Physics

Prospective students should use this checklist to obtain specific admissions requirements on how to apply to Graduate School.

Degree Offered:Ph.D., M.S.
Director:Dr. Mary Ellen Zvanut
Phone:(205) 934-6661
E-mail:mezvanut@uab.edu
Web site:http://www.uab.edu/cas/physics/graduate

Program Information

Students in the M.S. and Ph.D. programs may specialize in any of the areas of interest to the faculty, including experimental physics and astrophysics, theoretical and computational physics, or biophysics and medical applications of physics.

Admission

Admission into the physics graduate program is by recommendation of the graduate admission committee of the Department of Physics. The committee takes into consideration GRE General Test scores, prior academic performance, personal statement, prior research experiences, and the letters of evaluation, usually from former instructors and research supervisors.

Beginning the Program

All students must take a placement examination on basic physics concepts before registering for any courses. Upon arrival at UAB, international students may be required to take English as a Second Language course or Scientific Communication courses at UAB during their first year of study.

M.S. Program

Plan I

The student must successfully complete at least 30 semester hours of coursework, including at least four core courses selected from PH 610 -  PH 650 PH 651, and PH 671 - PH 672 and 6 semester hours of Thesis Research PH 699). The student must also write and complete a successful oral defense of a thesis under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Additional coursework should be selected with the advice of the student's graduate study committee to meet the particular needs of the student.

An interdisciplinary track for an M.S. degree Plan I is also offered. Students admitted to this track will typically hold a bachelor's degree in a science area other than physics, such as astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, mathematics, or psychology, or an engineering degree, including optics and materials science. Thesis research will be in an interdisciplinary area, including astrophysics, astrobiology, biophysics, chemical physics, geophysics, mathematical physics, neurophysics, optics, materials science, or engineering physics. Students awarded an M.S. degree within this track will be prepared for an Assistant Research Physicist position, including qualification for co authorship, and would typically work under the direction of a doctoral-level person. The acquired skill would be highly marketable, as individuals trained in multidisciplinary areas for basic and applied research are increasingly in demand in industry, government laboratories, and other research institutions.

Acceptance into this interdisciplinary track will be through a Physics Graduate Faculty member, who will be prepared to supervise the student's thesis research and develop a plan of study. This plan of study will include a core of courses (Classical Mechanics, PH 561 - PH 562; Electromagnetic Theory,PH 545 - PH 546; and Quantum Mechanics, PH 550 - PH 551), other physics graduate-level courses, and a minimum of 12 hours of graduate-level courses offered by other departments. The Department of Physics will establish a standing Physics Interdisciplinary Track Committee to review and concur in each student's plan of study. As is current practice, thesis oversight will be by the student's M.S. Graduate Study Committee.

Plan II

With approval of the physics graduate program director, a nonthesis option (Plan II) is available for all tracks in the Masters program. In this case, the graduate study committee requires an additional 6 semester hours of coursework instead of a thesis and gives the student an M.S.-degree exit examination.

Ph.D. Program

Students may choose from a Physics Track or Applied Physics Track. All students are required to pass a written qualifying examination covering the core areas of classical mechanics, electromagnetic theory, and quantum physics.  In addition, an examination is given in one selected topic recommended by the graduate committee.  The core exams must be taken at the first offering after completion of the appropriate course: PH 710, PH 750 - PH 751, and PH 771.  Students may take the exam two times, but no more than this. If the second attempt is required, it must be done so at the first offering following completion of the first attempt. Under no circumstances may any part of the examination be taken more than twice.

Following satisfactory completion of the core qualifying examinations and consultation with individual faculty members, the student selects a specific area for dissertation research under the supervision of an appropriate graduate faculty member. The student's Graduate Study Committee, chaired by the major advisor, will outline a program of study including graduate courses and appropriate tools of research, such as computer and/or foreign language competency. Also, the Graduate Study Committee will administer an oral selected topic examination to test the student's knowledge in the area of research. The student must pass this oral examination in no more than two attempts. Then, with direction from the major advisor, the student should focus on formulating and writing a formal research proposal that must be presented and defended before the Graduate Study Committee; this should lead to a recommendation from the committee for admission to candidacy. Dissertation research culminates in the successful oral defense of the dissertation.

Physics Track: 90 total credit hours

  • Twenty semester hours of existing core course work chosen from classical physics, quantum physics, statistical physics, and electromagnetic theory.  Two semesters of scientific communications is required.
  • Nine semester hours of elective courses in physics
  • Directed and Dissertation Research (at least 2 semesters of dissertation research are required to graduate)
  •  

Applied Physics Track:  90 total credit hours

  • Fourteen semester hours of existing core course work chosen from classical physics, quantum physics, statistical physics, and electromagnetic theory.  Two semesters of scientific communications is required.
  • Twelve semester hours of elective courses in applied physics
  • Three semester hours of applied physics internship
  • Directed and Dissertation Research (at least 2 semesters of dissertation research are required to graduate)

Core and elective courses are listed at http://www.uab.edu/cas/physics/graduate/programs-of-study

 The following doctoral fellowships are available to the graduate students enrolled in the PhD program in physics at UAB.

Department of Education – Graduate Assistantship in the Areas of National Need (GAANN)

The U.S. Department of Education has funded the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Department of Physics for three years, 2012-15, to support the department’s doctoral students in their academic pursuits. The funding released through the fiscal year 2014 Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAAN) program, will support four physics Ph.D. students at a stipend level up to $30,000 depending on the financial need of the applicant as assessed by the UAB Office of Financial Aid. The GAANN program also makes an annual institutional payment of $14.724 per student to cover educational expenses.  The project title for the UAB physics program is “Doctoral Fellowships in Nanoscale Materials and Computational Physics at the University of Alabama at Birmingham”.  This distinctive program will lead to a Ph.D. degree in physics involving individualized academic course work, closely-supervised research experiences, optional industrial internships, continuous development of pedagogical and communication skills, and comprehensive supervision and evaluation of teaching performance.   

Additional Information

Deadline for Entry Term(s):Each Fall semester
Deadline for All Application Materials to be in the Graduate School Office:Six weeks before term begins
Number of Evaluation Forms Required:Three
Entrance Tests:GRE (TOEFL and TWE also required for international applicants whose native language is not English.)
Comments:GRE General Test is required; in addition, subject test is recommended

For detailed information, contact Dr. Mary Ellen Zvanut, UAB Department of Physics, CH 384, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294-1170.

Telephone 205-934-4736

E-mail mezvanut@uab.edu

Web http://www.uab.edu/cas/physics/graduate

 

Courses

PH 502. Instructional Physical Science. 4 Hours.

Modern Physics for Teachers.

PH 502L. Instructional Physical Science Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Design of Physical Science Labs and Detailed Instructional Plans.

PH 505. Studies in Physics Teaching II. 3 Hours.

Development of new curricula, apparatus, and techniques of presentation of concepts in physics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PH 507. Physical Science for Teachers I. 3 Hours.

Concepts of physical science. Laboratory includes evaluation of experiments and equipment for lecture demonstrations. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PH 508. Physical Science for Teachers II. 3 Hours.

Concepts of physical science. Laboratory includes evaluation of experiments and equipment for lecture demonstrations. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PH 520. Introduction to Methods in Theoretical Physics I. 3 Hours.

Vector calculus. Curvilinear coordinate systems; commonly encountered ordinary differential equations and special functions; complex variables and contour integration partial differential equations, including solutions by Green function methods. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C] and MA 252 [Min Grade: C]

PH 525. Applications of Contemporary Optics I. 3 Hours.

Applied geometrical optics. Refraction and reflection, paraxial optics, thick lens, matrix theory, optical aberrations, optical systems, and optical design using computer simulations.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C]

PH 526. Applications of Contemporary Optics II. 3 Hours.

Applied wave optics. Fresnel equations, optical interference, optical interferometry, coherence, diffraction, lasers, and Gaussian beam propagation.
Prerequisites: PH 525 [Min Grade: C]

PH 527. Geometrical Optics. 4 Hours.

Properties of optical systems. Lenses, mirrors, and stops; aberrations; rays and wave fronts, optical instruments; aspheric components.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C]

PH 527L. Geometrical Optics Lab. 0 Hours.

Geometrical Optics Lab.

PH 528. Physical Optics. 4 Hours.

Interference and diffraction phenomena; emission, propagation, and absorption of radiation; polarization and dispersion; stimulated emission.
Prerequisites: PH 527 [Min Grade: C]

PH 528L. Physical Optics Lab. 0 Hours.

Physical Optics Lab.

PH 529. Applications of Contemporary Optics III. 3 Hours.

Applied optical interactions with materials linear and nonlinear polarization phenomena, optical properties of materials, anisotropic optics, electro-optics, and nonlinear optics.
Prerequisites: PH 526 [Min Grade: C]

PH 532. Statistical Thermodynamics I. 3 Hours.

Statistical basis of laws of thermodynamics; ensembles and partition functions; quantum statistics of ideal gases, including photons and electrons; applications to solids, real gases, liquids, and magnetic systems; transport theory.
Prerequisites: PH 351 [Min Grade: C]

PH 533. Statistical Thermodynamics II. 3 Hours.

Statistical basis of laws of thermodynamics; ensembles and partition functions; quantum statistics of ideal gases, including photons and electrons; applications to solids, real gases, liquids, and magnetic systems; transport theory.
Prerequisites: PH 532 [Min Grade: C]

PH 545. Electromagnetic Theory I. 3 Hours.

Electromagnetic theory approached from standpoint of fields and using Maxwell's equations.
Prerequisites: PH 420 [Min Grade: C] or MA 444 [Min Grade: C]

PH 546. Electromagnetic Theory II. 3 Hours.

Electromagnetic theory approached from standpoint of fields and using Maxwell's equations.
Prerequisites: PH 545 [Min Grade: C]

PH 550. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics I. 3 Hours.

Principles of quantum mechanics; their application to particle waves, angular momentum, tunneling, radiation, and selection rules; perturbation and variational methods.
Prerequisites: PH 351 [Min Grade: C] and PH 562 [Min Grade: C]

PH 551. Introductory Quantum Mechanics II. 3 Hours.

Principles of quantum mechanics; their application to particle waves, angular momentum, tunneling, radiation, and selection rules; perturbation and variational methods.
Prerequisites: PH 550 [Min Grade: C]

PH 552. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics III. 2 Hours.

PH 553. Solid State Physics I. 3 Hours.

Properties of crystal lattices, lattice dynamics, lattice imperfections, and bonding energies; electronic properties of dielectrics, semiconductors, and metals; ferroelectric, magnetic, and optical properties of solids.
Prerequisites: PH 551 [Min Grade: C]

PH 554. Solid State Physics II. 3 Hours.

Properties of crystal lattices, lattice dynamics, lattice imperfections, and bonding energies; electronic properties of dielectrics, semiconductors, and metals; ferroelectric, magnetic, and optical properties of solids.
Prerequisites: PH 553 [Min Grade: C]

PH 557. Introduction to Nuclear Physics. 3 Hours.

PH 561. Classical Mechanics I. 3 Hours.

Kinematics and dynamics, including central forces, rotating coordinate systems, and generalized coordinates; Lagrangian and Hamiltonian.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C] and MA 252 [Min Grade: C]

PH 562. Classical Mechanics II. 3 Hours.

Kinematics and dynamics, including central forces, rotating coordinate systems, and generalized coordinates; Lagrangian and Hamiltonian.
Prerequisites: PH 561 [Min Grade: C]

PH 571. Atomic and Molecular Physics. 3 Hours.

Applications of quantum mechanics to structure and spectra of atoms and small molecules; use of symmetry in understanding and describing molecular vibrations and bonding.
Prerequisites: PH 551 [Min Grade: C]

PH 575. Intro to Biophysics I. 3 Hours.

Application of physical techniques and analytical methods of selected biological problems. Permission of instructor.
Prerequisites: PH 352 [Min Grade: C]

PH 576. Intro to Biophysics II. 3 Hours.

Application of physical techniques and analytical methods of selected biological problems. Permission of instructor.
Prerequisites: PH 575 [Min Grade: C]

PH 580. Classical Physics. 3 Hours.

PH 581. Laser Physics I. 3 Hours.

Physical principles of laser operation and design. Spontaneous and stimulated emission, population inversion, light amplification, laser resonators, Q-switching, mode-locking, pulse shortening techniques, spectral narrowing, and tunable lasers. Individual types of lasers will be considered. Practical applications of lasers will be treated in detail.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C]

PH 582. Laser Physics II. 3 Hours.

Physical principles of laser operation and design. Spontaneous and stimulated emission, population inversion, light amplification, laser resonators, Q-switching, mode-locking, pulse shortening techniques, spectral narrowing, and tunable lasers. Individual types of lasers will be considered. Practical applications of lasers will be treated in detail.
Prerequisites: PH 581 [Min Grade: C]

PH 583. Atomic and Nuclear Physics. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: PH 352 [Min Grade: C]

PH 584. Atomic and Nuclear Physics. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: PH 583 [Min Grade: C]

PH 585. Laser Spectroscopy. 3 Hours.

Practical applications of lasers and modern techniques and instrumentation in laser spectroscopy.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: D]

PH 586. Semiconductor Materials in Modern Technology. 3 Hours.

Brief review of electronic materials with emphasis on traditional and cutting edge Si technology. Competing and complementary semiconductors covered in standard lecture and seminar style. Materials: compound and tertiary semiconductors, organic semiconductors, wide bandgap semiconductors. Applications: optical and chemical sensors, microwave electronics, high power electronics, lasers. Specific applications/ materials determined by student interest.
Prerequisites: PH 352 [Min Grade: C] or EE 351 [Min Grade: C] or CH 326 [Min Grade: C]

PH 587. Nanoscale Science and Applications. 3 Hours.

Nanoscale Science and Applications. Physics of electronic, mechanical, and biological properties of materials at the nanoscale level approaching one billionth of a meter. The applications of nanoscale materials in electronic, mechanical, and biomedical systems will be emphasized. Special tools in synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials will be discussed.

PH 589. Applications of Modern Physics. 3 Hours.

PH 590. Preparations for Teaching. 1-3 Hour.

This class is intended to help teaching assistants prepare for successful teaching experiences. The course will emphasize a foundation of practical knowledge related to expectations and duites shared by teachers in higher education, as well as an opportunity to read, reflect, and discuss current research related to teaching and learning at the university level.

PH 591. Advanced Physics Laboratory I. 1-4 Hour.

Laboratory investigation of topics of modern physics. Permission of instructor.

PH 592. Advanced Physics Laboratory II. 1-4 Hour.

Laboratory investigation of topics of modern physics. Permission of instructor.

PH 593. Advanced Physics Laboratory III. 1-4 Hour.

Laboratory investigation of topics of modern physics. Permission of instructor.

PH 594. Computers in Physics. 3 Hours.

PH 595. Computers in Physics. 3 Hours.

PH 597. Special Topics in Physics. 1-3 Hour.

PH 610. Classical Mechanics I. 3 Hours.

Applications of methods of LaGrange, Hamilton, Poisson, and Hamilton-Jacobi to such classical problems as central force, small oscillation, and rigid body motions.
Prerequisites: PH 562 [Min Grade: C]

PH 635. Statistical Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Interpretation of macroscopic phenomena from microscopic principles; fundamental laws of statistical mechanics; applications to simple equilibrium systems, phase transitions, and transport problems.
Prerequisites: PH 551 [Min Grade: C]

PH 650. Electromagnetic Theory I. 3 Hours.

Boundary value and Green function methods for solving potential problems; fields in dielectric, magnetic media, and radiation fields.
Prerequisites: PH 546 [Min Grade: C]

PH 651. Electromagnetic Theory II. 3 Hours.

Boundary value and Green function methods for solving potential problems; fields in dielectric, magnetic media, and radiation fields.
Prerequisites: PH 650 [Min Grade: C]

PH 652. Electromagnetic Theory III. 3 Hours.

Electromagnetic Theory.

PH 653. Solid State Physics I. 3 Hours.

Structure and dynamics of solids; optical, magnetic, and transport properties.
Prerequisites: PH 551 [Min Grade: C]

PH 654. Solid State Physics II. 3 Hours.

Structure and dynamics of solids; optical, magnetic, and transport properties.
Prerequisites: PH 653 [Min Grade: C]

PH 655. Advanced Solid State Laboratory. 1-3 Hour.

Thin film X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy in materials characterization, electron paramagnetic resonance, and thin film deposition.
Prerequisites: PH 653 [Min Grade: C] and PH 654 [Min Grade: C]

PH 671. Quantum Mechanics I. 3 Hours.

Discrete and continuous spectra; central force problems; angular momentum and spin; systems of identical particles; perturbation theory; scattering theory.
Prerequisites: PH 546 [Min Grade: C] and PH 551 [Min Grade: C]

PH 672. Quantum Mechanics II. 3 Hours.

Discrete and continuous spectra; central force problems; angular momentum and spin; systems of identical particles; perturbation theory; scattering theory.
Prerequisites: PH 671 [Min Grade: C]

PH 673. Applications of Quantum Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Scattering theory, density matrix, and polarization; applications to atomic and nuclear reactions.
Prerequisites: PH 671 [Min Grade: C] and PH 672 [Min Grade: C]

PH 697. Special Topics in Physics. 1-12 Hour.

Topics of current interest, such as theoretical physics, computational physics, experimental techniques. May be repeated for credit. 1-12 hours.

PH 698. Nonthesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

May be repeated for credit.

PH 699. Research for Thesis. 1-12 Hour.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy. 1-12 hours.
Prerequisites: GAC M

PH 710. Advanced Classical Mechanics I. 3 Hours.

Analysis of dynamics, including rigid body motion, featuring the LaGrange formulation, introduction to the Hamiltonian, formulation, Poisson brackets, analyses in nonrelativistic applications.
Prerequisites: PH 562 [Min Grade: C]

PH 711. Advanced Classical Mechanics II. 3 Hours.

Analysis of dynamics, including rigid body motion, featuring the LaGrange formulation, introduction to the Hamiltonian, formulation, Poisson brackets, analyses in nonrelativistic applications.
Prerequisites: PH 710 [Min Grade: C]

PH 715. Advanced Statistical Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Applications of statistical laws to modern topics such as quantum fluids, critical phenomena, and nonequilibrium systems.
Prerequisites: PH 533 [Min Grade: C] or PH 635 [Min Grade: C]

PH 716. Advanced Statistical Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Applications of statistical laws to modern topics such as quantum fluids, critical phenomena, and nonequilibrium systems.
Prerequisites: PH 715 [Min Grade: C]

PH 732. Growth and Characterization of Thin Films I. 3 Hours.

Basics of vacuum science. Methods of thin film deposition. Nucleation, evolution of microstructure and surface morphology of thin films. Simulation of growth processes. Thin film characterization techniques (SEM/SIM, TEM, SPM, SPS/AES, XRD, optical and and mechanical measurements). Demonstrations on thin-film deposition and basic characterization of tilm microstructure and properties. Prerequisites: PH 553/653 and PH554/654 or permission of instructor. Lecture and demonstration. 3 semester hours.
Prerequisites: (PH 453 [Min Grade: C] or PH 553 [Min Grade: C]) and (PH 454 [Min Grade: C] or PH 554 [Min Grade: C])

PH 733. Growth and Characterization of Thin Films II. 3 Hours.

Basics of vacuum science. Methods of thin film deposition. Nucleation, evolution of microstructure and surface morphology of thin films. Simulation of growth processes. Thin film characterization techniques (SEM/SIM, TEM, SPM, XPS/AES, XRD, optical and mechanical measurements). Demonstrations on thin-film deposition and basic characterization of film microstructure and properties. Prerequisites: PH553/653 and PH554/654 or permission of instructor. Lecture and demonstrations. 3 semester hours.
Prerequisites: (PH 453 [Min Grade: C] or PH 553 [Min Grade: C]) and (PH 454 [Min Grade: C] or PH 554 [Min Grade: C])

PH 745. Molecular Spectroscopy. 3 Hours.

Infrared, Raman, and ultraviolet techniques applied to study of molecular properties, including rotation-vibration spectra and spectra of crystalline solids.

PH 746. Theoretical Nuclear Physics. 3 Hours.

PH 747. Theoretical Nuclear Physics. 3 Hours.

PH 750. Classical Electrodynamics I. 3 Hours.

Static and time-varying fields in vacuum and in matter, radiation fields, solutions and implications of Maxwell's equation utilizing advanced mathematical methods.
Prerequisites: PH 546 [Min Grade: C]

PH 751. Classical Electrodynamics II. 3 Hours.

Static and time-varying fields in vacuum and in matter, radiation fields, solutions and implications of Maxwell's equation utilizing advanced mathematical methods.
Prerequisites: PH 750 [Min Grade: C]

PH 752. Classical Electrodynamics III. 3 Hours.

Classical Electrodynamics.

PH 753. Solid State Physics I. 3 Hours.

Properties of electrons and photons in crystal lattices; electromagnetic interactions with solids; lattice defects.

PH 754. Solid State Physics II. 3 Hours.

Properties of electrons and photons in crystal lattices; electromagnetic interactions with solids; lattice defects.
Prerequisites: PH 753 [Min Grade: C]

PH 755. Advanced Solid State Physics III. 2 Hours.

Advanced Solid State Physics II.
Prerequisites: PH 753 [Min Grade: C] and PH 754 [Min Grade: C]

PH 760. Methods of Mathematical Physics I. 3 Hours.

Vector and tensor analysis; differential and integral equations; Green functions; variational techniques; linear operator theory; Fourier and Laplace transforms.

PH 761. Methods of Mathematical Physics II. 3 Hours.

Vector and tensor analysis; differential and integral equations; Green functions; variational techniques; linear operator theory; Fourier and Laplace transforms.

PH 762. Computational Physics I. 3 Hours.

Numerical techniques for solution of differential, integral, and matrix equations of physics; computer simulations of physical phenomena; optimization problems.
Prerequisites: PH 545 [Min Grade: C] and PH 551 [Min Grade: C] and PH 561 [Min Grade: C]

PH 771. Quantum Mechanics I. 3 Hours.

Discrete and continuous spectra; central force problems; angular momentum and spin; systems of identical particles; perturbation theory; scattering theory.
Prerequisites: PH 546 [Min Grade: C] and PH 551 [Min Grade: C]

PH 772. Quantum Mechanics II. 3 Hours.

Discrete and continuous spectra; central force problems; angular momentum and spin; systems of identical particles; perturbation theory; scattering theory.
Prerequisites: PH 771 [Min Grade: C]

PH 773. Applications of Quantum Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Scattering theory, density matrix, and polarization; applications to atomic and nuclear reactions.
Prerequisites: PH 771 [Min Grade: C] and PH 772 [Min Grade: C]

PH 791. Physics Seminar I. 1 Hour.

Topics of current interest in physics, presented by graduate students, faculty, and visitors. Required each term of all full-time graduate students.

PH 792. Physics Seminar II. 1 Hour.

Topics of current interest in physics, presented by graduate students, faculty, and visitors. Required each term of all full-time graduate students.

PH 793. Scientific Communications I. 1 Hour.

Scientific writing exercises and recent topics in physics presented by graduate students in order to provide experience in written and oral scientific communication.

PH 794. Scientific Communications II. 1 Hour.

Scientific writing exercises and recent topics in physics presented by graduate students in order to provide experience in written and oral scientific communication.
Prerequisites: PH 793 [Min Grade: C]

PH 797. Special Topics in Physics. 1-12 Hour.

Topics of current interest, such as group theory, medical physics, computational methods, biological physics, materials physics, optics, and space physics. May be repeated for credit.

PH 798. Non-Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hour.

Permission of instructor.

PH 799. Research for Dissertation. 1-12 Hour.

Admission to candidacy.
Prerequisites: GAC D

Faculty

Camata, Renato, Associate Professor of Physics, 2000, B.S. (Universidade de São Paulo), M.S., Ph.D. (Caltech), Aerosol processes in nanomaterials fabrication; nanostructured materials; laser synthesis and properties of semiconductor, electroceramic and bioceramic thin films
Catledge, Shane A., Assistant Professor of Physics, 2004, B.S. (California State –Sacramento), Ph.D. (UAB), Synthesis and properties of nanostructured super-hard materials; chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond films and novel nanostructured coatings for industrial cutting and biomedical implant applications; molecular sensing using fluorescent nanodiamond; mechanical properties
Harrison, Joseph G., Associate Professor of Physics, 1986, B.S. (Texas A&M), M.S., Ph.D. (Wisconsin - Madison), Solid-state theory; atomic and molecular physics; MRI modeling; chemical kinetics; simulation of nonoparticle-facilitated hyperthermia
Hilton, David, Associate Professor of Physics, 2007, B.S., M.S. (Rochester), M.S., Ph.D. (Cornell), Ultrafast spectroscopy and ultrashort pulse generations; ultrafast terahertz spectroscopy; correlated electron materials; superconductivity; high-magnetic field spectroscopy; magnetic semiconductors; complex functional nanomaterials; materials in extreme environments
Kawai, Ryoichi, Associate Professor of Physics, 1991, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (Waseda, Japan), Condensed-matter theory; biophysics theory; materials physics theory; computational physics; open quantum systems
Lawson, Christopher M., Professor of Physics, 1993, B.S. (Oklahoma State), M.S. (Colorado), Ph.D. (Oklahoma State), Nonlinear optics; fiber optics; optical sensors; optical coherence imaging tomography; laser spectroscopy
Martin, James C., Professor Emeritus of Physics, 1980, B.S. (Florida State), Ph.D. (Georgia Tech), Physics and science Education
Mirov, Sergey B., University Professor, 1993, Master (Moscow Power Engineering Institute), Ph.D. (USSR Academy of Sciences), Experimental quantum electronics, solid-state lasers, laser spectroscopy
Nordlund, Thomas M., Associate Professor of Physics, 1990, B.A. (Oregon), M.S., Ph.D. (Illinois), Physics education; biological imaging and self-assembly
Shealy, David L., Professor of Physics, Chair, Department of Physics, 1973, B.S., Ph.D. (Georgia), Geometrical optics; laser beam shaping optics; radiative transfer; caustic and optical aberration theory
Simien, Clayton, Assistant Professor of Physics, 2013, B.S. (Prairie View A&M), Ph.D. (Rice), Strongly correlated ultracold neutral plasmas; next generation frequency standards; precision measurements and variations in fundamental constants; quantum dipolar gases and rare-earth elements; laser cooling; nanotechnology; atomic sensors
Stanishevsky, Andrei V., Associate Professor of Physics, 2002, M.S. (Minsk Radioengineer Institute-USSR), Ph.D. (Belarus Academy of Sciences –USSR), Focused ion beam micro- and nanofabrication; PVD thin films deposition, characterization, and application; nanoparticle research
Vohra, Yogesh K., Professor of Physics, University Scholar, & Associate Dean, 1992, B.S., M.S. (Delhi, India), Ph.D. (Bombay, India), High Pressure Materials Research, Growth and Characterization of Synthetic Diamond, and Nanoscale Materials for Biomedical Applications
Wang, Xujing, Associate Professor of Physics, 2008, B.S. (NanKai, China), Ph.D. (Texas A&M), Theoretical physics; network theory; biophysics; theoretical and mathematical biology; genetics
Wenger, Lowell E., Professor of Physics, 2003, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (Purdue), Synthesis and characterization of magnetic materials, magnetic nanostructures, and high-temperature superconductors
Zvanut, Mary E., Professor of Physics, 1992, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (Lehigh), Electrical studies and EPR studies of insulators and semiconductors; microelectronics and optoelectronics