Biology

Prospective students should use this checklist to obtain specific admissions requirements on how to apply to Graduate School.

Degree Offered Ph.D., M.S., 5th Year M.S.
Director: Stephen A. Watts, Ph.D.
Phone: (205) 934-9685
E-mail: sawatts@uab.edu
Website: http://www.uab.edu/biology/

Program Information

Areas of Specialization

Graduate students in the M.S. and Ph.D. programs in biology may specialize in research activities at all levels of biological organization, with emphases on ecophysiology, cellular and molecular biology, endocrinology, and ecology of aquatic organisms, or on models related to human disease.

Admission

For admission in good standing, applicants must meet the following requirements, in addition to the Graduate School's standards: an undergraduate degree in a biological science, B-level scholarship in all biology courses, two semesters of organic chemistry, two semesters of physics, mathematics through calculus, and a minimum of 152 on both the verbal and quantitative portions of the GRE General Test, and a personal statement of career goals. The graduate program director in biology must approve admission on probation or with deficiencies in one of the above requirements. Three letters of evaluation from individuals who have a thorough knowledge of the applicant's academic abilities and potential are also required. It is strongly recommended that a student contact a mentor before applying. Students may enter at the beginning of any semester, with deadlines of March 1 for summer and fall applicants and October 15 for spring applicants.

Coursework, Thesis, and Dissertation

A dissertation embodying the results and analysis of an original experimental investigation is required for Ph.D. candidates. Students in the M.S. program may write a thesis based on a research project (Plan I) or, alternatively, may elect to submit a nonresearch project incorporating a review and analysis of one or more topics of current or historical interest in biology (Plan II).

Since scientific problems encountered today are multifaceted and require multidisciplinary approaches, students are expected to acquire a broad background in the physical and life sciences. Doctoral students must complete formal course work in or have equivalent training related to six of the following seven areas: ecology, physiology, cell biology, developmental biology, genetics, microbiology, and molecular biology. Master's students must have competency in five of these life-science areas. Each student is also expected to satisfactorily complete a course or sequence in biometry and any advanced courses designated by the student's graduate study committee consistent with the chosen area of specialization.

Each student must also enroll in three seminar courses approved by his or her graduate study committee, and one of the seminars must be outside the student's primary area of specialization. Also, each student is required to demonstrate proficiency in teaching by delivering formal course lectures or by conducting instructional laboratories. Certificates for advanced training in teaching are also available.

Examinations

To qualify for candidacy, a student in the Plan I master's program must satisfactorily complete either a written or an oral comprehensive examination. A doctoral student must take both written and oral comprehensive examinations. As part of a student's final defense of his or her dissertation or thesis, a public departmental seminar must be presented.

Class A Teaching Certification

Under the Alabama Department of Education's "Strengthened Subject Matter Option," students who complete requirements for the master's degree in biology can also receive class A teaching certification, providing that certain prerequisites and requirements are met. Complete details are available from the School of Education Certification Office, EB 100, 1530 3rd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294-1250 (Telephone 205-934-5423).

Additional Information & Mailing Address

Deadline for Entry Terms: Each semester
Deadline for All Application Materials to be in the Graduate School Office: March 1 for summer and fall; October 15 for spring admission
Number of Evaluation Forms Required: Three
Entrance Tests GRE (TOEFL and TWE also required for international applicants whose native language is not English.)

Contact Information

For detailed information contact Dr. Stephen A. Watts, Graduate Program Director, UAB Department of Biology, CH 375, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294-1170.
Telephone 205-934-9685
Fax 205.975.6097
E-mail sawatts@uab.edu
Web http://www.uab.edu/uabbio

Physical Address

UAB Department of Biology, Campbell Hall, Room 464, 1300 University Blvd., Birmingham, Alabama 35294-1170.

BY-Biology Courses

BY 501. Advanced Biology for Teachers I. 3 Hours.

Basic genetic principles; recent research developments. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BY 502. Botany for Teachers. 3 Hours.

Provides understanding of human structural and functional relationships essential in modern biology. Corequisite: BY 503.

BY 503. Advanced Biology for Teachers III. 1 Hour.

Laboratory supplementing lecture (BY 502) through use of human specimens, models, and demonstrations.

BY 504. Life Science for Middle School Teachers. 3 Hours.

Life Science for Middle School Teachers.

BY 507. Microbial Ecology. 3 Hours.

Microorganisms in nature; interactions with each other and with environment. Independent project required. Prerequisite: BY 271.

BY 511. Molecular Genetics. 3 Hours.

Prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene structure and function. Independent project required. Prerequisite: BY 271, BY 330 and CH 232.

BY 520. General Endocrinology. 3 Hours.

Roles of endocrine and neuroendocrine chemical messengers in the control of cellular and physiological processes. Term paper required. Prerequisite: BY 256 or permission of instructor.

BY 527. Histology. 4 Hours.

Microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues, and organs of animals; correlation of structure and function. Techniques and methodology. Lecture and laboratory. Completion of additional independent project required for graduate credit.

BY 527L. Histology Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Histology Lab required with BY 527 lecture.

BY 531. Advanced Recombinant DNA Technology. 3 Hours.

Manipulation of genes and their regulations, and techniques used in recombinant DNA technology. Independent project required. Prerequisites: BY 311, BY 330, CH 233 and CH 460 or 461.

BY 535. Natural History of Vertebrates. 4 Hours.

Adaptations of vertebrates for survival in particular environments. Survey and classification of local vertebrates. Two lectures, one laboratory or field trip per week. Independent project required.

BY 535L. Natural History of the Vertebrates Lab. 0 Hours.

Lab must be taken with BY 535 lecture.

BY 540. Biology of Aging. 3 Hours.

Current understanding of aging, measuring aging changes, theories of aging and aging changes in various human systems.
Prerequisites: BY 123 [Min Grade: C]

BY 552. Field Botany. 4 Hours.

Principles and techniques of plant identification and classification; consideration of phylogenetic systems. Lecture and field trips. Independent project required.

BY 552L. Field Botany Lab. 0 Hours.

Lab must be taken with BY 552 lecture.

BY 555. Principles of Scientific Investigation. 3 Hours.

Methods of scientific process, experimental design, data interpretation and presentation, and scientific writing.

BY 560. Advanced Invertebrate Zoology. 3 Hours.

Selected topics. Lecture and student projects. Prerequisite: BY 255.

BY 565. Limnology. 4 Hours.

Biology of freshwater and estuarine organisms. Lecture, laboratory, and field trips. Prerequisite: BY 124 and BY 470.
Prerequisites: BY 104 [Min Grade: D] and BY 370 [Min Grade: D]

BY 565L. Limnology Lab. 0 Hours.

Lab must be taken with BY 565 lecture.

BY 567. Tropical Ecology. 3 Hours.

An overview of the major tropical ecotypes with emphasis on ecology of terrestrial, aquatic, and marine tropical organisms. Major portion of course taught at a tropical field station in the Caribbean. Lectures, laboratory, and field trips. Library research paper required. Prerequisites: BY 255 or 256 or 470 and Graduate Standing and Permission of Instructor.

BY 568. Galapagos Ecology. 3 Hours.

The ecology of the Galapagos Islands, with an emphasis on terrestrial & marine organisms. Major portion conducted on the Galapagos Islands. Lecture & field trips. Library research paper required. Prerequisites: BY 255 or 256 or 470 and Graduate Standing and Permission of Instructor.
Prerequisites: BY 255 [Min Grade: D] or BY 256 [Min Grade: D] or BY 470 [Min Grade: D]

BY 569. Rain Forest Ecology. 3 Hours.

Overview of physical and environmental factors that structure the rainforest, biodiversity of life, and interactions of its organisms. A survey of prominent biota will be conducted. Major portion of course taught in Costa Rica. Lectures and field trips. Library research paper required. Prerequisites: BY 255 or 256 or 470 and Graduate Standing and Permission of Instructor.

BY 570. Ecology. 3 Hours.

Ecosystems and population biology. Lectures. Independent project required. Prerequisite: BY 255 or 256 or 260 and Graduate Standing.

BY 571. Ecology Lab. 1 Hour.

Preq is BY 570 or concurrent enrollment. Field trips. 1 hour.
Prerequisites: BY 570 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

BY 573. Biochemical Adaptation to the Environment. 3 Hours.

BY 585. Northern Field Studies. 3 Hours.

Ecology of northern coniferous forest and tundra ecosystems. Major portion of course taught on site in Alaska. Lecture and field trips. Graduate project/paper required. 3 hours. (Irregular offering).

BY 595. Special Topics in Biology I. 1-4 Hour.

BY 596. Special Topics in Biology II. 0-4 Hours.

BY 597. Investigative Techniques. 2 Hours.

BY 598. MR Lev Non-Thesis Research. 1-10 Hour.

BY 605. Microbial Physiology. 3 Hours.

Microbial structure and function, growth, metabolism, and regulation of cellular activity. Independent project required. Prerequisites: BY 271 and 3 semester hours of organic chemistry.

BY 607. Microbiology Ecology. 3 Hours.

Microorganisms in nature; interactions with each other and with the environment. Independent project required.

BY 610. Comparative Animal Physiology. 3 Hours.

Special physical and chemical processes occurring at cell tissue, and organ levels. Independent projects required.

BY 611. Advanced Human Anatomy. 4 Hours.

This course is a detailed, advanced examination of human anatomy and histology. In a laboratory setting, students will achieve course objectives from dissecting a human cadaver, and observing prosected cadavers and casted models.

BY 615. Eco-Epid. of Arthrpd Brn Dis. 4 Hours.

This course covers the ecology, epidemiology, & control of arthropods and the pathogens they transmit to humans and animals. Special emphasis will be placed on emerging and re-emerging pathogens such as: dengue, yellow fever, bartonella, Rift Valley fever, typhus, & Chagas disease. The laboratory will reinforce the lectures with hands-on identification of both arthropods and pathogens. Lecture and Lab. Independent Project required. 3 hours.

BY 615L. Eclogy & EPI Arthrop Lab. 0 Hours.

BY 616. Cellular Physiology. 3 Hours.

Structure and function of cells and their components at the molecular level. Laboratory experience using modern equipment and biochemical methods. Independent project required.

BY 619. Reproductive Physiology. 3 Hours.

Comparative reproductive physiology in animals with emphasis on mammals. Independent project required.

BY 626. Evolutionary Medicine. 3 Hours.

An evolutionary approach to issues relating to human health and disease.

BY 628. Instruct Bio Labs: Teaching Techniques. 3 Hours.

Student will assist in instruction of an introductory biology laboratory. Responsibilities will also include preparation of quizzes and practicals and designing and conducting an instructional laboratory exercise.

BY 629. Evolutionary Biology. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the history of evolutionary thought and modern evolutionary theory. Discussions cover (but are not limited to) the history of life, mechanisms of evolutionary change, sexual selection, adaptation, speciation, and molecular evolution. Students will also be introduced to historical and contemporary studies of evolution on a wide variety of topics and organisms. Regular meetings outside of lecture will involve discussions of classic and contemporary research papers in the field.

BY 632. Biological Information Resources. 3 Hours.

The National Center for Biological Information (NCBI) website is a treasure house of information and tools for researchers in all areas of modern Biology. The goal of this course is to provide guidance for students who wish to become familiar with the NCBI website through an online learning experience. They will learn many of the features available at this site and will gain experience using some of the tools. The course will be taught completely online and will consist of 1) Guidelines for navigating through NCBI, 2) Study guide questions for students to answer online, 3) NCBI tutorials with questions to be answered online, 4) Assignments with questions to be answered online, 5) Online exams. Graduate levels require a graduate project.
Prerequisites: BY 123 [Min Grade: C] or BY 124 [Min Grade: C]

BY 633. Advanced Molecular Genetics. 3 Hours.

Examination of the molecular genetics of eukaryotic organisms, including genomes, nucleosomes, chromosomes, transcription, splicing, transposition and signal transduction. The role of molecular biology in immune diversity and cell growth will also be studied.

BY 634. Functional Genomics and Systems Biology. 3 Hours.

Systems biology is an inter-disciplinary study underlying complex biological processes as integrated systems of many interacting components. This course will give students a foundation in understanding complex biological interactions at the molecular, network and genomic level. This course will cover state-of-the-art high throughput established and novel approaches used in genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics to obtain, integrate and analyze complex data. The students will also get familiar with knowledge on experimental perturbation of genomes, gene regulatory networks, comparative genomics and evolution, basic bioinformatics. This course will be a combination of text based lectures and discussions of the current literature relevant to Functional Genomics and Systems Biology. Prerequisite: BY210 minimum grade of C.
Prerequisites: BY 210 [Min Grade: C]

BY 637. Epigenetics. 3 Hours.

This course provides a survey of the field of epigenetics, introducing the student to the diverse areas of epigenetic research in a variety of eukaryotic systems. The course combines lectures with discussion of primary literature and research talks from invited faculty speakers working in epigenetics. In addition to providing an overview of the field of epigenetics, this course emphasizes working with primary scientific literature and the development of critical reading skills. Additional assignments are required for graduate credit.

BY 640. Immunology. 3 Hours.

Immune system and functions of host humoral and cellular immune responses. Mechanisms of antigen and antibody reactions and basic immunological methods. Term paper required.

BY 642. Experimental Phycology. 4 Hours.

Introduction to algae. Experimental approaches to productivity. Algae as model systems. Independent project required. Concurrent enrollment in BY 642 lab required.

BY 642L. Experimental Phycology Lab. 0 Hours.

Lab must be taken concurrently with BY 642 lecture.

BY 645. Neuroanatomy. 4 Hours.

This course will provide detailed lecture and laboratory experiences that describe the anatomy of the human brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nervous system. Students will culture rat hippocampal neurons and map the cerebral and cerebellar cortex on preserved human brains. Deep brain structures will be identified and their functional significance explored. Cranial nerves and major peripheral nerves will be described and identified through cadaveric dissections. Normal pathways will be contrasted with examples of abnormalities along with the resulting functional impairments. Graduate credit will be earned through the completion of additional term papers and/or projects.

BY 646. Techniques in Biological Research. 3 Hours.

Concepts and practical application of techniques pertinent to biological research.

BY 648. Psychoneuroimmunology. 3 Hours.

Explores communication between neuroendocrine and immune systems.

BY 651. Plant Biology. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the student to the basic concepts of plant biology including plant diversity, structure, physiology, metabolism, reproduction, genetics, molecular biology, evolution and ecology. It is targeted to Biology Majors and Biology Graduate Students. This class brings together knowledge and methodologies from a number of different disciplines to provide students with an intensive and comprehensive plant curriculum from the molecular to the organismal level.

BY 652. Field Botany for Teachers. 4 Hours.

Principles and techniques of plant identification and classification; consideration of phylogenetic systems. Lectures and field trips. Independent project required.

BY 652L. Field Botany Lab. 0 Hours.

Lab must be taken with BY 652 lecture.

BY 653. Mycology. 4 Hours.

ungi, including morphology, development, physiology, taxonomy, and phylogeny. Independent project required. Offered at irregular intervals.

BY 653L. Mycology Lab. 0 Hours.

BY 655. Biometry. 3 Hours.

Statistical techniques used to analyze and interpret data, with emphasis on biological applications. Lecture and computer-based laboratory. 3 semester hours. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

BY 656. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. 4 Hours.

Study of the anatomical systems of vertebrates in an evolutionary and functional context. Covers form, function, development and phylogeny of vertebrates, with overviews of organ systems, and the major adaptive events of vertebrate evolution. Labs complement lectures with dissections of representative species, and surveys of specializations in other forms. Lecture and laboratory.

BY 656L. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Lab. 0 Hours.

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Lab required with BY 656 lecture.

BY 662. Introductory Neurobiology. 3 Hours.

Introduction to biological basis of nervous system function. Comparative approach applying molecular, cellular, and systems' concepts to nervous system function is used to examine electrical and chemical signaling, neural circuitry, and cellular basis of behavior and neural development. Independent project required.

BY 665. Limnology. 4 Hours.

Introduction to ecology of inland waters and estuaries. Lectures and field trips.

BY 665L. Limnology Lab. 0 Hours.

Lab must be taken concurrently with BY 665 lecture.

BY 667. Population Ecology. 3 Hours.

This course covers the structure and dynamics of populations with an emphasis on understanding how reproduction, mortality, and dispersal interact to control fluctuations in population size and structure. Special emphasis will be placed on the use of models to address specific applications in conservation biology and natural resource management. Independent project/paper required. Preqs: BY 570 & graduate stranding or permission of instructor.

BY 669. Molecular Ecol & Phylogenetics. 3 Hours.

Course surveys processes and patterns of molecular evolution and methods of phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences, amino acid sequences, and other molecular markers. Additionally, a project/paper will be required. Graduate level; 3 hours credit.

BY 671. Biochemical Adapt Environment. 3 Hours.

Examination of physiological and biochemical adaptations of organisms to physical environment.

BY 673. Biochemical Adaptation to the Environment. 3 Hours.

BY 674. Chemical Ecology. 3 Hours.

Study of chemical interactions between organisms or between organisms and their environment. Topics include chemical signaling between organisms, sensing of the chemical environment, and chemical defenses against predators, pathogens, biofoulers, or competitors. Students will be introduced to these topics in a wide variety of terrestrial and aquatic habitats, with a special emphasis on marine organisms. Independent project/paper required. Preq: Graduate standing.

BY 675. Comparative Developmental Biology. 3 Hours.

Mechanisms of development with emphasis on comparative biology. Graduate standing.
Prerequisites: BY 210 [Min Grade: D]

BY 681. Seminar in Physiological Ecology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 682. Seminar in Immunology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 683. Seminar in Physiology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 684. Seminar in Microbial Ecology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 685. Seminar in Cell Biology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 686. Seminar in Mammalian Development. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 687. Seminar in Endocrinology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 688. Seminar in Algal Ecophysiology. 1 Hour.

Current research in specific areas.

BY 689. Seminar in Genetics. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 690. Seminar in Cellular Physiology. 1 Hour.

Current research in specific areas.

BY 691. Seminar in Botany. 1 Hour.

Current research developments.

BY 692. Seminar in Ecology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 693. Seminar in Embryology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 694. Seminar in Microbiology. 1 Hour.

Current research in microbial ecology and microbial physiology.

BY 695. Special Topics in Biology I. 1-4 Hour.

BY 696. Special Topics in Biology II. 1-4 Hour.

BY 697. Investigative Techniques. 1-2 Hour.

Application of modern experimental techniques in solving research problems.

BY 698. Nonthesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

BY 699. Thesis Research. 1-10 Hour.

Prequieite: Admission to candidacy.
Prerequisites: GAC M

BY 732. Biological Information Resources. 3 Hours.

The National Center for Biological Information (NCBI) website is a treasure house of information and tools for researchers in all areas of modern Biology. The goal of this course is to provide guidance for students who wish to become familiar with the NCBI website through an online learning experience. They will learn many of the features available at this site and will gain experience using some of the tools. The course will be taught completely online and will consist of 1) Guidelines for navigating through NCBI, 2) Study guide questions for students to answer online, 3) NCBI tutorials with questions to be answered online, 4) Assignments with questions to be answered online, 5) Online exams. Graduate levels require a graduate project.
Prerequisites: BY 123 [Min Grade: C] or BY 124 [Min Grade: C]

BY 734. Functional Genomics and Systems Biology. 3 Hours.

Systems biology is an inter-disciplinary study underlying complex biological processes as integrated systems of many interacting components. This course will give students a foundation in understanding complex biological interactions at the molecular, network and genomic level. This course will cover state-of-the-art high throughput established and novel approaches used in genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics to obtain, integrate and analyze complex data. The students will also get familiar with knowledge on experimental perturbation of genomes, gene regulatory networks, comparative genomics and evolution, basic bioinformatics. This course will be a combination of text based lectures and discussions of the current literature relevant to Functional Genomics and Systems Biology. Prerequisite: BY210 minimum grade of C.
Prerequisites: BY 210 [Min Grade: C]

BY 737. Epigenetics. 3 Hours.

This course provides a survey of the field of epigenetics, introducing the student to the diverse areas of epigenetic research in a variety of eukaryotic systems. The course combines lectures with discussion of primary literature and research talks from invited faculty speakers working in epigenetics. In addition to providing an overview of the field of epigenetics, this course emphasizes working with primary scientific literature and the development of critical reading skills. Additional assignments are required for graduate credit.

BY 746. Tech in Biological Research I. 3 Hours.

Concepts and practical application of techniques pertinent to biological research.

BY 751. Plant Biology. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the student to the basic concepts of plant biology including plant diversity, structure, physiology, metabolism, reproduction, genetics, molecular biology, evolution and ecology. It is targeted to Biology Majors and Biology Graduate Students. This class brings together knowledge and methodologies from a number of different disciplines to provide students with an intensive and comprehensive plant curriculum from the molecular to the organismal level.

BY 755. Biometry. 3 Hours.

Statistical techniques used to analyze and interpret data, with emphasis on biological applications. Lecture and computer-based laboratory. 3 semester hours. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

BY 763. Electron Microscopy. 4 Hours.

BY 763L. Electron Microscopy Lab. 0 Hours.

BY 767. Population Ecology. 3 Hours.

This course covers the structure and dynamics of populations with an emphasis on understanding how reproduction, mortality, and dispersal interact to control fluctuations in population size and structure. Special emphasis will be placed on the use of models to address specific applications in conservation biology and natural resource management. Independent project/paper required. Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

BY 769. Molecular Ecol & Phylogenetics. 3 Hours.

BY 773. Biochemical Adaptation to the Environment. 3 Hours.

BY 781. Seminar in Physiological Ecology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 782. Seminar in Immunology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 783. Seminar in Physiology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 784. Seminar in Microbial Ecology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 785. Seminar in Cell Biology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 786. Seminar in Mammalian Development. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 787. Seminar in Endocrinology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 788. Sem in Algal Ecophysiology. 1 Hour.

Current research in specific areas.

BY 789. Seminar in Genetics. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 790. Sem in Cellular Physiology. 1 Hour.

Current research in specific areas.

BY 791. Seminar in Botany. 1 Hour.

Current research developments.

BY 792. Seminar in Ecology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 793. Seminar in Embryology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 794. Seminar in Microbiology. 1 Hour.

Current research in microbial ecology and microbial physiology.

BY 795. Special Topics in Biology I. 1-4 Hour.

BY 796. Special Topics in Biology II. 1-4 Hour.

BY 797. Investigative Techniques. 1-2 Hour.

Application of modern experimental techniques in solving research problems.

BY 798. Nondissertation Research. 1-10 Hour.

BY 799. Dissertation Research. 1-10 Hour.

Prerequisite: Admission to Candidacy.
Prerequisites: GAC Z

MESC-Marine Environmental Sci Courses

MESC 506. Marine Biology for Teachers. 6 Hours.

MESC 516. Physiology of Marine Animals. 4 Hours.

MESC 538. Marine Zoogeography. 4 Hours.

MESC 539. Oceanology of the Gulf of Mexico. 4 Hours.

MESC 541. Benthic Community Structure. 4 Hours.

Benthic Comunity Structure.

MESC 543. Plankton. 4 Hours.

MESC 550. Marine Plant and Animal Interactions. 2 Hours.

Marine Plant and Animal Interactions.

MESC 560. Marine Geophysical Processes. 3 Hours.

MESC 565. Estuarine Biology. 4 Hours.

MESC 570. Field Marine Science. 2 Hours.

MESC 580. Marine Paleoecology. 4 Hours.

MESC 592. Seagrass Ecosystems. 2 Hours.

MESC 595. Phytoplankton Ecology and Physiology. 2 Hours.

Phytoplankton Ecology and Physiology.

MESC 611. Marsh Ecology. 4 Hours.

Habitat analysis, natural history studies, and population dynamics of selected marsh organisms. Lecture, laboratory, and fieldwork.

MESC 612. Marine Ecology. 4 Hours.

Bioenergetics, community structure, population dynamics, predation, completion, and speciation in marine ecosystems. Lecture, laboratory, and fieldwork.

MESC 614. Advanced Marine Ecology. 2 Hours.

Mechanisms controlling the distribution of marine organisms. Major concepts in marine ecological theory.

MESC 615. Coastal Ornithology. 4 Hours.

Coastal and pelagic birds, with emphasis on ecology, taxonomy, and distribution. Lecture, laboratory and field trips.

MESC 618. Benthic Ecology. 2 Hours.

Factors controlling life cycles of marine benthic organisms and organization of their communities.

MESC 619. Marine Microbial Ecology. 3 Hours.

Survey of the types of microorganisms found in the marine environment and their interactions with each other and their environment.

MESC 620. Coastal Ecosystems Dynamics. 2 Hours.

Investigation of the structure and function of a variety of coastal ecosystems and evaluation of energy and nutrient processing in disparate ecosystems.

MESC 621. Marine Plankton. 3 Hours.

Taxonomy and biology of marine phytoplankton, bacterioplankton and zooplankton.

MESC 622. Chemical Oceanography. 3 Hours.

An in-depth examination of the chemistry of seawater and its relationship with biological, geological and physial processes in the oceans.

MESC 623. Geological Oceanography. 3 Hours.

Historic and current consequences of both geophysical and classic geological processes as they relate to the marine environment. Tectonic theory, sedimentary processes, stratigraphy, micropaleontology, erosion, and the formation of hydrocarbons.

MESC 625. Physical Oceanography. 3 Hours.

Physical properties of the world's oceans. Waves, tides, circulations, fluctuations, and interactions of the sea with the atmosphere and landmasses.

MESC 626. Biological Oceanography. 3 Hours.

Chemical, physical and geological patterns and processes important in the interaction of organisms and the sea.

MESC 627. Fisheries Oceanography. 2 Hours.

Examination of the relationships between fish life history, recruitment dynamics and harvest potential, and local-, meso-, and global-scale oceanography processes.

MESC 629. Fisheries Techniques. 3 Hours.

Current biological and technological methodologies for studying fishes and aquatic habitats, with emphasis on study design and integration across subdisciplines.

MESC 630. Marine Biogeochemical Process. 2 Hours.

Understanding how biogeochemical processes regulate ecosystem function in the marine environment.

MESC 631. Sediment Biogeochemistry. 3 Hours.

Sediment biogeochemical processes and their effects on nutrient cycles, plant production, and animal distribution.

MESC 632. Ocean Variability and Global Change. 2 Hours.

Examination of large-scale, spatial and temporal variability in the earth/ocean system.

MESC 633. Marine Biogeography & Paleobio. 3 Hours.

Overview of the time course of evolutionary changes in marine ecosystems and the role of historical factors influencing the distribution of marine organisms. Lecture and field trip.

MESC 634. Marine Resource Management. 2 Hours.

Management of marine resources, development of legislation, and impacts of management on human resources.

MESC 635. Marine Analytical Instrumenta. 3 Hours.

Overview of the major analytical tools available to marine scientists.

MESC 636. Oceanographic Experiences. 1-3 Hour.

Participation in an oceanographic research cruise. Research project report.

MESC 670. Field Marine Science. 2 Hours.

Two-week field exercise at selected sites along the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic shoreline of North America. Pretrip lectures and readings.

MESC 692. Seagrass Ecosystem Ecology. 2 Hours.

Ecology of seagrass systems of estuarine environments.

MESC 693. Seminar in Marine Science. 1 Hour.

Current research.

MESC 694. Directed Studies on Marine Topics. 1-6 Hour.

Research on Marine Topics.

MESC 696. Special Topics in Marine Science. 1-6 Hour.

MESC 714. Advanced Marine Ecology. 2 Hours.

Mechanisms controlling the distribution of marine organisms. Major concepts in marine ecological theory.

MESC 716. Physiology of Marine Animals. 4 Hours.

MESC 718. Benthic Ecology. 2 Hours.

Factors controlling life cycles of marine benthic organisms and organization of their communities.

MESC 719. Marine Microbial Ecology. 3 Hours.

Summary of the types of micro-organisms found in the marine environment and their interactions with each other and their environment.

MESC 720. Coastal Ecosystems Dynamics. 2 Hours.

Investigation of the structure and function of a variety of coastal ecosystems and evaluation of energy and nutrient processing in disparate ecosystems.

MESC 721. Marine Plankton. 3 Hours.

Taxonomy and biology of marine phytoplankton, bacterioplankton and zooplankton.

MESC 722. Chemical Oceanography. 3 Hours.

An in-depth examination of the chemistry of seawater and its relationship with biological, geological and physical processes in the oceans.

MESC 723. Geological Oceanography. 3 Hours.

Historic and current consequences of both geophysical and classic geological processes as they relate to the marine environment. Tectonic theory, sedimentary processes, stratigraphy, micropaleontology, erosion, and the formation of hydrocarbons.

MESC 725. Physical Oceanography. 3 Hours.

Physical properties of the world's oceans. Waves, tides, circulations, fluctuations and interactions of the sea with the atmosphere and landmasses.

MESC 726. Biological Oceanography. 3 Hours.

Chemical, physical and geological patterns and processes important in the interaction of orga.isms and the sea.

MESC 727. Fisheries Oceanography. 2 Hours.

Examination of the relationships between fish life history, recruitment dynamics and harvest potential and local-, meso-, and global-scale oceanographic processes.

MESC 729. Fisheries Techniques. 3 Hours.

Current biological and technological methodologies for studying fishes and aquatic habitats, with emphasis on study design and integration across sub-disciplines.

MESC 730. Marine Biogeochemical Process. 2 Hours.

Understanding how biogeochemical processes regulate ecosystem function in the marine environment.

MESC 731. Sediment Biochemistry. 3 Hours.

Sediment biogeochemical processes and their effects on nutrient cycles, plant production and animal distribution.

MESC 732. Ocean Variability & Global Cha. 2 Hours.

Examination of large-scale, spatial and temporal variabiltiy in the earth/ocean system.

MESC 733. Marine Biogeography & Paleobio. 3 Hours.

Overview of the time course of evolutionary changes in marine ecosystems and the role of historical factors influencing the distribution of marine organisms. Lecture and field trip.

MESC 734. Marine Resource Management. 2 Hours.

Management of marine resources, development of legislation, and impacts of management on human resources.

MESC 735. Marine Analytical Instrument. 3 Hours.

Overview of the major analytical tools available to marine scientists.

MESC 736. Oceanographic Experiences. 1-3 Hour.

Participation in an oceanographic research cruise. Research project report.

MESC 738. Marine Zoogeography. 4 Hours.

MESC 739. Oceanology of the Gulf of Mexico. 4 Hours.

MESC 741. Bethnic Community Structure. 4 Hours.

MESC 743. Plankton. 4 Hours.

MESC 750. Marine Plant and Animal Interactions. 2 Hours.

Marine Plant and Animal Interactions.

MESC 760. Marine Geophysical Processes. 3 Hours.

MESC 765. Estuarine Biology. 4 Hours.

MESC 770. Field Marine Science. 2 Hours.

Two-week field exercise at selected sites along the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic shorelines of North America. Pre-trip lectures and readings.

MESC 780. Marine Paleoecology. 4 Hours.

MESC 792. Seagrass Ecosystems Ecology. 2 Hours.

Ecology of seagrass systems of estuarine environments.

MESC 793. Seminar in Marine Science. 1 Hour.

Current research.

MESC 794. Directed Studies on Marine Topics. 1-6 Hour.

Research on marine topics.

MESC 795. Phytoplankton Ecology and Physiology. 2 Hours.

MESC 796. Special Topics in Marine Science. 1-6 Hour.

Faculty

Amsler, Charles D. Jr., Professor of Biology, 1994, A.B. (Duke), M.S. (North Carolina-Wilmington), Ph.D. (California-Santa Barbara), Marine Ecophysiology, Chemical Ecology, and Polar Biology
Angus, Robert A., Professor Emeritus of Biology, 1978, B.S. (Wisconsin), Ph.D. (Connecticut), Aquatic Toxicology
Austad, Steven, Distinguished Professor and Chair of Biology, 2014, B.A. (UCLA), B.A. (California State-Northridge), Ph.D. (Purdue), Comparative Biogerontology, Assessment of Animal Healthspan, and Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Aging
Bej, Asim K., Professor of Biology, 1991, B.S., M.Sc. (Calcutta), Ph.D. (Louisville), Gut Microbiome of Model Organisms in Relation to the Environment and Human Health
Biga, Peggy, Assistant Professor of Biology , 2012, B.S., M.S. (Angelo State), Ph.D. (Idaho), Physiology and Developmental Biology
Cusic, Anne M., Associate Professor of Biology, 1988, B.S. (UAB), M.S. (Samford), Ph.D. (UAB), General Biology and Reproductive Biology
Fischer, Kathleen E., Research Assistant Professor of Biology, 2014, A.B. (UC Santa Cruz); Ph.D. (Harvard), Comparative Biology, Aging, Evolution, Natural History and Conservation
Ghanta, Vithal K., Professor of Biology, 1971, B.S. (G.C.W. College), M.S. (Banaras Hinda), Ph.D. (Southern Illinois), Research Interest: Cancer Immunology, Immunology, and Biology of Aging
Gilchrist, Roger. L., Assistnat Professor of Biology, 1999, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (Wyoming), Human Anatomy and Physiology
Harris, Melissa L., Assistant Professor of Biology, 2016, B.S., Ph.D. (UC Davis), Somatic Stem Cells, Aging, Genetics and Genomics, Pigmentation Biology
Kemp, Dustin W., Assistant Professor of Biology, 2016, B.S. (Texas A&M); M.S. (Florida Atlantic); Ph.D. (Georgia), Marine Ecology and Physiology, Global Climate Change
Krueger-Hadfield, Stacy A. , Assistant Professor of Biology, 2016, B.S., M.S. (California State - Northridge); Ph.D. (Université de Pierre et Marie Curie Sorbonne Universités); Ph.D. (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile), Evolutionary Ecology, Molecular Ecology, Phycology
Lancaster, Winston C., Assistant Professor of Biology, 2014, B.S. (Auburn); M.S. (LSU), Ph.D. (North Carolina), Human Anatomy, Comparative Anatomy, Biosonar in Bats and Whales
Marion, Ken R., Professor Emeritus of Biology, 1971, B.A., Ph.D. (Washington University, St. Louis), Animal Natural History and Aquatic Environmental Biology
McClintock, James B., Endowed University Professor of Polar and Marine Biology, 1987, B.S. (California), M.S., Ph.D. (South Florida), Marine Invertebrate Chemical Ecology, Climate Change Biology
Monti, Denise, Assistant Professor of Biology, 2013, B.S. (Cornell), M.P.H., Ph.D. (UAB), Phage Biology, STEM Teaching and Learning
Morris, Jeffrey J., Assistant Professor of Biology, 2015, B.S. (Kennesaw State); Ph.D. (Tennessee-Knoxville), Experimental Evolution and Phytoplankton PhysiologyExperimental Evol
Mukhtar, Karolina, Associate Professor of Biology, 2010, M.S. (Szczecin), Ph.d. (Cologne), Plant Molecular Biology
Mukhtar, Shahid, Assistant Professor of Biology, 2010, B.Sc., M.Sc. (Faisalabad), Ph.D. (Cologne) , Genetics, Molecular Biology, Functional Genomics, and Bioinformatics, and Network Biology
Raut, Samiksha, Assistant Professor of Biology, 2012, B.S., M.S. (Nagpur), Ph.D. (UAB), General Biology, Microbiology, and STEM Education
Riddle, Nicole C., Assistant Professor of Biology, 2012, B.S. (Missouri), Ph.D. (Washington University in St. Louis), Epigenetics and Chromatin Structure
Sun, Liou Y., Assistant Professor of Biology, 2015, B.S., M.D. (Southeast University); Ph.D. (Southern Illinois), Biology of Aging, Endocrinology, Obesity, Neurodegenerative Diseases
Tollefsbol, Trygve, Professor of Biology, 1998, B.S. (Houston), M.S., D.O., Ph.D. (North Texas Health Sciences Center), Gene Regulation in Cancer and Aging
Watson, R. Douglas, Professor of Biology, 1988, B.S. (Southern Utah State), Ph.D. (Iowa), Endocrinology and Developmental Biology
Watts, Stephen A., Professor of Biology, 1987, B.S. (Auburn), M.S., Ph.D. (South Florida), Aquatic and Marine Biology
Wibbels, Thane, Professor of Biology, 1993, B.S. (Nebraska), M.S. (Houston), Ph.D. (Texas A&M), Reproductive and Conservation Biology