Department of Sociology

Chair: William Cockerham

The Department offers two approaches for a major in sociology: 1.  General Sociology 2.  Social Psychology Concentration in Sociology. Minors are offered in Medical Sociology, Social Psychology, and General Sociology.

Sociology is the scientific study of human social behavior, from the smallest group interactions to the broadest and most complex social processes. As a social science, the discipline analyzes the patterns of behavior in all types of social relationships. This field has broad scope and relevance. The undergraduate program in general sociology is designed to complement UAB’s location in a large metropolitan area with a major medical center. Such a location provides an excellent laboratory for study in several areas, including medical sociology, aging, social psychology, social inequality, and urban sociology. Students may choose from several courses in each of these areas. A significant number of courses are available in medical and health-related sociology.

The social psychology concentration provides a perspective on interpersonal relationships that draws on research conducted by sociologists and psychologists. In the broadest sense, social psychology is the study of how people’s behaviors and thoughts influence, and are influenced by, the actions of others. As a field of study, social psychology has typically focused on the study of persons in face-to-face situations and small group settings.

The central goal of both general sociology and the social psychology concentration is to provide students with a solid foundation in the basic tools of the discipline: statistical analysis, research methodology, and theoretical frameworks.

General sociology offers training for four basic types of careers. First, it provides a broad background for students who are not planning a career in sociology but who want an understanding of the nature and development of social structures and social issues-knowledge that can be applied to a variety of occupations and careers. Second, it offers valuable preparation for professional careers in the social services. Third, it serves as useful pre-professional training for careers such as the health professions, law, business, education, government, and even architecture. Finally, the program helps prepare students for graduate study in sociology and other social sciences.

The social psychology concentration prepares students for careers in service-oriented fields such as health professions, education, business, and government, and graduate work in social psychology.  

Graduate Program

For information on the graduate program in sociology, please consult the Department of Sociology or the UAB Graduate School Catalog.

Major Requirements for Sociology

Major Requirements for Sociology with a Social Psychology Concentration

 

Major Requirements for Sociology

Grade and Level Requirement

  • A grade of "C" or better is required in all Sociology courses.
  • SOC 489 must be completed at UAB. A total of 9 hours at 400+ must be taken in residence at UAB. Transfer students must earn at least 12 semester hours in residence. 

Requirements for a Major in Sociology

RequirementsHours
General Requirements
SOC 100Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 410Social Statistics4
SOC 489The Research Experience4
Theory Requirement
Select one of the following:3
Mind, Self and Society
Development of Sociological Theory
Social Stratification
Sociology Electives
Select 21 hours in Sociology (SOC) courses. Nine of these hours must be at the 200- level or above, and nine hours at the 300-level or above.21
Total Hours35

Additional Requirement

General Electives

Students must take general electives to reach the 120 semester hour requirement. 

Social Psychology Concentration in the Sociology Major

To qualify for a B.A. degree in sociology with a concentration in social psychology, a student must complete a minimum of 35 semester hours as listed below. SOC 489must be completed at UAB. A total of 9 hours at 400+ must be taken in residence at UAB. Transfer students must earn at least 12 semester hours in residence. A grade of C or better is required in all courses applied toward the major, including transfer courses. The 35-semester-hour B.A. program in social psychology is distributed as follows: 

Requirements for a Major in Sociology with a Social Psychology Concentration

RequirementsHours
General Requirements
SOC 100Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 120Introduction to Social Psychology3
SOC 410Social Statistics4
SOC 489The Research Experience4
PY 101Introduction to Psychology3
PY 372Social Psychology3
Theory Requirement
Select one of the following:3
Mind, Self and Society
Development of Sociological Theory
Social Stratification
Psychology Requirements
Select one of the following:3
Developmental Psychology
Abnormal Psychology
Psychopathology and Culture
Sociology Electives
Select three of the following courses, with at least two at the 300-level or higher.9
Intimate Relationships and the Family
Human Sexuality
Sociology of Sex and Gender
Family Conflict and Violence
Introduction to Medical Sociology
The Sociology of Mental Health
Introduction to Aging
Social Structure and Personality
Deviant Behavior
Drugs and Society
Social Psychology of Aging
Biology and Society
Minority Aging
Death and Dying
Family Relations over the Life Course
Sociology of Aging
Sociology of Health and Illness
Gender and Health
Total Hours35

 

Proposed Program of Study for a Major in Sociology

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EH 1013EH 1023
MA 1103Core Curriculum Area IV: History13
SOC 1003Core Curriculum Area II: Humanities3
Core Curriculum Area IV: History13Core Curirculum Area IV: Social and Behavioral Science3
Core Curriculum Area II: Fine Art23General Elective3
 15 15
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
SOC 1203Socology (SOC) 200-level and above3
Sociology (SOC) 200-level and above3Core Curriculum Area III: Natural Science with Lab4
Core Curriculum Area II: Literature33Core Curriculum Area II: Humanities3
Core Curriculum Area III: Natural Science with Lab4Minor3
Minor3General Elective3
 16 16
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
Social Statistics or Social Theory44Social Statistics or Social Theory44
Sociology (SOC) 200-level and above3Sociology (SOC) 300-level and above3
Minor3Minor3
General Elective6General Electives6
 16 16
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
SOC 4894Sociology (SOC) 300-level and above6
Sociology (SOC) 300-level and above3Sociology (SOC) Elective3
Minor3Minor3
General Electives6General Elective3
 16 15
Total credit hours: 125

1

Select One: HY 101HY 102HY 104, HY 105, HY 120 or HY 121.

2

 Select One: ARH 101ARH 203, ARH 204, ARH 206, MU 120, THR 100, THR 105 or THR 200.

3

 Select One: EH 216, EH 217, EH 218, EH 221, EH 222, EH 223 or EH 224.

4

 SOC 410 or one of the following SOC 405SOC 407 or SOC 415

 

Proposed Program of Study for a Major in Social Psychology

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EH 1013EH 1023
MA 1103PY 1013
SOC 1003Core Curriculum Area II: Humanities3
Core Curriculum Area IV: History13Core Curriculum Area IV: History13
Core Curriculum Area II: Fine Art23General Elective3
 15 15
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
SOC 1203PY 3723
Core Curriculum Area II: Literature33Core Curriculum Area II: Humanities3
Core Curriculum Area III: Natural Science with Laboratory4Core Curriculum Area III: Natural Sciences with Laboratory4
Minor 3Minor3
General Elective 3General Elective3
 16 16
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
Social Statistics or Social Theory44Social Statistics or Social Theory44
Sociology (SOC) 300-level and above3Sociology (SOC) 300-level3
Minor 3Minor 3
General Elective6General Elective6
 16 16
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
SOC 4894Social Psychology Major (Select One)3
Sociology (SOC) Elective3 
Minor 3 
General Electives 6 
 Minor 3
 General Electives6
 16 12
Total credit hours: 122

1

Select One: HY 101HY 102HY 104, HY 105, HY 120 or HY 121.

2

 Select One: ARH 101ARH 203, ARH 204, ARH 206, MU 120, THR 100, THR 105 or THR 200.

3

 Select One: EH 216, EH 217, EH 218, EH 221, EH 222, EH 223 or EH 224.

4

 SOC 410 or one of the following SOC 405SOC 407 or SOC 415

 


 General Sociology Minor

RequirementsHours
Introductory Sociology Courses
SOC 100Introduction to Sociology 13
Sociology Electives15
Select 15 hours from Sociology (SOC) courses, with at least nine hours at the 300-level or above. 2
Total Hours18
1

SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology may also be eligible to count toward Core Curriculum Area IV.

 

2

SOC 245 will count toward this requirement, and may also be eligible to count toward Core Curriculum Area IV.

 Grade & Residency Requirement

A "C" or better is required in all courses applied to the minor. At least six hours of the minor must be completed at UAB, including three hours at the 300-level or above.

 

Medical Sociology Minor

Medical sociology focuses on study of the social causes and consequences of health and illness. In addition, it analyzes health organizations and institutions, the social behavior of health personnel and consumers of health care, as well as international patterns of health services. It is a particularly relevant minor for students preparing for a career in a health profession such as medicine, nursing, dentistry, or optometry.

A grade of “C” or Better is required for all courses within the Medical Sociology Minor. 

 Minor Requirements for Medical Sociology

RequirementsHours
Required Courses
SOC 280Introduction to Medical Sociology3
SOC 283The Sociology of Mental Health3
Social Diversity and Inequality
Select two of the following:6
Sociology of Sex and Gender
Race and Ethnic Relations
Urban Sociology
Minority Health
Social Psychology of Aging
Social Stratification
Health-Related Issues and Problems
Select one of the following:3
Family Conflict and Violence
Urban Sociology
Minority Health
Population Problems
Drugs and Society
Death and Dying
Homelessness: Causes and Consequences
Sociology of Health and Illness
Gender and Health
Elective
Select one of the following:3
Ethnomedicine and Ethnopsychiatry
Abnormal Psychology
Medical Psychology
Human Sexuality
Family Conflict and Violence
Minority Health
Population Problems
Drugs and Society
Biology and Society
Minority Aging
Death and Dying
Homelessness: Causes and Consequences
Sociology of Health and Illness
Gender and Health
Independent Study: Sociology 1
Total Hours18
1

Must choose three of the following: Minority Women‘s Health, Women‘s Health, Women and Violence, Human Trafficking, Adolescent Pregnancy, Women and Reproduction, or Women and Sexuality 

 Grade and Residency Requirement

Transfer students must take at least 6 semester hours in sociology at UAB including at least 3 semester hours in courses numbered above 300. A grade of C or better is required in all courses applied toward the minor, including transfer courses. 

 

 Minor Requirements for Social Psychology

RequirementsHours
Introductory Sociology Courses
SOC 100Introduction to Sociology 13
SOC 120Introduction to Social Psychology3
Social Psychology Electives
Select four of the following courses, with at least three at the 300-level or above:12
Developmental Psychology 2
Abnormal Psychology
Psychopathology and Culture
Social Psychology
Intimate Relationships and the Family
Human Sexuality
Sociology of Sex and Gender
Family Conflict and Violence
Introduction to Medical Sociology
The Sociology of Mental Health
Introduction to Aging
Social Structure and Personality
Deviant Behavior
Drugs and Society
Social Psychology of Aging
Mind, Self and Society
Biology and Society
Death and Dying
Family Relations over the Life Course
Sociology of Aging
Sociology of Health and Illness
Gender and Health
Total Hours18
1

SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology may also be eligible to count toward Core Curriculum Area IV.

2

PY 212 Developmental Psychology may also be eligible to count toward Core Curriculum Area IV.

 Grade & Residency Requirement

A "C" or better is required in all courses applied to the minor. At least six hours of the minor must be completed at UAB, including three hours at the 300-level or above.

 

Honors Program in Sociology

Goal

The Sociology Honors Program is designed to help prepare outstanding undergraduate majors for graduate study in sociology or a career in medical sociology. The program offers a mentored research experience, and under faculty supervision, students will be exposed to a wide range of sociological perspectives and research areas.

Eligibility

Acceptance into the Sociology Honors Program requires the following:

  • Completion of the required sociology courses including Introduction to Sociology, Theory, Research Methods and Statistics (by the end of the fall term of the year the student enters the honor’s program).
  • An undergraduate cumulative GPA of 3.00 or above.
  • A junior or senior level standing (admittance to Honors Program must take place before August 1).
  • A cumulative GPA in Sociology courses of 3.3 or above.

Requirements

The following is required to graduate with honors in the Sociology Honors Program:

  • Completion of the required sociology courses.
  • Completion of two-semester Honors seminar 498/499.
  • Completion of a senior-level thesis or Service Learning Project or Research Project under faculty supervision.

Benefits

Participation in the Sociology Honors Program provides a unique opportunity for highly motivated, academically talented undergraduate students to have access to and interact with faculty in an environment that encourages creativity and independent scholarship. Seminar participation and research experience will be important to nurturing the student’s sociological imagination. Completion of the Honors Program is an advantage when applying to graduate school or looking for employment in an appropriate discipline-oriented field. Finally, students who complete the program will graduate “With Honors in Sociology.”

Contact

For additional information and/or admission to the Sociology Honors Program, contact:

The Director of Undergraduate Programs
Department of Sociology
460H Heritage Hall Bldg
Birmingham, AL 35294-1152
Telephone: (205) 934-3307

 

Honors Program in Social Psychology

Goal

The Social Psychology Honors Program is designed to help prepare outstanding undergraduate majors for graduate study in Social Psychology or a career in medical Social Psychology. The program offers a mentored research experience, and under faculty supervision, students will be exposed to a wide range of sociological perspectives and research areas.

Eligibility

Acceptance into the Social Psychology Honors Program requires the following:

  • Completion of the required Social Psychology courses; including Introduction to Sociology, Theory, Research Methods and Statistics (by the end of the fall term of the year the student enters the honor’s program).
  • An undergraduate cumulative GPA of 3.00 or above.
  • Junior or senior level standing (admittance to Honors Program must take place before August 1).
  • Cumulative GPA in Social Psychology courses of 3.3 or above.

Requirements

The following is required to graduate with honors in the Social Psychology Honors Program:

  • Completion of the required Social Psychology courses.
  • Completion of two-semester Honors seminar 498/499.
  • Completion of a senior-level Thesis or Service Learning Project or Research Project under faculty supervision.

Benefits

Participation in the Social Psychology Honors Program provides a unique opportunity for highly motivated, academically talented undergraduate students to have access to and interact with faculty in an environment that encourages creativity and independent scholarship. Seminar participation and research experience will be important to nurturing the student’s sociological imagination. Completion of the Honors Program is an advantage when applying to graduate school or looking for employment in an appropriate discipline-oriented field. Finally, students who complete the program will graduate “With Honors in Social Psychology.”

Contact

For additional information and/or admission to the Social Psychology Honors Program, contact:

The Director of Undergraduate Programs
Department of Sociology
460H Herritage Hall Bldg
Birmingham, AL 35294-1152

Telephone (205) 934-3307

 

Courses

SOC 100. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Hours.

Human social life, its forms and consequences for everyday life. Social inequality and differentiation by race, ethnicity, class and gender. Assessment of the competency is through performance on course examinations, quizzes, and written assignments.

SOC 120. Introduction to Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

How societies and groups affect perception of self and others; emotional climate and structure of group interaction; processes and dynamics of group leadership, interaction, and dissolution.

SOC 130. Intimate Relationships and the Family. 3 Hours.

Contemporary trends of marriage, cohabiting and partnerships; dating and courtship; social and psychological factors in mate selection; marital adjustment; role of sex, money, and children in marriage; divorce, other crisis situations, and changing patterns of family relationships in U.S. including the increase in LGBT families.

SOC 135. Human Sexuality. 3 Hours.

Social basis of sexual interaction; varieties of sexual interaction; sexuality related to daily life; attitudes, contraceptive use, and fertility and fecundity; sex role controversies; relation to institutions such as family, religion, medicine, and education; social definitions as determinants of behavior.

SOC 200. Social Change. 3 Hours.

Understanding social change helps us to better anticipate, prepare for, and shape the future. Examination of how and why human societies have changed so profoundly since prehistoric times; focus on information and technology as catalysts for change; patterns of change in contemporary societies from world system and comparative perspectives.

SOC 220. Sociology of Sex and Gender. 3 Hours.

This course discusses the presumed biological differences; socialization differences of females and males; positions in and treatment by major institutions such as education, religion and economy; influence of gender labeling on development and lives of individuals.

SOC 230. Family and Kinship. 3 Hours.

Structure and dynamics of family institutions and kinship systems in cross-cultural perspective over time and space; theoretical implications of family's relationship to social and technological environment, and the impact of globalization.

SOC 235. Sociology of Religion. 3 Hours.

Social aspects of individual religious experience; organization of churches and sects; relationships among religion, science, and other institutions; Major faith groups: religion and global conflict.

SOC 240. Family Conflict and Violence. 3 Hours.

Origins, manifestations, effects, controls, and rehabilitation aspects of family conflict and violence.

SOC 245. Contemporary Social Problems. 3 Hours.

How certain social conditions or behaviors come to be seen as social problems, why they persist and how they can be changed. Emphasis on understanding contemporary issues, and how diverse social groups are impacted by them.

SOC 250. Race and Ethnic Relations. 3 Hours.

Various ethnic and racial groups, with emphasis on theory and research on intergroup relations; internal structure, culture, and experiences of ethnic groups, with empahsis on contemporary American society.

SOC 275. Urban Sociology. 3 Hours.

Lifestyle changes in urban society; social and demographic characteristics of cities; benefits and problems resulting from these characteristics; urban problems compared with rural and suburban problems.

SOC 278. Global and International Sociology. 3 Hours.

Globalization is a pervasive feature of contemporary social life. A world economy, a world polity, and a world culture are rapidly expanding. This course examines globalization’s aspects and impacts to begin understanding its causes, effects, and implications for our own lives.

SOC 279. Contemporary China. 3 Hours.

Significant sociological issues facing modern China including: economic development, population problems, social inequality, religious freedom, and family dynamics.

SOC 280. Introduction to Medical Sociology. 3 Hours.

Social and cultural factors in defining health and illness; social determinants of health; health and illness behavior; health professionals; organization and delivery of health care in the U.S. (This course was formerly titled Health and Society).

SOC 282. Minority Health. 3 Hours.

The relationship between race, ethnicity, health, social and behavioral factors, and health policy. Health related issues specific to various racial and ethnic groups will be discussed.

SOC 283. The Sociology of Mental Health. 3 Hours.

Examination of mental and illness in its social context the social construction of mental health and illness the interrelationships between social structure, social factors, stress, coping resources and mental health experiences of mental health and illness.

SOC 285. Introduction to Aging. 3 Hours.

Aging experience in modern world. Theories of aging, dimensions of aging, everyday concerns associated with aging, and future prospects of aging.

SOC 290. Special Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Hour.

Irregularly offered courses on special topics in sociology. Varies in content. May be repeated for credit but topic may not be repeated.
Prerequisites: SOC 100 [Min Grade: C]

SOC 291. Special Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Hour.

Irregularly offered courses on special topics in sociology. Varies in content. May be repeated for credit but topic may not be repeated.
Prerequisites: SOC 100 [Min Grade: D]

SOC 292. Special Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Hour.

Irregularly offered courses on special topics in sociology. Varies in content. May be repeated for credit but topic may not be repeated.
Prerequisites: SOC 100 [Min Grade: D]

SOC 293. Special Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Hour.

Irregularly offered courses on special topics in sociology. Varies in content. May be repeated for credit but topic may not be repeated.
Prerequisites: SOC 100 [Min Grade: D]

SOC 294. Special Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Hour.

Irregularly offered courses on special topics in sociology. Varies in content. May be repeated for credit but topic may not be repeated.
Prerequisites: SOC 100 [Min Grade: D]

SOC 295. Special Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Hour.

Irregularly offered courses on special topics in sociology. Varies in content. May be repeated for credit but topic may not be repeated.
Prerequisites: SOC 100 [Min Grade: D]

SOC 315. The Sociology of Terrorism. 3 Hours.

Examination of the social and social psychological explanations of the phenomenon, with particular emphasis given to theories of social construction of terrorism.

SOC 316. Popular Culture. 3 Hours.

Relationship between popular culture, our cultural heritage, and present cultural identity. Connections with big business, music, sports, politics, film and mass media. Analyze cultural objects (movies), compare past mindsets with the present.

SOC 317. Sociology of Social Media. 3 Hours.

Communication and information technology as a product of social, economic, political, cultural forces. Its impact on everyday life. Focus on the Internet and how individuals use it to gather, distribute and convey information.

SOC 319. Sociology of The South. 3 Hours.

Focus on the South as a unique region. Examing areas such as history, politics, race relations, religion, music, personality, social types and collective behavior.
Prerequisites: SOC 100 [Min Grade: C]

SOC 320. Sociology Through Fiction. 3 Hours.

Sociological theories and concepts as illustrated in contemporary fiction. Classes will vary in terms of the fictional genre explored.

SOC 323. Social Structure and Personality. 3 Hours.

Interaction of social structure and personality; motivation, cognition, and impact of family, social class, and other institutions on personality development and mental illness.

SOC 335. Human Sexuality: A Comparative Approach. 3 Hours.

Sexual identity from a sociological perspective. Topics include: theories of sexual orientation, social movements related to sexual identity, development of sexual identity over the life course, and relationship to social institutions such as the family, medical community, and legal system.

SOC 336. Sport and Society. 3 Hours.

Sociological analysis of sport in contemporary societies. Sport as microcosm of society and modern institution; socialization process, problems of racial and sexual inequality, aggression and violence, mass media, and societal change.

SOC 340. Deviant Behavior. 3 Hours.

How and why certain behaviors, thoughts, and characteristics are labeled deviant; how and why certain individuals are labeled; consequences of being labeled; individual and group conflict; socialization to deviance; education; law enforcement; institutions; influence on family and friends.

SOC 350. Sociology of Hip Hop. 3 Hours.

Examines the emergence and impact of Hip Hop music and culture from historical, aesthetic, and sociopolitical perspectives.

SOC 360. Sociology of Work. 3 Hours.

Social organization of occupations; role and function in modern industrial society; gender and race; professionalism, job choices, and careers and stress; labor force composition, unemployment, and retirement. This class often does a field trip to a local business.

SOC 370. Population Problems. 3 Hours.

Scope and method of population analysis; analysis of growth, distribution of characteristics, and changes of population of U.S.; impact of changes in population structure on American and world society.

SOC 383. Drugs and Society. 3 Hours.

Variety of legal and illegal drugs in use in our society, their history, their social effects, and strategies for control and prevention of their abuse.

SOC 385. Social Psychology of Aging. 3 Hours.

Behavioral and structural relationships of aged population in America. Aging and interpersonal behavior, aging and social structure, and aging and social intervention.

SOC 395. HIV/AIDS and Society. 3 Hours.

This course explores the social impact of HIV/AIDS in local, national, and international contexts, focusing on how society has responded to and changed as a result of HIV/AIDS, including public health surveillance and interventions, policies and funding for prevention/research, and broader cultural changes.

SOC 404. Survey Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Current best practices in survey research and applied experience in designing, administering, and analyzing data from surveys. Useful for marketing, polling, etc.
Prerequisites: SOC 410 [Min Grade: C]

SOC 405. Mind, Self and Society. 3 Hours.

Symbolic interaction as major theoretical perspective of sociological social psychology; origins of approach in Mead, Blumer, and Goffman. Significance of concepts such as role-taking, impression management, self, identity and symbolic interaction.

SOC 407. Development of Sociological Theory. 3 Hours.

Social thought from earliest classic thinkers to current sociological theories; interrelationship between sociological theory and research; how theories are constructed; application of theory to contemporary problems through various writing assignments. Writing is a significant component of this course (QEP).

SOC 410. Social Statistics. 4 Hours.

Elementary techniques and analysis; preparation and use of graphs and tables; measures of central tendency and dispersion; probability and sampling; tests of significance and measurements of association. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MA 102 [Min Grade: D] or MA 110 [Min Grade: D]

SOC 410L. Social Statistics Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of SOC 410. Required for all sociology majors. Cross listed as SW 321L. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).

SOC 415. Social Stratification. 3 Hours.

Inequality of wealth, prestige, and power distribution examined as caste-class differences; effect of stratification on individuals and their behavior, lifestyle, and life chances.

SOC 416. Sociology of the South. 3 Hours.

Focus on the South as a unique region. Race relations are the organizing principle. Examines areas such as history, politics, religion, music, personality, social types and collective behavior.

SOC 417. Political Sociology. 3 Hours.

Political sociology traces the relationships between political ideas, government structures, social life, and the neverending efforts of individuals and groups to modify these relationships to achieve their best notions of the good life.

SOC 431. Environmental Sociology. 3 Hours.

Examines the interaction between the biophysical environment and human society, how social processes, define, construct, and alter the environment, and human causes and consequences of environmental problems.

SOC 445. Biology and Society. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the basic techniques and theoretical models through which modern sociologists and other social scientists incorporate genetic and biological information and processes into their understanding of society.

SOC 455. Minority Aging. 3 Hours.

Cross-racial/ethnic exploration on national level of special problems of minority aged groups such as Latinos, Blacks, Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Pacific-Asians, and American Indians. Family, church, health care, housing, adult education, retirement, income, and recreation.

SOC 456. Death and Dying. 3 Hours.

Death, dying and bereavement from sociological and social psychological perspectives.

SOC 457. The Aging Family. 3 Hours.

This course examines family relationships from middle to late adulthood from a sociological perspective. We examine issues such as caregiving, preparing for retirement, family relationships and how they vary depending on family structure, effects of divorce and remarriage, parenting at older ages and assisted reproductive technologies, transfers and saving, family ties etc. Much of the class is oriented towards how later life experiences are guided by earlier life situations.

SOC 459. Aging: Policy and Programs. 3 Hours.

Analysis of American social policies on aging and aged. Survey of related legislation, programs, and services. Special focus on evaluating effects of policies and programs for aged.

SOC 469. Sociology of Aging. 3 Hours.

How roles and statuses change with age in relation to major social institutions; adjustments people make to such changes. Aging population's impact on society and effect of society on aged.

SOC 470. Urban Ecology. 3 Hours.

Spatial distribution of social, demographic, and physical factors in urban environment; distribution of population by age, race and class; competition for land between businesses and home owners; consequences of local ecology for poverty, health, etc.

SOC 472. Homelessness: Causes and Consequences. 3 Hours.

Current problems of homelessness in U.S. history, health, mental health, poverty, public attitudes, and government policy. Civic Engagement course.

SOC 480. Sociology of Health and Illness. 3 Hours.

Critical evaluation of medical care system and health policy; social consequences of current health issues; social causes of health and illness; alternative practitioners and self-help groups. (This course was formerly titled Medical Sociology).

SOC 482. Gender and Health. 3 Hours.

Sociological, psychological and biological explanations of gender differences in mental and physical health across the life course.

SOC 488. Sociological Practice/SL. 3 Hours.

Students will be involved in community research and/or service-learning projects related to a substantive area of sociology or gerontology. Placement in community organizations to focus on research or practice related to social policy.

SOC 489. The Research Experience. 4 Hours.

Capstone includes application of the basic tools of inquiry in sociological research; basic ethical issues in research; forming the research question; hypothesis testing; measurement, sampling, validity and reliability; data gathering techniques; research design; data management; disciplinary standards for writing the research proposal and reporting findings. For students in their last 30 hours.

SOC 489L. The Research Experience Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of the Capstone course, required of all Sociology majors.

SOC 490. Independent Study: Sociology. 1-3 Hour.

Individually designed programs for semi-independent research or guided readings in areas and subjects otherwise unavailable. Irregularly offered courses on special topics in sociology. Varies in content. May be repeated for credit but topic may not be repeated. This is a designated service-learning course integrating academic learning, civic learning and meaningful service to the community.

SOC 491. Independent Study and Special Courses in Sociology. 1-3 Hour.

Peer-facilitated, structured dialogues on topics related to socail identity in a diverse society. Separate topics on gender, race, religion, sexualities. Mat be repeated for credit but topic may not be repeated.

SOC 492. Independent Study and Special Courses in Sociology. 1-3 Hour.

Individually designed programs for semi-independent research or guided readings in areas and subjects otherwise unavailable. Irregularly offered courses on special topics in sociology. Varies in content. May be repeated for credit but topic may not be repeated.

SOC 493. Independent Study and Special Courses in Sociology. 1-3 Hour.

Individually designed programs for semi-independent research or guided readings in areas and subjects otherwise unavailable. Irregularly offered courses on special topics in sociology. Varies in content. May be repeated for credit but topic may not be repeated.

SOC 494. Independent Study and Special Courses in Sociology. 1-3 Hour.

Individually designed programs for semi-independent research or guided readings in areas and subjects otherwise unavailable. Irregularly offered courses on special topics in sociology. Varies in content. May be repeated for credit but topic may not be repeated.

SOC 495. Independent Study and Special Courses in Sociology. 1-3 Hour.

Individually designed programs for semi-independent research or guided readings in areas and subjects otherwise unavailable. Irregularly offered courses on special topics in sociology. Varies in content. May be repeated for credit but topic may not be repeated.

SOC 498. Sociology Honors Seminar. 3 Hours.

Special seminar for sociology honors students. Prerequisite: admission to the Sociology Honors Program and permission of the Undergraduate Director in Sociology.

SOC 499. Sociology Honors Thesis. 3 Hours.

Sociology Honors Thesis.

Faculty

Baker, Elizabeth H., Assistant Professor of Sociology, 2012, B.A., M.A. (Bowling Green), Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State)
Bauldry, Shawn, Assistant Professor of Sociology, 2013, B.A. (Wake Forest), M.A. (U. Washington), M.S. (UNC Chapel Hill), Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill)
Clair, Jeffrey Michael, Associate Professor of Sociology, 1989, B.A., M.A. (San Diego); Ph.D. (Louisiana State)
Cockerham, William C., Distinguished Professor of Sociology; Chair, Department of Sociology; Professor of Medicine; Co-Director, Center for Social Medicine and STDs, 1991, B.A. (Oklahoma), M.A., Ph.D. (California-Berkeley)
Daw, Jonathan, Assistant Professor of Sociology, 2014, B.A. (University of Texas-Austin), M.A., Ph.D. (University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill)
Drentea, Patricia, Associate Professor of Sociology, 1999, B.A. (Wisconsin), M.A., Ph.D. (Ohio State)
Hamilton, Harry, Teaching Associate Professor of Sociology, 2005, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (UAB)
Milner, Adrienne, Teaching Assistant Professor of Sociology, 2012, B.A. (Emory), M.A., Ph.D. (Miami)
Stepanikova, Irena, Assistant Professor of Sociology, 2012, B.A. (Campbellsville), M.A. (Masaryk), Ph.D. (Stanford)
Szaflarski, Magdalena, Assistant Professor of Sociology, 2012, B.A., M.A. (University of Michigan), Ph.D. (University of Cincinnati)
Wallace, Gail, Assistant Professor of Sociology, 2008, B.A. (California-Davis), M.A. (California State- Sacramento), Ph.D. (Iowa State)