Department of Philosophy

Chair: Gregory Pence

The Department of Philosophy offers the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in philosophy, as well as a minor in philosophy and course offerings for non-majors and non-minors (including occasional graduate courses for students in other fields). The department also sponsors an interdisciplinary minor in Philosophy and Law and interdisciplinary concentration in Philosophy and Political Economy. Both are described below.

The program for majors is built around two aims. First, the major offers study of the methods, problems, and history of philosophy. Second, it exposes the student to applications of and current developments within the discipline. Throughout the major goal is to teach students to present and analyze critically arguments, both orally and in writing. Graduates of the department have pursued such careers as teaching, law, medicine, counseling, and business.

Further information about the department and its programs may be obtained at the department’s website: www.uab.edu/philosophy.

There are three different ways in which to major in philosophy at UAB:

  • The general track.
  • The individually designed track.
  • The honors track.

When a student first declares a major in philosophy, he or she is classified in the general track. Students remain in this track unless they request entry into the individually designed track or are successfully admitted upon request into the honors track. These requests are made of the department chair.

The general track appeals to students with broad philosophic interests as well as students desiring a second major or in need of class schedule flexibility. The individually designed track is designed in consultation with a faculty advisor in areas such as applied ethics, bioethics, cognitive science, history of ideas, law and society, religion, and science and the modern world. Students graduating in the honors track  graduate “With Honors in Philosophy."

Residency at least 25 percent of the total semester hours required for graduation, including a minimum of 21 of the last 30, must be taken at UAB.  Courses taken as alternative credit or as a non-degree student (excluding post-baccalaureate students) may not be used to satisfy the residency requirement.  A minimum of nine semester hours required for the major (at or above the 400 level) must be completed at UAB.

  Concentration: Philosophy, Politics and Economics

The Department of Philosophy together with the Department of Marketing, Industrial Distribution, and Economics and the Department of Government offer a concentration in Philosophy, Politics and Economics.

The concentration focuses on the interesting array of topics at the intersection of Philosophy, Economics, and Political Science. Students in the PPE concentration will work with faculty in all three departments. 

Because the PPE concentration trains students to attack a wide range of problems using rigorous analytical techniques, it is an excellent basis for those who are interested in going to graduate school, whether in Philosophy, Economics, or Political Science; for those who want to go to law school; and for those who want to pursue careers in journalism, politics, management, intelligence, marketing, industrial organization, and many other fields.  Students with an interest in fundamental research will have ample opportunity to learn what is going on at the research frontier.

To get the PPE degree a student must get a Bachelor's degree in Philosophy and satisfy additional requirements (to learn more click on 'Majors' and 'Four-Year Plans'). Students who may be interested in getting a PPE degree are encouraged to contact Dr. David Morrow at davidmorrow@uab.edu, who will be happy to answer your questions.

 Major Requirements for Philosophy

RequirementsHours
Philosophy Requirements
Select 10 Philosophy (PHL) courses, with 7 courses at the 200-level or higher, 3 courses must be at the 400-level, one of which must be a Capstone--PHL 490, 491, or 492.30
Introduction to Philosophy
Contemporary Moral Issues
Bioethics
Practical Reasoning
Introduction to Ethics
The Rule of Law
Philosophy of Religion
Philosophy and Christianity
Existentialism
Philosophy of the Arts
History of Moral Philosophy
Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Social and Political Philosophy
Classical Political Thought
Modern Political Theory
Classical Thought of India China and the West
History of Philosophy: Socrates Plato and Aristotle
The Scientific Enterprise
Topics in Philosophy
Topics in Philosophy
Topics in Philosophy
Teaching Practicum
Philosophy and Feminism
Ethics: Theories of Good and Evil
Intermediate Symbolic Logic
Cooperation and Competition
Philosophical Issues in Behavior Economics
Libertarianism: A Political Philosophy
Philosophy of Law
History of Philosophy: Descartes to Hume
American Philosophy
Philosophy of Language
Minds and Machines
Philosophy of Mind
Topics in Philosophy
Topics in Philosophy
Topics in Philosophy
Epistemology: Theories of Knowledge
Metaphysics
Philosophy of Law
History of Philosophy: Kant and 19th Century
History of Philosophy: Twentieth Century
Philosophical Problems in the Natural and Social Sciences
Philosophy Seminar
Philosophy Seminar
Philosophy Seminar
Directed Studies
Principles of Scientific Integrity
Directed Readings
Philosophy of Science
Problems ProSeminar
Problems ProSeminar
Problems ProSeminar
Total Hours30

 

Grade Requirement

No course in which a grade below "C" has been earned may be counted toward the major. 

 

 Requirements for Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) Concentration

RequirementsHours
Spine Requirements
MA 109Survey of Calculus3
PHL 322Philosophical Issues in Behavior Economics3
PHL 321Cooperation and Competition3
PHL 491Philosophy Seminar (Capstone)3
Statistics Requirement
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Statistics
Introduction to Statistics
Elementary Statistical Methods and Design
Social Statistics
Quantitative Analysis I
Economics Requirements
EC 210Principles of Microeconomics3
EC 211Principles of Macroeconomics3
EC 304Microeconomics3
Select one of the following:3
Money and Banking
Labor Economics
Macroeconomics
Economics of Environment
Managerial Economics
Mathematical Approach in Economics and Business
Monetary Economics
Topics in Public Policy
Economic Development and Growth
International Economics
Topics in the History of Economic Theory
Survey of Econometrics
Public Finance
Urban Economics
Industrial Organization
Applied Forecasting
Applied Regression Analysis
Economics for Educators
Economics Internship
Advanced Topics in Economics
Directed Readings in Economics
Economics for Educators
Major Electives
Select seven of the following courses, with no more than 9 hours at the 100 level21
Introduction to Philosophy
Contemporary Moral Issues
Bioethics
Practical Reasoning
Introduction to Ethics
The Rule of Law
Philosophy of Religion
Philosophy and Christianity
Existentialism
Philosophy of the Arts
History of Moral Philosophy
Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Social and Political Philosophy
Classical Political Thought
Modern Political Theory
Classical Thought of India China and the West
History of Philosophy: Socrates Plato and Aristotle
The Scientific Enterprise
Topics in Philosophy
Topics in Philosophy
Topics in Philosophy
Philosophy and Feminism
Ethics: Theories of Good and Evil
Intermediate Symbolic Logic
Cooperation and Competition
Philosophical Issues in Behavior Economics
Libertarianism: A Political Philosophy
Philosophy of Law
History of Philosophy: Descartes to Hume
American Philosophy
Philosophy of Language
Minds and Machines
Philosophy of Mind
Topics in Philosophy
Topics in Philosophy
Topics in Philosophy
Epistemology: Theories of Knowledge
Metaphysics
Philosophy of Law
History of Philosophy: Kant and 19th Century
History of Philosophy: Twentieth Century
Philosophical Problems in the Natural and Social Sciences
Philosophy Seminar
Philosophy Seminar
Directed Studies
Principles of Scientific Integrity
Directed Readings
Philosophy of Science
Problems ProSeminar
Problems ProSeminar
Problems ProSeminar
Total Hours48

Grade Requirement

No course in which a grade below "C" has been earned may be counted toward the major.

Proposed Program of Study for a Major in Philosophy

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
PHL 100 or 1153PHL 100 or 1153
 PHL 1203
 3 6
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
Any two 200 or 300 level philosophy classes6Any 200 or 300 level philosophy class3
 6 3
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
Any two 300 or 400 level philosophy classes6Any 300 or 400 level class3
 6 3
Senior
First TermHours 
PHL 4903 
 3
Total credit hours: 30

 

 

Proposed Program of Study for a Major in Philosophy with Concentration in Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE)

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
PHL 1003PHL 1203
 3 3
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MA 10913QM 2143
PHL 2303EC 21013
 6 6
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
PHL 32213PHL 32113
EC 21113EC 4083
PHL 31513PHL 3753
 9 9
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EC 30413PHL 49113
PHL 4053PHL 4703
 6 6
Total credit hours: 48

 

1

Courses are required for the Philosophy & Political Economy (PPE) Concentration.

 Minor Requirements for Philosophy

RequirementsHours
Philosophy Requirement18
Select 18 hours from Philosophy (PHL) courses, with at least 9 hours at the 200-level or above.
Total Hours18

 A grade of "C" or better is required in all philosophy courses for the minor.

 

Minor Requirements for Philosophy & Law

Director: Theodore Benditt (Philosophy)

The Philosophy and Law minor provides interested students with a secondary specialization focusing upon the philosophical underpinnings of the political and legal systems of the United States and the modes of thought found in the legal system. Since legal argument frequently uses ideas found in moral thought, exposure to the theory or history of ethics is critical. The program may be of interest to students contemplating a career in law and related careers, though it is not intended as a pre-law or legal studies program. 

 Minor Requirements for Philosophy & Law

RequirementsHours
Required Philosophy Courses
PHL 135The Rule of Law3
PHL 230Social and Political Philosophy3
PHL 335Philosophy of Law3
or PHL 435 Philosophy of Law
Ethical Theory
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Ethics
History of Moral Philosophy
Ethics: Theories of Good and Evil
Electives 6
Select two of the following (other courses may be selected with approval of director):
Foundations of Law
The Judicial Process in America: An Overview
The American Judicial Process
American Political Thought
The Politics of Constitutional Law
The Bill of Rights
Total Hours18

Major in Philosophy with Honors

The Philosophy Honors Program is designed for qualified, self-motivated students. It is suited for those contemplating graduate work in philosophy or in professional fields in which an honors degree is desired. Through special distribution and credit hour requirements and a directed honors thesis, honors students are prepared for in-depth philosophical research and related graduate and professional opportunity. For acceptance in Philosophy Honors Program a student must

  • be a philosophy major
  • have at least sophomore standing
  • have at least nine semester hours in UAB philosophy courses
  • have at least a 3.5 GPA in UAB philosophy course work
  • submit an application to the department (application is available from department office)

Additional Requirements For Honors in Philosophy Degree

Course Grade and GPA Requirement

No course in which a grade below C has been earned may be counted toward the major.  A 3.6 GPA in philosophy (PHL) courses is required for graduation with honors.

RequirementsHours
Ethics and Value Theory
Select two of the following:6
Contemporary Moral Issues
Bioethics
Introduction to Ethics
The Rule of Law
History of Moral Philosophy
Social and Political Philosophy
Classical Political Thought
Modern Political Theory
Ethics: Theories of Good and Evil
Libertarianism: A Political Philosophy
Philosophy of Law
History of Philosophy
Select two of the following:6
Existentialism
History of Moral Philosophy
Classical Thought of India China and the West
History of Philosophy: Socrates Plato and Aristotle
History of Philosophy: Descartes to Hume
Hist of PHL:Kant and 19th Cent
American Philosophy
History of Philosophy: Twentieth Century
Epistemology/Metaphysics/ Philosophy of Mind/ Logic/ Philosophy of Language/Philosophy of Science
Select three of the following:9
Introduction to Symbolic Logic
The Scientific Enterprise
Intermediate Symbolic Logic
Philosophy of Language
Minds and Machines
Philosophy of Mind
Epistemology: Theories of Knowledge
Metaphysics
Philosophical Problems in the Natural and Social Sciences
Seminar
Select one of the following:3
Philosophy Seminar
Philosophy Seminar
Philosophy Seminar
Philosophy Electives
Select three of the following:9
Introduction to Philosophy
Contemporary Moral Issues
Bioethics
Practical Reasoning
Introduction to Ethics
The Rule of Law
Philosophy of Religion
Philosophy and Christianity
Existentialism
Philosophy of the Arts
History of Moral Philosophy
Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Social and Political Philosophy
Classical Political Thought
Modern Political Theory
Classical Thought of India China and the West
History of Philosophy: Socrates Plato and Aristotle
The Scientific Enterprise
Topics in Philosophy
Topics in Philosophy
Topics in Philosophy
Philosophy and Feminism
Ethics: Theories of Good and Evil
Intermediate Symbolic Logic
Cooperation and Competition
Philosophical Issues in Behavior Economics
Libertarianism: A Political Philosophy
Philosophy of Law
History of Philosophy: Descartes to Hume
American Philosophy
Philosophy of Language
Minds and Machines
Philosophy of Mind
Topics in Philosophy
Topics in Philosophy
Topics in Philosophy
Epistemology: Theories of Knowledge
Metaphysics
Philosophy of Law
Hist of PHL:Kant and 19th Cent
History of Philosophy: Twentieth Century
Philosophical Problems in the Natural and Social Sciences
Philosophy Seminar
Philosophy Seminar
Philosophy Seminar
Directed Studies
Principles of Scientific Integrity
Directed Readings
Philosophy of Science
Problems ProSeminar
Problems ProSeminar
Problems ProSeminar
Honors Thesis3
Directed Studies *
Total Hours36
*

 To register for this course, contact the Department of Philosophy

Courses

PHL 100. Introduction to Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Introductory survey of philosophy, its nature, methods and problems. Topics typically include, among others, God, freedom, knowledge, right and wrong. Classical and/or contemporary readings.

PHL 115. Contemporary Moral Issues. 3 Hours.

Survey of contemporary moral problems and dilemmas; introduction to methods and concepts of moral philosophy. Topics may include abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, economic justice, homosexuality, animal rights, and respect for nature. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course (QEP).

PHL 116. Bioethics. 3 Hours.

Moral problems and dilemmas in medicine and health affairs; elementary methods and concepts of moral philosophy. Problems typically include, among others, AIDS and human and animal experimentation. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course (QEP).

PHL 120. Practical Reasoning. 3 Hours.

Survey of skills in critical thinking and scientific reasoning, including the ability to identify different kinds of arguments, recognize common fallacies of reasoning, and evaluate analogical, causal, and statistical arguments. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).

PHL 125. Introduction to Ethics. 3 Hours.

Elements of moral philosophy. Moral objectivity; connections among morality, rationality, and religion; nature and significance of moral value.

PHL 135. The Rule of Law. 3 Hours.

Law and legal institutions and processes, with emphasis on civil law. Development of legal ideas in such areas as torts, contracts, and property law. Role and history of legal institutions within political framework. Relations between courts and legislatures. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course (QEP).

PHL 203. Philosophy of Religion. 3 Hours.

Religion; its nature, warrant, and significance. God, evil, religious experience, faith, and reason.

PHL 204. Philosophy and Christianity. 3 Hours.

What Christians believe and why they believe it; foundations of Christian philosophical thought. Christian concepts of God, Christ, salvation, atonement, faith, and ethics.

PHL 205. Existentialism. 3 Hours.

What existentialists believe and why they believe it; foundations of existentialist philosophical thought. Existentialist concepts of freedom, commitment, anxiety, and authenticity.

PHL 208. Philosophy of the Arts. 3 Hours.

Art; its nature, scope, and significance. Concepts of expression, beauty, artistic creation, and standards of art criticism.

PHL 215. History of Moral Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Socrates to present, focusing on historical development of moral tradition that has shaped Western society. Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hobbes, Hume, Kant, Mill, Nietzsche, and others.

PHL 220. Introduction to Symbolic Logic. 3 Hours.

Modern theory of deductive inference. Emphasis on recognizing valid forms of reasoning. Truth-function theory and some beginning concepts of quantification theory. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).

PHL 230. Social and Political Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Survey of contemporary debates concerning fundamental principles of political life. Topics typically include justification of political authority, the proper role of government in society, economic justice, freedom and rights, and the free enterprise system. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course (QEP).

PHL 232. Classical Political Thought. 3 Hours.

Development of western political thought from plato to Augustine; Theories of major political thinkers.

PHL 233. Modern Political Theory. 3 Hours.

Development of Western political thought from the earlymodern era to contemporary debates in works of Machiavelli to Mill. Theories of major political thinkers.

PHL 239. Classical Thought of India China and the West. 3 Hours.

Conceptions of self, society, and natural world.

PHL 240. History of Philosophy: Socrates Plato and Aristotle. 3 Hours.

Origins and development of Western philosophic tradition, with emphasis on writings of Plato and Aristotle. Concepts of knowledge, reality, and the good life.

PHL 270. The Scientific Enterprise. 3 Hours.

Science; its nature, scope, and significance. Scientific reasoning; science as social institution; ethical issues in science.

PHL 290. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

In-depth examination of one or more problems, authors, or ideas of historical or current interest.

PHL 291. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

In-depth examination of one or more problems, authors, or ideas of historical or current interest.

PHL 292. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

In-depth examination of one or more problems, authors, or ideas of historical or current interest.

PHL 309. Teaching Practicum. 3 Hours.

Teaching experience in philosophy courses, supervised by a faculty member. Student must have previously taken the course for which the student will work within. Permission of Director of Undergraduate Studies required. Pass/Fail.

PHL 314. Philosophy and Feminism. 3 Hours.

Feminism; conceptual foundations, scope, and applications. Problems typically include, among others, feminist concepts of gender, reasoning, knowledge, and ethics. Prerequisite: One previous PHL course or permission of instructor.

PHL 315. Ethics: Theories of Good and Evil. 3 Hours.

Morality; its nature, principles, and scope. Normative and critical problems in moral philosophy; moral obligation. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.

PHL 320. Intermediate Symbolic Logic. 3 Hours.

Quantification theory; identity and definite description; soundness and completeness; skill in formal proof and ability to express arguments from natural language into artificial language. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.
Prerequisites: PHL 220 [Min Grade: C] or MA 120 [Min Grade: C]

PHL 321. Cooperation and Competition. 3 Hours.

This is an introductory course in game theory. Topics include game forms, Nash and subgame-perfect equilibrium, von Neumann-Morgenstern utility theory, design and solution of games, strategic implications of uncertainty and information asymmetries, institutions and elementary mechanism design, and basic evolutionary game theory. All topics are taughtby application to examples from business, politics, law and individual behavior. Course work will include analysis of philosophical implications and applications. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: EC 210 [Min Grade: C]

PHL 322. Philosophical Issues in Behavior Economics. 3 Hours.

This is an intro to the relatively new field of Behavioral Economics. Behavioral economists attempt to develop empirically more plausible accounts of economic behavior by, among other things, incorporating insights from psychology into their models. In this course, we will discuss both theoretical developments and applications in a variety of fields, including industrial organization, marketing, and negotiations. Course work will include analysis of the philosophical issues raised in philosophy of mind, cognitive science, and philosophy of science. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.
Prerequisites: EC 210 [Min Grade: C]

PHL 330. Libertarianism: A Political Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Libertarians believe that the legitimate functions of government are limited to protecting people=s rights to life, liberty, and property. As such, libertarianism represents a fundamental challenge to the legitimacy of the modern welfare state. The purpose of this course is to examine systemically the llibertarian vision of the proper role of government and the philosophical foundations of that vision. Readings are from historical and contemporary sources. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required. Writing is a significant component of this course (QEP).

PHL 335. Philosophy of Law. 3 Hours.

Theories of the nature of law (natural law, realism, positivism, critical legal theory); interpretation of precedents, statutes, and Constitution; Constitutional protections such as freedom of speech and religion and the right of privacy; selected issues in criminal and civil law. Ethics and Civic responsibility are significant components of this course (QEP).

PHL 341. History of Philosophy: Descartes to Hume. 3 Hours.

Philosophy in modern era, focusing on continental rationalism and British empiricism; emphasis on theories of knowledge and reality; science, religion, and modernism. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required. Writing is a significant component of this course (QEP).

PHL 348. American Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Major philosophers of classical American period; Pierce, James, and Dewey. Origins and nature of American pragmatism. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.

PHL 350. Philosophy of Language. 3 Hours.

Language; its nature, structure, and uses. Reference, meaning, communication, and interpretation; Russell, Wittgenstein, Chomsky, and Quine, among others. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.

PHL 372. Minds and Machines. 3 Hours.

Artificial intelligence; its philosophical foundations and implications. Topics may include mind-body problem, nature of intelligence, machine models of mind, computational processes, and mental representation. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.

PHL 375. Philosophy of Mind. 3 Hours.

Mind; its nature, forms, and functions. Concepts of mind/body, consciousness, rationality, and personal identity; free will. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required. Writing is a significant component of this course (QEP).

PHL 390. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

This course is a seminar whose content may be different each time it is taught. It provides instructors with the opportunity to deal with topics that may not be considered in any other course or which may be treated in another course but only at an introductory level. Topics may include: special topcs insome area of philosophy, interdisciplinary issues, and important work or works by a great philosopher. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.

PHL 391. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

This course is a seminar whose content may be different each time it is taught. It provides instructors with the opportunity to deal with topics that may not be considered in any other course or which may be treated in another course but only at an introductory level. Topics may include: special topcs insome area of philosophy, interdisciplinary issues, and important work or works by a great philosopher. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.

PHL 392. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

This course is a seminar whose content may be different each time it is taught. It provides instructors with the opportunity to deal with topics that may not be considered in any other course or which may be treated in another course but only at an introductory level. Topics may include: special topcs insome area of philosophy, interdisciplinary issues, and important work or works by a great philosopher. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.

PHL 405. Epistemology: Theories of Knowledge. 3 Hours.

Human knowledge; its nature, sources, and limits. Concepts of truth, objectivity, evidence, and belief. Two previous PHL courses or permission of instructor required. Writing is a significant component of this course (QEP).

PHL 408. Metaphysics. 3 Hours.

Reality; its basic elements, principles of existence and identity, and appearance and reality. Concepts of cause, matter, mind, realism, and anti-realism. Two previous PHL courses or permission of instructor required.

PHL 435. Philosophy of Law. 3 Hours.

Theories of the nature of law (natural law, realism, positivism, critical legal theory); interpretation of precedents, statutes, and Constitution; Constitutional protections such as freedom of speech and religion and the right of privacy; selected issues of criminal and civil law. Requires additional work not required in PHL 335. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course (QEP).

PHL 442. Hist of PHL:Kant and 19th Cent. 3 Hours.

Western philosophic tradition from Kant through end of nineteenth century. Kant, Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Mill, among others. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.
Prerequisites: PHL 100 [Min Grade: D] or PHL 115 [Min Grade: D] or PHL 116 [Min Grade: D] or PHL 215 [Min Grade: D]

PHL 443. History of Philosophy: Twentieth Century. 3 Hours.

Major movements and problems of twentieth century philosophy. Moore, Russell, Wittgenstein, and Quine, among others. Two previous PHL courses or permission of instructor required.

PHL 470. Philosophical Problems in the Natural and Social Sciences. 3 Hours.

Nature and uses of science. Concepts of explanation, confirmation, scientific law, and theory; special problems in sciences. Two previous PHL courses or permission of instructor required.

PHL 490. Philosophy Seminar. 3 Hours.

In-depth survey of either a topic or individual author of current interest. A systematic survey using previous course work in the main areas of philosophy to produce a substantial paper. Emphasis on detailed analysis of the structure of arguments and standards for empirical evidence where relevant. Proper standards for citation and attribution. Course fulfills capstone requirement for Seniors.

PHL 491. Philosophy Seminar. 3 Hours.

In-depth survey of either a topic or individual author of current interest. A systematic survey using previous course work in the main areas of philosophy to produce a substantial paper. Emphasis on detailed analysis of the structure of arguments and standards for empirical evidence where relevant. Proper standards for citation and attribution. This course fulfills the capstone requirement for seniors.

PHL 492. Philosophy Seminar. 3 Hours.

In-depth survey of either a topic or individual author of current interest. A systematic survey using previous course work in the main areas of philosophy to produce a substantial paper. Emphasis on detailed analysis of the structure of arguments and standards for empirical evidence where relevant. Proper standards for citation and attribution. This course fulfills the capstone requirement for seniors.

PHL 499. Directed Studies. 1-3 Hour.

Special arrangement opportunity for in-depth study. Permission of Instructor Only.

Faculty

Abrams, Marshall, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, 2007, A.B. (California-Davis), Ph.D. (Chicago)
Benditt, Theodore M., Professor of Philosophy, 1978, B.A., J.D., M.A. (Pennsylvania), Ph.D. (Pittsburgh)
King, Matthew, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, 2014, B.A. (University of Virginia), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Maryland)
McCain, Kevin, Assistant Profesor of Philosophy, 2012, B.A., B.S. (Southeast Missouri State University), M.A. (University of Missouri-Columbia), Ph.D. (University of Rochester, New York)
Morrow, David R., Assistant Professor of Philosophy, 2010, B.A. (John Hopkins); Ph.D. (CUNY)
Pence, Gregory E., Chair & Professor of Philosophy, 1976, B.A. (William and Mary), M.A., Ph.D. (New York)
Price, Marjorie, Associate Professor of Philosophy, 1977, A.B. (Barnard), M.A., Ph.D. (New York)
Whall, Mary B., Assistant Professor of Philosophy, 1993, B.S., B.A. (UAB), Ph.D. (Georgia)