Department of Criminal Justice

http://www.uab.edu/justice-sciences

Chair: Jeffery Walker

The Department of Criminal Justice offers programs of study leading to a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice (BSCJ), a Master of Science in Criminal Justice (MSCJ), a joint Bachelor of Science in Digital Forensics (BSDF), a Master of Science in Forensic Science (MSFS), a joint Master of Science in Criminal Justice/Master of Science in Public Administration (MSCJ/MPA.), a joint Master of Science in Computer Forensics and Security Management (MSCFSM). The Department also offers undergraduate minors in Forensics Science, Legal Affairs, and a joint minor in Forensic Psychology.  The department also sponsors category “A” and “B” graduate Certificate Programs in Computer Forensics.

Bachelor of Science with a Major in Criminal Justice

The program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice offers students broad academic exposure to the fields of criminal justice and criminology, and while providing opportunities for students to take courses in computer forensics/cybercrime and forensic science. The primary mission of the program is to educate students by developing in them the knowledge and skills necessary to be successful in the field of criminal justice, including:

  1. Major theoretical explanations of crime/delinquency.
  2. The logic and procedures associated with the research process, including understanding statistical analysis.
  3. The substantive, procedural, and operational aspects of the criminal justice system and its processes.
  4. The ethical foundations for the system.

Each of these areas is developed through activities associated with specific courses in the curriculum as well as through an Internship/Capstone experience during the student’s senior year.

Undergraduate students interested in Forensic Science should consult the MSFS Program Director to learn more about the field. Students interested in the Legal Affairs minor should contact the Pre-Law Program Director. Students interested in the Bachelor of Science in Digital Forensics or Forensic Psychology minor should contact the Department Chair. 

Bachelor of Science with a Major in Criminal Justice

RequirementsHours
JS 100Introduction to the Criminal Justice System3
JS 101Crime and Criminality3
JS 220Police in America: An Overview3
JS 230The Judicial Process in America: An Overview3
JS 240Corrections in America: An Overview3
JS 300Research Methods in Criminal Justice3
JS 360Criminology3
JS 410Criminal Justice Ethics3
Internship & Capstone
Select one of the following:3
Internship and Capstone in Criminal Justice for Practitioners
Distance Internship and Capstone in Criminal Justice
Internship and Capstone in Criminal Justice
Statistics Requirement
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Statistics
Introduction to Statistics
Sociological Literacy
Elementary Statistical Methods
Electives (must include at least 3 hours at 400-level)12
Total Hours42

Grade and Residency Requirement

A grade of C or better is required in all Justice Science courses. At least 3 hours must be taken at the 300 level or higher and 9 hours must be taken at the 400 – level or higher. Students must have a 2.3 cumulative GPA prior to applying for their Internship.

Additional Requirements

Minor

A minor is not required for this degree. Students are encouraged to take a minor in an area related to crime and justice. Contact the criminal justice advisor for more information about minors.

General Electives

Students must take general electives to reach the 120 semester hour requirement.

Bachelor of Science in Digital Forensics

Proposed Program of Study for a Major in Criminal Justice

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EH 1013EH 1023
MA 1103JS 1013
JS 1003Core Curriculum Area II: Humanities3
Core Curriculum Area IV: History13Core Curriculum Area IV: History13
Core Curriculum Area IV or Freshman Learning Community3Core Curriculum Area IV or Freshman Learning Community3
 15 15
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
JS 2203JS 2303
JS 120 (or Equivalent)3JS 2403
Core Curriculum Area II: Literature23Core Curriculum Area III: Natural Science with Laboratory4
Core Curriculum Area II: Fine Art33Core Curriculum Area II: Humanities3
Core Curriculum Area II: Natural Science with Laboratory4General Elective3
 16 16
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
JS 3003Justice Science (400 level)3
JS 3603Justice Science (JS) Elective3
Justice Science (JS) Elective3Minor6
Minor3General Elective3
General Elective3 
 15 15
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
JS 4103Capstone (Select one):3
Justice Science (300-400 level)3 
Minor6 
General Elective3 
 Minor3
 General Elective7-9
 15 13-15
Total credit hours: 120-122
1

Select One: HY 101, HY 102, HY 104, HY 105, HY 120 or HY 121.

2

Select One: EH 216, EH 217, EH 218, EH 221, EH 222, EH 223 or EH 224.

3

Select One: ARH 101, ARH 203, ARH 204, ARH 206, MU 120, THR 100, THR 105 or THR 200.

Minor in Criminal Justice

The minor in criminal justice is designed for students who are majoring in a discipline related to human and societal issues or in the sciences. Crime, justice, and community have relevance to almost all fields. The minor in criminal justice provides students with the background they need to understand these issues in the broader context of society. 

RequirementsHours
Required Justice Science Courses
JS 100Introduction to the Criminal Justice System3
JS 101Crime and Criminality3
JS 220Police in America: An Overview3
JS 230The Judicial Process in America: An Overview3
JS 240Corrections in America: An Overview3
Justice Science Electives6
Select six hours from Justice Sciences (JS) courses, with both courses being at the 300-level or above.
Total Hours21

GPA Requirement: A C or better is required in all courses applied to the minor.

Legal Affairs Minor (18 Semester Hours)

The minor in Legal Affairs is designed to help students learn to think both critically and creatively about law, rather than to specifically prepare them for law school. Because the program is interdisciplinary and presents law as the subject of liberal inquiry, students in the program examine law from various perspectives. The minor exposes students to both general and specific aspects of both substantive and procedural law – civil and criminal; and helps them understand not only litigation, but alternatives to it.

Minor in Legal Affairs

RequirementsHours
Required Courses
JS 150Foundations of Law3
JS 230The Judicial Process in America: An Overview3
or PSC 330 The American Judicial Process
Core Electives
Select three of the following courses:9
Criminal Law
Criminal Procedure
Criminal Evidence
Trial Advocacy
Mediation
Criminal Investigation: Techniques and Analysis
The Legal Profession
Mock Trial Competition
Law and Society
Law and Society
Law and Film
The Politics of Constitutional Law
The Bill of Rights
American Constitutional Law I
International Law
Additional Electives
Select one of the following:3
Fraud Examination
Law and Economics
Economics, Institutions & Law
Forensic Accounting and Information Tech Auditing
Legal Environment of Business
Legal Elements of Fraud Investigation
Employment Law
Practical Reasoning
The Rule of Law
Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Intermediate Symbolic Logic
Philosophy of Law
Introduction to Forensic Psychology
Psychology and Law
Total Hours18
Note:

A grade of "C" or better required for all courses

 Minor in Forensic Psychology

Forensic Psychology is the professional practice by psychologists within the areas of clinical psychology, counseling psychology, neuropsychology, and school psychology, when they are engaged regularly as experts in an activity primarily intended to provide professional psychological expertise to the judicial system. Forensic psychologists work with individuals who may present a variety of mental health issues within the context of the civil law (e.g., personal injury suits, civil commitment proceedings, child custody disputes, or workers' compensation cases) and criminal law (e.g., insanity, competency to stand trial, assessment of future violence potential, or treatment of sex offenders). The minor is co-sponsored by the Department of Justice Sciences and the Department of Psychology, and is intended to expose students with an interest in forensic psychology to a broad-based overview of the field. A total of 24 semester hours is required to complete the minor. 

RequirementsHours
Required Courses
JS 110Introduction to Forensic Science3
JS 125Introduction to Forensic Psychology3
or PY 125 Introduction to Forensic Psychology
JS 330Criminal Law3
JS 404Serial Killers3
JS 460Violence: An American Tradition3
JS 333Trial Advocacy3
PY 218Abnormal Psychology3
or PY 372 Social Psychology
PY 319Psychopathology and Culture3
Total Hours24

A grade of “C” or better is required for all courses.

Transfer Students must earn at least 9 hours of PY or JS credit at UAB, 6 hours of which must be at the 300 level or higher. Students may have to satisfy prerequisites before taking some of the courses.

Minor in Forensic Science

RequirementsHours
Students will be required to take the following courses:
JS 110Introduction to Forensic Science3
JS 250Criminalistics: An Overview3
Students will select 2 of the following forensic science electives:6
Forensic Anthropology
Advanced Criminalistics
Forensic Science Lab I
Introduction to Computer Forensics
Research Methods in Forensic Science
Investigation of Fires and Explosions
Students will select 2 of the following natural science electives:6
Introductory Biology I
and Introductory Biology I Laboratory
Introductory Biology II
and Introductory Biology II Laboratory
Genetics
Molecular Genetics
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry I Laboratory
General Chemistry II
and General Chemistry II Laboratory
Quantitative Analysis
and Quantitative Analysis Laboratory
Instrumental Analysis
and Instrumental Analysis Laboratory
Total Hours18

Honors Program in Criminal Justice

Purpose

The Criminal Justice Honors Program encourages and prepares outstanding students to pursue a career in the field of Criminology/Criminal Justice by providing an opportunity to undertake projects under the guidance of faculty mentors. The program promotes initiative, creativity, and independent thinking among academically talented students.

Eligibility

Students are admitted to the Honors Program based on an evaluation conducted by the Honors Program Coordinator and a committee of faculty members. Students seeking admission to the Honors Program must:

  • Be a second freshman.
  • Have a cumulative GPA of 3.25 or higher and a GPA of 3.25 or higher in all Justice Sciences courses attempted.

Benefits

Participation in the Criminal Justice Honors Program provides opportunities for academically talented students to have unique access to faculty and to interact with other honors students in an environment that encourages creative and innovative thinking. Completion of the honors program is advantageous when applying to graduate programs in the field. Students who complete the program will graduate from UAB “With Honors in Criminal Justice.”

Requirements

Requirements for the Honors Program include completing the remainder of the students’ elective courses for the Criminal Justice major and being active in the Criminal Justice Student Association and in Honors Program activities. 

Selected junior or senior students in the Honors Program may be invited by faculty members to complete a senior project. This will require taking JS 481 Honors Research (Fall semester) and JS 482 Honors Research and Colloquium (Spring semester), completing the Honors Research Project, and presenting the results of the project at the Department’s Honor’s Research Colloquium. Students are also encouraged to present the results at an undergraduate conference or at professional conference, such as the Annual Meetings of the Southern Criminal Justice Association.

Contact

For additional information on the Criminal Justice Honors Program, please contact

Dr. Shelly McGrath
Department of Criminal Justice
1201 University Blvd.
Suite 210
Birmingham AL 35294-4562
E-mail: smgrath@uab.edu 

Courses

JS 100. Introduction to the Criminal Justice System. 3 Hours.

Introduction to criminal justice as a system consisting of interactions among three main components: police, courts, and corrections and the processes involving those components.

JS 101. Crime and Criminality. 3 Hours.

Examination of the causes and consequences in society of crime/delinquency, including theoretical explanations, sources of data on crime/delinquency, and efforts at controlling the behavior.

JS 110. Introduction to Forensic Science. 3 Hours.

Overview of the major components of forensic science including death investigation, toxicology, osteology, questioned documents, law, and criminalistics.

JS 115. Comparative Criminal Justice Systems. 3 Hours.

Analysis of police, judicial, and correctional components found in the world's four major legal systems: Common Law, Islamic, Napoleonic and Socialist.

JS 120. Introduction to Statistics. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic statistical theory and analysis. Course emphasizes computation, units of measurement, and evaluation of quantitative assertions; interpretation of quantitative data; use of quantitative data for problem-solving; and communication of information using numbers/words appropriate for the audience. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course.

JS 125. Introduction to Forensic Psychology. 3 Hours.

Overview of issues involving the intersection of law and psychology. Focus on role of clinical asessment of competency, scientific jury selection, expert witnesses in court, punishment and sentencing, and related issues.

JS 150. Foundations of Law. 3 Hours.

Examination and analysis of the evolution, function, and sources of law and legal systems in Western culture.

JS 160. Introduction to Private Security. 3 Hours.

Survey of the field of private security, including organizational, administrative, operational, and liability issues common to it.

JS 170. Introduction to Crime Scene Analysis. 3 Hours.

Overview of crime scene investigation (CSI), including history of crime scene investigation; processing techniques and methods used to document and preserve evidence found at crime scenes.

JS 220. Police in America: An Overview. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the history and evolution of modern law enforcement in the United States, including the role and functions of police in the community.
Prerequisites: JS 100 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

JS 230. The Judicial Process in America: An Overview. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the structure and function of American courts, including judicial selection and behavior, the prosecution function, jury system, and the role of lawyers.
Prerequisites: JS 100 [Min Grade: C]

JS 240. Corrections in America: An Overview. 3 Hours.

Introduction to history and evolution of probation, prisons, parole, and community-based programs for adult and juvenile offenders.
Prerequisites: JS 100 [Min Grade: C]

JS 250. Criminalistics: An Overview. 3 Hours.

Introduction to indentification and application of major types of physical trace evidence in criminal cases involving analysis and comparision. Laboratory component included; Laboratory fee is charged.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C]

JS 300. Research Methods in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Introduction to ideas, techniques, and problems associated with social research with an emphasis on criminal justice/criminology applications. Writing assignments emphasize ability to make a logical argument and respond to counter claims; incorporating outside sources into written materials; and use conventions appropriate for the discipline. Writing is a significant component of this course.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and (JS 101 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 101 [Min Grade: C])

JS 305. Religion and Crime. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to research on the impact of religious institutions and values on multiple aspects of public policy and life. Students will explore the impact of religion on law creation, crime-control attitudes, criminal and deviant behaviors, provision of social services, politics, and race/ethnic relations.

JS 307. Crime and Everyday Life. 3 Hours.

Examines everyday aspects of crime, including different forms of crime, media involvement, crime patterns, and policy responses.

JS 320. Police Organization and Administration. 3 Hours.

Analysis of organizational and administrative structure and function of police departments in the U.S.
Prerequisites: JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]

JS 321. Police-Community Relations. 3 Hours.

Overview and analysis of historical and contemporary relationship between police agencies and the public; legal issues; analysis of crime prevention programs, community participation, and police discretion.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C])

JS 322. Legal Aspects of Private Security. 3 Hours.

Introduction to and examination of critical legal aspects of private security, especially liability issues.
Prerequisites: JS 160 [Min Grade: C]

JS 330. Criminal Law. 3 Hours.

Analysis of the development of criminal law, including legal elements of a crime, defenses in criminal cases, appellate case analysis, and legal terminology.
Prerequisites: JS 230 [Min Grade: C] or (JS 150 [Min Grade: C])

JS 331. Criminal Procedure. 3 Hours.

Introduction to legal rules relating to the criminal process from investigation through punishment.
Prerequisites: JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]

JS 332. Criminal Evidence. 3 Hours.

Examination of the system of rules and standards, both state and federal, by which admission of proof at criminal trial is regulated.
Prerequisites: JS 230 [Min Grade: C] or JS 150 [Min Grade: C]

JS 333. Trial Advocacy. 3 Hours.

Overview of preparations for civil and criminal litigation including courtroom procedure, evidence, and the art of advocacy.
Prerequisites: JS 230 [Min Grade: C] or JS 150 [Min Grade: C]

JS 335. Mediation. 3 Hours.

Examination of mediation as a specific form of alternative dispute resolution (ADR), including its history, development, and processes.
Prerequisites: JS 230 [Min Grade: C] or JS 150 [Min Grade: C]

JS 336. Criminal Investigation: Techniques and Analysis. 3 Hours.

Examination of both technical and analytical aspects of the criminal investigative process.

JS 337. Introduction to the Intelligence Community. 3 Hours.

Overview of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) and its role in the intelligence community; Examination of the development and expansion of state and local fusion centers and first responder roles in evolving federal, state, and local intelligence community enterprise.

JS 338. Intelligence Oversight and Legal Controls. 3 Hours.

Historical development of intelligence oversight from the 1940s to the present; intelligence abuses; expansion of executive branch authority post-September 11, 2001.
Prerequisites: JS 337 [Min Grade: C]

JS 339. Methodologies in Intelligence Analysis. 3 Hours.

Introduction to analytical tactics, techniques, and procedures used by and in the intelligence community.
Prerequisites: JS 337 [Min Grade: C]

JS 340. Terrorism and the Intelligence Community. 3 Hours.

Examines application of the intelligence cycle (collection, analysis, management & dissemination of information) to the war on terrorism using case studies of successes and failures.
Prerequisites: JS 337 [Min Grade: C]

JS 341. Correctional Institutions. 3 Hours.

Introduction to prisons, jails, and juvenile institutions in the U.S.; evolution of penology and correctional change strategies; inmate social system; prison stress, violence, and reform.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C])

JS 342. Probation and Parole. 3 Hours.

Analysis of history, structure, and function of probation and parole systems in the United States; pre-sentence investigations; offender selection and classification; offender supervision; and agency administration.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C])

JS 343. Community-Based Corrections. 3 Hours.

Examination of contemporary redefinition of correctional functions emphasizing development and use of community resources; diversion of offenders from criminal justice system; nontraditional correctional programs.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and JS 240 [Min Grade: C]

JS 344. Science and Technology in the Intelligence Community. 3 Hours.

Introduction to, and critical examination of, science and technology capability of each member agency within the intelligence community.
Prerequisites: JS 337 [Min Grade: C]

JS 350. Advanced Criminalistics. 3 Hours.

Examination of advanced criminalistics, including biological or genetic properties of evidence, trace evidence analytics, and firearm and tool-mark examinations.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C]

JS 351. Forensic Science Lab I. 3 Hours.

Basic identification and individualization of common, frequently occurring physical evidence materials, with emphasis on trace evidence.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 110 [Min Grade: C]

JS 352. Forensic Science Laboratory II. 3 Hours.

Basic identification and individualization of common, frequently occurring physical evidence materials, with emphasis on biological materials.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 110 [Min Grade: C]

JS 360. Criminology. 3 Hours.

Identification and assessment of early and modern theories concerning the causes of crime in society.
Prerequisites: JS 101 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 101 [Min Grade: C]

JS 362. Victimology. 3 Hours.

Examination of the criminal-victim relationship and societal reaction to victims including victim services, restitution, and compensation.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and (CJ 101 [Min Grade: C] or JS 101 [Min Grade: C])

JS 380. Media, Crime & Justice. 3 Hours.

Examination of issues in crime and justice as depicted in popular media, including motion pictures, television, video, and other media.

JS 390. The Death Penalty in America. 3 Hours.

Overview of capital punishment in America including its history and justification, major Supreme Court rulings, current issues, and future directions.

JS 400. Drugs and Society. 3 Hours.

This course teaches students the pharmacological effects of and different categories of drugs. Different theories of drug use are discussed as well as the historical development of drug laws. Various harms associated with drug use are discussed as well as the consequences of drug prohibition. Lastly, students are expected to understand the different methods of drug research.

JS 402. Introduction to Computer Forensics. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the use of analytical and investigative techniques in criminal or civil litigation to identify, collect, examine and preserve evidence/information magnetically stored or encoded.

JS 403. Restorative Justice. 3 Hours.

Introduction to, and analysis of, movement in criminal justice to institutionalize peaceful approaches to harm, problem-solving and violations of legal and human rights. Includes discussion of specific programs, critical evaluation of these programs, and analysis of future directions of the movement.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and (JS 101 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 101 [Min Grade: C])

JS 404. Serial Killers. 3 Hours.

Examination of the psychology and sociology of serial killers, including case studies, agency responses and related issues.

JS 407. Special Topics in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

In-depth analysis of substantive topic in criminal justice or criminology including contemporary issues, ethics, historical review, or related topics. Varies by semester and by Instructor. May be repeated twice for credit.

JS 408. Juvenile Delinquency. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the nature, scope, and causes of illegal behavior by juveniles, and societal repsonses to that behavior.

JS 410. Criminal Justice Ethics. 3 Hours.

Analysis of systems of ethics and their applicability to problems in the administration of the justice system including those facing police officials, lawyers, judges, and correctional professionals. Writing and Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C])

JS 411. Juvenile Justice System. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the evolution and operation of specialized agencies and procedures to address juvenile law-breaking, including emerging problems and solutions.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and (JS 101 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 101 [Min Grade: C])

JS 412. Juvenile Law. 3 Hours.

Review and analysis of emerging statutory and case law in American juvenile justice.
Prerequisites: JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]

JS 413. The Legal Profession. 3 Hours.

Weekly seminars conducted by accomplished practitioners in civil litigation, criminal prosecution, criminal defense, labor and employment law, products liability, domestic relations, military justice, environmental, indigent legal aid, and alternative dispute resolution (ADR) techniques.

JS 415. Investigating Online Crimes. 3 Hours.

Introduction to cyber investigative techniques involving focused analysis of email and websites; examination of legal process and preparing evidence in cyber crime cases; rules concerning introduction of digital evidence.
Prerequisites: JS 402 [Min Grade: C]

JS 424. Serial Killers in Cross-National Settings. 3 Hours.

Examines serial homicide in cross-national settings including offender disorders; crime scene analysis; significance of victims; and offender classification process.

JS 434. Mock Trial Competition. 3 Hours.

Represent UAB as member of Mock trial Team in invitational, regional, and national competition. May be repeated for maximum of 12 hours of which not more than 6 hours may be counted toward fulfilling major or minor requirements.

JS 436. The Intelligence Community. 3 Hours.

Weekly seminars by intelligence community experts covering relevant topics including state fusion centers; proliferation of intelligence units within first responder agencies; growing role of the private sector; and local prosecution for intelligence agency abuse.

JS 437. Cybercrime and Forensics. 3 Hours.

Overview of all aspects of media forensics including analysis of character encoding, file formats, and digital media; examination of disk acquisition and duplication techniques; application of media forensic techniques in criminal investigation scenarios.
Prerequisites: JS 402 [Min Grade: C]

JS 440. White Collar and Corporate Crime. 3 Hours.

Introduction to, and analysis of, illegal/deviant behavior occurring in complex organizational settings, including theoretical explanations; patterns and case studies; and control strategies.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and (JS 101 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 101 [Min Grade: C])

JS 441. Terrorism and Social Control. 3 Hours.

Exploration of causes and consequences of terrorism and how governments respond, including investigation, prosecution, and punishment of terrorists.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and (JS 101 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 101 [Min Grade: C])

JS 442. Race, Crime, Gender and Social Policy. 3 Hours.

Examination of how subordinate status of minority groups (African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans and Women) affects interaction with the justice system as offenders, victims, and professionals.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and (JS 101 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 101 [Min Grade: C])

JS 443. Women and the Criminal Justice System. 3 Hours.

Examination of women's experiences as offenders, victims, and professionals in the criminal and civil justice systems.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and (JS 101 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 101 [Min Grade: C])

JS 444. Law and Society. 3 Hours.

Examination of relationship between law and society, including how law is used to facilitate or retard social change, social control, and social conflict.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and (JS 150 [Min Grade: C] or JS 230 [Min Grade: C])

JS 445. Juvenile Corrections. 3 Hours.

Examination of historical and contemporary efforts to reduce juvenile delinquency through institutional and community-based programs; innovative programs; evaluation of program effectiveness.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and (JS 101 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 101 [Min Grade: C])

JS 450. Questioned Death Investigation. 3 Hours.

Introduction to and analysis of questioned deaths, including techniques used in case investigation; overview and history of coroners' offices structure and function in the U.S.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 110 [Min Grade: C]

JS 451. Research Methods in Forensic Science. 3 Hours.

Review of routinely used research methods to conduct forensic science scientific studies.
Prerequisites: CJ 110 [Min Grade: C] or JS 110 [Min Grade: C]

JS 453. Investigation of Fires and Explosions. 3 Hours.

Introduction to arson investigation including overview of specific techniques used in case investigation; case preparation and presentation in court.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 110 [Min Grade: C]

JS 456. Forensic Approaches to Osteology. 3 Hours.

Introduction study of structure and function of bones with particular emphasis on ability to identify age, sex, and population type of skeletal material.
Prerequisites: JS 110 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 110 [Min Grade: C]

JS 460. Violence: An American Tradition. 3 Hours.

Examines violence as an American tradition, including historical acts of violence as catalysts for social change, destructive or negative violence, and policies and prevention strategies.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) and (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 100 [Min Grade: C])

JS 465. Cold Case Analysis. 3 Hours.

Introduction to methods used in analyzing unsolved cases, including innovative technology, 3rd party investigators, and teams.

JS 466. Spatial Analysis and Crime Mapping. 3 Hours.

This skills-based class will introduce students to the application of geographic information systems (GIS) to crime-related topics and issues.

JS 477. Legislative Issues in the Intelligence Community. 3 Hours.

Case studies of legislative contributions to and curbs on intelligence community's legal authority, including Patriot Act, Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), Defense Department Authorization Act, and state and local legislative initiatives.

JS 481. Honors Research. 3 Hours.

Undergraduate research project developed and completed under direction of faculty mentor.

JS 482. Honors Research and Colloquium. 3 Hours.

Completion of undergraduate Honors Project under the guidance of a faculty mentor with presentation of project at department colloquium.

JS 483. Patterns in Crime. 3 Hours.

Examination of the major correlates of crime and criminality; critical examination of major sources of information from which data on crime correlates are gathered.
Prerequisites: (JS 100 [Min Grade: C] and CJ 100 [Min Grade: C]) or (JS 101 [Min Grade: C] and CJ 101 [Min Grade: C])

JS 490. Independent Research in Criminal Justice. 1-3 Hour.

Independent readings, research or project approved and directed by a criminal justice faculty member who supervises proposed plan of study. Permission of Department Chair.

JS 491. Independent Research in Criminal Justice. 1-3 Hour.

Independent readings, research or project approved and directed by a criminal justice faculty member who supervises proposed plan of study. Permission of Department Chair.

JS 492. Study Abroad in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

This course affords students the opportunity engage in academic study outside of the U.S. to examine substantive topics in crime and justice. Students spend time (to be determined by the specific program) at a destination point, where they engage with students and faculty members in classroom and research settings at partner post-secondary institutions, experience immersion in foreign culture, and engage in comparative analysis of policies and programs relating to crime and justice.

JS 497. Internship and Capstone in Criminal Justice for Practitioners. 3-6 Hours.

Supervised capstone experience for students already working in a local, state, or federal criminal justice or ancillary agency. Course strongly emphasizes demonstration of student¿s ability to communicate in written form to appropriate audiences, including competence in grammar and mechanics; understanding and practicing ethical decision making and civic responsibility; and quantitative analyses including construction and interpretation of tables and ability to adequately communicate quantitative information. Prerequisite: Permission of Internship Coordinator. May be repeated for maximum of 12 hours of which not more than 6 hours may be counted toward fulfilling major or minor requirements. Ethics and Civil Responsibility and Writing are significant components of this course.

JS 498. Distance Internship and Capstone in Criminal Justice. 3-6 Hours.

Supervised capstone experience in criminal justice agency located more than 100 miles from Birmingham. Course strongly emphasizes demonstration of student¿s ability to communicate in written form to appropriate audiences, including competence in grammar and mechanics; understanding and practicing ethical decision making and civic responsibility; and quantitative analyses including construction and interpretation of tables and ability to adequately communicate quantitative information Prerequisite: Permission of Internship Coordinator. May be repeated for maximum of 12 hours of which not more than 6 hours may be counted toward fulfilling major or minor requirements. Ethics and Civil Responsibility and Writing are significant components of this course.

JS 499. Internship and Capstone in Criminal Justice. 3-6 Hours.

Supervised capstone experience in local, state, or federal criminal justice or ancillary agency. Course strongly emphasizes demonstration of ability to communicate in written form to an appropriate audience, including competence in grammar and mechanics; understanding and practicing ethical decision making and civic responsibility; and quantitative analyses including construction and interpretation of tables and ability to adequately communicate quantitative information. Prerequisite: Permission of the Internship Coordinator. May be repeated for maximum of 12 hours of which not more than 6 hours may be counted toward fulfilling major or minor requirements. Ethics and Civil Responsibility and Writing are significant components of this course.

Faculty

Copes, J. Heith, Professor and Director, Master of Science in Criminal Justice Program, 2001, B.S. (Southwestern Louisiana), M.A., Ph.D., (Tennessee), Qualitative Methods, Criminal Decision Making, Visual Criminology
Earwood, Martha, Teaching Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice & Internship Coordinator, 2003, B.S., M.S. (Georgia State), Corrections, Victimology, Restorative Justice, Experiential Learning.
Gardner, Elizabeth A., Associate Professor and Director, Master of Science in Forensic Science Program, 2007, B.S. (Penn State), PhD. (Michigan State), Drug Chemistry, Legal Highs, Gun Powder Residue, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, Pharmaceutical Spam
Griffin, O. Hayden, Associate Professor of Justice Sciences, 2013, J.D. (University of Richmond), Ph.D. (University of Florida), Corrections, Policy, Drugs and Society, Law and Society
Lim, Hyeyoung, Assistant Professor and Honors Program Director, 2013, Ph.D. (Sam Houston State), Police Use of Force, Police Decision Making, Quantitative Methods, Program and Policy Evaluation
Linville, Jason G., Teaching Assistant Professor, 2004, B.S. (Ohio), M.S., Ph.D. (UAB), Forensic Biology, Entomology, Forensic Science Education
McGrath, Shelly A., Assistant Professor of Justice Sciences, 2008, B.S. (St. Mary’s), M.S. (Ball State), Ph.D. (Southern Illinois), Quantitative Methods, Crime Mapping, Violence
Morgan, Kathryn, Associate Professor of Justice Sciences; Director of African American Studies, 1991, B.S., M.A. (Texas Woman’s), Ph.D. (Florida State), Corrections, Criminological Theory, Minorities, Violence
Walker, Jeffery, Professor and Chair, 2015, PhD (Sam Houston), MA (Arkansas - Little Rock), BS (Arkansas)
Warner, Gary, Instructor and Director of Research in Computer Forensics, 2007, B.S. (UAB), Digital Forensics, Cybercrime and Security
Wheeler, Anne P., Teaching Assistant Professor, 2012, J.D. (Harvard), Criminal Law, Procedure and Evidence, Law and Society, Litigation Skills and Strategies, Professional Ethics