Department of Materials Science and Engineering

http://www.uab.edu/engineering/home/departments-research/mse

Chair: J. Barry Andrews
Associate Chair: Uday K. Vaidya
Undergraduate Program Director:  Derrick R. Dean

Materials engineering involves the development, production, modification, and application of engineering materials to meet the specific needs of society. It is based on an understanding of the structures and forces that control the engineering properties of metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. Students learn how to control the properties of materials, how to select the optimum material and predict its behavior under various environmental and service conditions, and how to alter this behavior through materials design, research, and development. Materials Engineers are employed in every major industry, including aerospace, chemical, automotive, metals casting, biomedical, and microelectronics.

The materials engineering program at UAB has a curriculum of 128 semester credit hours that has been continuously accredited since 1971 by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of ABET, http://www.abet.org. In addition to courses in mathematics, calculus-based physics, chemistry, and the humanities/social sciences, students take a core of fundamental engineering course work and a sequence of materials engineering courses. The required materials engineering courses address ceramics, polymers, composite materials, and metals. They emphasize the relationships among properties, structure, processing, and performance. Materials engineering elective courses are also offered to introduce students to leading-edge materials engineering topics.  In addition to the general materials engineering program, students can specialize in either Biomaterials, Polymer Matrix Composites or Metallurgy by proper selection of their electives (see Concentrations). The curriculum prepares graduates to directly enter the professional practice of materials science and engineering, to pursue graduate studies in materials science and engineering, or enter a professional school, such as medicine or dentistry. The department has very active research programs in metal casting and composite materials.

The department also offers courses of study leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in materials engineering. These programs are described in the UAB Graduate School Catalog.

Vision

The Vision of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering is to be an internationally recognized research-oriented department – a first choice for undergraduate and graduate education.

Mission

The Mission of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering is to excel in research for the benefit of society while educating students at all levels to be immediately productive.

Educational Objectives

Our Materials Engineering undergraduate program will produce functioning professionals who:

  • Advance in materials engineering or related professional positions.
  • Continue to develop intellectually and professionally.

Lower Division Requirements For Materials Engineering

The following requirements are in addition to the School of Engineering core requirements.

RequirementsHours
General Chemistry Requirement
CH 115
  & CH 116
General Chemistry I
   and General Chemistry I Laboratory
4
CH 117
  & CH 118
General Chemistry II
   and General Chemistry II Laboratory
4
Required Courses
CE 210Statics3
CE 220Mechanics of Solids3
CE 344Civil Engineering Analysis I3
EE 312Electrical Systems3
EGR 110
  & EGR 111
Introduction to Engineering I
   and Introduction to Engineering II
2
or EGR 200 Introduction to Engineering Design
EGR 150Computer Methods in Engineering3
EGR 265Math Tools for Engineering Problem Solving4
MA 126Calculus II4
ME 102Engineering Graphics2
ME 251Introduction to Thermal Sciences2
Total Hours37

 Major Requirements For Materials Engineering

RequirementsHours
Required Materials Engineering Courses
MSE 280Engineering Materials3
MSE 281
  & 281L
Physical Materials I
   and Physical Materials I Laboratory
4
MSE 380Thermodynamics of Materials3
MSE 381Physical Materials II3
MSE 382Mechanical Behavior of Materials3
MSE 401Materials Processing3
MSE 413Composite Materials3
MSE 430Polymeric Materials3
MSE 464
  & 464L
Metals and Alloys
   and Metals and Alloys Laboratory
4
MSE 465
  & 465L
Characterization of Materials
   and Characterization of Materials Laboratory
4
MSE 470
  & 470L
Ceramic Materials
   and Ceramic Materials Laboratory
4
MSE 496MSE Honors Seminar1
MSE 498Capstone Design Project I2
MSE 499Capstone Design Project II3
Materials Engineering Elective
Choose three hours of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) courses.3
Frontiers of Materials
Frontiers of Automotive Materials
Interpretation of Microstructure
Nanomaterials
MSE 409
  & 409L
Principles of Metal Casting
   and Principles of Metal Casting Laboratory
Nondestructive Evaluation of Materials
Electronic, Magnetic, and Thermal Prop of Materials
Special Topics in (Area) (minimum of 3 hours)
Individual Study in (Area) (minimum of 3 hours )
Completion of Departmental Honors Program satisfies three credits of either a Materials Engineering Elective or an Engineering/Mathematics/Science Elective.
Science/Mathematics Elective
Choose three hours of Science/Mathematics courses3
Any Biology (BY) courses numbered BY 115 and above.
Any Chemistry (CH) courses at the CH 200 level or above
Any Physics (PH) courses above PH 222.
Introduction to Linear Algebra
Scientific Programming
Mathematical Modeling
Any Mathematics (MA) courses MA 434 and above
Engineering/Mathematics/Science Electives
Select six hours from MSE, other engineering, BY, MA, CH, or PH. 6
Any Biology (BY) courses BY115 or above not already taken as a major requirement.
Any Chemistry (CH) courses at CH 200 level or above not already taken as a major requirement
Any Physics (PH) courses above PH 222
Introduction to Linear Algebra
Scientific Programming
Mathematical Modeling
Any Mathematics (MA) courses MA 434 and above.
Any engineering course not required in the major except CE 120, EE 305, EGR 125, EGR 301, EGR 499, ME 101, ME 241, ME 301, ME 302, or MSE 350. Completion of Departmental Honors Program satisfies three credits of an Engineering/Mathematics/Science Elective.
Total Hours55

Concentration in Biomaterials

Students seeking the degree of BSMtE may add a concentration in Biomaterials by appropriate selection of their MSE Elective and Science/Mathematics/Engineering Electives (9 credit hours total).

 Concentration in Biomaterials

RequirementsHours
BME 311Biomaterials for Non-Majors3
BME 435Tissue Engineering3
BME 420Implant-Tissue Interactions3
Total Hours9

 

Concentration in Metallurgy

Students seeking the degree of BSMtE may add a concentration in Metallurgy by appropriate selection of their MSE Elective and Science/Mathematics/Engineering Electives (9 credit hours total).

 Concentration in Metallurgy

RequirementsHours
Elective Courses
Select three from the following:9
Failure Analysis
Interpretation of Microstructure
Principles of Metal Casting
Nondestructive Evaluation of Materials
Total Hours9

 

Concentration in Polymer Matrix Composites

Students seeking the degree of BSMtE may add a concentration of Polymer Matrix Composites by appropriate selection of their MSE Elective and Science/Mathematics/Engineering Electives (10 credit hours total). CH 235/CH 236 may be used as the Science/Mathematics Elective instead of one of the Science/Mathematics/Engineering Electives.

 Concentration in Polymer Matrix Composites

RequirementsHours
CH 235Organic Chemistry I3
CH 236Organic Chemistry I Laboratory1
Elective Courses
Select two from the following:6
Failure Analysis
Nanomaterials
Nondestructive Evaluation of Materials
Total Hours10

 

Please refer to the School of Engineering Overview for School policies related to admission, academic progress, reasonable progress toward degree, and graduation.

 Curriculum for the Bachelor of Science in Materials Engineering (BSMtE)

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
CH 115
  & CH 116
4EGR 11111
EGR 11011EH 1023
MA 1254CH 117
  & CH 118
4
ME 1022PH 221
  & 221L
4
EH 1013MA 1264
 14 16
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
CE 2103CE 2203
EGR 26524EE 3123
MSE 2803ME 2512
PH 222
  & 222L
4MSE 281
  & 281L
4
Core Curriculum Area II or IV: Humanities & Fine Art or Social & Behavioral Science33EGR 1503
 Core Curriculum Area II or IV: Humanities & Fine Art or Social & Behavioral Science33
 17 18
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MSE 3813MSE 470
  & 470L
4
MSE 3803Science/Mathematics Elective43
MSE 465
  & 465L
4MSE 464
  & 464L
4
CE 3443Core Curriculum Area II or IV: Humanities & Fine Art or Social & Behavioral Science33
MSE 4013MSE 3823
 16 17
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MSE 4982MSE 4993
Science/Math/Engineering Elective43Science/Math/Engineering Elective43
MSE 4133Core Curriculum Area II or IV: Humanities & Fine Art or Social & Behavioral Science33
MSE 4961Materials Engineering Elective 43
Core Curriculum Area II or IV: Humanities & Fine Art or Social & Behavioral Science36MSE 430
  & 430L
3
 15 15
Total credit hours: 128
1

Transfer students may substitute EGR 200 for EGR 110/EGR 111

2

Students may also take MA 227 and MA 252 for Engineering Problem Solving and either the SCI/MA or one SCI/MA/EGR elective.

3

Please refer to the Core Curriculum as specified for Engineering majors.

4

Completion of Departmental Honors Program satisfies three credits of either a Materials Engineering Elective or an Engineering/Mathematics/Science Elective.

Courses

MSE 011. Coop/Internship in MSE. 0 Hours.

Engineering workplace experience in preparation for the student's intended career.

MSE 280. Engineering Materials. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of materials engineering, including terminology, mechanical testing and behavior, heat treating, and processing of metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. Degradation of materials and criteria for materials selection. Course requires completion of 4 credits of Area III Science.

MSE 281. Physical Materials I. 4 Hours.

Structure of metals, ceramics and polymers; crystal bonding; phase diagrams, diffusion, dislocations and grain boundaries. Applications to the iron-carbon system, including heat treatment. MSE 281L must be taken concurrently.
Prerequisites: MA 125 [Min Grade: C] and MSE 280 [Min Grade: D]

MSE 281L. Physical Materials I Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of MSE 281 and must be taken concurrently.

MSE 350. Introduction to Materials. 3 Hours.

Concepts and applications, crystal structure of materials, formation of microstructures, and selected structure-property relationships. Not available for credit toward engineering major. For non-engineering majors only.

MSE 380. Thermodynamics of Materials. 3 Hours.

First, second, and third laws of thermodynamics. Gibbs free energy, heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy, and relationships between thermodynamic functions. Free-energy versus composition relationships; behavior of ideal and non-ideal solutions; concept of thermodynamic activity of components in solution. Applications to materials systems.
Prerequisites: CH 117 [Min Grade: D] and CH 118 [Min Grade: D] and MA 126 [Min Grade: C] and MSE 280 [Min Grade: D]

MSE 381. Physical Materials II. 3 Hours.

Microstructural changes in response to temperature and time; vacancies, annealing, diffusion, nucleation and growth kinetics. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium microstructures. Applications to precipitation hardening and solidification of metals.
Prerequisites: MSE 281 [Min Grade: D]

MSE 382. Mechanical Behavior of Materials. 3 Hours.

Microscopic deformation mechanisms in materials leading to macroscopic properties of fatigue; creep; ductile, transitional, and brittle fracture; friction; and wear. CE 220 (Mechanics of Solids) is recommended as a prerequisite for this course.
Prerequisites: MSE 281 [Min Grade: D]

MSE 401. Materials Processing. 3 Hours.

Processing of metals, glasses, ceramics, and composites. Powder processing, casting, welding, rapid solidification, and other advanced methods. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: CE 220 [Min Grade: D], MSE 280 [Min Grade: D] and CE 220 [Min Grade: D]

MSE 402. Frontiers of Materials. 3 Hours.

Recent advances in materials technology and application. Novel processing, structures, properties, and performance issues.
Prerequisites: MSE 281 [Min Grade: D]

MSE 405. Frontiers of Automotive Materials. 3 Hours.

Advanced lightweight automotive materials, manufacturing and modeling techniques. Technology advancements in cost-effective carbon, glass and related reinforcements; "green" and sustainable materials, crashworthiness and injury protection of occupants and pedestrians, metal castings, heavy truck, mass transit, fuel cell and hybrid vehicles. Students taking this class will receive a GATE certificate of training in automotive materials technologies upon successful completion.
Prerequisites: MSE 281 [Min Grade: D]

MSE 407. Interpretation of Microstructure. 3 Hours.

Interpretation of metal and ceramic microstructures with respect to their general type and origin and their relationship to their composition, type of phase diagram, processing, and the driving forces and kinetics of their evolution. The student will learn to identify the prior processing of a material and design means of modification to produce alternate structures.
Prerequisites: MSE 381 [Min Grade: C]

MSE 408. Nanomaterials. 3 Hours.

The emphasis of this course will be to introduce the basic tools of nanotechnology, building blocks of nanostructured materials, the behavior of materials with nanoscale structures and their technological applications, including automotive, medical, and electronic, etc.
Prerequisites: MSE 280 [Min Grade: C]

MSE 409. Principles of Metal Casting. 3 Hours.

Production and evaluation of cast ferrous metals (gray iron, ductile iron, steel) and non-ferrous metals (brass, bronze, aluminum). Design of castings and molds. Laboratory on the gating, risering and molten metal treatment, analysis and handling techniques required to produce high quality castings. MSE 409L must be taken concurrently.
Prerequisites: MSE 280 [Min Grade: D]

MSE 409L. Principles of Metal Casting Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of MSE 409 and must be taken concurrently.

MSE 413. Composite Materials. 3 Hours.

Processing, structure, and properties of metal-, ceramic-, and polymer-matrix composite materials. Roles of interfacial bond strength, reinforcement type and orientation, and matrix selection in physical and mechanical properties of composite materials. MSE 382 (Mechanical Behavior of Materials) is recommended as a prerequisite for this course. Writing is a significant component of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MSE 281 [Min Grade: D]

MSE 430. Polymeric Materials. 3 Hours.

Processing methods, structure/engineering/property relationships, and applications of polymeric materials.
Prerequisites: MSE 281 [Min Grade: D] and CH 117 [Min Grade: D] and CH 118 [Min Grade: D]

MSE 430L. Polymeric Materials Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of MSE 430 and must be taken concurrently.

MSE 433. Nondestructive Evaluation of Materials. 3 Hours.

Principles, applications, and limitation of ultrasonic vibrations, acoustic emission, radiographic, magnetic particle, eddy current, and other nondestructive testing methods. Intelligent sensors and health monitoring of real structures.
Prerequisites: MSE 465 [Min Grade: D]

MSE 464. Metals and Alloys. 4 Hours.

Microstructures, properties, heat treatment, and processing of ferrous and nonferrous materials.
Prerequisites: MSE 281 [Min Grade: D]

MSE 464L. Metals and Alloys Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of MSE 464 and must be taken concurrently.

MSE 465. Characterization of Materials. 4 Hours.

Theory and practice of materials characterization, with emphasis on optical metallography, quantitative metallography, scanning electron microscopy, crystallography, and x-ray diffraction. Specific applications in metals and ceramics considered. MSE 465L must be taken concurrently.
Prerequisites: MSE 281 [Min Grade: D]

MSE 465L. Characterization of Materials Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of MSE 465 and must be taken concurrently.

MSE 470. Ceramic Materials. 4 Hours.

Structure, processing, properties, and uses of ceramic compounds and glasses. Mechanical, thermal, and electrical behavior of ceramic materials in terms of microstructure and processing variables.
Prerequisites: MSE 281 [Min Grade: D] and CH 117 [Min Grade: D] and CH 118 [Min Grade: D]

MSE 470L. Ceramic Materials Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Laboratory component of MSE 470 and must be taken concurrently.

MSE 484. Electronic Magnetic and Thermal Prop of Materials. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of electron band structure, mechanisms behind rectifying junctions, transistors, and other electronic devices. Magnetic and thermal properties of materials.
Prerequisites: MSE 280 [Min Grade: D] and PH 221 [Min Grade: C]

MSE 489. Undergraduate Research in MSE. 0 Hours.

Undergraduate research experiences in materials science and/or engineering.

MSE 490. Special Topics in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Special Topics in (Area).

MSE 491. Individual Study in (Area). 1-6 Hour.

Individual Study in (Area).

MSE 496. MSE Honors Seminar. 1 Hour.

Research presentations by faculty, students, and invited guests on topics related to Materials Science and Engineering.

MSE 497. MSE Honors Research. 2-6 Hours.

Honor students develop materials engineering research skills by working closely with faculty and graduate students.
Prerequisites: EGR 301 [Min Grade: P]

MSE 498. Capstone Design Project I. 2 Hours.

Capstone design project: interdisciplinary design teams, ethics, materials selection, design process, development of proposal, project planning and scheduling, project execution and resource scheduling, and communication of design. Writing is a significant component of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MSE 401 [Min Grade: D](Can be taken Concurrently) or ME 405 [Min Grade: D](Can be taken Concurrently)

MSE 499. Capstone Design Project II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of MSE 498 which must be taken in the previous term. Interim and final design reviews with written and oral reports. Writing is a significant component of this course (QEP).
Prerequisites: MSE 498 [Min Grade: D]

Faculty

Andrews, J. Barry, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Chair, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 1976, B.S. (UAB), M.E., PhD. (Florida), P.E. (Alabama), Polymer and Metal Matrix Composites, Solidification, Physical Metalurgy
Chawla, Krishan Kumar, Professor Emeritus of Materials Science and Engineering, 1998, B.S. (Banaras Hindu, India), M.S., Ph.D. (Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Metal, Ceramic, and Polymer Matrix Composite Materials; Fibers; Foams
Dean, Derrick R., Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 2004, B.S., M.S. (Tuskegee), Ph.D. (Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Structure-Property Relationships of Polymers and Multiphase Polymer Systems, including Blends; Nano- and Micro-Composites
Dwyer, Zoe. B., Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Programs, 1999, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (UAB)
Foley, Robin D., Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 1990, B.S., M.S. (Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Ph.D. (Wisconsin-Madison), Materials Characterization, Physical Metallurgy, Metals Casting
Genau, Amber, Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 2010, B.S., M.S. (Iowa State); Ph.D. (Northwestern), Solidification Microstructure Analysis, 3D Image Characterization
Griffin, John A. , Research Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 2011, B.S.Mt.E, M.S.Mt.E. (UAB), Metals Casting, Testing and Characterization, Nondestructive Evaluation
Janowski, Gregg M., Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Associate Provost for Assessment and Accreditation, 1990, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (Michigan Technological), X-Ray Diffraction, Composite Materials, Physical Matallurgy, Structure-Processing-Property Relationships
Monroe, Charles A., Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 2012, B.S. (Penn State), M.S., Ph.D. (Iowa), Metals Casting, Design for Manufacture, Process Modeling
Ning, Haibin, Research Assistant Professor, 2010, B.E. (Central South University, China); M.S. (Guangxi University, China), Ph.D. (UAB), Polymer Matrix Composite Materials, Metal; Design and Modeling
Pillay, Selvum, Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 2007, Bach (M L Suttan Technikon), M.S.M.E. (Florida A&M), Ph.D. (UAB), Polymer Matrix Composites, Manufacturing and Processing, Design for Manufacture
Scripa, Rosalia N., Professor of Materials Science and Engineering: Professor of Biomedical Engineering, 1976, B.S. (Alfred), M.S. (Pennsylvania State), M.S., Ph.D. (Florida), P.E. (Alabama), Structure and Properties of Glass and Ceramics, Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Electronic and Magnetic Materials, Growth and Characterization of II-VI Semiconducting Compounds
Simien, Daneesh, Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 2014, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (Rice University), Self Corrective and Response, "Smart" Nano Scale Composite Materials, Structure-Property Relationships of Polymer Composites Inclusive of Rheological and Electrical Properties, Nano Scale Sensors and Flexible Robust Electronics
Thomas, Vinoy, Research Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 2007, B.S., M.S. (University of Kerala, India), Ph.D. (Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences & Technology, India), Polymeric Biomaterials and 3D Composite Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering, Nanomaterials and Nanodiamonds for Biomedical Applications, Green Materials Synthesis and Structure-Property Relationships
Vaidya, Uday K., Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, 2001, B.S.M.E. (Karnataka University, India), M.S. (Shivaji University, India), Ph.D. (Auburn), Composites Application Development; Thermoset and Thermoplastic Polymer Matrix Composites; Design, Manufacturing & Processing Modeling; Nondestructive Evaluation and Dynamic Response; R&D to Commercialization