Department of Mathematics

Chair: Rudi Weikard
Associate Chair: John C. Mayer

The Department of Mathematics offers courses in pure and applied mathematics and a major and minor in mathematics leading to employment in education, government, business, and industry. In addition, mathematics courses are offered to support programs in the physical, social, biological, and health sciences and in engineering, business, and education. Students considering a major or minor in mathematics should consult the undergraduate advisor, Dr. Hutchison, at (205) 934-2154 to arrange for counseling on career and academic objectives and program planning.

The Department of Mathematics Web site (http://www.uab.edu/mathematics/) summarizes information about the Departmental programs.

For the major there are four distinct B.S. degree tracks in mathematics:

  1. Mathematics (traditional track)
  2. Mathematics with Honors
  3. Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation
  4. Mathematical Reasoning 

Mathematics Fast-Track Program

The Department of Mathematics has an accelerated program for qualified students. Through this Fast-Track option, a mathematics major can earn a BS degree and an MS degree in mathematics in four to five years (depending upon whether summer terms are included). As another option, students can pursue a BS in mathematics and an MS in biostatistics by choosing the biostatistics track at the end of the third year. Each individual Fast-Track student works with a mentor from the graduate faculty on a mathematics research project during every term. Fast-Track students will usually begin taking graduate mathematics courses after the third year, and are automatically admitted to the graduate program in the fourth year, if performing satisfactorily. Students who complete this program will be prepared for continued graduate work in mathematics and the sciences, or for careers in industry. Fast-Track scholarships are available. For more information, contact the Honors Program Director, Dr. Oversteegen, at (205) 934-2154.

Course Numbering System

Mathematics course numbers indicate both the level and area of the course. The first digit (0, 1, 2, 3, or 4) indicates developmental (no degree credit), freshman, sophomore, junior, or senior level, respectively. The second and third digits indicate area, according to this scheme:

  • 00–10 — Pre-calculus
  • 11–19 — History of mathematics and mathematical reasoning
  • 20–29 — Logic and foundations
  • 30–39 — Algebra
  • 40–49 — Analysis
  • 50–59 — Differential equations
  • 60–69 — Applications-oriented courses
  • 70–79 — Geometry and topology
  • 80–89 — Probability and statistics
  • 90–99 — Special topics, seminars, and independent research

For example, MA 454 Intermediate Differential Equations is an advanced level differential equations course. Calculus courses (MA 125, MA 126, and MA 227) are exceptions to the area numbering scheme.

Graduate Programs

The Department of Mathematics offers graduate study leading to the degrees of Master of Science in mathematics (thesis or non-thesis option) and Doctor of Philosophy in applied mathematics. Further information may be obtained from the Graduate Program Director, or the UAB Graduate School Catalog.

See the UAB Graduate School Catalog for descriptions of graduate courses.

Major in Mathematics

Major in Mathematics with an Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation Track

Major in Mathematics with a Mathematical Reasoning Track

Major Requirements for Mathematics                     

RequirementsHours
Required Mathematics Courses 1
Thirty-nine semester hours with twenty-four at the 300 level or above
MA 125Calculus I4
MA 126Calculus II4
MA 227Calculus III4
MA 252Introduction to Differential Equations3
MA 434Algebra I: Linear3
MA 440Advanced Calculus I3
MA 441Advanced Calculus II3
Select one of the following:3
Scientific Programming
Mathematical Modeling
Modeling with Partial Differential Equations
Numerical Analysis
Mathematics Electives6-9
Two or three electives selected from courses numbered 300 or above, each of which must have a calculus (MA 125) prerequisite. MA 411 does not count toward the major.
Advanced Mathematics Sequence
Choose one of the following sequences:3-6
Algebra I: Linear
   and Algebra II: Modern 2
Intermediate Differential Equations
   and Partial Differential Equations I
Partial Differential Equations I
   and Modeling with Partial Differential Equations
Operations Research I
   and Operations Research II
Differential Geometry I
   and Differential Geometry II
Introduction to Topology I
   and Introduction to Topology II
Probability
   and Mathematical Statistics
Probability
   and Advanced Probability
Total Hours36-42
1

Completion of MA 125 automatically satisfies the Core Curriculum Area III: Math requirement.  MA 126, MA 252 and MA 361 are all quatitative literacy (QL) and writing (W) courses satisfying the QEP requirements of the core.  In addition, MA 125 is a QL course.  UAB requires that all students complete a capstone requirement.  For this track the capstone requirement is MA 441 .

2

Three electives are required if MA 434/MA 435 is chosen as the advanced sequence.

Additional Requirements

  • At least one of the following courses must be completed. Each is an ethics and civic responsibility (ECR) course satisfying a QEP requirement of the Core Curriculum.
RequirementsHours
HY 101Western Civilization I3
HY 102Western Civilization II3
HY 105World History 1600 to the Present3
HY 120The United States To 18773
HY 121The United States Since 18773

Grade Requirement

A grade of C or better is required in each course counted toward the major.

Minor

  • A minor is required for this degree.

General Electives

Students must take general electives to reach the 120 semester hour requirement

Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation Track

This track aims to provide graduates with the mathematical and computational skills needed to develop and maintain mathematical models from the Sciences, Engineering, Medicine and the Biosciences, Business, and elsewhere.

A mathematical model is a rendering of some real-world system into the language of mathematics, usually taking the form of a single partial differential equation, or a system of such equations. The development of effective mathematical models is a fundamental need of our society, based as it is upon science and technology, and these models act as the indispensable link between us humans and the multitude of machines that we use to manage and investigate our world.

 Major Requirements for Mathematics in the Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation Track

RequirementsHours
Required Mathematics Courses 1
39 semester hours with 21 hours at the 300 level or above
MA 125Calculus I4
MA 126Calculus II4
MA 227Calculus III4
MA 252Introduction to Differential Equations3
MA 360Scientific Programming3
MA 260Introduction to Linear Algebra3
or MA 434 Algebra I: Linear
MA 455Partial Differential Equations I3
or MA 461 Modeling with Partial Differential Equations
or MA 486 Mathematical Statistics
Mathematics Electives6
Two additional electives selected from courses numbered 300 or above, and from areas 30-­99 of the course numbering system for mathematics
Mathematics Electives9
Select three additional courses of the following courses:
Vector Analysis
Complex Analysis
Intermediate Differential Equations
Partial Differential Equations I
Modeling with Partial Differential Equations
Intro to Stochastic Differential Equations
Operations Research I
Operations Research II
Partial Differential Equations: Finite Diff. Meth.
Gas Dynamics
Numerical Analysis
Probability
Mathematical Statistics
Advanced Probability
Total Hours39
1

Completion of MA 125 automatically satisfies the Core Curriculum Area III: Math requirement. MA 126 and MA 252 are quantitative literacy (QL) and writing (W) courses satisfying the QEP requirements of the Core Curriculum. In addition, MA 125 is a QL course. UAB requires that all students must complete a capstone requirement. For this track the capstone requirement is one of MA 455, MA 461,and MA 486.

Additional Requirements

  • At least one of the following courses must be completed. Each is an ethics and civic responsibility (ECR) course satisfying a QEP requirement of the Core Curriculum.
RequirementsHours
HY 101Western Civilization I3
HY 102Western Civilization II3
HY 105World History 1600 to the Present3
HY 120The United States To 18773
HY 121The United States Since 18773

Grade Requirement

A grade of C or better is required in each course counted toward the major.

Minor

  • A minor in the sciences, business, or engineering is required for this degree.

General Electives

Students must take general electives to reach the 120 semester hour requirement.

Mathematical Reasoning Track

The Mathematical Reasoning Track is designed to develop a deeper level of understanding of mathematical thinking, including a deepening knowledge of important mathematical ideas, understanding the role of inquiry and reflection in learning mathematics, understanding the role of cultivating a productive disposition in tackling mathematical problems, and developing the ability to communicate mathematics to audiences at different levels. In particular, this track is appropriate for students interested in pursuing certification in mathematics at the middle school level.

 Major Requirements for Mathematics in the Mathematical Reasoning Track

RequirementsHours
Required Mathematics Courses 1
MA 125Calculus I4
Select two courses from the following four:6-8
Pre-Calculus Trigonometry 2
Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry
Finite Mathematics
Calculus II
Probability
MA 311History of Mathematics I3
MA 313Patterns, Functions and Algebraic Reasoning3
MA 314Geometric and Proportional Reasoning3
MA 361Mathematical Modeling3
MA 411Integrating Mathematical Ideas3
MA 418Statistics for Teachers3
Mathematics Electives
Select two of the following:6
Numerical Reasoning
Geometry I
Algebra I: Linear
Probability
Special Topics 3
Total Hours34-36
1

Completion of MA 106 or MA 107 automatically satisfies the Core Curriculum Area III: Math requirement. MA 106, MA 107, MA 110, MA 125, MA 361, MA 418 are all quantitative literacy courses satisfying the QEP requirements of the Core Curriculum. In addition, MA 361 is a QEP writing (W) course. UAB requires that all students complete a capstone requirement. The capstone requirement for this track is MA 411 .

2

Students cannot count both MA 106 and MA 107 toward their major.

3

MA 419 cannot be repeated for credit toward this major.

Additional Requirements

  • At least one of the following courses must be completed. Each is an ethics and civic responsibility (ECR) course satisfying a QEP requirement of the Core Curriculum.
RequirementsHours
HY 101Western Civilization I3
HY 102Western Civilization II3
HY 105World History 1600 to the Present3
HY 120The United States To 18773
HY 121The United States Since 18773


Grade Requirements

A grade of C or better is required in each course counted toward the major. Requirements are 34-36 semester hours in mathematics with 24 at the upper level (courses numbered 300 and above). Nine hours must be taken at the 400 level.

Minor

  • A minor is required for this degree.

General Electives

Students must take general electives to reach the 120 semester hour requirement

Proposed Program of Study for a Major in Mathematics with a Traditional Track

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MA 1254MA 1264
EH 1013EH 1023
HY 1013HY 1023
ARH 1013CS 2014
 13 14
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MA 2274MA 2523
EH 2163MA 3613
PH 2214CS 2503
CS 3024PH 2224
 General Elective3
 15 16
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MA 4343MA 4353
MA 4853MA 4863
CMST 1013EC 2103
CS 3034CS 3343
PY 1013PHL 1153
 16 15
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MA 4403MA 4413
MA 4723General Electives13
CS 4103 
MA 3113 
General Elective3 
 15 16
Total credit hours: 120

Proposed Program of Study for a Major in Mathematics with an Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation Track

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MA 1254MA 1264
EH 1013EH 1023
HY 1013HY 1023
ARH 1013CS 2014
CS 1013 
 16 14
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MA 2274MA 2523
EH 2163MA 3613
MA 3603PH 2224
CS 3024CS 2503
PH 2214General Elective3
 18 16
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MA 2603MA 4543
MA 4553EC 2103
CMST 1013CS 3343
CS 3034PHL 1153
PY 1013Mathematics (MA) Elective (Must be Approved)3
 16 15
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MA 4853MA 4863
CS 4103General Electives10
Elective3 
General Elective3 
 12 13
Total credit hours: 120

Proposed Program of Study for a Major in Mathematics with a Mathematical Reasoning Track

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MA 1103MA 1063
EH 1013EH 1023
HY 1013HY 1023
ARH 1013EDU 2003
FYE Course (credit hours may vary)1HPE 2002
 General Elective3
 13 17
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MA 1254MA 3143
EH 2163PHL 1003
MA 3133ECY 3003
EDT 3003PH 2014
PY 1013EDF 3623
 16 16
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MA 3113Elective3
MA 4183CMST 1013
PH 2024MA 4193
EPR 3633Education Certification Course3
SOC 1003MA 4113
 16 15
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EDR 4423Education Internship10
MA 4723 
Education Certification Course 8 
MA 3613 
 17 10
Total credit hours: 120

 Minor Requirements for Mathematics

RequirementsHours
Required Mathematics Courses
MA 125Calculus I 14
MA 126Calculus II4
MA 227Calculus III4
Mathematics Electives
Select nine hours from Mathematics courses numbered 200 or above. 29
Total Hours21
1

MA 125 Calculus I may also satisfy the Core Curriculum Area III: Math requirement; check the Core Curriculum for your particular major.

2

At least 6 semester hours of which must have a calculus (MA 125) prerequisite. (MA 260 Introduction to Linear Algebra and MA 434 Algebra I: Linear cannot both be counted.)  MA 411 does not count toward the minor.

 

GPA & Residency Requirement

A minimum grade of C is required in all courses applied to the minor. A minimum of six semester hours with a calculus (MA 125) prerequisite must be completed at UAB.

Honors Program

The Mathematics Honors Program is designed for advanced, motivated students. Through a mentored research program format and seminars, research and communication skills are developed in preparation for a graduate or professional career.

The Mathematics Honors Program fosters a spirit of inquiry, independence, and initiative along with providing an overview of the relationships among the branches of mathematics studied. The student will have an early opportunity to tackle a mathematical research project while interacting one-on-one with faculty members in a research setting. The mentoring, the approved seminars, and the oral presentation or poster should all contribute to the student’s development. Upon completion of the program, the student will graduate “With Honors in Mathematics.”

Acceptance into the Mathematics Honors Program requires the student:

  • to be a mathematics major in the traditional track;
  • to have earned a 3.5 GPA in mathematics courses attempted;
  • to have earned a 3.0 GPA overall;
  • to have arranged with one or more faculty mentors to work on undergraduate research projects for six semester hours distributed over two or more terms; and
  • to have filled out and submitted the Mathematics Honors Program application form to the Undergraduate Program Director.

Major requirements for the Mathematics Honors Program:

  • to be a mathematics major in the traditional track;
  • to complete an additional 9 hours of approved seminar (3 hours) and research (6 hours);
  • to have earned a 3.5 GPA in mathematics courses and a 3.0 GPA overall; and
  • to present an oral or poster presentation on mathematics in an academic setting

Suggested Curriculum for the Honors Program

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MA 1254MA 1264
EH 1013EH 1023
HY 1013HY 1023
ARH 1013EC 2103
FYE/FLC Course (credit hours may vary)2PHL 1153
 15 16
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MA 2274MA 2523
MA 2981MA 3613
MA 4343MA 2981
EH 2163PH 2214
EC 2103EC 2113
Minor Course3 
 17 14
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MA 3981MA 4413
MA 4403MA Elective3
MA 4901MA 3981
PH 2224MA 4901
MA Elective3CMST 1013
Minor Course3Minor Course3
 15 14
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MA 4901MA Sequence3
MA sequence3MA 4911
MA 4981MA 4981
Minor Courses6Minor Courses3
General Electives4General Electives6
 15 14
Total credit hours: 120

Courses

MA 098. Basic Algebra. 3 Hours.

Arithmetic of integers, rational numbers, real numbers, exponents, polynomial algebra, factoring, rational functions, linear and quadratic equations, elementary geometry, verbal problems. Designed to prepare students for college level math courses. Consists of two scheduled 50 minute class meetings per week, plus one scheduled 50 minute lab meeting per week, plus 70 minutes of individually scheduled lab time per week Attendance at the first day of class is mandatory. Attendance at the first lab meeting is mandatory. Students not in attendance on the first day of class or the first lab meeting will be dropped from the course. Non-credit; does not contribute to any degree requirements. 0.000 Credit Hours.

MA 098L. Basic Algebra Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Basic Algebra Lab - Arithmetic of integers, rational numbers, real numbers, exponents, polynomial algebra, factoring, rational functions, linear and quadratic equations, elementary geometry, verbal problems. Must be taken in conjunction with MA098 Basic Algebra. Attendance at the first lab meeting is mandatory.

MA 102. Intermediate Algebra. 3 Hours.

Absolute values, Cartesian coordinates, graphs of linear equations, concept of a function, linear systems, algebra of polynomials, factoring of polynomials, algebra of rational expressions, literal equations, word problems involving linear, rational and quadratic models, integer and rational exponents, radical expressions, rational, radical and quadratic equations, complex numbers. Students not in attendance on the first day will be dropped form from the class. Students not in attendance at the first lab meeting will be dropped from the course. On-line section only: MA 102 section QL is an on-line version of MA 102 intended primarily for students who have job conflicts or live a long distance from the campus. There are no lectures or instructor-led lab meetings with this section. Students who need direct instructor support should register for one of the other sections of MA 102. Students in the on-line section should be self-starters who are confident in their ability to master mathematics. Instructor support is available via email.
Prerequisites: MA 098 [Min Grade: P] or (A02 20 and HSCG 2.50) or A02 21 or (S02 480 and HSCG 2.50) or S02 500 or MAAD 15 or MA1 085 or MA 098 [Min Grade: C]

MA 102L. Intermediate Algebra Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Absolute values, Cartesian coordinates, graphs of linear equations, concept of a function, linear systems, algebra of polynomials, factoring of polynomials, algebra of rational expressions, literal equations, word problems involving linear, rational and quadratic models, integer and rational exponents, radical expressions, rational, radical and quadratic equations, complex numbers. Must be taken in conjunction with MA 102, Intermediate Algebra.

MA 105. Pre-Calculus Algebra. 3 Hours.

Functions from algebraic, geometric (graphical), and numerical points of view, including polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions; inverse functions; systems of equations and inequalities; quadratic and rational inequalities; complex and real roots of polynomials; applications and modeling, both scientific and business. Supports development of quantitative literacy. Consists of one scheduled 50 minute lecture per week, plus one 50 minute scheduled lab meeting per week, plus 70 minutes of individually scheduled lab time per week. Attendance at the first day of class is mandatory. Attendance at the first lab meeting is mandatory. Students not in attendance on the first day of class or the first lab meeting will be dropped from the course. May not be enrolled in Undergraduate Certificate. Lecture, online at least 80%. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MA 102 [Min Grade: C] or (A02 22 and HSCG 3.50) or (A02 23 and HSCG 3.00) or (A02 24 and HSCG 2.50) or (S02 520 and HSCG 3.50) or (S02 540 and HSCG 3.00) or (S02 560 and HSCG 2.50) or S02 580 or MAAD 21 or MA2 080 or A02 25

MA 105L. Pre-Calculus Algebra Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Functions from algebraic, geometric (graphical), and numerical points of view, including polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions; inverse functions; systems of equations and inequalities; quadratic and rational inequalities; complex and real roots of polynomials; applications and modeling, both scientific and business. Must be taken in conjunction with MA105 Pre-Calculus Algebra.

MA 106. Pre-Calculus Trigonometry. 3 Hours.

Trigonometric functions (circular functions) and their inverses, graphs, and properties; right triangle trigonometry and applications; analytical trigonometry, trigonometric identities and equations; polar coordinates; complex numbers; laws of sines and cosines; conic sections. Supports development of quantitative literacy. Consists of one scheduled 50 minute lecture per week, plus one 50 minute scheduled lab meeting per week, plus 70 minutes of individually scheduled lab time per week. Attendance at the first day of class is mandatory. Attendance at the first lab meeting is mandatory. Students not in attendance on the first day of class or the first lab meeting will be dropped from the course. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MA 105 [Min Grade: C] or (A02 25 and HSCG 3.50) or (A02 26 and HSCG 3.00) or A02 27 or (S02 580 and HSCG 3.50) or (S02 600 and HSCG 3.00) or S02 620 or MAC1 17 or MA3 080

MA 106L. Pre-Calculus Trigonometry Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Trigonometric functions (circular functions) and their inverses, graphs, and properties; right triangle trigonometry and applications; analytical trigonometry, trigonometric identities and equations; polar coordinates; complex numbers; laws of sines and cosines; conic sections. Must be taken in conjunction with MA106 Pre-Calculus Trigonometry.

MA 107. Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry. 4 Hours.

Functions, their graphs and applications, including polynomial, rational, algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. A fast-paced course designed as a review of the algebra and trigonometry needed in calculus. (MA107 is a combination of MA105 Pre-Calculus Algebra and MA106 Pre-Calculus Trigonometry taught in a single semester.) Satisfies core curriculum requirement in mathematics. Supports development of quantitative literacy. Consists of two scheduled 50 minute lectures per week, plus one 50 minute scheduled lab meeting per week, plus 70 minutes of individually scheduled lab time per week. Attendance at the first day of class is mandatory. Attendance at the first lab meeting is mandatory. Students not in attendance on the first day of class or the first lab meeting will be dropped from the course. Quantitative literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MA 102 [Min Grade: B] or (A02 24 and HSCG 3.50) or (A02 25 and HSCG 3.00) or (A02 26 and HSCG 2.50) or A02 27 or MAAD 21 or MA4 085 or (S02 560 and HSCG 3.50) or (S02 580 and HSCG 3.00) or (S02 600 and HSCG 2.50) or S02 620

MA 109. Survey of Calculus. 3 Hours.

An overview of calculus and its applications for students majoring in business: limits, differentiation and integration of algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential functions; applications to business and economics; functions of several variables; partial derivatives, extrema, and multiple integration. Students construct models of business situations, translate verbal descriptions into mathematical form, interpret and create graphical, algebraic, and numerical representations of relationships, use quantitative evidence to formulate arguments and draw conclusions, and communicate quantitative information in a manner suitable to the audience. May not be enrolled in Undergraduate Certificate. Lecture. Quantitative literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MA 105 [Min Grade: C] or MA 107 [Min Grade: C] or (A02 23 and HSCG 3.50) or (A02 24 and HSCG 3.00) or (A02 25 and HSCG 2.50) or A02 26 or (S02 540 and HSCG 3.50) or (S02 560 and HSCG 3.00) or (S02 580 and HSCG 2.50) or S02 600 or MAC1 17

MA 110. Finite Mathematics. 3 Hours.

An overview of topics of finite mathematics and applications of mathematics for the liberal arts student. Topics include counting, permutations, combinations, basic probability, conditional probability, descriptive statistics, binomial and normal distributions, statistical inference, and additional selected topics. Students construct models of problems situations, translate verbal descriptions into mathematical form, interpret and create schematic representations of mathematical relationships, use quantitative evidence as a basis for reasoning, argument, and drawiwng conclusions, and communicate their results to an audience appropriately. May not be enrolled in Undergraduate Certificate. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MA 098 [Min Grade: C], MA 096 [Min Grade: C] or MA 097 [Min Grade: C] or MA 098 [Min Grade: C] or MA 102 [Min Grade: C] or (A02 20 and HSCG 2.00) or A02 21 or (S02 480 and HSCG 2.00) or S02 500 or MAAD 15 or MA1 085

MA 110L. Finite Mathematics Laboratory. 0 Hours.

An overview of topics of finite mathematics and applications of mathematics for the liberal arts student. Topics include counting, permutations, combinations, basic probability, descriptive statistics, binomial and normal distributions, statistical inference and addtional selected topics.

MA 120. Introduction to Symbolic Logic. 3 Hours.

Modern theory of deductive inference. Emphasis on recognizing valid forms of reasoning. Truth-function theory and some concepts of one-variable quantification theory. May not be used to satisfy Core Curriculum requirement in mathematics.

MA 125. Calculus I. 4 Hours.

Limit of a function; continuity, derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric exponential, and logarithmic functions, application of derivative to extremal problems, related rates problems, and graphing; Newtons method; the definite integral and its application to area problems. Quantitative literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MA 106 [Min Grade: C] or MA 107 [Min Grade: C] or (A02 25 and HSCG 3.50) or (A02 26 and HSCG 3.00) or A02 27 or (S02 580 and HSCG 3.50) or (S02 600 and HSCG 3.00) or S02 620 or MAC2 16 or MA5 080

MA 126. Calculus II. 4 Hours.

Fundamental theorem of integral calculus; techniques of integration; applications in integration such as volume, arc length, work, and average value; infinite series; polar coordinates; parametric equations; plane and space vectors; lines and planes in space. Writing assignment on a project drawing from the above topics. Quantitative Literacy and Writing are significant components of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MA 124 [Min Grade: C] or MA 125 [Min Grade: C]

MA 180. Introduction to Statistics. 3 Hours.

Descriptive and inferential statistics, probability distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing. Recommended that 2 years of high school algebra or MA102 has been completed before taking course. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).

MA 224. Intermediate Symbolic Logic. 3 Hours.

Full development of quantification theory, including identity and definite description, and soundness and completeness proofs. Skill in formal proof emphasized, as well as ability to express arguments from natural language in artificial language.
Prerequisites: MA 120 [Min Grade: C] or PHL 220 [Min Grade: C]

MA 227. Calculus III. 4 Hours.

Vector functions, functions of two or more variables, partial derivatives, quadric surfaces, multiple integration and vector calculus, including Greens Theorem, curl and divergence, surface integrals, and Gauss' and Stokes' Theorem.
Prerequisites: MA 126 [Min Grade: C]

MA 252. Introduction to Differential Equations. 3 Hours.

First order differential equations (separable, linear, exact, and additional non-linear examples using MAPLE), modeling with first order DE's, examples of systems of first order DE's, theory of higher order linear DE's (homogeneous and non-homogeneous, superposition of solutions, linear independence and general solutions, initial and boundary value problems), solution of constant coefficient homogeneous linear equations, variation of parameters and Green's functions with complicated cases done using MAPLE. Modeling projects in the course will emphasize the use of MAPLE to do the heavy lifting. Quantitative Literacy and Writing are significant components of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MA 126 [Min Grade: C]

MA 260. Introduction to Linear Algebra. 3 Hours.

Linear equations and matrices; real vector spaces, basis, diagonalization, linear transformations; determinants, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors; inner product spaces, matrix diagonalization; applications and selected additional topics. MA 260 and MA 434 may not both be counted toward the major or minor.
Prerequisites: MA 126 [Min Grade: C]

MA 265. Math Tools for Engineering Problem Solving. 4 Hours.

An applied mathematics course designed to utilize the terminology and problem-solving approaches inherent to engineering, while completing the mathematical preparation of most engineering students. This course includes elements of MA 227 and MA 252.
Prerequisites: MA 126 [Min Grade: C]

MA 268. Introduction to Mathematical Biology. 3 Hours.

This course, designed at the interface of several disciplines, targets undergraduate students in biology, mathematics, and engineering. We will review the biology of problems that arise in nature and medicine and study the mathematics that allows us to tackle these problems. This course serves as an introduction, by example, to multivariable calculus, discrete and continuous differential equations in one or more variables, vectors, matrices, linear and non-linear dynamical systems, and basic concepts of chaos. Biological topics may include single species and interacting population dynamics, modeling infectious and dynamic diseases, regulation of cell function, molecular interactions and receptor-ligand binding, biological oscillators, and an introduction to biological pattern formation. There will also be discussions of current topics of interest such as tumor growth and angiogenesis, HIV and AIDS, and control of the mitotic clock.
Prerequisites: MA 126 [Min Grade: C]

MA 298. Research in Mathematics. 1-12 Hour.

This course covers special topics in mathematics and the applications of mathematics. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites vary with topics. Freshman or sophomore standing recommended. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

MA 311. History of Mathematics I. 3,4 Hours.

Development of mathematical principles and ideas from an historical viewpoint, and their cultural, educational and social significance.
Prerequisites: MA 125 [Min Grade: C] or MA 142 [Min Grade: C]

MA 312. History of Mathematics II. 3 Hours.

Development of mathematical principles and ideas from an historial viewpoint, and their cultural, educational and soical significance.
Prerequisites: MA 311 [Min Grade: C]

MA 313. Patterns, Functions and Algebraic Reasoning. 3 Hours.

Problem solving experiences, inductive and deductive reasoning, patterns and functions, some concepts and applications of geometry for elementary and middle school teachers. Topics include linear and quadratic relations and functions and some cubic and exponential functions. Number sense with the rational number system including fractions, decimals, and percents will be developed in problem contexts. An emphasis will be on developing algebraic thinking and reasoning. Enrollment in the School of Education or permission of instructor. Recommended that two years of high school algebra or MA 102 has been completed before taking course.

MA 314. Geometric and Proportional Reasoning. 3 Hours.

Problem solving experiences, inductive and deductive reasoning, concepts and applications of geometry and proportional reasoning. Topics include analysis of one-, two- and three-dimensional features of real objects, ratio and proportionally, similarity,and congruence, linear, area, and volume measurement, and the development of mathematically convincing arguments. An emphasis will be on developing geometric and proportional thinking and reasoning.

MA 315. Probablistic and Statistical Reasoning. 3 Hours.

Descriptive and inferential statistics, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing. Reasoning with probability and statistics is emphasized.
Prerequisites: MA 313 [Min Grade: C]

MA 316. Numerical Reasoning. 3 Hours.

Develop an understandingof numberand improve numerical reasoning skills specifically with regard to place value, number relationship that build fluency with basis facts, and computational proficiency; developing a deep understanding of numerous diverse computational algorithms; mathematical models to represent fractions, decimals and percents, equivalencies and operations with fractions, decimals and percents; number theory including order of operations, counting as a big idea, properties of number, primes and composites, perfect, abundant and significant numbers, and figurate numbers; inductive and deductive reasoning with number.
Prerequisites: MA 313 [Min Grade: C]

MA 317. Extending Algebraic Reasoning. 3 Hours.

Extension of algebraic and functional reasoning to polynomials, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; problem-solving involving transfer among representations (equation, graph, table); proof via symbolic reasoning, contradiction, and algorithm; interpretation of key points on graphs (intercepts, slope, extrema); development of facility and efficiency in manipulating symbolic representations with understanding; appropriate use of technology and approximate versus exact solutions; functions as models.
Prerequisites: MA 313 [Min Grade: C]

MA 360. Scientific Programming. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the computational skills needed to attempt serious scientific computational tasks. Computers and floating point arithmetic; the GNU/Linux operating system and an introduction to the compiled programming languages FORTRAN (including FORTRAN 95) and C++ in the context of solving systems of linear equations and differential equations arising from practical situations; use of debuggers and other debugging techniques, and profiling; use of callable subroutine packages like LAPACK and differential equation routines; parallel programming a Beowulf system with MPI; introduction to Matlab.
Prerequisites: MA 126 [Min Grade: C]

MA 361. Mathematical Modeling. 3 Hours.

Mathematical modeling using computer software, including spreadsheets, systems dynamics software, and computer algebra systems; connections to calculus and systems of ordinary differential equations are emphasized. Students translate verbal descriptions into mathematical form using appropriate units and reasonable relationships, construct and interpret multiple representations of mathematical relationships, including tabular, graphical, and schematic, use quantitative evidence produced by models as a basis for reasoned argument to unambiguous conclusions, communicate the mathematical structure of models appropriately to an audience in written form, using proper grammar, usage, spelling, and mathematical modeling conventions of language. Lecture. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MA 123 [Min Grade: C], MA 125 [Min Grade: C] or MA 123 [Min Grade: C]

MA 398. Research in Mathematics. 1-12 Hour.

This course covers special topics in mathematics and the applications of mathematics. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Junior standing recommended. Permission of instructor required.

MA 411. Integrating Mathematical Ideas. 3 Hours.

This course will integrate ideas from algebra, geometry, probability, and statistics. Emphasis will be on using functions as mathematical models, becoming fluent with multiple representations of functions, and choosing the most appropriate representations for solving a specific problem. Students will be expected to communicate mathematics verbally and in writing through small group, whole group, and individual interactions.
Prerequisites: MA 125 [Min Grade: C] and MA 314 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently) or MA 315 [Min Grade: C] or MA 316 [Min Grade: C] or MA 317 [Min Grade: C])

MA 418. Statistics for Teachers. 3 Hours.

Descriptive and inferential statistics, probability distributions, estimation, hypotheses testing, regression. Writing assignment on a project drawing from the above topics. Recommended that 2 years of high school algebra or MA 102 has been completed before taking course. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).

MA 419. Special Topics. 1-4 Hour.

Topics vary; may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: MA 125 [Min Grade: C]

MA 434. Algebra I: Linear. 3 Hours.

Abstract vector spaces, subspaces, dimension bases, linear transformations, matrix algebra, matrix representations of linear transformations, determinants. MA 260 and MA 434 may not both be counted toward the minor.
Prerequisites: MA 126 [Min Grade: C]

MA 435. Algebra II: Modern. 3 Hours.

Groups, homomorphisms, quotient groups, isomorphism theorems, rings and ideals, integral domains, fields. As time permits, Galois theory, semi-groups, modules, or other areas of algebra may be included.
Prerequisites: MA 434 [Min Grade: C]

MA 440. Advanced Calculus I. 3 Hours.

Real numbers, sequences and series, continuity, differential and integral calculus, exponential and logarithm functions, sine and cosine functions. Students present proofs from a list of pre-assigned theorems to the class. Written versions of the proofs are posted for easy access in subsequent proofs. Logical correctness and proper mathematical proof-writing style are assessed. Writing and Quantitative Literacy are significant components of the course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MA 227 [Min Grade: C]

MA 441. Advanced Calculus II. 3 Hours.

Real numbers, sequences and series, continuity, differential and integral calculus, exponential and logarithm functions, sine and cosine functions. Students present proofs from a list of pre-assigned theorems to the class. Written versions of the proofs are posted for easy access in subsequent proofs. Logical correctness and proper mathematical proof-writing style are assessed. Writing and Quantitative Literacy are significant components of the course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MA 440 [Min Grade: C]

MA 444. Vector Analysis. 3 Hours.

Review and application of multiple integrals; Jacobians and change of variables in multiple integrals; line and surface integrals; Green, Gauss, and Stokes theorems, with applications to physical sciences and computation in spherical andcylindrical coordinates.
Prerequisites: MA 227 [Min Grade: C] or EGR 265 [Min Grade: C]

MA 445. Complex Analysis. 3 Hours.

Analytic functions, complex integration and Cauchys theorem, Taylor and Laurent series, calculus of residues and applications, conformal mappings.
Prerequisites: MA 227 [Min Grade: C] or EGR 265 [Min Grade: C]

MA 453. Transforms. 3 Hours.

Theory and applications of Laplace and Fourier transforms.
Prerequisites: MA 252 [Min Grade: C] or EGR 265 [Min Grade: C]

MA 454. Intermediate Differential Equations. 3 Hours.

Topics from among Frobenius series solutions, Sturm-Liouville systems, nonlinear equations, and stability theory.
Prerequisites: MA 252 [Min Grade: C]

MA 455. Partial Differential Equations I. 3 Hours.

Classification of second order partial differential equations; background on eigenfunction expansions and Fourier series; integrals and transforms; solutions of the wave equations, reflection of waves; solution of the heat equations in bounded and unbounded media; Laplaces equation, Dirichlet and Neumann problems. Written project reports required. Quantitative Literacy and Writing are significant components of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MA 252 [Min Grade: C]

MA 456. Partial Differential Equations II. 3 Hours.

Classification of second order partial differential equations; background on eigenfunction expansions and Fourier series; integrals and transforms; solution of the wave equations, reflection of waves; solution of the heat equation in bounded and unbounded media; Laplace's equation, Dirichlet and Neumann problems.
Prerequisites: MA 455 [Min Grade: C]

MA 461. Modeling with Partial Differential Equations. 3 Hours.

Practical examples of partial differential equations; derivation of partial differential equations from physical laws; introduction to MATLAB and its PDE Tool-box, and COMSOL using practical examples; an overview of finite difference and finite element solution methods; specialized modeling projects in topics such as groundwater modeling, scattering of waves, medical and industrial imaging, continuum mechanics and deformation of solids, Fluid mechanics including the class boat race, financial derivative modeling, and acoustic and electromagnetic wave applications. Written project reports required for all homework assignments. Quantitative Literacy and Writing are significant components of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MA 227 [Min Grade: C]

MA 462. Intro to Stochastic Differential Equations. 3 Hours.

Stochastic differential equations arise when random effects are introduced into the modeling of physical systems. Topics include Brownian motion and Wiener processes, stochastic integrals and the Ito calculus, stochastic differential equations, and applications to financial modeling, including option pricing.
Prerequisites: MA 485 [Min Grade: C]

MA 463. Operations Research I. 3 Hours.

Mathematical techniques and models with application in industry, government and defense. Topics usually chosen from dynamic, linear, and nonlinear programming; decision theory; Markov chains; queuing theory; inventory control; simulation; network analysis; and selected case studies.
Prerequisites: MA 227 [Min Grade: C]

MA 464. Operations Research II. 3 Hours.

Mathematical techniques and models with application in industry, government, and defense. Topics usually chosen from dynamic, linear, and nonlinear programming; decision theory; Markov chains; queuing theory; inventory control; simulation; network analysis; and selected case studies.
Prerequisites: MA 463 [Min Grade: C]

MA 465. Partial Differential Equations: Finite Diff. Meth.. 3 Hours.

Review of difference methods for ordinary differential equations, including Runge-Kutta, multi-step, adaptive stepsizing, and stiffness; finite difference versus finite element; elliptic boundaryvalue problems, iterative solution methods, self-adjoint elliptic problems; parabolic equations, including consistency, stability, and convergence, Crank-Nicolson method, method of lines; first order hyperbolic systems and characteristics, Lax-Wendroff schemes, method of lines for hyperbolic equations.
Prerequisites: MA 360 [Min Grade: C] and MA 455 [Min Grade: C]

MA 467. Gas Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Euler's equations for inviscid flows, rotation and vorticity, Navier-Stokesequations for viscous flows, hyperbolic equations and characteristics, rarefaction waves, shock waves and entropy conditions, the Riemann problem for one-dimensional gas flows, numerical schemes.
Prerequisites: MA 252 [Min Grade: C] and MA 360 [Min Grade: C]

MA 468. Numerical Analysis. 3 Hours.

Introduction to Matlab, integration, interpolation, rational approximation, splines, numerical methods for ordinary differential equations, ordinary differential equation modeling, minimization of functions. Requires Knowledge of C or Fortran.
Prerequisites: MA 252 [Min Grade: C]

MA 469. Numerical Analysis II. 3 Hours.

Integrals, interpolation, rational approximation, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, iterative solution of algebraic equations in single variable, least squares. Gaussian elimination of solution of linear equations.
Prerequisites: MA 468 [Min Grade: C]

MA 470. Differential Geometry I. 3 Hours.

Theory of curves and surfaces: Frenet formulas for curve, first and second fundamental forms of surface; global theory; abstract surfaces, manifolds, Riemannian geometry.
Prerequisites: MA 126 [Min Grade: C]

MA 471. Differential Geometry II. 3 Hours.

Theory of curves and surfaces: Frenet formulas for curve, first and second fundamental forms of surface; global theory; abstract surfaces, manifolds, Riemannian geometry.
Prerequisites: MA 470 [Min Grade: C]

MA 472. Geometry I. 3 Hours.

The axiomatic method; Euclidean geometry including Euclidean constructions, basic analytic geometry, transformational geometry, and Klein's Erlanger Program; introduction to fractal geometry. Course integrates intuition/exploration and proof/explanation.
Prerequisites: MA 109 [Min Grade: C] or MA 125 [Min Grade: C]

MA 473. Geometry II. 3 Hours.

Analytical geometry, Birkhoff s axioms, and the complex plane; structure and representation of Euclidean isometries; plane symmetries; non-Euclidean(hyperbolic) geometry and non-Euclidean transformations; fractal geometry; algorithmic geometry. Course integrates intuition/exploration and proof/ explanation.
Prerequisites: MA 472 [Min Grade: C] and (MA 260 [Min Grade: C] or MA 434 [Min Grade: C])

MA 474. Introduction to Topology I. 3 Hours.

Essence and consequences of notion of continuous function developed. Topics include metric spaces, topological spaces, compactness, connected-ness, and separation.
Prerequisites: MA 126 [Min Grade: C]

MA 475. Introduction to Topology II. 3 Hours.

Essence and consequences of notion of continuous function developed. Topics include metric spaces, topological spaces, compactness, connectedness, and separation.
Prerequisites: MA 474 [Min Grade: C]

MA 480. Introduction to Statistics. 3 Hours.

Descriptive and inferential statistics, probability distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing. Recommended that two years of high school algebra or MA 102 has been completed before taking course.

MA 484. Mathematical Finance. 3 Hours.

The notion of no arbitrage. Interest, compounding, bonds. Review of mean, variance, and covariance. Portfolio management: risk and return. Forwards and Futures. Put-call parity. Martingales and conditional expectation. The binomial model. Fundamental theorems of asset pricing. Brownian motion (heuristics). Ito's formula and Girsanov's theorem (heuristics). The Black-Scholes-Merton formula. Interest rates. The binomial model for stochastic interest rates.
Prerequisites: MA 227 [Min Grade: B] or MA 260 [Min Grade: B] or MA 485 [Min Grade: B]

MA 485. Probability. 3 Hours.

Sample spaces; combinations, absolute and conditional probability; discrete and continuous random variables; probability distributions and density functions.
Prerequisites: MA 126 [Min Grade: C]

MA 486. Mathematical Statistics. 3 Hours.

Sampling techniques and data analysis, Simulation, Point estimation, Confidence intervals, Sufficient statistics, Rao-Cramer lower bound, Tests for binomials, Tests for normals, Goodness-of-_t test, Contingency tables, Two factor analysis, Regression, Order statistics, Nonparametric methods: Wilcoxon test, Run test, and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. A computer project that involves a written report. Quantitative Literacy and Writing are significant components of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MA 485 [Min Grade: C]

MA 490. Mathematics Seminar. 1-3 Hour.

This course covers special topics in mathematics and the applications of mathematics. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites Permission of instructor.

MA 491. Senior Seminar. 1-3 Hour.

This seminar covers career planning, professional ethics, and an historical perspective on the development of mathematics as an integrated body of knowledge. The exit examination for the course is the Mathematics Graduate Record Examination. Prerequisite: Senior status. 1.000 Credit Hour.

MA 492. Special Topics in Mathematics. 1-3 Hour.

This course covers special topics in mathematics and the applications of mathematics. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites vary with topics.

MA 493. Special Topics in Mathematics. 1-3 Hour.

This course covers special topics in mathematics and the applications of mathematics. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites vary with topics.

MA 494. Special Topics in Mathematics. 1-6 Hour.

This course covers special topics in mathematics and the applications of mathematics. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites vary with topics.

MA 495. Special Topics in Mathematics. 1-6 Hour.

This course covers special topics in mathematics and the applications of mathematics. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites vary with topics.

MA 496. Special Topics in Mathematics. 1-12 Hour.

This course covers special topics in mathematics and the applications of mathematics. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites vary with topics.

MA 497. Special Topics in Mathematics. 1-12 Hour.

This course covers special topics in mathematics and the applications of mathematics. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites vary with topics.

MA 498. Research in Mathematics. 1-12 Hour.

This course covers special topics in mathematics and the applications of mathematics. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites vary with topics. Senior standing recommended.

MA 499. Honors Research in Mathematics. 1-12 Hour.

Mentored research in mathematics leading to a written research report and a public presentation in the form of a talk or poster. Admission restricted to students admitted to Honors in Mathematics. Permission of instructor required.

Faculty

Blokh, Alexander, Professor of Mathematics, 1992, Ph.D. (Kharkov State), Dynamical Systems
Chernov, Nikolai, Professor of Mathematics, 1994, M.S., Ph.D. (Moscow State, Russia), Dynamical Systems, Ergodic Theory
Dale, Louis, Professor of Mathematics; Vice President for Equity and Diversity, 1973, B.A. (Miles), M.S. (Atlanta), Ph.D. (Alabama), Ring Theory
Hutchison, Jeanne S., Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 1970, B.S. (Creighton), M.A., Ph.D. (California-Los Angeles)
Johnson, Walter, Instructor of Mathematics, Introductory Math Curriculum Director, 2002, B.S.EE. (Auburn), M.A.Ed. (UAB)
Jung, Paul, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 2011, Ph.D. (University of California System: Los Angeles), Probability Theory and Statistical Mechanics
Karpeshina, Yulia, Professor of Mathematics, 1995, M.S., Ph.D. (Saint Petersburg, Russia), Partial Differential Equations and Mathematics Physics
Knowles, Ian W., Professor of Mathematics, 1979, B.Sc. (Adelaide), M.Sc., Ph.D. (Flinders-South Australia), Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations, Numerical Analysis
Kravchuk, Elena, Instructor of Mathematics, 2002, M.S. (Donetsk State – Ukraine), Ph.D. (NASU, Donetsk – Ukraine)
Lewis, Roger T., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, 1975, A.B. (Tennessee), M.S. (Florida Institute of Technology), Ph.D. (Tennessee), Differential Equations, Spectral Theory
Li, JunFang, Associate Professor of Mathematics, 2008, B.A. (Wuhan Univ., China), Ph.D. (Oklahoma), Geometric Analysis and Non-linear Partial Differential Equations
Mayer, John C., Professor of Mathematics; Associate Chair, Department of Mathematics, 1984, B.A. (Randolph-Macon), M.A., Ph.D. (Florida), Topology, Continuum Theory, Dynamical Systems, Mathematics Education
Nkashama, Mubenga N., Professor of Mathematics, 1989, B.S., M.S. (National University of Zaire), Ph.D. (Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium), Multilinear Algebra, Control Theory, Optimization, Data Mining
Oversteegen, Lex G., Professor of Mathematics, 1980, Kandidaat Doctorandus (Amsterdam), Ph.D. (Wayne State), Topology, Continuum Theory, Dynamical Systems
O’Neil, Peter V., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, 1978, B.S. (Fordham), M.S., Ph.D. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute), Graph Theory, Combinatorics
Saito, Yoshimi, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, 1983, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Kyoto, Japan), Scattering Theory, Differential Equations
Shterenberg, Roman G., Associate Professor of Mathematics, 2007, M.S., Ph.D (St. Petersburg State University – Russia), Mathematical Physics, Spectral Theory, Inverse Problems, Partial Differential Equations, Non-linear Partial Differential Equations
Simányi, Nándor, Professor of Mathematics, 1999, M.S., Ph.D. (Rolánd Eötvös - Hungary), Dr.M.S. (Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Dynamical Systems, Ergodic Theory, Topology
Stansell, Laura R., Instructor of Mathematics, 2007, B.S. (Berry), M.S. (Southern Mississippi), M.S. (UAB)
Stocks, Douglas R., Associate Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, 1969, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Texas)
Stolz, Günter, Professor of Mathematics, 1994, Ph.D. (Frankfurt, Germany), Spectral Theory, Mathematical Physics
Vaughan, Loy O. Jr., Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1969, B.A. (Florida State), M.S., Ph.D. (Alabama)
Weikard, Rudi, Professor of Mathematics; Chair, Department of Mathematics, 1990, Ph.D. (Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany), Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations, Mathematical Physics
Zeng, Yanni, Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1997, B.S., M.S. (Zhongshan, China), Ph.D. (New York), Nonlinear Analysis, Applied Partial Differential Equations
Zou, Henghui, Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1994, B.S. (Xiangtan, P.R.C.), M.S. (Peking, P.R.C.), Ph.D. (Minnesota), Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations, Nonlinear Analysis