English

 Prospective students should use this checklist to obtain specific admissions requirements on how to apply to Graduate School.

Degree Offered:M.A.
Director:Dr. Gale Temple
Phone:(205) 934-8593
Email:gtemple@uab.edu
Web site:www.uab.edu/english

Admission Requirements

For admission in good standing, applicants must meet the Graduate School's requirements for scholarship and test scores (GRE General Test or MAT). The applicant should normally have finished the requirements for an undergraduate degree in English, including satisfactory completion of at least six semester hours in a foreign language. A generally well-prepared applicant who is lacking in some part of the undergraduate preparation may be admitted with the provision that any deficiencies be removed by a time specified by the graduate program director.

Program Description

Students in the graduate program can concentrate their studies in any of three areas: Literature, Composition and Rhetoric, or Creative Writing. The requirements for each of these concentrations are explained below.

Concentration in Literature

Most literature courses can be considered to fall into one of the following areas, each of which has its own reading list.

Group I:

British Lit before 1500
British Lit 1500-1660
British Lit 1660-1790
British Lit 1790-1900
British Lit 1900-present

Group II:

American Lit before 1800
American Lit 1800-1900
American Lit 1900-present
African American Lit 1746-present
African Diaspora Lit

Group III:

Composition Pedagogy
Rhetorical Theory
Linguistics
Critical Theory

Concentration in Literature

Plan I.

  1. Students who write a thesis must take 3 hours in Bibliography & Methods, 3 hours of linguistics, 6 hours of thesis work, 12 hours of British/American literature, and 6 hours of electives. They must take at least 6 hours in Group I and 6 hours in Group II.
  2. 15 hours of course work must be at the 600 seminar level in English. A maximum of 3 of these required 15 hours can be taken as EH 699 Thesis Research.
  3. Students must choose a member of the English faculty to chair their Graduate Study Committee (GSC). In consultation with this chair, students must select at least two other faculty members to complete their GSC. All members of the GSC must be graduate faculty. Once constituted, membership of the GSC cannot be changed without the approval of the departmental graduate program committee.
  4. Before students can be admitted to candidacy, they must have passed 18 hours of course work and had a thesis proposal accepted by their GSC and the Director of Graduate Studies.
  5. Students must pass a Thesis Defense.

Plan II.

  1. Nonthesis students must take 3 hours in Bibliography & Methods, 3 hours of linguistics, 12 hours of British/American literature, and 12 hours of electives.
  2. 15 hours of course work must be at the 600 seminar level in English.
  3. Students must pass individual tests in 5 areas, but 1 of these tests may be replaced by earning a cumulative 3.5 or better G.P.A. in two English graduate courses in one of the listed areas OR by passing two creative writing courses at the 500 level or above.
  4. All students must choose at least one test area from each Group.
  5. By the time students have earned 24 credit hours toward the M.A., students must secure the agreement of a graduate faculty member to serve as chair of their Graduate Study Committee (GSC). Students are encouraged to secure this faculty mentor as early as possible since the chair of a student's GSC has primary responsibility for mentoring the student through the exam process. The Committee chair must coordinate the composition, administration, and evaluation of all area tests for that student. The chair is also responsible for informing the student (and graduate program director) of the criteria for evaluation of the subject area tests; for notifying the student of the results; and for meeting with the student afterwards to review the tests. The chair is also responsible for keeping the graduate program director informed of the student's progress and maintaining a complete exam file on the student.
  6. In consultation with the student and the graduate program director, the Committee chair will appoint at least three other faculty to serve on the student's GSC. All members of the GSC must be graduate faculty. Once constituted, membership of the GSC cannot be changed without the approval of the departmental graduate program committee.
  7. Each two-hour area test must follow a standard format that allows students to demonstrate their ability to read closely and to synthesize ideas.
    1. Area tests in literature and critical theory will give the following instructions based on selections from the area reading list:

      Choose one of the following passages and write an essay that:
      1. Establishes–based on the chosen passage–some significant literary, intellectual, and/or cultural context and presents a thesis having to do with that context.
      2. Explains, by a close reading of the text, why the chosen passage is important both to the work from which it is taken and to the thesis of the present essay.
      3. Discusses the context and thesis in relation to at least two other works from the area reading list.
    2. Area tests for Composition Pedagogy or Rhetorical Theory will give the following instructions based on selections from the area reading list:
      Choose one of the following passages or set of passages and write an essay that:
      1. Indicates your understanding of the passage(s) and the work from which it is taken.
      2. Identifies and explains the specific issues in rhetorical theory or composition pedagogy that are addressed by or related to the selection(s).
      3. Discusses these issues in a broader context by drawing on at least two other works from the area reading list.
    3. See the Director of the Linguistics Program for a sample area test in Linguistics.
  8. Students must provide their GSC with a minimum of three weeks' notice in scheduling area tests, which must be taken Monday-Friday during the tenth week of each semester (sixth week during the shortened summer term).
  9. Students are limited to three attempts at passing a test for the same area.
  10. The GSC will hold a group grading session to evaluate individual tests as Failing, Passing, or High Pass (the latter designation must be a unanimous decision of the GSC). If a student earns four High Passes, this student will be passed "With Distinction."
  11. There is no oral examination for nonthesis students.

Concentration in Composition/Rhetoric

Plan I.

  1. Students who write a thesis must take 3 hours in Bibliography & Methods of Research, 3 hours of linguistics, 9 hours of literature electives, 6 hours of thesis research, 3 hours of rhetorical theory, and 6 additional hours of courses in the areas of Rhetorical Theory, Composition Pedagogy, or Professional Writing (total of 30 hours).
  2. 15 hours of course work must be at the 600 seminar level in English. A maximum of 3 of these required 15 hours can be taken as EH 699 Thesis Research.
  3. Students must choose a member of the Composition/Rhetoric faculty to chair their Graduate Study Committee (GSC). In consultation with this chair, students must select at least two other faculty members to complete their GSC. All members of the GSC must be graduate faculty and at least one (in addition to the chair) should be another composition/rhetoric specialist. Once constituted, membership of the GSC cannot be changed without the approval of the departmental graduate program committee.
  4. Before students can be admitted to candidacy, they must have passed 18 hours of course work and had a thesis proposal accepted by their GSC and the Director of Graduate Studies.
  5. Students must pass a Thesis Defense.

Plan II.

  1. Nonthesis students must take 3 hours in Bibliography & Methods of Research, 3 hours of linguistics, 9 hours of literature electives, 3 hours of rhetorical theory, and 12 additional hours of courses in the areas of Rhetorical Theory, Composition Pedagogy, or Professional Writing (total of 30 hours).
  2. Guidelines 2-11 under Concentration in Literature, Plan II, apply to these students.

Concentration in Creative Writing (Plan I only)

  1. Creative writing students are required to take 12 hours of creative writing workshop courses, 6 hours of thesis research, 9 hours of literature, and 3 hours of English electives.
  2. 15 hours of course work must be at the 600 seminar level in English including at least one section of a 600-level creative writing workshop. A maximum of 3 of these required 15 hours can be taken as EH 699 Thesis Research.
  3. Students must choose a member of the Creative Writing faculty to chair their Graduate Study Committee (GSC). In consultation with this chair, students must select at least two other faculty members to complete their GSC. All members of the GSC must be graduate faculty and at least one (in addition to the chair) should be another creative writing specialist. Once constituted, membership of the GSC cannot be changed without the approval of the departmental graduate program committee.
  4. Before students can be admitted to candidacy, they must have passed 18 hours of course work, including at least 3 hours in creative writing, and had a thesis proposal accepted by their GSC and the Director of Graduate Studies.
  5. Students must pass a Thesis Defense.

Additional Information

Deadline for Entry Term(s):Each semester
Deadline for All Application Materials to be in the Graduate School Office:Six weeks before term begins
Number of Evaluation Forms Required:Three
Entrance TestsGRE or MAT (TOEFL and TWE also required for international applicants whose native language is not English.)

For detailed information, contact Dr. Gale Temple, Graduate Program Director, Department of English HB 220, 1530 3rd Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294-1260.

Telephone 205-934-8593

E-mail EnglishGrad@uab.edu

Web http://www.uab.edu/cas/english/graduate-studies

Courses

EH 501. Tutoring Writing. 3 Hours.

Designed to improve writing skills through understanding theories of tutoring and to prepare future teachers for tutor training and writing center development.

EH 502. Writing in Popular Periodicals. 3 Hours.

An exploration of current theory regarding the production, distribution, and consumption of popular periodicals and practice contributing to these sources.

EH 503. Business Writing. 3 Hours.

Advanced writing concentration on letters, resumes, and professional reports.

EH 504. Technical Writing. 3 Hours.

Advanced writing concentrating on short informal and long formal reports.

EH 505. Poetry Writing Workshop. 3 Hours.

Advanced work in poetry through critique of student writing. This course may be taken twice for a maximum 6 semester hours of credit.

EH 506. Poetry Writing Workshop. 3 Hours.

Advanced work in poetry through critique of student writing. May be taken twice for credit.

EH 507. Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop. 3 Hours.

Advanced work in creative nonfiction through critique of student writing. This course may be taken twice for a maximum 6 semester hours of credit.

EH 508. Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop. 3 Hours.

Advanced work in creative nonfiction through critique of student writing. May be taken twice for credit.

EH 509. Fiction Writing Workshop. 3 Hours.

Advanced work in prose fiction through critique of student writing. This course may be taken twice for a maximum 6 semester hours of credit.

EH 510. Fiction Writing Workshop. 3 Hours.

Advanced work in prose fiction through critique of student writing. May be taken twice for credit.

EH 511. Novel. 3 Hours.

Techniques of prose fiction: Selections from British, American, European, and Russian Literature.

EH 512. Poetry: Lyric and Shorter Forms. 3 Hours.

Songs, sonnets, elegies, odes, and dramatic monologues.

EH 513. Drama. 3 Hours.

Techniques and problems of drama, classical through contemporary.

EH 514. Modern British and European Drama. 3 Hours.

Techniques and problems of modern European drama: Ibsen, Shaw, Chekhov, Synge, Pirandello, Brecht, Beckett, and others.

EH 515. The Form of Fiction: The Short Story. 3 Hours.

American, Russian, and European short stories emphasizing aesthetics of form.

EH 516. Modern American Poetry. 3 Hours.

Selections from Frost, Stein, Stevens, Pound, Eliot, Williams, Doolittle, Jeffers, Moore, McKay, Loy, Toomer, Crane, Hughes, and others.

EH 517. Creative Writing Workshop: Special Projects. 3 Hours.

Advanced work in genres other than poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction or a special workshop taught by a visiting writer. May be taken twice for credit.

EH 518. Creative Writing Workshop: Special Projects. 3 Hours.

Advanced work in genres other than poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction or a special workshop taught by a visiting writer. May be taken twice for credit.

EH 519. Young Adult Literature. 3 Hours.

Close reading of young adult literature; its form and history, its assumptions about adolescent psychology, and its literary relationship to the traditional canon.

EH 520. World Literature I: to 1600. 3 Hours.

Selections in translation from Greek, Roman, and Hebrew classics, other literature, and from oral tradition.

EH 521. World Literature II: 1600 to Present. 3 Hours.

Selections in translation from European, African, and South American writers.

EH 522. African Literature. 3 Hours.

Selected novels, short stories, autobiographies, folk tales, drama, essays, films, songs from pre-colonial Africa to the present, including works by Emecheta, wa Thiong o, Head, Achebe, Ba, Armah, Laye, Salih, Soyinka, and Abrahams.

EH 523. African Women's Literature. 3 Hours.

Works by African women from pre-colonial Africa to present.

EH 531. Special Topics in Film. 3 Hours.

In-depth study of a specialized topic in film. The course may focus on a particular national cinema (American, Italian, Japanese, etc.); one or moredirectors (Welles, Hitchock, Kubrick, etc.); a development in film history or genre(the studio system, the French New Wave, the musical, etc.); or issues in visual representation (film theory; adaptation; sexuality in film, etc.).

EH 533. Academic Writing. 3 Hours.

Introduction, for students in all disciplines, to the process of scholarly inquiry and the most common genres of academic writing, including critiques, bibliographies, proposals, conference presentations, and articles.
Prerequisites: EH 101 [Min Grade: C] or EH 102 [Min Grade: C]

EH 535. Teaching Creative Writing. 3 Hours.

Examines current theory and practice in teaching creative writing, particularly in secondary schools and introductory college-level classes.

EH 541. Literary Theory and Criticism I: Ancients to 19 ce. 3 Hours.

Introduction to theories of art and literary production in the contexts of aesthetics and culture from Plato to the end of the nineteenth century.

EH 542. Literary Theory and Criticism II: 20th Cent-Present. 3 Hours.

Introductin to theories of art and literary production in the contexts of aesthetics and culture from Russian formalism to the present.

EH 543. Archetype and Myth. 3 Hours.

Recurring images, underlying patterns, and shapes-of-meaning in poetry, fiction, and fairy tales.

EH 544. Women s Literature and Theory. 3 Hours.

Literary works and theoretical perspectives of Angelou, Chopin, Hong, Kingston, Hurston, Walker, Woolf, Plath, and others.

EH 545. Special Topics in African-American Studies. 3 Hours.

Investigates writings of colonial and contemporary African American writers on specific topic.

EH 546. African-American Autobiography. 3 Hours.

Personal narrative by African Americans, including texts by Wheatley, Douglas, Jacobs, Wilson, Dubois, Johnson, Hurston, Hughes, Wright, Baldwin, Angelou, and Moody. 3 hours.

EH 547. African-American Dramatic Tradition. 3 Hours.

Development of African American Dramatic Tradition from the nineteenth century through the Harlem Renaissance and Black Arts Movement to Contemporary Postmodernism, including Brown, Hurston, Baraka, and Wilson. 3 hours.

EH 548. African-American Poetry Tradition. 3 Hours.

Development of African American Poetry from its early works to the present,including Wheatley, Dunbar, Hughes, Brooks, and Angelou. 3 hours.

EH 550. Advanced Grammar. 3 Hours.

Present-day English grammar.

EH 551. Generative Grammar. 3 Hours.

Advanced analysis of English grammar with emphasis on Chomskyan generative grammar.
Prerequisites: EH 250 [Min Grade: C] or EH 251 [Min Grade: C]

EH 552. Grammar and Usage for English Teachers. 3 Hours.

Intensive review of structure of English; usage, punctuation, and style as these relate to grammar.

EH 553. Advanced History of the English Language. 3 Hours.

Advanced topics.

EH 554. The Biology of Language. 3 Hours.

Vocal tract and neuroanatomical specializations for language, language acquisition, genetic language disorders, language and other primates, and evolution of language.

EH 556. Visual Rhetoric. 3 Hours.

The nature of public communication is changing. Although words will never die, images have become a fast and effective medium for persuasion, and any writer who is interested in public communication must now have skills in both the analysis and production of visual rhetoric. Visual Rhetoric offers intensive studies in the rhetorical characteristics of image communication, especially as it intersects with verbal communication. Students in this course will learn strategies for incorporating persuasive images into verbal texts, thus enhancing the overall impact of any document.

EH 557. Writing and Medicine. 3 Hours.

Intensive examination of public discourse focusing on health, illness, and medical practice and production of texts as health consumers and health practitioners.

EH 559. Discourse Analysis. 3 Hours.

Intensive studies in public discourse, with particular emphasis on the social politics of linguistic choices.

EH 560. American Women Writers before 1900. 3 Hours.

Survey of American Women s Writing before 1900.

EH 561. American Literature 1620-1820. 3 Hours.

Representative American writing from colonial period to Washington Irving.

EH 562. American Literature 1820-1870. 3 Hours.

Representative writers such as Alcott, Cooper, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Fuller, Fern, Harper, Thoreau, Jacobs, Whitman, Stowe, and Dickinson.

EH 563. American Literature 1870-1914. 3 Hours.

Realism and naturalism: Twain, James, Howell, Crane, Jewett, Wharton, Dre iser, Norris, and Chopin, among others.

EH 564. American Literature 1914-1945. 3 Hours.

Selected fiction, poetry, and drama of major American writers such as Eliot, Faulkner, Hemingway, Hurston, o Neill, and Wright.

EH 565. American Literature 1945-Present. 3 Hours.

Selected fiction, poetry, and drama in context of post-war cultural trends and literary movements.

EH 566. The Slave Narrative and Its Literary Expressions. 3 Hours.

Genre of slave narrative, its critical theories, and its nineteenth- and twentieth-century literary expressions. Includes Equiano, Jacobs, Wilson, Douglass, DuBois, Wright, Angelou, and Morrison.

EH 567. Black Women Writers. 3 Hours.

Evolution of Afrocentric feminist consciousness through early and contemporary writings.

EH 568. The Harlem Renaissance. 3 Hours.

Black writers during Harlem Renaissance movement. Includes Johnson, Toomer, Murray, Larsen, McKay, Thurman, Reed, and Morrison.

EH 569. Medieval Culture: Literature and Society. 3 Hours.

Exploration through art, literature, and history of dominant themes of Middle Ages, from Germans to Dante and Chaucer.

EH 570. Arthurian Legend. 3 Hours.

King Arthur and his knights in literature from sixth-century history and formulation of legend in Middle Ages to its use in twentieth century.

EH 571. Beowulf in Context. 3 Hours.

An interdisciplinary course in Anglo-Saxon art and culture bearing upon Beowulf, close study of the Norse analogues of the Old English epic. 3 hours.

EH 573. Chaucer: Pilgrimage to Canterbury. 3 Hours.

Selections from Canterbury Tales and Chaucer s fourteenth-century milieu.

EH 574. English Renaissance Drama(Excluding Shakespeare). 3 Hours.

Plays by Marlowe, Kyd, Jonson, Tourneur, Webster, Middleton, and Ford.

EH 575. English Renaissance Poetry and Prose. 3 Hours.

Topics vary. Broad survey of period or close analysis of genre, theme, or author.

EH 576. Shakespeare. 3 Hours.

King Lear, Othello, and three other plays. Required for English majors.

EH 578. Milton. 3 Hours.

Selected prose and poetry, including Paradise Lost. 3 hours.

EH 580. The Restoration. 3 Hours.

Dryden, Butler, Rochester, Marvell, Bunyan, Congreve, Wycherley, and Ethere.

EH 581. The Eighteenth Century: Literature and Culture. 3 Hours.

Interdisciplinary exploration of texts that focuses on social, economic, and political backgrounds. Topics and authors vary.

EH 582. The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation. 3 Hours.

Formal and philosophical implications of selected texts. Authors and topics vary.

EH 583. British Romanticism. 3 Hours.

Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Hazlitt, Lamb, and DeQuincy.

EH 585. British Victorian Poetry. 3 Hours.

Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, and others.

EH 586. Eighteenth Century British Novel. 3 Hours.

Fielding, Defoe, Sterne, Smollet, and Richardson.

EH 587. Nineteenth Century British Novel. 3 Hours.

Austen, Dickens, Thackeray, Bronte, Trollope, and Eliot.

EH 588. British Novel: The Modern Age. 3 Hours.

Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce, Woolf, Ford, and others. 3 hours.

EH 589. James Joyce. 3 Hours.

Study of James Joyce s fiction through Ulysses.

EH 591. Major Writers. 3 Hours.

See class schedule for topic. May be repeated.

EH 592. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

See class schedule for topic. May be repeated for total of 9 hours.

EH 593. Special Topics in Linguistics. 3 Hours.

See course schedule for topic.
Prerequisites: EH 250 [Min Grade: C] or EH 251 [Min Grade: C]

EH 597. Individual Studies(Non-Thesis Option). 1-3 Hour.

Non-Thesis Research. See Graduate Director for procedure to apply for this course.

EH 599. Film Thesis. 3 Hours.

Thesis on an independently designed topic within film history or film aesthetics, allowing the completion of the interdisciplinary film minor.
Prerequisites: EH 210 [Min Grade: C]

EH 600. Seminar: Engineering Communication. 3 Hours.

Strengthens engineering students understanding of and application of effective communication practices in the workplace. Subjects covered included techniques of audience analysis; production of problem/solution formats; analysis and creation of reports, journal articles, and proposals; and presentation of ideas in written and oral formats.

EH 601. Seminar: Classical Rhetorical Theory. 3 Hours.

Review of Rhetoric from Classical period through Renaissance with emphasis on the works of Plato and Aristotle.

EH 602. Seminar: Modern Rhetorical Theory. 3 Hours.

Advanced studies in twentieth-century theories of rhetoric; themes include Marxism, feminism, philosophy, semantics, and ideology.

EH 603. Seminar: Literacy in Communities. 3 Hours.

Examines the theory and practice of literacy instruction in varied cultural contexts.

EH 604. Research Methods in Composition and Rhetoric. 3 Hours.

Examination of traditional and current methods of research in composition and rhetoric with practice designing and implementing research tied to students interests.

EH 610. Seminar: Prosody Poetics and Close Reading. 3 Hours.

Fosters an ability to read poetry closely and analytically; examines traditional descriptions of poetic form and meter; introduces recent work in poetic theory and philosophy of poetic composition.

EH 611. Teach Intern in Creative writi. 3 Hours.

Off-campus teaching positions in creative writing in conjunction with elementary, middle, econdary, and community schools or groups. Students should contact the Director of Creative Writing for listings of available positions and application procedures. The Director of Creative Writing in conjunction with the English Department's Graduate Program Committee will determine who will be approved for a teaching internship. Requires admission to the Graduate Program in English, EH 535, and 6 hours of creative writing workshops at the 500 or 600 level.

EH 615. Graduate Poetry Writing Workshop. 3 Hours.

Extensive work in poetry resulting in a manuscript of publishable quality.

EH 616. Graduate Poetry Writing Workshop. 3 Hours.

Extensive work in poetry resulting in a manuscript of publishable quality.

EH 617. Graduate Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop. 3 Hours.

Extensive work in creative nonfiction resulting in a manuscript of publishable quality.

EH 618. Graduate Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop. 3 Hours.

Extensive work in creative nonfiction resulting in a manuscript of publishable quality.

EH 619. Graduate Fiction Writing Workshop. 3 Hours.

Extensive work in fiction resulting in a manuscript of publishable quality.

EH 620. Graduate Fiction Writing Workshop. 3 Hours.

Extensive work in fiction resulting in a manuscript of publishable quality.

EH 635. Seminar: Middle English Literature. 3 Hours.

Study of writers other than Chaucer, with a concentration on the writings of the Gawain Poet, the lais and lyrics, and some female writers.

EH 636. Chaucer Seminar. 3 Hours.

Emphasis on the importance of Chaucer as a poet, his contributions to literature, and his cultural setting. Canterbury Tales and selected earlier poetry. 3 hours.

EH 637. Seminar: English Renaissance Literature. 3 Hours.

Topics vary. Analysis of a group of texts within a genre, with a common theme, or by a single author or group of authors, as well as the discursive and social contexts in which these texts were produced.

EH 638. Seminar: Eighteenth Century British Literature. 3 Hours.

Analysis of the formal and cultural aspects of 18th-century literature; attention to interdisciplinary aspects of selected texts.

EH 639. Seminar: Nineteenth Century British Literature. 3 Hours.

Intensive exploration of a particular aspect of literature and culture from the Romantic or Victorian period. Focus varies.

EH 640. Seminar: Twentieth Century British Literature. 3 Hours.

An in-depth examination of selected literary trends in modern English and Irish literature, focusing especially on the critical and/or theoretical frameworks by which these trends were defined. Topics vary.

EH 644. Practicum in Teaching Lit.. 3 Hours.

This course focues on the methods and pedagogical philosophy of teaching English and American literature at the early post-secondary level. Required admission to the MA program in English or registration as a non-degree graduate student.

EH 645. Seminar: Bibliography and Methods of Research. 3 Hours.

Emphasis on how materials in Sterne Library may be used effectively. Includes computer searching, listserve, and the internet. Field trips to special collections.

EH 646. Seminar: Practicum in Teaching Writing. 3 Hours.

Theory and practice of teaching writing at the postsecondary level.

EH 647. Practicum in Tutoring Seminar. 1 Hour.

English grammar review and effective tutoring strategies. Prerequisites: students must have been awarded an assistsantship and be scheduled to tutor in the Writing Center. 1 hour.

EH 648. Seminar: Introduction to Old English. 3 Hours.

Part one of an in-depth study of Anglo-Saxon English culminating in interpretation of The Dream of the Rood and The Wanderer in the original alliterative verse. Satisfies the M.A. linguistics requirement.

EH 649. Beowulf Seminar. 3 Hours.

Part two in the Old English sequence, exploring a few shorter works as well as the epic in close detail.
Prerequisites: EH 648 [Min Grade: C]

EH 655. Seminar: History of the English Language. 3 Hours.

EH 656. Seminar: American Literature 1620-1820. 3 Hours.

Focus on texts reflecting the evolution of American culture from its colonial period to the early national period.

EH 657. Seminar: American Literature 1820-1870. 3 Hours.

Centering on writers from the American Romantic Movement to explore such themes as their use of symbolism, transcendentalism, feminist approaches, or connections with American landscape art.

EH 658. Seminar: American Literature 1870-1914. 3 Hours.

EH 659. Seminar: American Literature 1914-1945. 3 Hours.

A study of one or more authors from the following list: O Neill, Faulkner, Larsen, Frost, Eliot, Stevens.

EH 660. Seminar: American Literature 1945-Present. 3 Hours.

Selected postmodern works in the context of U.S. cultural trends and literary movements since the Cold War.

EH 677. Seminar: Shakespeare:The Body Gender and Sexuality. 3 Hours.

Investigates languages of the body, sexuality, and gender in seven plays, as well as historical materials and current criticism and theories of the body.

EH 690. Major Writers Seminar. 3 Hours.

See class schedule for announcement of subjects. May be repeated for total of 9 hours credit if focus is on different subjects.

EH 692. Special Topic/Eliot & Allusion. 3 Hours.

Special Topics/ Eliot and Allusion. This class will read the seminal poems of Eliot's careerd alongside the texts from which he draws his allusions. We will examine the extent to which the allusions work metonymically in Eliot's poetry. We will also examine where the allusive metaphors break down, fail, and contradict each other, and we will examine the effects of these "failures." Students will compose several reader response assignments, a term paper and a final exam. Pre-req: Admission to Graduate School in English or permission of instructor.

EH 693. Special Topics Seminar. 3,6 Hours.

See class schedule for announcement of subjects. May be repeated for total of 9 hours credit if focus is on different subjects.

EH 694. Seminar: British Literary Themes from the Middle Ages Through Early 18th Century. 3 Hours.

See class schedule for topic.

EH 695. Seminar: British Literary Themes from Jane Austen to the Present. 3 Hours.

Recent themes include effects of industrialism, role of women, the concept of the gentleman, loss of faith, and relation of the artist and audience. Writers vary.

EH 696. Sem: American Literary Themes from the Puritans to the Present. 3 Hours.

See class schedule for topic.

EH 698. Directed Studies Seminar. 1-6 Hour.

See departmental description of the M.A. program for special restrictions on this course. Prerequisite: Permission of Associate Chair. 1-3 hours.

EH 699. Thesis Research. 1-6 Hour.

Prerequisites: GAC M

Faculty

Bach, Rebecca Ann, Professor of English, 1994, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania)
Bacha, Jeffrey, Assistant Professor of English, 2012, B.A. (University of Michigan-Flint), M.A. (Georgia State University), Ph.D. (Purdue), Rhetoric and Composition, Professional and Technical Communication
Basilico, David Anthony, Associate Professor of English; Director, Linguistics Program, 1993, B.A. (Brown), Ph.D. (Arizona)
Bellis, Peter, Professor of English; Chair, Department of English, 2007, B.A. (Amherst), M.A. (Texas-Austin), M.A., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Braswell, Mary Flowers, Professor of English, 1969, B.A., M.A. (Alabama), Ph.D. (Emory)
Braziel, James, Assistant Professor of English; Co-Director, Creative Writing Program, 2010, B.A. (Georgia), M.F.A (Bowling Green State)
Chapman, Alison, Associate Professor of English; Director, Undergraduate Studies, 2000, B.A. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania)
Daniels, Melissa, Professor of English, 2013, B.A. (University of La Verne), M.A. (Georgia), Ph.D. (Emory)
Graves, Lila V., Associate Professor of English, 1976, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (Auburn)
Grimes, L. Kyle, Associate Professor of English, 1990, B.A. (Dartmouth), M.A., Ph.D. (Illinois)
Hutchings, John William, Professor of English, 1981, A.B. (Transylvania), M.A., Ph.D. (Kentucky)
Madden, Kerry, Associate Professor of English, 2009, B.A. (Tennessee), M.F.A. (Tennessee)
McComiskey, Bruce, Professor of English, 1998, B.A., M.A. (Illinois State), Ph.D. (Purdue)
Minnix, Christopher, Assistant Professor of English; Director, Freshman Composition, 2012, B.S. (Grace College), M.A. (Radford), Ph.D. (Tennessee), Rhetorical Theory, Transnational Rhetoric, Compositions Studies, Writing Program Administration
Quinlan, Kieran, Professor of English, 1986, B.A., M.A. (Oxford), M.A., Ph.D. (Vanderbilt)
Ryan, Cynthia, Associate Professor of English; Director, Internships, 1998, B.S., M.A. (Illinois State), Ph.D. (Purdue)
Siegel, Daniel, Associate Professor of English; Director, Honors, Department of English, 2002, B.A. (Chicago), M.A., Ph.D. (Virginia)
Temple, Gale M., Associate Professor of English; Director, Graduate Studies, 2001, B.S. (Michigan), M.A., Ph.D. (Loyola-Chicago)
Vines, Adam, Assistant Professor of English, 2006, B.A., M.A. (UAB), M.F.A. (Florida)
Wells, Jaclyn, Assistant Professor of English, 2013, B.A. (Knox), M.A. (Southern Illinois University Carbondale), Ph.D. (Purdue)