Department of History

Chair: Colin Davis

 The Department offers the Bachelor of Arts degree and the Master of Arts degree in History. The department also includes the Media Studies program (formerly known as Digital Community Studies Program) which offers a minor. 

In its broadest sense, the discipline of history provides the background for all other subjects and disciplines. The classical goal of self-knowledge can be enhanced through the study of history. The analytical study of history provides an understanding of “why we are what we are” and “how we came to be where we are today.” The purpose of historical study is not only an understanding of our own past and present, but an appreciation of the evolution of other cultures, civilizations, and nations.

Students interested in careers in the fields of law, teaching, public service, international affairs, business, journalism, and a variety of other areas involving the social sciences and humanities will find the history major beneficial and rewarding.

The Media Studies Program offers a minor for students interested in opportunities for applied research in local communities through the use of new media technology. The minor provides students a solid grounding in the history, theory and practice of documentary film, film history, oral history, ethnography, community studies, and media theory. Students will gain experience in community-based research, as well as attain proficiency in various new media technologies.

 

Major Requirements for History

A grade of C or better is required in all History (HY) courses.

RequirementsHours
History Sequence 1
Select four of the following courses: 212
Western Civilization I
Western Civilization II
World History to 1600
World History 1600 to the Present
The United States To 1877
The United States Since 1877
Research Courses
HY 300The Historian's Craft3
HY 497History Capstone3
History Electives
Select seven courses in History (HY) not listed above, including three at the 400-level and two at the 300-level or above. Students must take two of their electives in U.S. history and two in non-U.S. history; one of the two non-U.S. history electives must be a non-Western history.21
Total Hours39
1

Completion of this requirement will automatically satisfy Core Curriculum Area IV: History.

2

Students may not take both HY 101 and HY 104 or both HY 102 and HY 105.

3

Students may take no more than a total of 6 semester hours of the following independent studies courses:  Directed Readings in History (HY 491/HY 492) or Internship in Public History (HY 482).

4

 Students must take 18 semester hours in 300- and 400-level courses at UAB.

Proposed Program of Study for a Major in History

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EH 1013EH 1023
MA 1103Core Curriculum Area IV: History16
Core Curriculum Area IV: History13Core Curriculum Area II: Humanities3
Core Curriculum Area II: Fine Art23Core Curriculum Area IV: Social and Behavioral Sciences3
Core Curriculum Area IV: Social and Behavioral Science3 
 15 15
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
Core Curriculum Area II: Literature33HY 3003
Core Curriculum Area III: Natural Science with Laboratory4Core Curriculum Area III: Natural Science with Laboratory4
History Survey3Core Curriculum Area II: Humanities3
Minor 3Minor3
General Elective3General Elective3
 16 16
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
History (300 level and above)3History (400 level)3
History (200 level and above)3History (300 level and above)3
Minor 3Minor 3
General Elective6General Elective 3
 General Elective 3
 15 15
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
HY 4973History (400 level)3
History (400 level)3History (300 level and above)3
History (200 level and above)3Minor 3
Minor 3General Elective 3
General Elective 3General Elective 1-3
 15 13-15
Total credit hours: 120-122

 

1

Select one: HY 101, HY 102, HY 104, HY 105, HY 120 or HY 121.

2

 Select One: ARH 101, ARH 203, ARH 204, ARH 206, MU 120, THR 100, THR 105 or THR 200.

3

 Select One: EH 216, EH 217, EH 218, EH 221, EH 222, EH 223 or EH 224

 

Minor Requirements for History

A grade of C or better is required in all courses applied to the minor.

RequirementsHours
Introductory U.S. History
Select one of the following: 3
The United States To 1877 1
The United States Since 1877 1
Introductory History courses
Select two of the following: 26
Western Civilization I 3
Western Civilization II 3
World History to 1600
World History 1600 to the Present
The United States To 1877 3
The United States Since 1877 3
History Electives
Select six hours from 300-level or above History (HY) courses and three hours any level history. 9
Total Hours18
1

May also apply toward Core Curriculum Area IV.

2

Students may not take both HY 101 and HY 104 or both HY 102 and HY 105.

3

May also apply toward Core Curriculum Area IV.

Note: At least 6 semester hours in history above the 300 level must be taken at UAB. No grade below C may be counted toward the history minor.

Honors Program in History

Purpose

The History Honors Program is designed for outstanding history majors at UAB and allows qualified students to write a Honor’s Thesis based on original research. Faculty-led independent research for the senior thesis provides students with experience in applying historical methods and analytical writing techniques. This more advanced study helps prepare undergraduate history majors for graduate work in the field or for post-graduate training in other areas such as law, theology, and medicine. Students who complete the program will graduate “With Honors in History.”

Eligibility

To be eligible for the History Honors Program, students must complete at least 60 semester hours with a minimum 3.0 overall GPA and a minimum 3.5 GPA in history courses. At least 24 semester hours in the history major (including HY 300 Historian’s Craft ) must be completed prior to acceptance in the Honors Program.

Interested students must apply for the program which includes submitting a prospectus with bibliography. The application must include the signature of a History Department faculty member who has agreed to direct the Honor’s Thesis. If the student is accepted to the program, the student and the thesis director will choose two additional faculty members to make up the student’s thesis committee. The thesis committee will determine whether the student’s completed thesis qualifies for honors.

Requirements

The History Honors Program requires 39 total semester hours in history and maintenance of an overall 3.0 GPA and a 3.5 GPA in history courses through graduation.

Additional requirements include:

RequirementsHours
Select four from the following:12
Western Civilization I
Western Civilization II
World History to 1600
World History 1600 to the Present
The United States To 1877
The United States Since 1877
HY 300The Historian's Craft 13
HY 497History Capstone 23
Select two courses at the 300 or 400 level 26
Select two courses at the 400 level or above 26
Select two electives 26
HY 401Honors Thesis3
Total Hours39
1

The department recommends that this course be taken after completion of the lower-division survey requirement and before taking upper-division courses.

2

These courses may not be transferred from another institution and must be taken at UAB.

Honors students may take one or two graduate seminars in history for undergraduate credit with permission of the Director of the History Undergraduate Program. This credit may not be used for graduate credit.

Contact

For additional information on the History Honors Program, contact the Department of History, Director of History Undergraduate Program or Chair; Telephone (205) 934-5634.

Courses

HY 101. Western Civilization I. 3 Hours.

This course examines the diverse cultures which are included in what is commonly referred to as the West. Students develop an understanding of the evolution of religious, political, social, military and economic structures and relationships in Europe and the Middle East up to 1600. Students develop an appreciation of how individuals have influenced and been influenced by time and place. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components to this course (QEP).

HY 102. Western Civilization II. 3 Hours.

This course examines developments in the Western World since 1600. Since for most of this period, European culture dominated the world the course will also examine interactions between the West and non-European cultures. The course focuses on political, economic, social and cultural developments and stresses change and continuity over time as well as the various ideas and debates which have marked the modern West. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course (QEP).

HY 104. World History to 1600. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the development of major world civilizationss from pre history to the early modern era(ca. 1600 CE). The principal charateristics of these civilzations such as political development, social structure, gender relations, religious beliefs and philosophies, will be examined. The ultimate goal is for students to see the wolrd around them with an increased understanding and appreciation for the societies, traditions, and ideas that existed in the past and in many cases still exist and influence us today. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course (QEP).

HY 105. World History 1600 to the Present. 3 Hours.

This course will examine many significant world historical developments from the beginning of the early modern era (approximately 1600 CE) to the present. These historical developments include: intellectual movements, political revolutions and nationalism, industrialization, cultural changes, and the relationship between Western and non-Western societies. The ultimate goal of this course is for students to perceive the world around them with an increased understanding and appreciation for the diverse societies, traditions, and ideas that existed in the past¿and in many cases still exist and influence us today. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course (QEP).

HY 120. The United States To 1877. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to some of the main political, social, cultural, and economic developments in American history from the era of exploration and colonial settlement through the end of the Civil War. Central themes of the course will include the cross-cultural encounters (and clashes) in the Americas between various European and native peoples; the spectacular growth of European settlements in North America; the creation (always contested) of an American national identity; the emergence of a market economy and the question of American ideas of success and happiness. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course (QEP).

HY 121. The United States Since 1877. 3 Hours.

This course assists students in gaining a sophisticated understanding of the development of modern America - its politics, economics and social fabric together with how these have helped shape its foreign involvement. In the process, this course helps students understand the big idea of "change over time" and how all people face the choice of using change to help themselves and others - or not do this with resultant consequences. Finally, this course offers "lessons" out of our past about civic engagement, cultural diversity, and emerging globalism - "values" for productive citizenship on the contemporary scene. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course (QEP).

HY 201. Economic History of the United States. 3 Hours.

Economic developments of U.S. from colonial times to present, focusing on business organization, technology and innovation.

HY 202. Reacting to the Past. 3 Hours.

Reacting to the Past" is an award winning pedagoy involving complex, collaborative role-playing games in which students seek to attain "victory objectivs" while grappling with central tests in the history of ides. The class will conduct several Reacting games that will allowstudents to explore key moments in Europe intellectual and cultural history.

HY 203. History of American Technology. 3 Hours.

History of civilization of new technology in the United States emphasizing role of inventors and engineers.

HY 206. Introduction to Film and History. 3 Hours.

This course will examine fiction and non-fiction films as socially significant documents. Students will receive an introduction to the techniques of film analysis in the class.

HY 207. The American Film. 3 Hours.

Creation and development of motion pictures in the United States, including how films are made, American film industry, and impact of Hollywood on American culture.

HY 208. Women in Film. 3 Hours.

This course will provide a history of women in film, focusing on both women working in the film industry and the representation of women on screen. The course will focus on American film history, 1930's Hollywood to the present.

HY 210. History of American Medicine. 3 Hours.

Survey of patterns and trends in American medicine.

HY 214. Roman Republic. 3 Hours.

Survey of Roman history, society, and culture from the founding of the city of Rome in 753 BCE to the death of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE. Course covers the conquest of Italy, the Punic wars, and the conquest of the Hellenistic kingdoms. Emphasis on the impact of military success on the lifestyle and culture of the Roman people.

HY 217. History of Ancient Greece. 3 Hours.

Ancient Greece from prehistory to Alexander and the Hellenistic age.

HY 218. History of the Roman Empire. 3 Hours.

Survey of Roman history, society, and culture from the death of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE to the reign of Constantine in the early fourth century CE, with an emphasis on how the Roman empire ruled.

HY 219. Late Antiquity and Early Middle Ages. 3 Hours.

This course explores the transition from the Classical Greco-Roman Mediterranean world to the Middle Ages. It begins with the conversion of the Roman Empire to Christianity. Then it explores the collapse of the Western Roman Empire and the continuation of the Eastern Empire (known to historians as the Byzantine Empire). It places Mohammad and the rise of Islam in its historical context and explores the impact of the early Islamic conquests. The course will finish around the year 800 with the reign of Charlemagne in the West and Islamic Abbasid Dynasty ruling in Baghdad.

HY 223. African-American History to 1865. 3 Hours.

Ancient African civilizations and their demise, the slave trade and slavery in New World to the Civil War.

HY 224. African-American History Since 1865. 3 Hours.

Survey of late 19th century to present African American history.

HY 225. History of Alabama. 3 Hours.

Social, economic, and political survey of state from prehistory to present.

HY 226. History and Development of Birmingham. 3 Hours.

Social, economic, and political survey of the Birmingham area.

HY 227. Technology and Society. 3 Hours.

Relationship of machines and people in modern industrial society. Topics from recent American history and from contemporary problems.

HY 228. Southern Industrial History. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of the major social, economic, and political developments behind the numerous attempts to industrialize the South from the post Civil War period to the present. Attention will be paid to Birmingham's Industrial District, the impact of World War I and World War II on Southern Industry, Labor Music, Women in Industry, Organized Labor and Unions, as well as the impact of the Space and Automobile Industry on the Modern South.

HY 230. Middle East 550 BCE to 1453 CE. 3 Hours.

Survey course on the history of the Middle East from the rise of the Persian Empire to the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople. Course covers the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's conquests, Roman in the Middle East, the early Islamic Conquests, and the impact of the Crusades. The development of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are emphasized.

HY 234. The World Since 1945. 3 Hours.

Events and trends from the end of the Second World War to the present, emphasizing the orgins of the Cold War, decolonization, Europena integration, globalization, the rise of China, India and Japan, the revolutions in Easten Europe in 1989 and the collapse of communism in the Soviet Union, the third wave of democratization, Islamic fundamentalism, 9/11, and the international financial crisis of 2008-2009.

HY 235. War in the Modern World. 3 Hours.

American military history from colonial times to present, including impact of Western ideas and technology on national defense policy.

HY 236. Europe Since 1945. 3 Hours.

After the Nazi catastrophe, what was to be the future of Europe? After sketching the context of unparalleled death and destruction, this course focuses on European reconstruction on both sides of the Iron Curtain. While contrasting Eastern and Western regimes, course will also seek to compare postwar recovery plans, cultural aesthetics, and shared legacies borne out of the experience of World War II. Strong emphasis is given to questions of memory and national identity, the history of European integration in the West, and socialist interdependence in the East. After 1989, course will focus on the expansion of the European Union, alongside transnational cultural phenomena such as European soccer, environmentalism, spaces of memory, and the loaded question of Europe’s “boundaries” in the east and southeast.

HY 237. Eastern Europe 1600-1918. 3 Hours.

Before WWI, Eastern Europe consisted of a patchwork of ethnic groups ruled by four empires, which were ultimately destroyed with the rise of nationalism. This course explores this lost world of Eastern Europe in the Age of Empire and attends to four conceptual areas which dominated it: the concept and practice of Empire; the genesis, development, and triumph of nationalism; the contribution of the region’s diverse Jewish population; and questions surrounding the ultimate downfall of this world. Students in this course compose six critical essays surrounding secondary and primary analyses of these conceptual areas and engage in regular course discussions.

HY 238. Eastern Europe 1914-Present. 3 Hours.

This course traces drastic transformative processes which remade Eastern Europe during the violent twentieth century, including: nationalism, ethnic cleansing, genocide, the Holocaust, communism, the Cold War, and European integration. Virulent nationalism, Nazi atrocities, and the vicious revenge they inspired decimated the multiethnic world that had come before and forged ethnically homogenous nation-states with rigid frontiers. With previous understandings of property rights, moral responsibility, and neighborliness undermined, and with Soviet armies occupying the ruins that remained, communists and their unwitting nationalist allies found fertile ground for the establishment of command economies, which repressed the traumatized survivors of the Second World War and their descendants until 1989. Students in this course compose six critical essays surrounding secondary and primary analyses of these conceptual areas and engage in regular course discussions.

HY 239. The Holocaust. 3 Hours.

On the basis of extensive reading, this course introduces students to the central problems surrounding the Nazi genocide of European Jewry as well as the postwar memory debates which have resulted from it. We will examine Jewish culture, contributions, and integration in pre-1932 Europe, as well as after the Holocaust, and conclude by exploring the contemporary influence of the Holocaust, such as in Israeli national identity. Students in this course compose six critical essays surrounding secondary and primary analyses of these conceptual areas and engage in regular course discussions.

HY 245. Introduction to Latin American History. 3 Hours.

A sweeping survey of Latin American history from colonial times through the contemporary era focusing on forces and patterns that have shaped the region as a whole, making it broadly distinct from our own “Anglo” America.

HY 247. Indians, Spaniards & Creoles. 3 Hours.

A history of Latin American society and civilization in the formative era of Iberian (Spanish & Portuguese) colonialism, 1492 through c. 1810. The course looks at major precolumbian civilizations; the Spanish Conquest; and nature of Spanish-Indian relations. It stresses the impact of Iberian values, norms, and institutions, i.e. Church and State, on the emergence of unique new hybrid or Creole societies by the end of the period.

HY 248. Modern Latin America. 3 Hours.

A survey of Latin American history from c. 1810 to the present. Covers the vital era of political independence and, through “case studies” of major countries, examines key trends and developments that have shaped the region and its 21 nations since then. Major topics include 19th century nation-state formation and economic modernization; 20th century urbanization, nationalism, social revolution, military dictatorships, and democratization, including the rise of influential women's (and feminist) movements.

HY 251. Nineteenth-Century Europe. 3 Hours.

National consolidation, imperialist adventure, and European society and politics from 1815 to 1914.

HY 252. Twentieth Century Europe. 3 Hours.

Europe as transformed by total war, economic dislocation, rise of totalitarian movements, and post-1945 integration from 1914 to present.

HY 257. The Celtic Fringe: Ireland, Scotland, Wales. 3 Hours.

History of "other" British nations: Irish, Scots, and Welsh. Internal development and relations with England.

HY 258. Britain and the Third World. 3 Hours.

This course examines the relations between Great Britain, the modern world¿s first superpower and non-European peoples all over the world. In addition to examining issues of Empire, the course stresses the cultural interactions that were critical in the development of the modern world and the problems and opportunities of multi-ethnic societies. The course emphasizes those areas in Africa, Asia and the Middle East where the encounters between the British and the native culture created situations which are still major issues for the twentieth century world. Parallels to American experiences are also discussed. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course (QEP).

HY 259. Social History of Crime. 3 Hours.

This course examines the various approaches historians have made to the social and cultural history of criminal violence. While the topic is one that applies to every human society, most of the material deals with Europe and the United States.

HY 262. Introduction to Early Modern Spanish History. 3 Hours.

Survey of the history of Spain from the 15th to the 18th centuries with emphases on the social and cultural effects of European expansion, race and religion, the Inquisitions, and Spain's contribution to European art and literature.

HY 263. History of the Russian Empire. 3 Hours.

Russian history from prehistory to 1917, focusing on development of Russian state and its social and political character.

HY 264. Russian Revolution: 1917-1921. 3 Hours.

Russian Revolution with emphasis on political, social, and national conflicts in cities, in countryside, and in non-Russian areas.

HY 265. History of the Soviet Union 1917-1991. 3 Hours.

Bolshevik Revolution and role of Soviet Union as world power.

HY 270. Topics in History. 3 Hours.

Special studies of historical topics. May be repeated.

HY 271. Traditional East Asian History and Culture. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the histories and cultures of East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia) from ancient times to 1800.

HY 272. Modern East Asia. 3 Hours.

A political and social history of East Asia and East Asia's relations with the West from 1800 to present.

HY 278. Untold Stories: Oral History. 3 Hours.

This course teaches the techniques and theories of oral history as a primary way to uncover untold or "hidden" histories of ordinary people. Students will conduct interviews of persons who participated in an aspect of history or who witnessed an important era.

HY 279. Women Rogues, Radicals and Reformers. 3 Hours.

This course looks at women as agents of their own history in the United States and of American society as a whole. It concentrates on how women have defined and used sexual politics, political radicalism, and reform agendas from the 1600s to the 1960s.

HY 280. Historic Preservation and Public Policy. 3 Hours.

Ways to research, assess, and use historic buildings and architecture as a way to study history and infrom public policy.

HY 285. Mapping Our World. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the historical applications of mapping and map-making. It will provide a background to geometric mapping and Geography using aerial photography, satellite remote sensing, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and historical maps and related datasets. Students will be taught the importance of maps to a wide range of fields from a number of academic specialists. This will include the physical sciences (NASA atmospheric applications), biological sciences (environmental mapping), social sciences (crime mapping and archaeological mapping), health sciences (disease mapping), and humanities (religious mapping). Students will work in UAB labs and in broader Birmingham on learning ArcGIS and mapmaking skills, and will submit an e-Portfolio by the end of the semester. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).

HY 289. Topics in African American History. 3 Hours.

Special studies in African American historical topics.

HY 290. Topics in History. 3 Hours.

Special studies of historical topics. May be repeated.

HY 291. Topics in History. 3 Hours.

Special studies of historical topics. May be repeated.

HY 292. Topics in History/SL. 3 Hours.

Special studies of historical topics. May be repeated. Service Learning.

HY 300. The Historian's Craft. 3 Hours.

This course examines the values, methodology, and materials of historical analysis. During the semester students will develop their writing skills, study the quantitative aspects of historical scholarship and examine the ethical and civic responsibilities historians bear towards the profession and the larger community. Writing is a significant component of this course (QEP).

HY 303. Women in American History. 3 Hours.

Changing economic, political, and social roles of women from colonial period to present.

HY 304. U.S. Civil Rights Movement. 3 Hours.

History of civil rights from late 19th century to present; significance of movement to those involved and to rest of American society.

HY 305. Popular Culture in American History. 3 Hours.

Mass culture of U.S. through films and recorded sound, from creation of entertainment industry in 19th century to television and counterculture of 1960s.

HY 307. The American Film. 3 Hours.

Creation and development of motion pictures in the United States, including how films are made, American film industry, and the impact of Hollywood on American culture.

HY 308. History of Popular Music in the United States. 3 Hours.

Creation of musical entertainment, the changing audience, and diffusion of recordings from earliest recordings of music hall songs to rap and hip hop.

HY 309. American Film in the 1980s and 1990s. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the rise of the independent film in the 1980s and the struggle with mainstream Hollywood studios for dominance of cinema in the 1990s. Covers independent film makers, finance, scripts and what it takes to make a personal film.

HY 310. Film in the 1960s. 3 Hours.

The sixties were a revolutionary time for films and the film industry, and this course surveys film from Europe and Asia but with special emphasis on American film and the way it reflected the counter culture.

HY 311. History of the Documentary Film. 3 Hours.

Studies the development of the film documentary and the issues of representing reality on film. Deals with film aesthetic and the techniques of making films. Looks at American and European documentaries.

HY 312. Rock n Roll and Race Relations. 3 Hours.

Looks at popular music as a part of American Culture. Concentrates on the rise of R and B and rock n roll as the signifiers of a new youth culture in the United States with special emphasis on music in Birmingham.

HY 313. Indie Rock from Punk to Post Modern. 3 Hours.

Covers the rise of indie rock from the punks of the 1970s to the Seattle Sound of the 1990s, and its impact on popular culture. Also examines the influence of sampling, electronica and dance music on the alternative culture of the 1980s.

HY 314. Roman Republic. 3 Hours.

Survey of Roman history, society, and culture from the founding of the city of Rome in 753 BCE to the death of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE. Course covers the conquest of Italy, the Punic wars, and the conquest of the Hellenistic kingdoms. Emphasis on the impact of military success on the lifestyle and culture of the Roman people.

HY 315. Egypt in the Age of the Pyramids. 3 Hours.

This course spans the years 5000 BC through 1550 BC (Predynastic and Dynasties 1-17), which encompasses Egypt's pyramid building age. It will focus broadly on the archaeology, history, art, architecture, religion, and literature of this period. It is designed to stand independently of its companion course Imperial and Post-Imperial Egypt.

HY 316. Imperial and Post-Inperial Egypt. 3 Hours.

This course spans the years 1550 BC to the Ptolemaic-Roman periods, which covers Egypt's glorious imperial era (New Kingdom: Dynasties 18-10) and its decline in Dynasties 21-31, with the rise of other empires and the Macedonian and Roman control of Egypt. It focuses broadly on the archaeology, history, art, architecture, religion, and literature of this time span and is designed to stand independently of its companion course Egypt in the Age of the Pyramids.

HY 317. History of Ancient Greece. 3 Hours.

Ancient Greece from prehistory to Alexander and the Hellenistic age.

HY 318. History of the Roman Empire. 3 Hours.

Survey of Roman history, society, and culture from the death of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE to the reign of constantine in the early fourth century CE, with an emphasis on how the Roman Empire ruled.

HY 319. Late Antiquity and Early Middle Ages. 3 Hours.

This course explores the transition from the Classical Greco-Roman Mediterranean world to the Middle Ages. It begins with the conversion of the Roman Empire to Christianity. Then it explores the collapse of the Western Roman Empire and the continuation of the Eastern Empire (known to historians as the Byzantine Empire). It places Mohammad and the rise of Islam in its historical context and explores the impact of the early Islamic conquests. The course will finish around the year 800 with the reign of Charlemagne in the West and Islamic Abbasid Dynasty ruling in Baghdad.

HY 320. Political History From Roosevelt to Roosevelt. 3 Hours.

History of the period between 1900 and 1945, with emphasis on national politics.

HY 321. Political History Since FDR. 3 Hours.

A History of United States since 1945, with a special emphasis on national politics; includes Cold War domestic and foreign policy, the rights revolutions, changing political ideologies and identities, globalization and its effects.

HY 322. The Great Depression in Film. 3 Hours.

Examines the causes and effects of the Great Depression using both fictional and documentary films and required readings; students will analyze how Hollywood interpreted the lives of Americans during that period.

HY 325. Southern Politics in the 20th Century. 3 Hours.

The social and economic bases of Southern politics.

HY 326. Mansions, Mines, and Jim Crow. 3 Hours.

This course will study the history of Birmingham (1871-1950) by examining the few men who owned the mines and mills, the masses of men who worked for them, and the way that Jim Crow segregation kept the system from working.

HY 327. Southern Labor History. 3 Hours.

Unique conditions and people who formed Southern labor history. Changing contours of slave, industrial, and post-industrial labor force.

HY 329. US Women's Labor History. 3 Hours.

Role and influence of working women on American history as social and political force in creating work identity and culture.

HY 330. Middle East 550 BCE to 1453 CE. 3 Hours.

Survey course on the history of the Middle East from the rise of the Persian Empire to the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople. Course covers the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's conquests, Roman in the Middle East, the early Islamic Conquests, and the impact of the Crusades. The development of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are emphasized.

HY 334. The World Since 1945. 3 Hours.

Events and trends from the end of the Second World War to the present, emphasizing the origins of the Cold War, decolonization, European integration, globalization, the rise of China, Inida, and Japan, the revolutions in Eastern Euope in 1989 and the collapse of communism in the Soviet Union, the third wave of democratization, Islamic fundamentalism, 9/11, and the internation financial crisis of 2008-2009.

HY 336. Europe Since 1945. 3 Hours.

After the Nazi catastrophe, what was to be the future of Europe? After sketching the context of unparalleled death and destruction, this course focuses on European reconstruction on both sides of the Iron Curtain. While contrasting Eastern and Western regimes, course will also seek to compare postwar recovery plans, cultural aesthetics, and shared legacies borne out of the experience of World War II. Strong emphasis is given to questions of memory and national identity, the history of European integration in the West, and socialist interdependence in the East. After 1989, course will focus on the expansion of the European Union, alongside transnational cultural phenomena such as European soccer, environmentalism, spaces of memory, and the loaded question of Europe’s “boundaries” in the east and southeast.

HY 337. Eastern Europe 1600-1918. 3 Hours.

Before WWI, Eastern Europe consisted of a patchwork of ethnic groups ruled by four empires, which were ultimately destroyed with the rise of nationalism. This course explores this lost world of Eastern Europe in the Age of Empire and attends to four conceptual areas which dominated it: the concept and practice of Empire; the genesis, development, and triumph of nationalism; the contribution of the region’s diverse Jewish population; and questions surrounding the ultimate downfall of this world. Students in this course compose six critical essays surrounding secondary and primary analyses of these conceptual areas and engage in regular course discussions.

HY 338. Eastern Europe 1914-Present. 3 Hours.

This course traces drastic transformative processes which remade Eastern Europe during the violent twentieth century, including: nationalism, ethnic cleansing, genocide, the Holocaust, communism, the Cold War, and European integration. Virulent nationalism, Nazi atrocities, and the vicious revenge they inspired decimated the multiethnic world that had come before and forged ethnically homogenous nation-states with rigid frontiers. With previous understandings of property rights, moral responsibility, and neighborliness undermined, and with Soviet armies occupying the ruins that remained, communists and their unwitting nationalist allies found fertile ground for the establishment of command economies, which repressed the traumatized survivors of the Second World War and their descendants until 1989. Students in this course compose six critical essays surrounding secondary and primary analyses of these conceptual areas and engage in regular course discussions.

HY 339. The Holocaust. 3 Hours.

On the basis of extensive reading, this course introduces students to the central problems surrounding the Nazi genocide of European Jewry as well as the postwar memory debates which have resulted from it. We will examine Jewish culture, contributions, and integration in pre-1932 Europe, as well as after the Holocaust, and conclude by exploring the contemporary influence of the Holocaust, such as in Israeli national identity. Students in this course compose six critical essays surrounding secondary and primary analyses of these conceptual areas and engage in regular course discussions.

HY 341. US-Latin American Relations. 3 Hours.

A history of the multi-faceted, often troubled, relations between the U.S. and its nearest southern neighbors since the early nineteenth century. While touching on various aspects of those relations, it stresses the geopolitical aspect, focusing on conflicts that have arisen as a result of different interests and perceptions as well as basic power assymetries.

HY 342. Sex & Latin American Society. 3 Hours.

A social history of Latin America that traces the evolution of relations between the sexes since the colonial period and focuses on the role of gender (socially-constructed rather than biological differences between men and women), along with race, class, and other factors, in shaping the experiences of women in particular.

HY 343. Modern Latin America. 3 Hours.

A survey of Latin American history from c. 1810 to the present. Covers the vital era of political independence and, through “case studies” of major countries, examines key trends and developments that have shaped the region and its 21 nations since then. Major topics include 19th century nation-state formation and economic modernization; 20th century urbanization, nationalism, social revolution, military dictatorships, and democratization, including the rise of influential women’s (and feminist) movements.

HY 351. Continental Enlightenment 1680-1790. 3 Hours.

Ideas and politics during 18th century, focusing on Western Europe outside France; new ideas about society, religion, and government in Italian and German states.

HY 353. The Christians in History. 3 Hours.

Origins, development, and spread of Christianity from antiquity to the modern world.

HY 355. The Reformation. 3 Hours.

Issues and meanings of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations of the 16th and 17th centuries, with particular attention to intelluctual, social, and political dimensions.

HY 357. Religion in Early Modern European History. 3 Hours.

Examines the theological, soical and political upheavals that shaped religious life and how religion permeated early modernculture from the abstract philosophical debates to the most mundane daily activities.

HY 359. Social History of Crime. 3 Hours.

This course examines the various approaches historians have made to the social and cultural history of criminal violence. While the topic is one that applies to every human society, most of the material deals with Europe and the United States.

HY 360. The Celtic Fringe: Ireland, Scotland, Wales. 3 Hours.

History of other Britain nations: Irish, Scots, and Welsh. Internal development and relations with England.

HY 361. Britain and the Third World. 3 Hours.

British foreign policy, emphasizing Empire and British relations with peoples outside Europe.

HY 370. End of the U.S.S.R.. 3 Hours.

An analysis of Gorbachev's impact on the Soviet Union and the social and political forces he unleashed.

HY 371. Traditional East Asian History and Culture. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the histories and cultures of East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia) from ancient times to 1800.

HY 375. The Pacific War, 1931-1945. 3 Hours.

The military and political conflict between Japan, China, and the United States from the Manchurian Incident to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

HY 376. Japan and the United States. 3 Hours.

A social and political history of relations between Japan, China and the U.S. from the Manchurian Incident to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

HY 377. Modern East Asia. 3 Hours.

A political and social history of East Asia and East Asia's relations with the West from 1800 to present.

HY 378. Untold Stories: Oral History. 3 Hours.

This course teaches the techniques and theories of oral history as a primary way to uncover untold or "hidden" histories of ordinary people. Students will conduct interviews of persons who participated in an aspect of history or who witnessed an important era.

HY 379. Women Rogues, Radicals and Reformers. 3 Hours.

This course looks at women as agents of their own history in the United States and of American society as a whole. It concentrates on how women have defined and used sexual politics, political radicalism, and reform agendas from the 1600¿s to the 1960¿s.

HY 388. History of American Medicine. 3 Hours.

Survey of patterns and trends in American medicine.

HY 389. Topics in African American History. 3 Hours.

Special studies of African American historical topics. May be repeated.

HY 390. Topics in History. 3 Hours.

Special studies of historical topics. May be repeated.

HY 391. Topics in History. 3 Hours.

Special studies of historical topics. May be repeated.

HY 392. Topics in History/SL. 3 Hours.

Special studies of historical topics. May be repeated. Service Learning.

HY 393. Topics in History. 3 Hours.

Special studies of historical topics. May be repeated.

HY 401. Honors Thesis. 3 Hours.

Independent research project for honors students in history, directed by faculty advisor. Course taken twice to produce thesis for Honors in History.

HY 402. Reacting to the Past. 3 Hours.

Reacting to the Past" is an award winning pedagogy involving complex, collaborative role-playing games in which students seek to attain "victory objectives" while grappling with central tests in the history of ideas. This class will conduct several Reacting games that will allow students to expolre key moments in European intellectual and cultural history.

HY 403. Colonial American History to 1765. 3 Hours.

Examines colonial North America, especially Britain's colonies, their social and cultural development, and the emergence of distinctive British American and African American identities.
Prerequisites: HY 120 [Min Grade: D]

HY 404. American Revolution. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the history and historiography of the American Revolution and the emergence of the United States as a nation-state with emphasis on the origins of the Revolution, the progress of the War for Independence, the social consequences of the Revolution, the creation of the American Republic, and the contested memories and meanings of the Revolution and American identity.

HY 405. War and Society in Early America. 3 Hours.

Examination of the history of warfare in colonial North America and the impact of war on colonial and native societies. Topics will include the "military revolution" and colonial America, war and culture, and wars for empire.
Prerequisites: HY 120 [Min Grade: C]

HY 406. Age of Jackson and the Market Revolution. 3 Hours.

Examines the first 50 years of the 16th Century, commonly known as the Age of Jacksin or the Market Revolution, as am era of profound economic, political and the cultural revolutions that overwhelmed America as it became recognizably modern, industrial and democratic.

HY 407. Frontiers of Early America 1492-1815. 3 Hours.

Provides a broad introduction to the history and historigraphy of the origins, writing and ratification of the U.S. Constitution.
Prerequisites: HY 120 [Min Grade: C]

HY 408. Early Republic, 1789-1828. 3 Hours.

Intellectual, political, and social origins and aspects of decades and the search for a national culture and identity.
Prerequisites: HY 120 [Min Grade: C]

HY 409. U.S. Constitutional History to 1877. 3 Hours.

Landmark cases in interpretation of Constitution against background of American history.
Prerequisites: HY 120 [Min Grade: C]

HY 410. U. S. Constitutional History Since 1877. 3 Hours.

Landmark cases in interpretation of Constitution against background of American history.
Prerequisites: HY 121 [Min Grade: C]

HY 411. The Antebellum South. 3 Hours.

South from post-revolutionary era through 1860, emphasizing social and cultural developments and myths.
Prerequisites: HY 120 [Min Grade: C]

HY 412. The American Civil War. 3 Hours.

Origins of secession and political, social, military, and diplomatic developments during war.
Prerequisites: HY 120 [Min Grade: C]

HY 413. Reconstruction in America. 3 Hours.

Myths and realities of Reconstruction from 1865 to 1877.
Prerequisites: HY 120 [Min Grade: C]

HY 414. The New South, 1877 to 1945. 3 Hours.

Political, economic, and urban development of South from Reconstruction to end of World War II.

HY 415. The Modern South, 1945 to Present. 3 Hours.

Social, political, and cultural developments of post-World War II South, including urbanization, civil rights, political party transformations, ethnic diversification, and federal public policy.

HY 416. The Fifties in America. 3 Hours.

Examines the decade that was the 1950's using documentaries and movies to identify major events and trend which includes the Korea War, political change, civil rights, teen culture and changing sexual mores.

HY 417. The Making of Modern America 1877-1920. 3 Hours.

Changing forms of industrialism and social problems created; Populism, Progressivism, and other reform movements of era.

HY 418. America in the 1920s and 1930s. 3 Hours.

American popular culture, political development, and economic change in period between two World Wars.
Prerequisites: HY 121 [Min Grade: C]

HY 419. The Second World War. 3 Hours.

Diplomatic and military history, with emphasis on world-historical changes brought about by World War II.

HY 420. Recent America 1945 to the Present. 3 Hours.

Economic, social, and political trends; history of Cold War.

HY 421. The Vietnam Wars, 1945-1975. 3 Hours.

A social, political, and military history of the French and American wars in Vietnam during the Cold War era.

HY 422. Ethnic Cleansing & Genocide 1912-2012. 3 Hours.

With strong attention to definitions and critical approaches to comparative history, this course examines the varied forms of forced population movements in recent European history, moving from precedents during and after World War I through the era of upheaval during and after World War II. A significant portion of the course examines the legacy of these movements after 1945 and then broadens discussion to examine global forced population movements in the postwar period (India/Pakistan, Palestine/Israel, Rwanda, etc.) and contemporary cases. Alongside intensive readings, it incorporates a critical research paper devoted to an instance or aspect of forced population movement.

HY 423. Southern Women: Image and Reality. 3 Hours.

Southern women's lives from colonial period into 20th century. Contrasts myths, particularly myth of belle on pedestal, with realities of women's lives.
Prerequisites: HY 120 [Min Grade: C]

HY 424. Emergence of Modern American 1877-1945. 3 Hours.

Focused study of the final appearance of an industrial economy and the different approaches to the government it generated, including the various reform movements ( populism, socialism, progressivism, latent civil rights, women's movement, New Deal) that spun out of this experience.
Prerequisites: HY 121 [Min Grade: C]

HY 427. History of American Technology. 3 Hours.

Development and impact of new technology in U.S. from colonial period to present.

HY 428. Technology and American Life. 3 Hours.

Impact of technology on modern American life and culture; automobile, television, and computer.

HY 429. Workers in American Society. 3 Hours.

Seventeenth century artisans to contemporary factory and office workers, organized and unorganized; effect of industrial and technological revolution on American labor, society, and politics.

HY 430. U. S. Labor History. 3 Hours.

Examines the mulit-faceted lives of American workers from the colonial period to the late 20th Century with emphasis on their changing lives as economics changed grew.

HY 431. American Film and Violent Society. 3 Hours.

History of violent movies in the United States from earliest silent films to new gangster films of Quentin Tarantino. Meaning of these films and what they say about American society.

HY 432. Labor History in Film. 3 Hours.

Examines and contrasts the imagery of working class life with documentary and film.

HY 435. American Urban History. 3 Hours.

Major patterns of urbanization and urban life in American history.

HY 438. The Changing American Landscape. 3 Hours.

History of way America looks and how it has changed from rural to urban, from farming to industrial landscape. Extensive field trips in Birmingham area.
Prerequisites: HY 120 [Min Grade: C] or HY 121 [Min Grade: C]

HY 439. American Environmental History. 3 Hours.

Changing perspectives on American environment and major issues in environmental history.

HY 445. History of Women Latin America. 3 Hours.

Condition of Lation American women in historial perspective with reference to factors such as race, class, religion and ethnicity; Hispanic cultural attitudes that aave shaped that condition over time.

HY 446. Nations of the Andes. 3 Hours.

A study of the vital Andean region of South America since the time of the Inca Empire, with special focus on the rise of the modern-day countries of Peru, Chile, Ecuador and Colombia. Explores their struggles, starting in the 19th century, to transform their ethnically diverse, highly stratified societies into modern and more inclusive nations. Major topics include the impact of 19th century liberal nation-building and agro-export economies as well as 20th century nationalism, “indigenismo”, social conflict, populism, revolutionary movements and contemporary ethnic rights movements; also, the rise of illicit drug-production and trafficking.

HY 447. Modern Mexico. 3 Hours.

Examines the evolution of the Mexican nation and its relations with the rest of the world from c.1800 to the present. This includes the country’s dramatic 19th century struggles for political unity and survival; the U.S.-Mexican War and origins of Mexicans’ Yankeephobia; the epic Mexican Revolution of 1910 and its impact; and rise of modern Mexican nationalism as well as contemporary trends such as the restoration of electoral democracy since c. 2000.

HY 448. Topics in History. 3 Hours.

Special studies of historical topics. May be repeated.

HY 449. Topics in History. 3 Hours.

Special studies of historical topics. May be repeated.

HY 450. Topics in Ancient History. 3 Hours.

Special studies in ancient historical topics.

HY 451. History of Greece. 3 Hours.

Ancient Greece from prehistory to Alexander and Hellenistic Age.

HY 452. History of Rome. 3 Hours.

Ancient Rome from time of Etruscans through Republic and Empire until decline in the 4th century A.D.

HY 453. Clash of Civilizations. 3 Hours.

This course critically analyzes the conception of a clash between "eastern" and "western" civilizations through historical based case studies. Possible topics include the Greco-Persian wars, the early Islamic conquests, the Crusades, the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, and the War on Terror.

HY 454. Topics in Middle Eastern History. 3 Hours.

Special studies in Middle Eastern historical topics.

HY 455. Renaissance and Reformation. 3 Hours.

From background of medieval society to birth of commercial, urban society; individualism; development of centralized territorial state; popular piety; humanism and art.
Prerequisites: HY 101 [Min Grade: D]

HY 456. Seventeenth-Century Europe: Absolutism, Revolution and Science. 3 Hours.

Evaluation of Seventeenth century through a study of the economy and society, statecraft and politics, warfare and the military revolution, the English civil war, the scientific revolution, and court life and absolutism.

HY 457. Nineteenth-Century Europe. 3 Hours.

National consolidation, imperialist adventure, and European society and politics, 1815-1914.

HY 458. Modern Europe. 3 Hours.

Europe as transformed by total war, economic dislocation, and rise of totalitarian movements; 1914 to present.

HY 459. Spain and the Spainsh Inquisition. 3 Hours.

Examines early modern Spainsh history covering the breakdown of the Spainsh "convivencia," the rise of the Catholic kings and the absolutist state, the establishment of a Spanish colonial empire and its ultimate decline of power, as well as an examination of the Spainsh Inquisition and its institional development and function as a tool of the Spainsh state.

HY 460. Ancient and Medieval Britain. 3 Hours.

Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Roman, and Viking influences and evolution of kingdom from Norman Conquest to reign of Edward III.

HY 461. English History: 1307-1660. 3 Hours.

Social and political history of England from peasant uprisings of the late 14th century through Wars of the Roses, Tudor years, and civil war of the 17th century.

HY 462. Early Modern Britain. 3 Hours.

History of the nations of the British Isles from the civil wars of the 16th century to the beginning of the Victorian Age.

HY 463. Victorian Britain. 3 Hours.

Social and political history of 19th century Britain.

HY 464. Modern Great Britain. 3 Hours.

Problems facing Britain in the 20th century, including end of empire, economic decline, and political restructuring.

HY 465. French Enlightenment. 3 Hours.

French Enlightenment as intellectual and social phenomenon.

HY 466. The French Revolution. 3 Hours.

Revolution as social, political, and cultural event and its place in modern European history and historiography.

HY 467. Modern France 1815 - Present. 3 Hours.

Economic, social and political history of France and the contentious issues of equality, democracy, and liberty between the Napolenic era and the present.

HY 468. German Catastrophe 1815-2012. 3 Hours.

After the collapse of Nazism, Germany was in ruins, truncated to a fraction of its former size, occupied and divided by hostile powers, and stained by the infamy of barbaric war crimes, most especially the Holocaust of Europe's Jews. After first examining the rise of German power and influence in nineteenth and early twentieth-century Europe (with emphasis on German nationalism, ideological tensions, Jewish life, industrialization, and Germany's relations with its Eastern neighbors), this course examines how defeat and resulting extremism after the First World War bred an environment in which the Nazis could seize power. Step by step, we will explore how an entirely new East Central Europe was forged in the terrible fires of 1938-1948, and we will examine how the resulting ruptures in memory and self-understanding wrought by this German Catastrophe were buried, manipulated, and confronted over the course of the Cold War and to the present day.

HY 469. Stalin and Stalinism. 3 Hours.

The life and times of Joseph Stalin (1878-1953) and his impact on the development of the Soviet Union after Lenin's death in 1924.
Prerequisites: HY 102 [Min Grade: C] or HY 105 [Min Grade: C] or HY 121 [Min Grade: C]

HY 470. The Soviet Union Since 1953. 3 Hours.

Soviet economic, political, and social trends since Stalins death in 1953.
Prerequisites: HY 102 [Min Grade: C] or HY 105 [Min Grade: C] or HY 121 [Min Grade: C]

HY 471. Russian Intellectual History. 3 Hours.

The emergence of modern Rusian intellectual thought from Peter thr Great (1682-1725) to the outbreak of the First World War with special emphasis on philosophy, literature, history and the issue of the Russian identity, as formulated by those who calim that Russia is part of the West and those who calim that it is a completely exceptional political and culture entity.

HY 472. Terror and Terrorism from French Revolution to Present. 3 Hours.

History of terrorism from its advent during the French Revolution of 1789 to the gobal war of present time reviewing three main instances of terrorism in history; French Revolution from 1793 through 1794, Russia in the 1870a and 1880s and their civil war between 1918 and 1921, and the present-day conflicts involving the United States and the Middle East.

HY 473. The Cold War. 3 Hours.

A survey and assessment of the dynamic relationship between the United States and its allies and the Soviet Union and the People's Republic of China from the Second World to 1991 and the collapse of the USSR. This course emphasizes the domestic as well as the international sources of this conflict, starting with the Second World War and communist ideology. It will cover the rise and fall of the international communist order, highlighting the differences between Soviet and Chinese efforts to reform their post-Stalinist and post-Mao systems in the 1980s, and the US role in this process.

HY 475. Modern China. 3 Hours.

China's political, social and cultural history from the final decades of the Qing dynasty in the 19th century to its re-emergence as a major world power in the late 20th century.

HY 476. Japan to the 19th Century. 3 Hours.

Japan's political and cultural history from its legendary beginnings to the final decades of the Tokugawa shogunate.

HY 477. Modern Japan. 3 Hours.

Japan's political and cultural history from the Meiji Restoration to the present.

HY 478. Topics in European History. 3 Hours.

Special Studies in European History.

HY 480. Historic Preservation and Public Policy. 3 Hours.

Ways to research, assess, and use hostoric buildings and architecture as a way to study history and inform public policy.

HY 481. Public History. 3 Hours.

Various approaches to interest and inform general public of local and state history. Visits to public history sites around Birmingham area.

HY 482. Internship in Public History. 1-3 Hour.

Individually designed program that allows students to work in local historic museums, archives, or other sites to gain professional experience in public history.

HY 483. Internship in Environmental Studies. 1-3 Hour.

Individually designed program that places students in local environmental organizations, divisions of local businesses or government, or special projects to gain professional experience in preparation for an environmental career.

HY 489. Topics in African American History. 3 Hours.

Special studies in African American historical topics.

HY 490. Undergraduate Seminar in History. 3-6 Hours.

Topic varies depending on professor.

HY 491. Directed Readings in History. 3 Hours.

Individually designed course of reading in various fields.

HY 492. Directed Readings in History. 1-3 Hour.

Individually designed course of reading in various fields.

HY 497. History Capstone. 3 Hours.

This course requires history majors to demonstrate their competency by successfully completing a research project.
Prerequisites: HY 300 [Min Grade: C]

HY 498. Topics in History. 3 Hours.

Special studies of historical topics. May be repeated.

HY 499. Topics in History. 3 Hours.

Special studies in historical topics. May be repeated.

Faculty

Conley, Carolyn A., Professor of History; Chair, Department of History, 1985, B.A. (Duke), M.A. (Chicago), Ph.D. (Duke)
Corley, Robert G. , Assistant Professor of History, 1993, B.A. (Birmingham-Southern), M.A., Ph.D. (Virginia)
Davis, Colin J., Professor of History, 1991, B.A. (Warwick-Coventry, England), M.A., Ph.D. (SUNY-Binghamton)
Demshuk, Andrew T., Assistant Professor of History, 2011, B.A. (Aquinas College), M.A. (Marquette), Ph.D. (Illinois-Urbana)
Doss, Harriet E. Amos, Associate Professor of History, 1978, B.A. (Agnes Scott), M.A., Ph.D. (Emory)
Forman, Michele, Instructor of Digital Community Studies, 2010, B.A. (Harvard), M.A. (UAB)
Jefferson, Robert F., Associate Professor of History, 2010, B.A. (Elon College), M.A. (Old Dominion), Ph.D. (Michigan)
Keitt, Andrew W., Associate Professor of History, 1999, B.A. (Duke), M.A., Ph.D. (UC-Berkeley)
King, Pamela Sterne, Assistant Professor of History, 2004, B.A. (Samford), M.A. (UAB)
Liber, George O., Professor of History, 1987, B.A. (Indiana), M.A. (Harvard), Ph.D. (Columbia)
McConnell, Michael N., Associate Professor Emeritus of History, 1985, B.A. (Indiana of Pennsylvania), M.A. (Youngstown), Ph.D. (William and Mary)
Millard, Andre J., Professor of History, 1989, B.A. (Nottingham-England), M.A. (Mississippi), Ph.D. (Emory)
Miller, Stephen J., Associate Professor of History, 2001, B.A. (Wisconsin-Madison), M.A., Ph.D., (UCLA)
Mohl, Raymond A., Distinguished Professor of History, 1996, B.A. (Hamilton), M.A.T. (Yale), M.A., Ph.D. (NYU)
Murray, Pamela S., Professor of History, 1990, B.A. (New Mexico State), M.A., Ph.D. (Tulane)
O'Beirne, Rosie, Instructor of Digital Community Studies, 2010, B.A. (UAB); M.A. (Alabama)
Steele, Brian D., Associate Professor of History, 2005, B.A., M.A. (Tulsa), Ph.D. (UNC)
Van Sant, John E., Associate Professor of History, 2000, B.A., M.A. (UC-Davis), Ph.D. (Oregon)
Ward, Walter D., Assistant Professor of History, 2010, B.A., M.A., (NCSU), M.A., Ph.D. (UCLA)