical systems and thermal systems. With an understanding of the phenomena associated with these topics, mechanical engineers conceive and design a wide variety of devices, machines, and systems to meet the needs and desires of a modern economy. Mechanical engineers also engage in applied research, product development, and project management. Mechanical engineers have a primary role in addressing the problems related to manufacturing, productivity, and safety in the workplace; supply and efficient utilization of energy; transportation; and human rehabilitation.

In addition to Blazer Core, the mechanical engineering curriculum includes a core of fundamental engineering coursework and advanced courses in thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, mechanics of machinery, and mechanical design. The program also includes courses in mathematics, calculus-based physics, and chemistry. Laboratory experiences are provided in each area to illustrate the application of theory in engineering practice. With additional coursework, the mechanical engineering program can also be utilized as a pre-health curriculum.

Please refer to the School of Engineering overview for policies regarding admission; change of major; transfer credit; transient status; dual degree programs; reasonable progress; academic warning, probation, and suspension; reinstatement appeals; and graduation requirements.

Vision

To be a nationally and internationally recognized research-oriented mechanical engineering program – a first choice for undergraduate and graduate education.

Mission

To prepare students to be immediately productive and able to adapt to and lead in a rapidly changing environment and to create and apply knowledge for the benefit of society.

Program Educational Objectives

The Educational Objectives of the Mechanical Engineering undergraduate program are the following:

  • Graduates will meet or exceed the expectations of their employers in mechanical engineering or any other career path they choose;
  • Graduates will pursue continuing education opportunities in their chosen field through a variety of means, such as professional development training and advanced education;
  • Graduates will pursue leadership positions in their selected profession and/or communities.

Student Outcomes

Upon completion of the BSME degree program, our graduates will have:

  1. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics
  2. an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors
  3. an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  4. an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts
  5. an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives
  6. an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions
  7. an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

RequirementsHours
Blazer Core Requirements43
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry I Recitation
and General Chemistry I Laboratory
English Composition I
English Composition II
Computer Aided Graphics and Design
Introduction to Engineering 1
Calculus I 1
General Physics I
and General Physics Laboratory I
and General Physics I Recitation
General Physics II
and General Physics Laboratory II
and General Physics II - Recitation
Academic Foundations: Reasoning
Thinking Broadly: History & Meaning
Thinking Broadly: Creative Arts
Thinking Broadly: Humans & Their Societies
City as a Classroom s
Other Required Courses73
Statics
Mechanics of Solids
Mechanics of Solids Laboratory
Engineering Economics
General Chemistry II
and General Chemistry II Recitation
Electrical Systems
Computer Methods in Engineering
Math Tools for Engineering Problem Solving 1
Calculus II 3
Dynamics
and Dynamics Recitation
Thermodynamics I
and Thermodynamics Recitation
Thermodynamics II
Introduction to Fluid Mechanics
Introduction to Heat Transfer
Introduction to Mechatronic Systems Engineering
Thermo-Fluids Systems
and Thermo-Fluids Systems Laboratory
Linear Algebra and Numerical Methods
Kinematics and Dynamics of Machinery
Machine Design
Mechanical Systems
and Mechanical Systems Laboratory
Capstone Design Project I
Capstone Design Project II
Engineering Materials
Materials Processing
Math/Science Elective3
Choose one course from the following:
Topics in Contemporary Biology
Human Population and the Earth's Environment
Introductory Biology I
and Introductory Biology I Laboratory
Organic Chemistry I
and Organic Chemistry I Recitation
Physical Geology
Introduction to Statistics
Scientific Programming
Mathematical Modeling
Vector Analysis
Complex Analysis
Fourier Analysis
General Physics III: Thermodynamics & Quantum Physics
Mechanical Engineering Electives9
Choose one course from each of the categories below:
Computer Aided Engineering Courses
Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics Basics
Building Energy Modeling and Analysis
Introduction to Finite Element Method
Thermal Fluids Courses
Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics Basics
Combustion
Internal Combustion Engines
Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning
Thermal-Fluid Systems Design
Building Energy Modeling and Analysis
Mechanical Systems Courses
Vehicular Dynamics
Introduction to Vehicle Drive Systems Engineering
Introduction to Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Engineering
Introduction to Finite Element Method
Mechanical Vibrations
Systems Engineering
Automated Manufacturing
Instrumentation and Measurements
Total Hours128
1

EGR 200 preferred; other FYE courses accepted

2

CE 280 preferred; other CAC courses accepted

3

May substitute MA 227 and MA 252 for EGR 265 and the MA/SCI elective

Residency Requirement

In addition to UAB's residency requirement, to earn a bachelor of science in mechanical engineering from UAB, the program requires that students complete the following courses at UAB:

RequirementsHours
Any two of the following:6
Introduction to Heat Transfer
Introduction to Mechatronic Systems Engineering
Kinematics and Dynamics of Machinery
Machine Design
ME 498Capstone Design Project I3
ME 499Capstone Design Project II3
Total Hours12

Please refer to the School of Engineering overview for policies regarding admission; change of major; transfer credit; transient status; dual degree programs; reasonable progress; academic warning, probation, and suspension; reinstatement appeals; and graduation requirements.

Curriculum for the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering(BSME)

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
CH 115
115R
CH 116^
4EGR 103#3
EGR 20013EGR 1503
EH 101%3EGR 1941
MA 125
125L*
4MA 1264
 PH 221
221L
221R^
4
 14 15
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
CE 2103CE 2203
CH 117
117R
3CE 2211
EGR 26524EH 102%3
ME 241
241R
3ME 215
215R
3
PH 222
222L
222R^
4ME 2423
 Math/Science Elective2,43
 17 16
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
ME 3213EE 3123
ME 3643ME 3223
ME 3703ME 3603
MSE 2803ME 361
361L
3
Blazer Core: Reasoning33ME 3713
 Blazer Core: Creative Arts33
 15 18
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
ME 461
461L
3CE 3953
ME 4983ME 4993
MSE 4013Mechanical Engineering Elective53
Mechanical Engineering Elective53Mechanical Engineering Elective53
Blazer Core: City as a Classroom$3Blazer Core: History & Meaning33
Blazer Core: Humans & Their Societies33 
 18 15
Total credit hours: 128
1

EGR 200 preferred; other FYE courses accepted

2

May substitute MA 227 and MA 252 for EGR 265 and the Math/Science elective

3

Refer to Blazer Core as specific for engineering majors

4

Students may choose from the following: BY 101, BY 108, BY 123, CH 235, ES 101, MA 180, MA 360, MA 361, MA 444, MA 445, MA 453

5

Students must choose one course from each area:

^

Satisfies Blazer Core: Scientific Inquiry

%

Satisfies Blazer Core: Writing

#

Satisfies Blazer Core: Communicating in a Modern World

*

Satisfies Blazer Core: Quantitative Literacy

$

CE 280 preferred, other City as a Classroom courses accepted

Courses

ME 011. Undergraduate Internship in ME. 0 Hours.

Engineering internship experience in preparation for the student's intended career. Students in a university recognized cooperative education experience should register for COP 011 or COP 012.

ME 102. Engineering Graphics. 2 Hours.

Basic concepts in technical sketching, computer-aided drawing and design, projections, sections, and dimensioning.
Prerequisites: MA 105 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently) or MA 106 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently) or MA 107 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently) or MA 125 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently) or MA 225 [Min Grade: C]

ME 103. Drawing, Design and Measurement for Industrial Distribution. 3 Hours.

Technical sketching and reading of engineering drawings and analysis of systems involving human performance. For non-engineering majors. Not available for credit toward engineering major.

ME 215. Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Kinematics of particles in Cartesian, cylindrical, and polar coordinates. Simple relative motion. Second law application in rectilinear translation. Projectile motion. Energy and momentum principles for particles and for rigid bodies in plane motion. Impact and conservation of linear momentum.
Prerequisites: CE 210 [Min Grade: C]

ME 215R. Dynamics Recitation. 0 Hours.

An application-based course designed to reinforce concepts from ME 215.

ME 241. Thermodynamics I. 3 Hours.

Thermodynamic definitions, properties of a pure substance, ideal, and real gases, work, and heat. Fundamental laws of thermodynamics, entropy, reversible cycles, and irreversibility.
Prerequisites: PH 221 [Min Grade: C] and (CH 115 [Min Grade: C] or CH 125 [Min Grade: C]) and MA 126 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently) or MA 226 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

ME 241R. Thermodynamics Recitation. 0 Hours.

An application-based course designed to reinforce concepts from ME 241.

ME 242. Thermodynamics II. 3 Hours.

Application of thermodynamic principles to engineering systems; vapor power cycles; gas turbine cycles; Otto and Diesel cycles; refrigeration cycles; mixtures of ideal gases; psychrometrics.
Prerequisites: ME 241 [Min Grade: D] and EGR 150 [Min Grade: D] and (MA 126 [Min Grade: C] or MA 226 [Min Grade: C])

ME 251. Introduction to Thermal Sciences. 2 Hours.

Introduction to thermodynamics and heat transfer for non-mechanical engineering majors.
Prerequisites: (MA 126 [Min Grade: C] or MA 226 [Min Grade: C]) and PH 221 [Min Grade: C]

ME 302. Overview of Mechanical Components. 3 Hours.

An introduction to statics, dynamics, strength of materials, and engineering design. Transformation of energy, thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics. For non-engineering majors. Not available for credit toward engineering major.

ME 321. Introduction to Fluid Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Fluid properties, fluid statics, fluid in motion (control volume method), pressure variation in flowing fluids (Bernoulli equation), principles of momentum and energy transport, dimensional analysis and similitude, internal flow and external flow.
Prerequisites: ME 241 [Min Grade: D] and (MA 227 [Min Grade: D] and MA 252 [Min Grade: D] or EGR 265 [Min Grade: D]) and CE 210 [Min Grade: D] and EGR 150 [Min Grade: D]

ME 322. Introduction to Heat Transfer. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of heat transfer and their application to practical problems, including steady and transient heat conduction, external and internal forced convection, natural convection and radiation.
Prerequisites: ME 321 [Min Grade: D]

ME 360. Introduction to Mechatronic Systems Engineering. 3 Hours.

Control systems, feedback, and transfer function concepts. Laplace transform of mechatronic systems. Stability, steady state, and transient response. Systems modeling and analysis in time and frequency domain. Root locus and Nyquist Bode plots. Actuators, sensors, and controllers for various engineering applications. Fundamentals of mechanical and electrical/electronic component integration with controls and mechatronic system design.
Prerequisites: ME 215 [Min Grade: D] and ME 364 [Min Grade: D]

ME 361. Thermo-Fluids Systems. 3 Hours.

Pressure, temperature, fluid flow, and heat transfer instrumentation and their application to measurements of mass, heat, and momentum transport, flow characterization, heat engine and refrigeration cycles, and other thermal-fluids experiments. Experimental uncertainty analysis. Writing proficiency is required. ME 361L must be taken concurrently.
Prerequisites: ME 242 [Min Grade: D](Can be taken Concurrently) and ME 322 [Min Grade: D](Can be taken Concurrently)

ME 361L. Thermo-Fluids Systems Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Lab component for ME 361 Thermo-Fluids Systems. ME 361 must be taken concurrently.

ME 364. Linear Algebra and Numerical Methods. 3 Hours.

Linear equations and matrices, real vector bases, matrix decompositions, linear transformations; determinants, eigenvalues, eigenvectors; numerical methods for linear systems of equations, integration, ordinary differential equations; approximation, interpolation, least squares fits.
Prerequisites: (MA 227 [Min Grade: D] and MA 252 [Min Grade: D] or EGR 265 [Min Grade: D]) and EGR 150 [Min Grade: D]

ME 370. Kinematics and Dynamics of Machinery. 3 Hours.

Displacement, velocity and acceleration analysis, synthesis and design of linkages and mechanisms for various engineering applications on the basis of motion requirements. Static and dynamic force analysis of linkages, balancing of rotors and reciprocating machines. Significant consideration is given to designing geometry of gear sets: spur, helical, worm, and bevel gears. Analysis of planetary gear sets and drivetrains completes the course. Computer workshops support the learning process of main technical components.
Prerequisites: (EGR 103 [Min Grade: D] or ME 102 [Min Grade: D]) and ME 215 [Min Grade: D]

ME 371. Machine Design. 3 Hours.

Body stress, deflection and fatigue strength of machine components. Failure theories, safety factors and reliability, surface damage. Application to the design of gears, shafts, bearings, welded joints, threaded fasteners, belts and chains, keys, pins, springs, as well as mechanical design and selection of other machine components. Software applications, design projects, and exposure to hardware and systems are used to reinforce concepts.
Prerequisites: CE 220 [Min Grade: D] and EGR 150 [Min Grade: D] and ME 215 [Min Grade: D]

ME 411. Intermediate Fluid Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Applications of fluid dynamic principles to engineering flow problems such as turbo-machinery flow and one-dimensional compressible flow. Vorticity, potential flow, viscous flow, Navier-Stokes solutions, and boundary layers.
Prerequisites: ME 321 [Min Grade: D] and ME 364 [Min Grade: D]

ME 421. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics Basics. 3 Hours.

Governing equations for fluid flows, classifications of flow regimes, and approaches to analyze fluid flow problems. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), mesh generation, boundary conditions, numerical solution of equations governing fluid flows, and visualization. Hands-on exercises using a commercial CFD solver.
Prerequisites: ME 321 [Min Grade: D]

ME 430. Vehicular Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the fundamentals of mechanics and analytical methods for modeling vehicle dynamics and performance. Topics include tire-road interaction modeling, vehicle longitudinal dynamics and traction performance, lateral dynamics, handling, stability of motion and rollover, as well as contribution of the drivetrain system, steering system and suspension configurations to the dynamics of a vehicle. Software applications, projects, and exposure to hardware and systems are used to reinforce concepts.
Prerequisites: ME 215 [Min Grade: D]

ME 431. Introduction to Vehicle Drive Systems Engineering. 3 Hours.

Engineering fundamentals of mechanical and mechatronic, hybrid-electric, and electric drive systems. Applications to passenger cars and commercial vehicles. Drive system and component design, including main clutches and torque converters, transmissions, transfer cases, and drive axles. Introduction to plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles.
Prerequisites: ME 215 [Min Grade: D] and ME 370 [Min Grade: D](Can be taken Concurrently)

ME 432. Introduction to Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Engineering. 3 Hours.

Introduction to fully electric and hybrid vehicle engineering. Mechatronic system and component design. Batteries and energy storage devices. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.
Prerequisites: ME 215 [Min Grade: D] and ME 360 [Min Grade: D](Can be taken Concurrently)

ME 445. Combustion. 3 Hours.

Evaluation of the impact of fuel characteristics and operating conditions on the performance of coal-fired electric utility steam-raising plant and the prospects for continued reliance on coal as fuel for electric power generation. The phenomena emphasized are the behavior of turbulent jets; ignition, devolatilization and combustion of coal particles; radiative heat transfer and the effect of ash deposits on heat transfer; formation of air pollutants and their removal from combustion products; integrated gasification combined cycle; and capture and sequestration of carbon dioxide.
Prerequisites: ME 242 [Min Grade: D] and ME 322 [Min Grade: D]

ME 447. Internal Combustion Engines. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of reciprocating internal combustion engines: engine types, engine components, engine design and operating parameters, thermochemistry of fuel-air mixtures, properties of working fluids, ideal models of engine cycles, engine operating characteristics, gas-exchange processes, fuel metering, charge motion within the cylinder, combustion in spark-ignition and compression ignition engines.
Prerequisites: ME 215 [Min Grade: D] and ME 242 [Min Grade: D]

ME 454. Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals and practice associated with heating, ventilating, and air conditioning; study of heat and moisture flow in structures, energy consumption, and design of practical systems.
Prerequisites: ME 242 [Min Grade: D] and ME 322 [Min Grade: D]

ME 455. Thermal-Fluid Systems Design. 3 Hours.

Comprehensive design problems requiring engineering decisions and code/Standard compliance. Emphasis on energy system components: piping networks, pumps, heat exchangers. Includes fluid transients and system modeling.
Prerequisites: ME 242 [Min Grade: D] and ME 322 [Min Grade: D]

ME 456. Building Energy Modeling and Analysis. 3 Hours.

Computer modeling of energy use and thermal comfort in buildings using several software tools. Interpretation and analysis of the results. Implementing energy efficiency measures in the model and studying the effects on energy use.
Prerequisites: ME 242 [Min Grade: D] and ME 322 [Min Grade: D]

ME 461. Mechanical Systems. 3 Hours.

This course concentrates on main technical principles and aspects of mechanical systems design. The course also provides fundamental knowledge on test equipment and experimental techniques for experimenting on main technical principles of mechanical design. This course discusses data acquisition systems and signal conditioning, and design of experiments. Writing proficiency is required. ME 461L must be taken concurrently.
Prerequisites: CE 220 [Min Grade: D] and ME 215 [Min Grade: D]

ME 461L. Mechanical Systems Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Lab Component of ME 461 Mechanical Systems. ME 461 must be taken concurrently.

ME 464. Introduction to Finite Element Method. 3 Hours.

Concepts and applications of finite element method. Development and applications of basic elements used in engineering mechanics. Use of finite element analysis software. Application of finite element concept to several areas of mechanics.
Prerequisites: CE 220 [Min Grade: D] and ME 364 [Min Grade: D]

ME 475. Mechanical Vibrations. 3 Hours.

Development of equations of motion for free and forced single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) systems. Multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Transient response, support motion and vibration isolation for SDOFs. Vibration absorbers, generalized mass and stiffness, orthogonality of normal modes, and root solving and Gauss elimination procedures. Cholesky decomposition and Jacobi diagonalization methods.
Prerequisites: (MA 227 [Min Grade: D] and MA 252 [Min Grade: D] or EGR 265 [Min Grade: D]) and ME 215 [Min Grade: D]

ME 477. Systems Engineering. 3 Hours.

Exposure to the field of systems engineering, mission design, requirements development, trade studies, project life cycle, system hierarchy, risk analysis, cost analysis, team organization, design fundamentals, work ethics, compare and evaluate engineering alternatives, systems thinking. Registration is restricted to junior or higher standing.

ME 478. Automated Manufacturing. 3 Hours.

Introduction to automated manufacturing technology. Components of automated systems (controllers, sensors and actuators) and automated manufacturing sub-systems (3D printer, CNC, robot and computer vision) will be studied in a lecture\lab environment with hands on activities.
Prerequisites: (EGR 103 [Min Grade: D] or ME 102 [Min Grade: D]) and EGR 150 [Min Grade: D]

ME 480. Instrumentation and Measurements. 3 Hours.

Thorough exploration of fundamental measurement concepts and techniques for data acquisition and validation. Explanation of important selection criteria for the identification and configuration of commercially available data acquisition devices. Students will get hands-on experience following best practices for data acquisition (high speed vs low speed) relevant to their field of study or career. Many types of sensors, their underlying technology, and measurement techniques will be discussed (i.e. accelerometers, load cells, Digital Image Correlation, etc.) to demonstrate best practices for sensor selection for a wide range of specialized applications. Registration is restricted to junior or higher standing.

ME 489. Undergraduate Research in Mechanical Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

Undergraduate research experiences in mechanical engineering.
Prerequisites: (EGR 194 [Min Grade: D] and EGR 111 [Min Grade: D]) or HC 111 [Min Grade: D] and (MA 125 [Min Grade: C] or MA 225 [Min Grade: C]) and PH 221 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

ME 490. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering. 1-3 Hour.

Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering.

ME 491. Individual Study in Mechanical Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

Individual Study in Mechanical Engineering.

ME 494. Mechanical Engineering Seminar. 1 Hour.

Required for ME undergraduate Honors Program students. Presentations by students, faculty, and guests regarding current research.

ME 496. Honors Research. 1-6 Hour.

Research opportunities for undergraduate students in the Mechanical Engineering Honors Program.
Prerequisites: EGR 301 [Min Grade: C]

ME 498. Capstone Design Project I. 3 Hours.

Capstone design project: interdisciplinary design teams, ethics, materials selection, design process, development of proposal, project planning and scheduling, project execution and resource scheduling, and communication of design.
Prerequisites: (ME 322 [Min Grade: D] and ME 360 [Min Grade: D]) or (ME 322 [Min Grade: D] and ME 370 [Min Grade: D]) or (ME 322 [Min Grade: D] and ME 371 [Min Grade: D]) or (ME 360 [Min Grade: D] and ME 370 [Min Grade: D]) or (ME 360 [Min Grade: D] and ME 371 [Min Grade: D]) or (ME 370 [Min Grade: D] and ME 371 [Min Grade: D]) and MSE 401 [Min Grade: D](Can be taken Concurrently)

ME 499. Capstone Design Project II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of ME 498. Capstone interim and final design reviews with written and oral reports. ME 498 must be taken the term immediately before ME 499.
Prerequisites: (ME 322 [Min Grade: D] or ME 360 [Min Grade: D] or ME 370 [Min Grade: D] or ME 371 [Min Grade: D]) and (ME 322 [Min Grade: D] or ME 360 [Min Grade: D] or ME 370 [Min Grade: D] or ME 371 [Min Grade: D]) and (ME 322 [Min Grade: D] or ME 360 [Min Grade: D] or ME 370 [Min Grade: D] or ME 371 [Min Grade: D]) and ME 498 [Min Grade: D]