Department of Physics

http://www.uab.edu/physics

Chair: Dr. Ilias Perakis

Physics is the fundamental science concerned with the study of the universe, including the properties that emerge from interactions among the fundamental constituents of materials and their couplings to external probes such as light. It includes core theories of classical mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, relativity, and thermodynamics, which have withstood the test of time. Practical applications of these fundamental theories are covered in courses such as Machine Learning Applications in Physics and Materials Science, Nanoscale Science & Applications, Biophysics, Physics of Current and Emerging Energy Technologies, Laser Physics, Optics, and Solid State Physics. There are many opportunities for physics majors to excel through hands-on research participation in funded projects, where stipends are available through research grants or the established NSF/NASA REU Program, by joining the Honors Physics Program, and by participating in the Society of Physics Students.

The Department of Physics offers courses in astronomy, physics, and physical science that prepare students well for 21st century careers not always associated with physics in the past. The B.S. degree, with a major in physics, emphasizes the understanding of the theories of physics to solve fundamental and applied problems in science and technology by using critical thinking, advanced computation, and systematic analysis. Physicists work effectively in many 21st century careers which require these skills, such as, basic, applied, and medical research; advanced materials and laser science; medical, financial, and legal services; product design and development; computer coding, advanced computational science, and software engineering; management, administration, and quality control; as well as in higher and secondary education. 

The Department of Physics is a partner in the UABTeach initiative. UABTeach lets undergraduate students receive both their B.S. degree in physics and full teaching certification in four years. More information about the coordination between UABTeach and the UAB Physics Undergraduate program is available at the UABTeach Web site (http://www.uab.edu/uabteach/).

The department offers the following B.S. degrees and concentrations as well as a minor in physics:

  1. Major in Physics
  2. Major in Physics – Advanced Physics Track
  3. Major in Physics – Applied Physics Track
  4. Major in Physics – Computational Physics Track
  5. Major in Physics – Biophysics Track

A Bachelor of Science degree with Honors in Physics is available for all tracks, and offers the motivated and capable physics major with the enhanced opportunity to develop the research, problem-solving and communication skills necessary to excel in a scientific career or in the marketplace.

Advising for all physics majors is provided by a professional advisor in conjunction with physics faculty members. 

The Department of Physics Web site (http://www.uab.edu/physics/) summarizes information about the Departmental programs. Further information may be obtained from Dr. Renato Camata, Undergraduate Program Director at (205) 934-8143, camata@uab.edu.

Graduate Programs

The Department of Physics offers graduate study leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in physics. Further information may be obtained from Dr. Mary Ellen Zvanut, Graduate Program Director at (205) 934-6661, mezvanut@uab.edu, or the UAB Graduate School Catalog.

See the UAB Graduate School Catalog for descriptions of graduate courses.


Bachelor of Science with a Major in Physics

The curriculum of the Major in Physics provides fundamental knowledge in the core theories of physics.

RequirementsHours
Required Mathematics Courses
MA 125Calculus I4
or MA 225 Calculus I - Honors
MA 126Calculus II4
or MA 226 Calculus II - Honors
MA 227Calculus III4
MA 252Introduction to Differential Equations3
Required Physics Courses
PH 110Topics in Contemporary Physics1
PH 221General Physics I: Mechanics4
PH 222General Physics II: Electricity & Magnetism4
PH 223General Physics III: Thermodynamics & Quantum Physics4
PH 350Computation, Theory, and Measurement in Quantum Physics and Relativity4
PH 420Mathematical Methods of Physics I3
PH 432Statistical Thermodynamics I3
PH 445Electromagnetic Theory I3
PH 450Introductory Quantum Mechanics I3
PH 461Classical Mechanics I3
PH 499Physics Capstone3
Required Chemistry Courses
CH 115
CH 116
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry I Laboratory
4
CH 117
CH 118
General Chemistry II
and General Chemistry II Laboratory
4
Mathematics Elective
Select one of the following courses:3-4
Introduction to Linear Algebra
Math Tools for Engineering Problem Solving
Introduction to Mathematical Biology
History of Mathematics I
History of Mathematics II
Scientific Programming
Mathematical Modeling
Integrating Mathematical Ideas
Special Topics
Algebra I: Linear
Algebra II: Modern
Advanced Calculus I
Advanced Calculus II
Vector Analysis
Complex Analysis
Transforms
Intermediate Differential Equations
Partial Differential Equations I
Partial Differential Equations II
Modeling with Partial Differential Equations
Intro to Stochastic Differential Equations
Operations Research I
Operations Research II
Partial Differential Equations: Finite Diff. Meth.
Gas Dynamics
Numerical Analysis
Numerical Analysis II
Differential Geometry
Differential Geometry II
Geometry I
Geometry II
Introduction to Topology I
Introduction to Topology II
Probability
Mathematical Statistics
Total Hours61-62

Grade Requirement

Students must earn a grade of “C” or better in all courses applied to this major.

Additional Requirements

Physics or General Electives

Students must take physics or general electives to reach the 120 semester hour requirement.

Minor

A minor is required for this degree, unless a double major is being earned.



Bachelor of Science with a Major in Physics and an Advanced Physics Track

In addition to the requirements for the Major in Physics, students in the Advanced Physics Track are required to complete the following courses:

RequirementsHours
PH 446Electromagnetic Theory II3
or PH 466 Applied Mechanics and Electromagnetism II
PH 451Introductory Quantum Mechanics II3
Additional elective PH courses recommended for the Advanced Physics Track:
Machine Learning Applications in Physics and Materials Science
Computational Physics
Introductory Solid State Physics I
Introductory Solid State Physics II
Introduction to Biophysics I
Advanced Physics Laboratory I
Honors Research
Special Topics in Physics
... Click on the "Courses" tab at the top of this page or visit the Department of Physics Web Site (http://www.uab.edu/physics/) for a full list of PH electives for the Advanced Physics Track.
Total Hours6

The Advanced Physics Track is designed to prepare students for graduate studies in physics or other physical sciences. In additional to a strong foundation in the key theories of physics, this track encourages students to enroll in numerous advanced physics electives to broaden and deepen their preparation in physics. 



Bachelor of Science with a Major in Physics and an Applied Physics Track

In addition to the requirements for the Major in Physics, students in this track are required to complete a minimum of nine semester hours of courses offered by Physics or other UAB departments that qualify as Applied Physics Track courses:

RequirementsHours
Select a minimum of nine hours of courses that qualify as Applied Physics Track courses.9
For example:
Physics of Current and Emerging Energy Technologies
Physics of Fluids and Polymer Solutions
Machine Learning Applications in Physics and Materials Science
Biomedical Optics
Applied Mechanics and Electromagnetism II
Introductory Solid State Physics I
Introduction to Biophysics I
Laser Physics I
Nanoscale Science and Applications
... Please visit the Department of Physics Web site (http://www.uab.edu/physics/) for a full list of courses offered by Physics and other UAB departments that qualify as Applied Physics Track courses.
Total Hours9

The Applied Physics Track is designed to prepare students for careers in industry or other technology enterprises. A judicious choice of courses that qualify as Applied Physics Track courses allows graduates to develop a competitive set of professional skills.  


Bachelor of Science with a Major in Physics and a Computational Physics Track

In addition to the requirements of the Major in Physics, students in the Computational Physics Track are required to complete a minimum of nine semester hours of computationally intensive courses offered by Physics or other UAB departments.

RequirementsHours
Select a minimum of nine hours of courses that qualify as Computational Physics Track courses:9
For example:
Scientific Programming
Machine Learning Applications in Physics and Materials Science
Computational Physics
Object-Oriented Programming
Object-Oriented Programming Lab
Discrete Structures
Algorithms and Data Structures
Algorithms and Data Structures Laboratory
Big Data Programming
Parallel Computing
Artificial Intelligence
Computer Graphics
... Please visit the Department of Physics Web site (http://www.uab.edu/physics/) for a full list of courses offered by Physics and other UAB departments that qualify as Computational Physics Track courses.
Total Hours9

The Computational Physics Track is designed to provide graduates with valuable computational skills in the areas of simulation of physical processes, big data processing and experimental analysis, and high levels of mathematical reasoning. 


Bachelor of Science with a Major in Physics and a Biophysics Track

The Biophysics Track is a multidisciplinary program of study designed to place students in medical school, graduate school in the biosciences, teaching positions, or biotech enterprises. A balanced, flexible mix of physics, chemistry, biology and math is required.

RequirementsHours
Required Biology
BY 123Introductory Biology I4
BY 124Introductory Biology II4
Required Chemistry
CH 115
CH 116
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry I Laboratory
4
CH 117
CH 118
General Chemistry II
and General Chemistry II Laboratory
4
CH 235
CH 236
Organic Chemistry I
and Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
4
CH 237
CH 238
Organic Chemistry II
and Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
4
Required Mathematics
MA 125Calculus I4
or MA 225 Calculus I - Honors
MA 126Calculus II4
or MA 226 Calculus II - Honors
MA 227Calculus III4
MA 252Introduction to Differential Equations3
Required Physics Courses
PH 110Topics in Contemporary Physics1
PH 221General Physics I: Mechanics4
PH 222General Physics II: Electricity & Magnetism4
PH 223General Physics III: Thermodynamics & Quantum Physics4
PH 350Computation, Theory, and Measurement in Quantum Physics and Relativity4
PH 432Statistical Thermodynamics I3
PH 499Physics Capstone3
Physics Electives
Select seven hours of Physics (PH) courses at the 400 level.7
For example:
Introduction to Biophysics I
Nanoscale Science and Applications
Physics of Fluids and Polymer Solutions
Machine Learning Applications in Physics and Materials Science
Biomedical Optics
Computational Physics
Mathematical Methods of Physics I
Physics of Current and Emerging Energy Technologies
Advanced Physics Laboratory I
... Click on the "Courses" tab at the top of this page for a full list of PH electives for the Biophysics Track.
Mathematics Elective
Select one of the following courses:3
Introduction to Linear Algebra
Math Tools for Engineering Problem Solving
Introduction to Mathematical Biology
History of Mathematics I
History of Mathematics II
Scientific Programming
Mathematical Modeling
Integrating Mathematical Ideas
Special Topics
Algebra I: Linear
Algebra II: Modern
Advanced Calculus I
Advanced Calculus II
Vector Analysis
Complex Analysis
Transforms
Intermediate Differential Equations
Partial Differential Equations I
Partial Differential Equations II
Modeling with Partial Differential Equations
Intro to Stochastic Differential Equations
Operations Research I
Operations Research II
Partial Differential Equations: Finite Diff. Meth.
Gas Dynamics
Numerical Analysis
Numerical Analysis II
Differential Geometry
Differential Geometry II
Geometry I
Geometry II
Introduction to Topology I
Introduction to Topology II
Probability
Mathematical Statistics
Total Hours72

Additional Requirements

Students who have taken all or part of the PH 201-202 sequence before declaring a physics major may petition to have those courses substitute for PH 221-222.

Suggested plan for majoring in physics

The table below is meant to assist you in planning your path toward the B.S. degree in physics. Please consult with your Physics Faculty Track Mentor to select your Track Electives. Please consult with the Physics Academic Advisor to add the courses required by the UAB Core Curriculum. Additional requirements may apply depending on your affiliation with the Honors College, the Science and Technology Honors Program (STHP) or the University Honors Program (UHP).

Proposed Program of Study for a Major in Physics

  • Consult with your Physics Faculty Track Mentor to select your Track Electives.
  • Consult with the Physics Academic Advisor or an Honors College Advisor to add Core Curriculum courses or other requirements from Honors Programs.
Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
PH 1101PH 221*4
MA 225 or 1254MA 226 or 1264
CH 1153CH 1173
CH 1161CH 1181
 9 12
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
PH 222*4PH 2234
MA 2274MA 2523
MA 2603Track Elective (e.g., CE 210, EE 314, MA 360, etc.) 3
 11 10
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
PH 3504PH 4323
PH 4203PH 490, 491, or 4951-4
PH 4613Track Electives (e.g., PH 423, PH 475, PH 486, etc.)3-6
Track Elective (e.g., PH 336, PH 410, PH 487, etc.)3 
 13 7-13
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
PH 4453PH 446 or 466**3
PH 4503PH 451**3
PH 490, 491, 492, or 4951-4PH 4993
Track Elective (e.g., PH 418, PH 453, PH 481, etc.)3Track Elective (e.g., PH 454, PH 482, PH 497, etc.)3
 10-13 12
Total credit hours: 84-93
* Honors sections recommended for PH 221 and PH 222.
** Advanced Physics Track Requirement.

 Minor in Physics

RequirementsHours
Required Physics Courses
PH 221General Physics I: Mechanics 14
PH 222General Physics II: Electricity & Magnetism 14
PH 223General Physics III: Thermodynamics & Quantum Physics4
Physics Electives
Select 6 hours from the following:6
Physics of Current and Emerging Energy Technologies
Computation, Theory, and Measurement in Quantum Physics and Relativity
Physics of Fluids and Polymer Solutions
Machine Learning Applications in Physics and Materials Science
Mathematical Methods of Physics I
Computational Physics
Biomedical Optics
Applications of Contemporary Optics I
Statistical Thermodynamics I
Electromagnetic Theory I
Electromagnetic Theory II
Introductory Quantum Mechanics I
Introductory Quantum Mechanics II
Introductory Solid State Physics I
Introductory Solid State Physics II
Classical Mechanics I
Applied Mechanics and Electromagnetism II
Introduction to Biophysics I
Introduction to Biophysics II
Laser Physics I
Laser Physics II
Nanoscale Science and Applications
Total Hours18

GPA & Residency Requirement

A minimum grade of "C" is required in all courses applied to the minor, as well as all mathematics course prerequisites. A minimum of two physics courses must be completed at UAB.

Honors Program in Physics

The Physics Honors Program offers the motivated and capable physics major enhanced opportunities to develop the research, problem solving, and communication skills necessary for a dedicated effort in the scientific enterprise. By designing, describing, and defending a research project, the honors graduate will have a documented capacity for success in graduate school or in any career where scientific critical thinking, motivation, and accomplishment are valued.

Eligibility

Acceptance into the Physics Honors Program requires the student to:

  • have earned a 3.25 GPA in physics courses attempted.
  • have earned a 3.0 GPA overall.
  • have completed 16 semester hours in physics, including PH 351-PH 352.

Requirements

Students graduating with Physics Honors are required to have completed the following:

  • arrangement with a faculty sponsor to do a physics research project satisfying expectations for six semester hours of PH 495 Honors Research
  • selection of an Honors Committee.
  • committee approval of a written research proposal.
  • completion of the proposed six semester hours of PH 495 Honors Research.
  • maintenance of a 3.25 GPA in physics courses and an overall 3.0 GPA.
  • a written report in the format required by an appropriate journal.
  • an oral or poster presentation of the research project to the Honors Committee.

Benefits

The goal of the Physics Honors Program is to train capable undergraduates for uncommon accomplishment in academic research. The new physics honors graduate will have documented experience and productivity commonly found in second- or third-year graduate students. Ideally, the research project will result in publication and presentation at a national conference, giving the honors graduate strong credentials for graduate or medical/professional school, for industrial research, for science writing, and for teaching. Contacts made through publication and conferences and informed references written by mentor and committee members give the honors graduate a significant edge in the job market. The successful honors student will be recognized at the UAB Honors Convocation and will graduate “With Honors in Physics.”

Contact

Dr. Renato P. Camata
Director Undergraduate Physics Program
E-Mail: camata@uab.edu 

Dr. Ilias Perakis, Chair
E-mail:iperakis@uab.edu

Telephone: (205) 934-4736
Mail address
UAB-Physics
1720 2nd Ave. S., CH310
Birmingham, AL 35294-1170 USA

AST-Astronomy Courses

AST 101. Astronomy of the Universe. 3 Hours.

Survey of the universe of matter and energy. Interpretation of observations to develop a self-consistent view of the universe, basic physical laws and structures, cosmic history and evolution. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course. This course, when taken with its corresponding laboratory, meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area III: Natural Sciences.

AST 102. Astronomy of Stellar Systems. 3 Hours.

Mechanisms and processes of universe and interrelationships as systems, including nature of stars and galaxies: formation, interior processes, including energy generation, evolution, and galaxies as systems. Lecture and laboratory. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course. Requires concurrent enrollment in AST 112 laboratory. This course, when taken with its corresponding laboratory, meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area III: Natural Sciences.

AST 103. Astronomy of the Solar System. 3 Hours.

Descriptive and interpretive approach to solar and interplanetary phenomena, comets, and cometary/meteor relationships, asteroids and planetesimals, planetary surfaces, atmospheres, and interior structures. Physical law governing the solar system and quest for understanding its history and evolution, including formation. Lecture. Requires concurrent enrollment in AST 113 laboratory. This course, when taken with its corresponding laboratory, meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area III: Natural Sciences.

AST 105. Extraterrestrial Life. 3 Hours.

Interdisciplinary treatment (astronomy, chemistry, biology, planetary science, communications, and information sciences) of the universe as habitat, cosmic chemistry of molecules and evolution, environmental requirements, origin and occurrence of life, search for evidence, intelligence, communication, and contact. Lecture and laboratory. Concurrent enrollment in AST 115 laboratory required. This course, when taken with its corresponding laboratory, meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area III: Natural Sciences.

AST 111. Astronomy of the Universe Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Laboratory experience demonstrates how astronomy is practiced through observation experiences, laboratory experiments, and exercises involving analysis of data. Specific experiences illuminate topics presented in AST 101. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course. Must take with AST 101 to receive credit.
Prerequisites: AST 101 [Min Grade: D](Can be taken Concurrently)

AST 112. Astronomy of Stellar Systems Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Laboratory experience demonstrates how astronomy is practiced through observation experiences, laboratory experiments, and exercises involving analysis of data. Specific experiences illuminate topics presented in AST 102. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course. Must take with ST 102 to receive credit.
Prerequisites: AST 102 [Min Grade: D](Can be taken Concurrently)

AST 113. Astronomy of the Solar Systems Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Laboratory experience demonstrates how astronomy is practiced through observation experiences, laboratory experiments, and exercises involving analysis of data. Specific experiments illuminate topics presented in AST 103. Must take AST 103 to receive credit.
Prerequisites: AST 103 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

AST 115. Extraterrestrial Life Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Laboratory experience illuminates topics presented in AST 105. Must take AST 105 to receive credit. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area III: Natural Sciences.
Prerequisites: AST 105 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

PH-Physics Courses

PH 100. Preparatory Physics. 3 Hours.

Designed primarily for students in need of preparation for PH 201 or PH 221. Vectors, kinematics, and dynamics, including conservation laws. Emphasis placed on methods of analyzing physics problems, setting up equations for physics problems, and interpreting information in physics problems.
Prerequisites: MA 106 [Min Grade: C] or MA 107 [Min Grade: C] or MA 125 [Min Grade: C] or MA 225 [Min Grade: C]

PH 103. Understanding the World Through Data. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students of all disciplines with an introduction to using data and models to understand systems. This course features a carefully guided and curated selection of introductory-level topics related to modeling and simulation. Emphasis is placed on developing the inductive and deductive reasoning skills specific to the use of models in the physical sciences. Students will make and explore conjectures about data in a variety of disciplines, including physics, data science, biology, the social sciences, business, and finance. Students will be introduced to the use of simple models to visualize and qualitatively understand quantitative information via the Python programming language. No prior programming experience is necessary.

PH 110. Topics in Contemporary Physics. 1 Hour.

The objective of this course is to introduce incoming freshmen to the different areas of physics and to topics that physicists are working on today. Through lectures and seminars by members of the UAB physics faculty, students are introduced to the UAB Department of Physics community, their research activities, and career opportunities for graduates in the various tracks of the Physics Undergraduate Program. Course required for physics majors in the first fall semester of residency.

PH 191. Co-operative Work Program. 2-3 Hours.

Co-Op Work Program.

PH 201. College Physics I. 4 Hours.

First term of non-calculus based physics. Linear and planar motion, Newton's laws, work and energy, gravitation, momentum, rigid body motion, elasticity, oscillations, waves, sound, fluids, ideal gases, heat and thermodynamics. Lecture and laboratory. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area III: Natural Sciences.
Prerequisites: (MA 106 [Min Grade: C] or MA 106 [Min Grade: P]) or (MA 107 [Min Grade: C] or MA 107 [Min Grade: P]) or (MA 125 [Min Grade: C] or MA 125 [Min Grade: P]) or PH 100 [Min Grade: C] or MA 225 [Min Grade: C] or (MA 126 [Min Grade: C] or MA 126 [Min Grade: P]) or MA 226 [Min Grade: C] or (A02 25 and HSCG 3.5) or (A02 26 and HSCG 3.0) or A02 27 or (SAT2 580 and HSCG 3.5) or (SAT2 600 and HSCG 3.0) or SAT2 620 or MAC2 16 or MTH5 80 or (S02 600 and HSCG 3.5) or (S02 620 and HSCG 3.0) or S02 640 or MTH5 75 or MPL 76

PH 201L. College Physics Laboratory I. 0 Hours.

Laboratory for PH 201. Lecture, laboratory, and recitation must be taken concurrently.

PH 201R. College Physics I Recitation. 0 Hours.

First term of non-calculus based physics. Linear and planar motion, Newton s Law, work and energy, gravitation, momentum, rigid body motion, statics, elasticity, oscillations, waves, sound, fluids, ideal gases, heat,and thermodynamics. Lecture, laboratory, and resicitation must be taken concurrently.

PH 202. College Physics II. 4 Hours.

Second term of non-calculus based physics. Electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Lecture, laboratory, and recitation must be taken concurrently. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area III: Natural Sciences.
Prerequisites: PH 201 [Min Grade: C]

PH 202L. College Physics Laboratory II. 0 Hours.

Laboratory for PH 202. Lecture, laboratory, and recitation must be taken concurrently.

PH 202R. College Physics II - Recitation. 0 Hours.

Second term of non-calculus based physics sequence covering electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Lecture, laboratory, and resicitation must be taken concurrently.

PH 211. College Physics I Laboratory. 0-1 Hours.

College Physics I Laboratory.

PH 212. College Physics II Lab. 1 Hour.

PH 221. General Physics I. 4 Hours.

First term of introductory, calculus-based general physics sequence covering classical mechanics: measurements, kinematics, vectors, translational and rotational dynamics, work, energy, momentum, statics, oscillatory motion, wave motion, and sound. Lecture and laboratory. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course. PH 221 General Physics I – Honors: This section of PH 221 is designed for students with strong interests and preparation in science, mathematics, and/or engineering. Topics are covered with more mathematical rigor and in greater depth than in regular sections. Second term of non-calculus based physics. Electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Lecture, laboratory, and recitation must be taken concurrently. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area III: Natural Sciences.
Prerequisites: MA 125 [Min Grade: C] or MA 225 [Min Grade: C]

PH 221L. General Physics Laboratory I. 0 Hours.

Laboratory for PH 221. Lecture, laboratory, and recitation must be taken concurrently.

PH 221R. General Physics I Recitation. 0 Hours.

First term of introductory, calculus-based general physics sequence covering classical mechanics: measurements, kinematics, vectors, translational and rotational dynamics, work, energy, momentum, statics, oscillatory motion, wave motion, and sound. Lecture, laboratory, and resicitation must be taken concurrently.

PH 222. General Physics II. 4 Hours.

Second term of introductory, calculus-based general physics sequence covering electricity and magnetism: Coulomb's Law, electric fields, Gauss' Law, potential, capacitors and dielectrics, Ohm's Law, DC circuits, magnetic fields, Ampere's Law, Biot-Savart Law, Faraday's Law, inductance, AC circuits, geometrical and physical optics. Lecture, Laboratory, and Recitation must be taken concurrently. PH 222 General Physics II Honors: This section of PH 222 is designed for students with strong interests and preparation in science, mathematics, and/or engineering. Topics are covered with more mathematical rigor and in greater depth than in regular sections. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area III: Natural Sciences.
Prerequisites: PH 221 [Min Grade: C] and (MA 126 [Min Grade: C] or MA 226 [Min Grade: C])

PH 222L. General Physics Laboratory II. 0 Hours.

Laboratory for PH 222. Lecture, Laboratory, and Recitation must be taken concurrently.

PH 222R. General Physics II - Recitation. 0 Hours.

Second term of introductory, calculus-based general physics sequence covering electricity and magnetism, Coulomb's Law, electric fields, Gauss' Law, potential, capacitors, and dielectrics, Ohm's Law, DC circuits, magnetic fields, Ampere's Law, Biot-Savart Law, Faraday's Law, inductance, AC circuits, geometrical and physical optics. Lecture, Laboratory, and Resicitation must be taken concurrently.

PH 223. General Physics III: Thermodynamics & Quantum Physics. 4 Hours.

Study of topics in thermodynamics (including the kinetic theory of gases, as well as first and second laws of thermodynamics) and modern physics (including atomic structure, quantum mechanics, and applications to condensed matter, nuclear and particle physics). Specific applications in medical physics will also be discussed. Emphasis on the use of quantitative reasoning to solve thermodynamics and quantum physics problems. Writing and scientific ethics assignments based on laboratory experiences. Lecture and laboratory. Writing, Quantitative Literacy and Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C]

PH 223L. General Physics Laboratory III. 0 Hours.

Laboratory for PH 223. Experimental work in the topics associated with PH 223, including atomic structure, quantum physics, and solid state physics. Successful students will develop their ability to collect and analyze experimental data, interpret the results, and present their findings in a clear, concise, and convincing way. Writing, Quantitative Literacy and Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.

PH 231. General Physics I Laboratory. 0-1 Hours.

General Physics I Laboratory.

PH 232. General Physics II Laboratory. 1 Hour.

General Physics II Laboratory.

PH 299. Reasoning through Modeling and Simulation of Data. 3 Hours.

This course provides in-depth coverage of modeling and simulation topics with a focus on the use of acquired knowledge for project-based cooperative learning. Students will learn to reason in terms of models and will learn how well-validated models are used to understand data and make sense of complex systems in the physical sciences. Students will work with a team of peers and the course instructor to develop modeling and computational knowledge and skills, and apply them to the analysis of real-world data sets. Students will engage in modeling and simulation in areas including physics, data science, biology, the social sciences, and business and finance. This course introduces students to a variety of powerful modeling methods used in physics, which are ubiquitous across many fields of study. Students will be introduced to simulation via the Python programming language. No prior programming experience is necessary.

PH 301. Instructional Astronomy I. 4 Hours.

Survey of selected topics in astronomy of the universe, stellar systems and solar systems with a focus on preparing to teach. Lecture and Laboratory must be taken concurrently.

PH 301L. Instructional Astronomy Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory for PH 301. Lecture and Laboratory must be taken concurrently.

PH 302. Instructional Physical Science. 4 Hours.

Lecture and discussion in areas of the physical sciences importance to basic scientific literacy and to current technology, with a focus on preparing to teach. Must be taken concurrently with PH 302L.

PH 302L. Instructional Physical Science Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory for PH 302.

PH 304. Intermediate Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Intermediate treatment of the kinematics and dynamics of classical systems.Presentation of problem solving techniques is emphasized.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C]

PH 305. Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism. 3 Hours.

Intermediate treatment of electricity and magnetism including fields, potential, induction, Maxwell's equations, circuits. Presentation of problem solving techniques is emphasized.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C]

PH 331. Classical Thermodynamics. 3 Hours.

Introduction to thermal phenomena on a macroscopic and statistical basic, principles and laws governing them.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C] and MA 227 [Min Grade: C]

PH 336. Physics of Current and Emerging Energy Technologies. 3 Hours.

The technologies involved in energy conversion, storage, and transmission, represent one of the cornerstones of modern civilization. In this course, the principles of mechanics, electromagnetism, thermodynamics, and quantum physics are applied to the understanding of current and emerging energy technologies. Topics include electrical power generation from conventional and renewable resources, electrochemical and thermal energy storage, as well as power transmission via electrical, optical, and superconducting systems.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C]

PH 350. Computation, Theory, and Measurement in Quantum Physics and Relativity. 4 Hours.

An emphasis on the principles of experimental physics at an advanced level, including computational modeling/analysis via introduction to Python coding. Lectures focused on the theoretical basis of modern physics topics with applications in special relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear structure, solid-state physics, semiconductors, lasers and nanotechnology.
Prerequisites: PH 223 [Min Grade: C] or PH 351 [Min Grade: C]

PH 350L. Computation, Theory, and Measurement in Quantum Physics and Relativity Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory for PH 350. Experimental work in the topics associated with PH 350 at a level of investigation to more strongly develop the connections between theory and experiment. Experiments are designed to verify fundamental concepts in modern physics and will integrate computer codes to analyze and visualize the data collected in the laboratory. Students will organize and maintain a rigorous laboratory notebook and will prepare/present scientific reports for these experiments as a major component of the course. Successful students will refine their data collection, analysis, and interpretation and scientific presentation skills. Writing, Quantitative Literacy and Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.

PH 351. Modern Physics I. 4 Hours.

Study of topics in modern physics, including special relativity, atomic structure, quantum mechanics, quantum statistics, and selected additional topics (e.g. solid state physics, molecular physics, lasers, semiconductors and nanotechnology, particle physics, and general relativity). Specific applications in medical physics will also be discussed. Emphasis on the use of quantitative reasoning to solve modern physics problems. Writing and scientific ethics assignments based on laboratory experiences. Lecture and laboratory. Writing, Quantitative Literacy and Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C]

PH 351L. Modern Physics I Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory for PH 351. Experimental work in the topics associated with PH 351, including special relativity, atomic structure, quantum physics, and solid state physics. Successful students will develop their ability to collect and analyze experimental data, interpret the results, and present their findings in a clear, concise, and convincing way. Writing, Quantitative Literacy and Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.

PH 352. Modern Physics II. 4 Hours.

A continuation of PH351 with more focus on the theoretical basis of modern physics topics with applications in special relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear structure, solid-state physics, semiconductors, lasers and nanotechnology. Application of the theory to experimental measurements associated with PH352L will be a major focus. Emphasis on the use of quantitative reasoning to solve modern physics problems. Writing and scientific ethics assignments based on laboratory experiences. Lecture and laboratory. Writing, Quantitative Literacy and Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.
Prerequisites: PH 351 [Min Grade: C]

PH 352L. Modern Physics II Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory for PH 352. Experimental work in the topics associated with PH 352 at a level of investigation to more strongly develop the connections between theory and experiment. Successful students will refine their data collection, analysis, and interpretation and scientific presentation skills. Writing, Quantitative Literacy and Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.

PH 397. Directed Reading in Physics I. 2-3 Hours.

Tutorial studies in physics offered by special arrangement. Permission of instructor.

PH 398. Directed Reading in Physics II. 2-3 Hours.

Tutorial studies in physics offered by special arrangement. Permission of instructor.

PH 410. Physics of Fluids and Polymer Solutions. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to fluid mechanics and polymer physics appropriate for physics, engineering, chemistry, and biology majors. Topics include the concept of a fluid, the fluid as a continuum, properties of the velocity field, thermodynamic properties of a fluid, viscosity, pressure distribution in a fluid, basic physical laws of fluid mechanics, the Reynolds transport theorem, differential relations for a fluid particle, viscous flow, polymer solutions and thermodynamics, Brownian motion, diffusion equation, Fick’s law, Stokes-Einstein equation and hydrodynamic radius of a polymer chain, and viscosity of polymer solutions.
Prerequisites: PH 221 [Min Grade: C] and MA 252 [Min Grade: C]

PH 418. Machine Learning Applications in Physics and Materials Science. 3 Hours.

This course covers interdisciplinary topics in data science, computer science, and materials physics, with a focus on introducing first-principles software based on density-functional theory and data-driven machine-learning discoveries for applications in materials science and other physics domains.
Prerequisites: PH 350 [Min Grade: C]

PH 420. Mathematical Methods of Physics I. 3 Hours.

Vector calculus. Curvilinear coordinate systems. Commonly encountered ordinary differential equations and special functions. Complex variables and contour integration. Partial differential equations, including solutions by Green function methods.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C] and MA 252 [Min Grade: C] or EGR 265 [Min Grade: C]

PH 421. Mathematical Methods of Physics II. 3 Hours.

Vector calculus. Curvilinear coordinate systems. Commonly encountered ordinary differential equations and special functions. Complex variables and contour integration. Partial differential equations, including solutions by Green function methods.
Prerequisites: PH 420 [Min Grade: C]

PH 423. Computational Physics. 3 Hours.

Introduces symbolic and numerical computation through examples drawn from classical and modern physics, such as, classical mechanics, electromagnetism, and quantum mechanics. Emphasizes computer-based approaches to visualization, solution of ordinary differential equations, evaluation of integrals, and finding roots, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors.
Prerequisites: MA 252 [Min Grade: C] or EGR 265 [Min Grade: C] and PH 222 [Min Grade: C]

PH 424. Biomedical Optics. 3 Hours.

The objective in this class is to present an introduction to applied optics, with an emphasis on biomedical applications.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C]

PH 425. Applications of Contemporary Optics I. 3 Hours.

Applied geometrical and wave optics. Paraxial ray optics, optical matrix theory, aberrations, optical imaging systems, and computer-based optical design. Optical interferometry, diffraction, holography, polarization phenomena, coherence theory, lasers, and Gaussian beam propagation.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C]

PH 426. Applications of Contemporary Optics II. 3 Hours.

Applied geometrical and wave optics. Paraxial ray optics, optical matrix theory, aberrations, optical imaging systems, and computer-based optical design. Optical interferometry, diffraction, holography, polarization phenomena, coherence theory, lasers, and Gaussian beam propagation.
Prerequisites: PH 425 [Min Grade: C]

PH 427. Geometrical Optics. 4 Hours.

Properties of optical systems. Lenses, mirrors, and stops. Aberrations. Rays and wave fronts. Optical instruments. Aspheric components. Lecture and laboratory must be taken concurrently.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C]

PH 427L. Geometrical Optics Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory for PH 427. Lecture and laboratory must be taken concurrently.

PH 428. Physical Optics. 4 Hours.

Interference and diffraction phenomena. Emission, propagation, and absorption of radiation. Polarization and dispersion. Stimulated emission. Lecture and laboratory must be taken concurrently.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C]

PH 428L. Physical Optics Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory for PH 428. Lecture and laboratory must be taken concurrently.

PH 429. Applications of Contemporary Optics III. 3 Hours.

Optical interactions with materials, including nonlinear optical effects, such as birefringence, electro-optics, photoelasticity, crystal optics, acousto-optics, and phase conjugation. Optical spectroscopies, such as spectroscopic instrumentation, lasers as spectroscopic light sources, fluorescence and Raman laser spectroscopy, and applications of laser spectroscopy in chemistry, environmental research, materials science, biology, and medicine.
Prerequisites: PH 425 [Min Grade: C] and PH 426 [Min Grade: C]

PH 432. Statistical Thermodynamics I. 3 Hours.

Statistical basis of laws of thermodynamics. Ensembles and partition functions. Quantum statistics of ideal gases, including photons and electrons. Applications to solids, real gases, liquids, and magnetic systems. Transport theory.
Prerequisites: PH 351 [Min Grade: C] or PH 223 [Min Grade: C]

PH 433. Statistical Thermodynamics II. 3 Hours.

Statistical basis of laws of thermodynamics. Ensembles and partition functions. Quantum statistics of ideal gases, including photons and electrons. Applications to solids, real gases, liquids, and magnetic systems. Transport theory.
Prerequisites: PH 432 [Min Grade: C] and PH 450 [Min Grade: C]

PH 435. Physics of Biomedical Processes and Technologies. 3 Hours.

Integrated study of the fundamentals and dynamical principles of mechanics, electromagnetism, and select quantum physics topics, with applications to biomechanical systems, biophysical networks, and bioimaging technologies.
Prerequisites: PH 461 [Min Grade: C] and PH 445 [Min Grade: C]

PH 436. Physics of Renewable Energy Systems. 3 Hours.

Integrated study of the fundamentals and dynamical principles of mechanics, electromagnetism, and select quantum physics topics, with applications to electrical power generation from renewable resources such as solar, wind, hydro, and ocean energy.
Prerequisites: PH 461 [Min Grade: C] and PH 445 [Min Grade: C]

PH 445. Electromagnetic Theory I. 3 Hours.

Electromagnetic theory approached from the standpoint of fields and using Maxwell's equations.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C] and PH 420 [Min Grade: C]

PH 446. Electromagnetic Theory II. 3 Hours.

Electromagnetic theory approached from the standpoint of fields and using Maxwell's equations.
Prerequisites: PH 445 [Min Grade: C]

PH 447. Directed Reading in Electromagnetic Theory. 2-3 Hours.

Tutorial studies in electromagnetic theory offered by special arrangement.

PH 450. Introductory Quantum Mechanics I. 3 Hours.

Principles of quantum mechanics and their application to particle waves, angular momentum, tunneling, radiation, and selection rules. Perturbation and variational methods. Successful completion of PH 350 or PH 352 is recommended prior to registering for this class.
Prerequisites: (PH 352 [Min Grade: C] or PH 350 [Min Grade: C]) and PH 461 [Min Grade: C]

PH 451. Introductory Quantum Mechanics II. 3 Hours.

Principles of quantum mechanics and their application to particle waves, angular momentum, tunneling, radiation, and selection rules. Perturbation and variational methods. Successful completion of PH 350 or PH 352 is recommended prior to registering for this class.
Prerequisites: PH 450 [Min Grade: C]

PH 452. Directed Reading in Quantum Mechanics. 2-3 Hours.

Tutorial studies in quantum mechanics offered by special arrangement.

PH 453. Introductory Solid State Physics I. 3 Hours.

Properties of crystal lattices, lattice dynamics, lattice imperfections, and bonding energies. Electronic properties of dielectrics, semiconductors, and metals. Ferroelectric, magnetic, and optical properties of solids.
Prerequisites: PH 450 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

PH 454. Introductory Solid State Physics II. 3 Hours.

Properties of crystal lattices, lattice dynamics, lattice imperfections, and binding energies. Electronic properties of dielectrics, semiconductors,and metals.
Prerequisites: PH 453 [Min Grade: C]

PH 455. Molecular Spectroscopy. 3 Hours.

Molecular Spectroscopy.

PH 461. Classical Mechanics I. 3 Hours.

Kinematics and dynamics, including central forces, rotating coordinate systems, and generalized coordinates. Lagrangian, Hamiltonian, and other equivalent formulations of mechanics.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C] and (MA 252 [Min Grade: C] or EGR 265 [Min Grade: C])

PH 462. Classical Mechanics II. 3 Hours.

Kinematics and dynamics, including central forces, rotating coordinate systems, and generalized coordinates. Lagrangian, Hamiltonian, and other equivalent formulations of mechanics.
Prerequisites: PH 461 [Min Grade: C]

PH 463. Directed Reading in Classical Mechanics. 2-3 Hours.

Tutorial studies in classical mechanics offered by special arrangement.

PH 465. Applied Mechanics and Electromagnetism I. 3 Hours.

Integrated study of the fundamentals and dynamical principles of mechanics, electromagnetism, and select quantum physics topics, with applications to biomechanical systems, biophysical networks, and bioimaging technologies.
Prerequisites: PH 461 [Min Grade: C] and PH 445 [Min Grade: C]

PH 466. Applied Mechanics and Electromagnetism II. 3 Hours.

Integrated study of the fundamentals and dynamical principles of mechanics, electromagnetism, and select quantum physics topics, with applications to electrical power generation from renewable resources such as solar, wind, hydro, and ocean energy.
Prerequisites: PH 461 [Min Grade: C] and PH 445 [Min Grade: C]

PH 467. Special Relativity. 3 Hours.

Principles and foundations of special relativity with applications to mechanics and electrodynamics.
Prerequisites: PH 446 [Min Grade: C] and PH 462 [Min Grade: C]

PH 468. General Relativity. 3 Hours.

Gravitational phenomena associated with and resulting from linear field equations. Equivalence principle, its implications of non-linear field, and physical consequences.

PH 469. Directed Reading in Physics. 2-3 Hours.

Tutorial studies in physics offered by special arrangement.

PH 471. Fundamentals of Spectroscopy. 3 Hours.

Explanation of phenomena related to rotational vibration and electronic spectroscopy of atoms and molecules; operational principles of spectroscopic tools including diffraction grating, waveguides and interferometers, basic group theory concepts and notation.

PH 475. Introduction to Biophysics I. 3 Hours.

Physics of biological systems: proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, supramolecular structures, and molecular motors; structure, function, energetics, thermodynamics, and bio-nanotechnology. Emphasis on systems that are best understood in physical and molecular detail. Systems will direct study, with modern physical methods introduced as needed.
Prerequisites: PH 351 [Min Grade: C] or PH 223 [Min Grade: C]

PH 476. Introduction to Biophysics II. 3 Hours.

Physics of biological systems: proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, supramolecular structures, and molecular motors; structure, function, energetics, thermodynamics, and bio-nanotechnology. Emphasis on systems that are best understood in physical and molecular detail. Systems will direct study, with modern physical methods introduced as needed.
Prerequisites: PH 475 [Min Grade: C]

PH 481. Laser Physics I. 3 Hours.

Physical principles of laser operation and design. Spontaneous and stimulated emission, population inversion, light amplification, laser resonators, Q-switching, mode-locking, pulse shortening techniques, spectral narrowing, and tunable lasers. Individual types of lasers such as gas, solid state, dye, color center, and semiconductor. Practical applications of lasers as well as modern techniques and instrumentation in laser spectroscopy.
Prerequisites: PH 222 [Min Grade: C]

PH 482. Laser Physics II. 3 Hours.

Physical principles of laser operation and design. Spontaneous and stimulated emission, population inversion, light amplification, laser resonators, Q-switching, mode-locking, pulse shortening techniques, spectral narrowing, and tunablelasers. Individual types of lasers such as gas, solid state, dye, color center, and semiconductor. Practical applications of lasers as well as modern techniques and instrumentation in laser spectroscopy.
Prerequisites: PH 481 [Min Grade: C]

PH 485. Laser Spectroscopy. 3 Hours.

Fundamental principles, experimental techniques, instrumentation, and practical applications of laser spectroscopy.

PH 486. Semiconductor Materials in Modern Technology. 3 Hours.

Brief review of electronic materials with emphasis on traditional and cutting edge silicon technology. Competing and complementary semiconductors covered in standard lecture and seminar style. Materials: compound and tertiary semiconductors, organic semiconductors, and wide bandgap semiconductors. Applications: optical and chemical sensors, microwave electronics, high power electronics, and lasers. Specific applications and materials determined by student interests.
Prerequisites: PH 352 [Min Grade: C] or PH 350 [Min Grade: C] or EE 351 [Min Grade: C] or CH 326 [Min Grade: C]

PH 487. Nanoscale Science and Applications. 3 Hours.

Physics of electronic, mechanical, and biological properties of materials at the nanoscale level approaching one billionth of a meter. The applications of nanoscale materials in electronic, mechanical, and biomedical systems will be emphasized. Special tools in synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials will be discussed.
Prerequisites: (PH 221 [Min Grade: C] and PH 222 [Min Grade: C]) or (CH 115 [Min Grade: C] and CH 117 [Min Grade: C])

PH 490. Preparations for Teaching. 1-4 Hour.

This class prepares physics majors for successful teaching experiences. The course emphasizes a foundation of practical knowledge related to expectations and duties shared by teachers in physics education, as well as an opportunity to read, reflect, and discuss current research related to physics teaching and learning in secondary and higher education.
Prerequisites: PH 352 [Min Grade: C] or PH 350 [Min Grade: C]

PH 491. Advanced Physics Laboratory I. 1-4 Hour.

This course provides physics majors with the opportunity to integrate the physics knowledge acquired in earlier courses in a research environment under the supervision of an approved UAB faculty mentor.
Prerequisites: PH 352 [Min Grade: C] or PH 350 [Min Grade: C]

PH 492. Advanced Physics Laboratory II. 1-4 Hour.

This course provides physics majors with the opportunity to integrate the physics knowledge acquired in earlier courses in a research environment under the supervision of an approved UAB faculty mentor.
Prerequisites: PH 491 [Min Grade: C]

PH 493. Advanced Physics Laboratory III. 1-4 Hour.

This course provides physics majors with the opportunity to integrate the physics knowledge acquired in earlier courses in a research environment under the supervision of an approved UAB faculty mentor.
Prerequisites: PH 492 [Min Grade: C]

PH 494. Research Methods in Physics. 1-3 Hour.

This course is designed to provide future physics teachers with the tools that physicists use to solve scientific problems; to give them the opportunity to use these tools in a physics laboratory setting; to make them aware of how scientists communicate with each other through peer-reviewed scientific literature; and to enable them to understand how scientists in general and physicists in particular develop new knowledge and insights, the most important of which are eventually presented in textbooks and taught in conventional science classes.
Prerequisites: EHS 126 [Min Grade: C]

PH 495. Honors Research. 3 Hours.

Research in an area of active research, under the direction of a faculty sponsor and the Honors Committee. May be repeated.
Prerequisites: PH 352 [Min Grade: C] or PH 350 [Min Grade: C]

PH 497. Special Topics in Physics. 1-6 Hour.

Topics of current interest, such as theoretical physics, computational physics, experimental techniques. May be repeated for credit.

PH 498. Directed Research. 1-6 Hour.

Directed Research.

PH 499. Physics Capstone. 3 Hours.

Instructional sessions, conclusion of research or teaching project and career planning activities aimed at the integration of physics knowledge and competencies in scientific writing, quantitative literacy, and ethics and civic responsibility.
Prerequisites: PH 490 [Min Grade: C] or PH 491 [Min Grade: C] or PH 495 [Min Grade: C]

PHS-Physical Sciences Courses

PHS 101. Physical Science. 4 Hours.

Scientific method and hands-on experience with integrated laboratory, discussion, and lecture. Emphasis on the use of quantitative reasoning to solve physical problems. Writing, assignments based on research and laboratory experiences that include collection and interpretation of experimental data. For nonscience majors. Lecture and laboratory. Writing and Quantitative Literacy are significant components of this course. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area III: Natural Sciences.

PHS 101L. Physical Science Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Must be taken concurrently with PHS 101 lecture.

PHS 102. Physical Science II. 4 Hours.

This course includes online lecture and laboratory activities and is designed to assist non-science major students in acquiring practical knowledge of established physical laws and learning scientific investigative methods. Writing and Quantitative Literacy are significant components of this course.
Prerequisites: PHS 101 [Min Grade: C]

PHS 102L. Physical Science II Lab. 0 Hours.

Physical Science II Laboratory.

PHS 110. Overview of Space Exploration. 3 Hours.

Descriptive approach to comparative planetology for non-science majors. Analysis of recent, ongoing, and planned space missions with regard to scientific objectives and experiment design.

PHS 141. Musical Acoustics. 3 Hours.

Scientific method and hands-on experience with integrated laboratory, discussion, and lecture, emphasizing physical principles and experiences important for understanding musical tones. For non-science majors. See MU 141. Prerequisite for this class includes completion of Core Curriculum mathematics requirement.

PHS 150. Science Writing. 3 Hours.

Scientific writing skills for science, mathematics, and engineering. Identification of audience and purpose, generation of ideas, organization of information and construction of arguments.

PHS 211. Discussion on the Nature of Matter. 3 Hours.

Honors seminar. Evolution of science and scientific method from early Greek origins in context of the study of matter. Non-mathematical, descriptive, and pictorial approach to understanding basic structure of matter and materials of technological interest. See HON 211. Scientific writing skills for science, mathematics, and engineering. Permission of instructor or admission to Honors Program.

Faculty

Agresti, David G., Professor Emeritus of Physics, 1969, B.S. (Ohio State), M.S., Ph.D. (Caltech), Astrophysics; condensed matter physics
Appavoo, Kannatassen "Krishen", Assistant Professor of Physics, 2016, B.A. (Berea College), Ph.D. (Vanderbilt University), Ultrafast optical microscopy; Dielectric metamaterials and plasmonics; Phase-change memory; Hybrid functional nanomaterials for energy-harvesting and sensing technologies; Nonlinear optics
Bauman, Robert P., Professor Emeritus of Physics, 1967, B.S., M.S. (Purdue), Ph.D. (Pittsburgh)
Camata, Renato, Associate Professor of Physics, 2000, B.S. (Universidade de São Paulo), M.S., Ph.D. (Caltech), Crystal growth and properties of thin film materials; physical vapor deposition of semiconductor, electroceramic and electronic quantum materials; aerosol processes in nanomaterials fabrication; nanostructured materials
Catledge, Shane A., Associate Professor of Physics, 2004, B.S. (California State –Sacramento), Ph.D. (UAB), Synthesis and properties of nanostructured super-hard materials; chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond films and novel nanostructured coatings for industrial cutting and biomedical implant applications; molecular sensing using fluorescent nanodiamond; mechanical properties
Chen, Cheng-Chien, Assistant Professor of Physics, 2016, B.S. (National Tsing-Hua University), Ph.D. (Standford University), condensed matter theory; scientific supercomputing; big data analytics; photon-based spectroscopies; non-equilibrium dynamics and emergent phenomena in strongly correlated systems; unconventional superconductors; quantum magnets; interacting topological states of matter
DeVore, Todd E., Instructor of Physics, 1998, B.S. (Lewis and Clark), M.S., Ph.D. (UAB), Physics and science education; computational physics
Fedorov, Vladimir V., Research Assistant Professor of Physics, 2007, M.S. (Moscow Institute of Physics), Ph.D. (Russian Academy of Science), Physical and mathematical science; coherent and laser spectroscopic characterization of doped laser materials; solid-state lasers; laser spectroscopy for molecular-sensing applications
Hilton, David, Associate Professor of Physics, 2007, B.S., M.S. (Rochester), M.S., Ph.D. (Cornell), Ultrafast spectroscopy and ultrashort pulse generations; ultrafast terahertz spectroscopy; correlated electron materials; superconductivity; high-magnetic field spectroscopy; magnetic semiconductors; complex functional nanomaterials; materials in extreme environments
Kawai, Ryoichi, Associate Professor of Physics, 1991, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (Waseda, Japan), Condensed-matter theory; biophysics theory; materials physics theory; computational physics; open quantum systems
Lawson, Christopher M., Professor of Physics, 1993, B.S. (Oklahoma State), M.S. (Colorado), Ph.D. (Oklahoma State), Nonlinear optics; fiber optics; optical sensors; optical coherence imaging tomography; laser spectroscopy
Lungu, Anca, Instructor of Physics, 2014, B.S., M.S. (University of Bucharest), Ph.D. (South Carolina), Physics education research, eLearning applied to physics education, development of new online courses and laboratories
Martin, James C., Associate Professor Emeritus of Physics, 1980, B.S. (Florida State), Ph.D. (Georgia Tech), Physics and Science Education
Martyshkin, Dmitri V., Research Assistant Professor, 2010, B.S. (Novosibirsk State University, Russia), M.S., Ph.D. (UAB), Development of spectroscopic characterization of doped laser materials; solid-state lasers; laser spectroscopy for molecular-sensing applications
Mirov, Sergey B., University Professor, 1993, Master (Moscow Power Engineering Institute), Ph.D. (USSR Academy of Sciences), Experimental quantum electronics, solid-state lasers, laser spectroscopy
Mohr, Robert D., Instructor of Physics, 2003, B.S. (North Georgia), M.S. (Clemson), Ph.D. (Alabama), Computational applications to theoretical astrophysical problems
Nordlund, Thomas M., Associate Professor Emeritus of Physics, 1990, B.A. (Oregon), M.S., Ph.D. (Illinois), Physics education; biological imaging and self-assembly
Perakis, Ilias, Professor and Chair, 2015, B.S. (National Technical University of Athens), M.S., Ph.D. (Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Theoretical & computational condensed matter physics; simulation of time-dependent nonlinear phenomena away from equilibrium; optical properties of quantum electronic materials; theory of laser-driven quantum phase transitions and metastable quantum phases; quantum kinetic simulations of ultrafast spectroscopy experiments; harnessing quantum coherence with laser pulses
Rast, Lauren, Instructor of Physics, 2014, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (UAB), Physics education research, eLearning, development of physics courses for the online environment, educational technologies for in-person and online courses
Shealy, David L., Professor Emeritus of Physics, 1973, B.S., Ph.D. (Georgia), Geometrical optics; laser beam shaping optics; radiative transfer; caustic and optical aberration theory
Simien, Clayton, Assistant Professor of Physics, 2013, B.S. (Prairie View A&M), Ph.D. (Rice), Strongly correlated ultracold neutral plasmas; next generation frequency standards; precision measurements and variations in fundamental constants; quantum dipolar gases and rare-earth elements; laser cooling; nanotechnology; atomic sensors
Stanishevsky, Andrei V., Associate Professor of Physics, 2002, M.S. (Minsk Radioengineer Institute-USSR), Ph.D. (Belarus Academy of Sciences –USSR), Focused ion beam micro- and nanofabrication; PVD thin films deposition, characterization, and application; nanoparticle research
Vohra, Yogesh K., Professor of Physics, University Scholar, & Associate Dean, 1992, B.S., M.S. (Delhi, India), Ph.D. (Bombay, India), High Pressure Materials Research, Growth and Characterization of Synthetic Diamond, and Nanoscale Materials for Biomedical Applications
Wills, Edward L., Research Associate Professor Emeritus of Physics, 1972, B.S., M.S. (Auburn), Ph.D. (Virginia)
Zvanut, Mary E., Professor of Physics, 1992, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (Lehigh), Electrical studies and EPR studies of insulators and semiconductors; microelectronics and optoelectronics