Occupational Therapy

Prospective students should use this checklist (Entry Level) to obtain specific admissions requirements on how to apply to Graduate School.

Prospective students should use this checklist (Post Professional) to obtain specific admissions requirements on how to apply to Graduate School.

Prospective students should use this checklist (Low Vision Rehabilitation) to obtain specific admissions requirements on how to apply to Graduate School.

Degree Offered:Master of Science
Interim Director:Dr. Gavin Jenkins
Phone:(205) 934-7324 or (205) 934-8623
Web site:http://www.uab.edu/shp/ot/

Program Information

The Department of Occupational Therapy at the University of Alabama at Birmingham offers an entry level Master of Science (MS) degree in occupational therapy for individuals who hold a baccalaureate degree in a field other than occupational therapy. For individuals without a baccalaureate degree, this curriculum is also offered in conjunction with the undergraduate Health Care Management program as a 3:2 HCM/OT Pathway (www.uab.edu/shp/ot/32-fast-ot).

MSOT Occupational Therapy

The MS in OT entry-level, or professional program, is a full-time day program.

Accreditation

The program is fully accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE)® of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA)®, located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449; telephone: (301)652-6611 ext 2914.

Credentials Conferred

The Master of Science degree is awarded by the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Professional Certification

Graduates of the program are eligible to sit for the national occupational therapist certification examination administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT)®; website: www.nbcot.org  After successful completion of the exam, the individual will be an Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR). Most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination.

Applicants should be aware that fieldwork placement sites, professional licensing agencies and prospective employers frequently require criminal history disclosures and background checks, although convictions do not necessarily disqualify someone for licensure or employment. Applicants with criminal convictions should recognize that such convictions may impede eventual licensure or employment and that the University of Alabama at Birmingham cannot predict the future decisions of fieldwork sites, licensing agencies, or employers. An individual who is considering, or who has entered, an occupational therapy educational program can have his/her background reviewed by requesting an Early Determination Review.

Length of Study

Entry level program: Minimum of 7 semesters (2 1/2 years) as a full-time student.

Program Entrance Date

Fall semester of each year a new class is enrolled.

Application Deadline

This program participates in the Occupational Therapy Centralized Application Service (OTCAS).  Please consult www.otcas.org for more information regarding specific OTCAS application requirements, procedures, and fees.  Applicants should send all application materials directly to OTCAS.  OTCAS will verify the application information and send completed applications to the program. 

Contact Information for OTCAS:

Web:  https://portal.otcas.org/ Phone: (617) 612-2860 -- Monday through Friday 9:00 -- 5:00 EST Email: otcasinfo@otcas.org

International Students

See Occupational Therapy Entry Level Admissions Checklist at the top of the page, in addition to these items:

  • Complete and submit UAB Graduate School International application;
  • Request one (1) official transcript to be mailed by the issuing institution to the UAB Graduate School; a transcript evaluation from World Education Services (www.wes.org) or Educational Credential Evaluators (www.ece.org) is required;
  • Take and receive an acceptable score on the TOEFL or the IELTS, if the student is from a country where English is not the official and primary language;
  • Submit official TOEFL test score: Institution code: 1856 or official IELTS score (provide the Graduate School's mailing address to the testing company/center; and
  • Mail Financial Affidavit of Support.

Requirements for Admission

The applicant must hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university in a field other than occupational therapy.  Acceptance will be based on the student's academic ability, aptitude for a career as an occupational therapist, and an interview.  The candidate is expected to satisfy the following requirements:

  • Hold a baccalaureate degree in a discipline other than occupational therapy from an accredited college or university; or receive a baccalaureate degree in a discipline other than occupational therapy by June 1st of the admission year;
  • UAB Entry-Level Occupational Therapy Program requires the GRE taken within the last 5 years;
  • Completion of prerequisite coursework by June 1st of the admission year.
  • Have a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 (A = 4.0);
  • Have an overall minimum GPA of 3.0 (A=4.0) or better for all prerequisite courses;
  • If invited, participate in an interview at the Department of Occupational Therapy.  Interviews are scheduled once an application is received, verified, and reviewed.
  • Complete a criminal background check and drug screen at program admission and again prior to placement as required by school policy.

Procedures Following Acceptance

Once accepted, students will be allowed to enroll into the program in the desired entry year only if the following requirements are met:

  • Medical clearance requirements met as posted at www.uab.edu/studenthealth/;  
  • Application to and acceptance by the Graduate School (online) (www.uab.edu/graduate/online-forms) including the fee;
  • Signed Letter of Intent received by the Department of Occupational Therapy; with,
  • $300 nonrefundable deposit to reserve a seat in the program (deposit will be applied to tuition).

Essential Requirements

Prior to enrollment, students must certify their ability to complete the essential tasks, with or without reasonable accommodation, associated with performing as an occupational therapy student.  Reasonable accommodation refers to ways in which the University can assist students with disabilities to accomplish these tasks (for example, providing extra time to complete an examination or enhancing the sound system in a classroom).  Reasonable accommodation does not mean that students with disabilities will be exempt from certain tasks; it does mean that the Department of Occupational Therapy will work with students with disabilities to determine whether there are ways to assist the student with completion of the required tasks.

After enrollment, a student with a disability who wishes reasonable accommodation contacts Disability Support Services (205) 934-4205 or (205) 934-4248 (TDD) or visit 9th Avenue Office Bldg. 1701 9th Ave., provides appropriate and current documentation substantiating the claimed disability, meets the requirements of a disability as described in the ADA, and identifies the needed accommodation. Reasonable accommodation in classroom and in practice settings cannot be provided without the formal request and the required documentation of the ADA defined disability. (Visit http://www.uab.edu/dss )

Essential Tasks and Skills

The student must possess sufficient cognitive skills to:

  • Acquire, process, retain and apply knowledge through a variety of instructional methods such as:  written materials (i.e. texts, journals, documentation and other written sources), oral delivery, visual demonstrations, laboratory experiences, clinical experiences and independent learning.
  • Complete reading assignments, search and analyze professional literature, and apply information gained to guide practice.
  • Process (measure, calculate, analyze, synthesize and evaluate) large amounts of complex information; apply theoretical concepts to practice activities and perform clinical problem-solving in a logical and timely manner.
  • Perceive and understand three-dimensional relationships and spatial relationships necessary for education and practice related tasks such a moving in a variety of environments, designing treatment equipment, and fabricating splints.
  • Maintain attention for 2-4 hours; tolerate days when classes or fieldwork may last 8-10 hours.
  • Take and pass test/quizzes in a variety of formats.
  • Complete written assignments and produce written documentation in standard and organized English.
  • Apply knowledge and judgment required to demonstrate ethical reasoning and behavior.
  • Apply safety knowledge and judgment to a variety of situations.
  • Comply with University, Program, and fieldwork site rules and regulations.
  • Demonstrate problem-solving skills and judgment necessary to modify evaluation or intervention methods when necessary to address the specific needs of individuals (behavioral, cultural, etc.), in order to maximize client performance.
  • Apply clinical reasoning and judgment necessary for interpretation of evaluation data and development of treatment plans.
  • Identify and select occupations that are goal directed and motivate and challenge clients.
  • Demonstrate judgment necessary to establish priorities and develop and use strategies.

The student must possess sufficient interpersonal skills, communication skills, and affective learning skills to:

  • Demonstrate positive sufficient interpersonal skills including, but not limited to, cooperation, flexibility, tact, empathy, and confidence.
  • Collaborate with classmates, clients, family members, significant others, and team members.
  • Function successfully in supervisory, and instructor-student relationships; change and adjust behavior and performance in the classroom, laboratory, or clinic on the basis of instructor feedback.
  • Participate equitably in cooperative group learning activities; actively participate in class discussions and as a member of a team.
  • Sustain the mental and emotional rigors of a demanding educational program in occupational therapy that includes academic and clinical components that occur within set time constraints and often concurrently.
  • Orally present information to groups of people.
  • Communicate in the English language effectively and clearly in oral and written forms, using proper spelling, punctuation, and grammar to explain procedures and teach skills. 
  • Use language appropriate to the recipient, with faculty, peers, clients, and other health professionals from different social and cultural backgrounds; use communication skills needed to practice safely.
  • Obtain information from clients, peers, faculty, supervisors, and other professionals.
  • Use therapeutic communication skills such as attending and active listening during therapeutic interactions; and motivating and facilitating client behaviors in order to maximize client performance.
  • Communicate effectively both verbally and non-verbally; elicit and describe factual information and perceive information derived from verbal and non-verbal communication and social cues.
  • Be appropriately assertive as required to speak in class, initiate and guide the therapy process, establish limits as needed for the safety of self and clients and establish professional identity within complex systems.
  • Utilize the computer for communication and class assignments.
  • Observe persons and scenarios and elicit relevant information for use in assessment and intervention.
  • Plan, guide and implement both individual and group interventions.

The student must possess sufficient professional behavior to:

  • Demonstrate respect for diversity, including but not limited to, socio-cultural, socioeconomic, spiritual, and lifestyle choices.
  • Function successfully in supervisory and instructor-student relationships; change and adjust behavior and performance in the classroom, laboratory, or clinic on the basis of instructor feedback.
  • Exhibit professional demeanor including appropriate language and dress, acceptance of responsibility for conduct.
  • Demonstrate organizational and time management skills and ability to prioritize activities effectively as needed to attend class and fulfill class requirements.
  • Exhibit flexibility and adapt to changing environments and expectations.
  • Cope with stresses encountered in the intensive educational process as well as clinical practice environments.
  • Demonstrate consistent work behaviors including initiative, preparedness, dependability, punctual attendance and work site maintenance.
  • Tolerate working in environments where there is exposure to disability, illness, pain, and death.
  • Maintain general good health and self-care in order not to jeopardize the health and safety of self and others in the academic and clinical settings.
  • Maintain ethical standards including honesty, integrity, and confidentiality, at all times.
  • Produce the required volume of work in the expected time frame.

The student must possess sufficient physical and sensory skills to:

  • Tolerate sitting up to 2 hours at a time, over an 8-10 hour period.
  • Tolerate periods of physical activity up to 8-10 hours per day.
  • Demonstrate coordination, equilibrium, and sensory functioning required to manipulate parts of, or whole bodies of, simulated and real clients for purposes of evaluation and treatment.
  • Demonstrate mobility and ability to move within environments adequately to access and maneuver within locations and destinations including classroom, lab, and clinical settings.
  • Demonstrate lifting ability sufficient to maneuver an individual's body parts effectively to perform evaluation and treatment techniques including, but not limited to, transferring another person into and out of a wheelchair, to and from the commode or bed, etc.
  • Demonstrate sufficient postural control, neuromuscular control, eye/hand coordination, and integrated function of the senses of vision, hearing, tactile sense, vestibular (movement sense) and proprioception (sense of muscles and joints) to manipulate and use common occupational therapy equipment, devices, materials, and supplies, and demonstrate competency in the use of these objects within assessment and treatment procedures commonly used in occupational therapy practice.
  • Demonstrate motor skill capacities with sufficient levels of strength, endurance and fine and gross motor coordination to safely, accurately, and effectively engage in a wide variety of therapeutic techniques, activities and occupations used in the occupational therapy assessment and intervention process; these capacities would include ability to lift and move objects, adequate manual dexterity, arm and hand function needed to use tools and perform other manipulative activities, use of limbs and trunk in bending, twisting, squatting, kneeling, reaching, pushing, pulling, holding, extending, and rotation.
  • Manipulate or guide another person's body in transfers, ambulation, positioning and assisted or facilitated trunk, head, and limb movements.
  • Manipulate bolsters, pillows, plinths, mats, assistive/adaptive devices, and other supports or chairs to aid in positioning, moving, or treating a patient/client effectively.
  • Legibly record/document evaluations, patient care notes, and referrals, etc., in standard medical charts in clinical settings in a timely manner and consistent with the acceptable norms of clinical settings.
  • Demonstrate or complete activities or tests with adequate degree of fine motor dexterity.
  • Tolerate physical contact with others; tolerate manipulation of his/her own body by peers or instructors for instructional purposes.
  • Demonstrate a sufficiently high degree of coordination of motor skills and vigilance to respond to emergency situations quickly and appropriately, including performance of CPR.
  • Travel to various community and fieldwork sites for experiential learning, clinical opportunities, and fieldwork.

Program Prerequisites - UAB Equivalents* 

(Course requirements are listed in semester credit hours)

Completion of prerequisite coursework within the last 8 years with a grade of “B” or better. No more than two prerequisites may be incomplete at the time of application; however, all courses must be completed by June 1st of the entrance year. Depending on the number and type of outstanding prerequisite courses, you may be accepted into the program early with certain conditions such as a requirement to achieve a grade of B or better in a course.

Have a minimum 3.0 (A=4.0) grade point average (GPA) overall, in the required prerequisite work, and last 60 semester hours.

RequirementsHours
Prerequisite Courses Required
Biology with Lab (UAB Equivalent BY 123+L)4
Human Anatomy with lab (UAB Equivalent BY 115+L)4
Human Physiology with lab (UAB Equivalent BY 116+L)4
Physics (UAB Equivalent PH 201)3
Abnormal Psychology (UAB Equivalent PY 218)3
Developmental or Lifespan Psychology (must be birth through death) (UAB Equivalent PY 212)3
Sociology Elective (UAB Equivalent SOC 101)3
Statistics Elective (PY 214, PY 216, MA 180, EPR 214 or AHS 360)3
Anthropology Elective (UAB Equivalent Soc 101 orANTH 101)3

UAB Entry-level Occupational Therapy Program requires taking the GRE within the last 5 years.

Typical Program

(Course requirements are listed in semester credit hours)

First Year
First TermHours
OT 5951
OT 6063
OT 6073
OT 6204
OT 6673
OT 6752
 16
Total credit hours: 16
First Year
Second TermHours
OT 5961
OT 6053
OT 6093
OT 6223
OT 6233
OT 6301
OT 6313
 17
Total credit hours: 17
First Year
Summer TermHours
OT 5971
OT 6103
OT 6244
OT 6321
OT 6624
OT 6733
OT 6982
 18
Total credit hours: 18
Second Year
First TermHours
OT 5981
OT 6254
OT 6331
OT 6613
OT 6684
OT 6703
OT 6982
 18
Total credit hours: 18
Second Year
Second TermHours
OT 5992
OT 6342
OT 6533
OT 6654-5
OT 6743
OT 6982
HRP 6502
 18-19
Total credit hours: 18-19
Second Year
Summer TermHours
OT 68510
 10
Total credit hours: 10
Third Year
First TermHours
OT 68610
 10
Total credit hours: 10

A minimum total of six credit hours Master’s Level Non-Thesis Research must be completed to meet graduation requirements.

For further information contact:
UAB, Department of Occupational Therapy
Recruitment and Admissions Coordinator        
SHPB 353
1720 2nd  Avenue South
Birmingham, AL 35294-1212
Telephone 205-934-7323
E-mail msot@uab.edu
Web http://www.uab.edu/shp/ot/

Postprofessional Degree

Deadline for entry term(s):Applications are no longer being accepted.
Deadline for all application materials to be in the graduate school office:One semester preceding the expected semester of enrollment.
Number of evaluation forms required: Three
Entrance Tests:GRE (TOEFL and TWE also required for international applicants whose native language is not English.)
Comments:None

Postprofessional Occupational Therapy Program

NOTE:  The Post Professional OT Program accepted its last cohort of students in Fall 2015.  Applications are no longer accepted.

The program offers postprofessional education to occupational therapists who wish to learn advanced theoretical, practice, and research skills. Currently one online specialization option exists for the postprofessional – low vision. Students interested in low vision must be accepted into the low vision certificate program prior to applying for the postprofessional master’s degree. The 33- semester hour low vision option guides the student through coursework for the areas indicated including theory, specialty practice application, research methodology, and a final project or thesis. Elective coursework from related departments taken prior to admission may be approved for degree requirements; however, you must submit a copy of the course syllabus and the year and semester you took the course before final decisions are made regarding approval. Graduates of the program may use this degree to enter specialized areas of practice, as part of the requirements for specialty certifications, to assume leadership positions within the profession, or to prepare for doctoral level study.

Credentials Conferred

The Master of Science degree is awarded by the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Length of Study

Approximately 11 semesters are needed to complete this degree. The low vision post-professional master's program was designed specifically for part-time online students.

Essential Requirements

After acceptance and prior to enrollment into online programs, students must certify their ability to complete the essential tasks, with or without reasonable accommodation, associated with performing as an occupational therapy student.  Reasonable accommodation refers to ways in which the University can assist students with disabilities to accomplish these tasks (for example, providing extra time to complete an examination or enhancing the sound system in a classroom).  Reasonable accommodation does not mean that students with disabilities will be exempt from certain tasks; it does mean that the Department of Occupational Therapy will work with students with disabilities to determine whether there are ways to assist the student with completion of the required tasks.

After enrollment, a student with a disability who wishes reasonable accommodation contacts Disability Support Services (205) 934-4205 or (205) 934-4248 (TDD) or visit 9th Ave. Office, 1701 9th Ave. S., provides appropriate and current documentation substantiating the claimed disability, meet the requirements of a disability as described in the ADA, and identify the needed accommodation. Reasonable accommodation in classroom and in practice settings cannot be provided without the formal request and the required documentation of the ADA defined disability. (Visit http://www.uab.edu/dss).

Essential Tasks

  • Students must meet class standards for course completion throughout the curriculum.
  • Students must be able to read, write, speak, and understand English at a level consistent with successful course completion.
  • Students must complete readings, assignments, and other activities outside of class hours.
  • Students must apply critical thinking processes to their work in the classroom  and exercise sound judgment in class during online discussions.
  • Students must have interpersonal skills as needed for productive classroom discussion, and respectful interaction with classmates and faculty.
  • Students must demonstrate appropriate health status prior to enrollment, with annual updates on some items.
  • Students must follow standards and policies specified in the Department of Occupational Therapy Student Handbook, and the University of Alabama at Birmingham Directions Handbook.
  • Students must adhere to all policies outlined in the Department of Occupational Therapy Student Handbook which will be displayed in the Resource section of each online course.

Postprofessional curriculum

(Course requirements are listed in semester credit hours)

Students must complete low vision coursework prior to, or concurrently with, post-professional coursework. Your stated area of interest will dictate the coursework required for completion of the post professional master’s degree.  Required coursework for the Low Vision Rehabilitation Graduate Certificate (15 hours) can be viewed at www.uab.edu/lowvision
Students in both programs need to complete the following courses:

RequirementsHours
OT 642Research Design in Occupational Therapy1-3
OT 643Data Analysis in Occupational Therapy Research1-3
OT 644Project Dissemination - Professional Writing and Presentation1-3
OT 653Using the Literature for Evidence Based Practice3
OT 658Foundations of Professional Education4
OT 667Research Methods3
OT 692Special Topics in OT (Elective)1-3

Electives offered outside of the occupational therapy curriculum in programs at UAB are allowed with the permission of the advisor. Up to 12 hours of coursework taken at other institutions may apply as well but must be approved by the student's advisor and must be completed  with a grade of B or better. A copy of the course syllabus is required for approval.
For further information contact:
Laura K. Vogtle, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA
Program Director
Occupational Therapy Postprofessional Program
UAB School of Health Professions
SHPB-338   
1720 2nd Avenue South
Birmingham, AL 35294-1212
Telephone 205-934-3568
E-mail lvogtle@uab.edu

Low Vision Rehabilitation, Graduate Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in Low Vision Rehabilitation is a practice oriented certificate degree program that prepares occupational therapists to provide comprehensive, competent intervention to adults with visual impairment from age-related eye diseases and brain injury. The program is designed for occupational therapists already working in low vision rehabilitation; those interested in starting low vision rehabilitation programs; and those just interested in expanding their practice skills. The program's flexible web-based distance format allows occupational therapists across the United States and other English speaking countries to obtain these skills while working full time.

Credentials Conferred

The Graduate Certificate in Low Vision Rehabilitation is awarded by the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Length of Study

The certificate requires 5 semesters to complete; students take 1 course per semester.

Program Entrance Date

Fall semester (begins in August)

Requirements for Admission

Degree in occupational therapy from an accredited university program.

Essential Requirements

After acceptance and prior to enrollment into online programs, students must certify their ability to complete the essential tasks, with or without reasonable accommodation, associated with performing as an occupational therapy student.  Reasonable accommodation refers to ways in which the University can assist students with disabilities to accomplish these tasks (for example, providing extra time to complete an examination).  Reasonable accommodation does not mean that students with disabilities will be exempt from certain tasks; it does mean that the Department of Occupational Therapy will work with students with disabilities to determine whether there are ways to assist the student with completion of the required tasks.

After enrollment, a student with a disability who wishes reasonable accommodation contacts Disability Support Services (205) 934-4205 or (205) 934-4248 (TDD), provides appropriate and current documentation substantiating the claimed disability, meet the requirements of a disability as described in the ADA, and identify the needed accommodation. Reasonable accommodation in classroom and in practice settings cannot be provided without the formal request and the required documentation of the ADA defined disability. (Visit http://www.uab.edu/dss).

Essential Tasks

  • Students must meet class standards for course completion throughout the curriculum.
  • Students must be able to read, write, speak, and understand English at a level consistent with successful course completion and development of positive client-therapist relationships.
  • Students must complete readings, assignments, and other activities.
  • Students must gather decision-making pieces of information during client assessment activities.
  • Students must perform evaluation and intervention activities by direct performance keys.
  • Students must apply critical thinking processes to their work in the courses.
  • Students must have interpersonal skills as needed for productive discussion, respectful interaction with classmates and faculty.
  • Students must demonstrate appropriate health status prior to enrollment with annual updates on some items. Requirements found at www.uab.edu/studenthealth.
  • Students must follow standards and policies specified in the Department of Occupational Therapy Student Handbook, and the University of Alabama at Birmingham Directions Handbook.
  • Students must adhere to all policies outlined in the Department of Occupational Therapy Student Handbook which is posted online at www.uab.edu/shp/ot/contact-us/student-resources.

Application Deadline and Procedure

See Occupational Therapy Low Vision Rehabilitation Admissions Checklist at the top of the page.

International Students:

See Occupational Therapy Low Vision Rehabilitation Admissions Checklist, in addition to the following items:

  • A transcript evaluation from World Education Services (www.wes.org) or Educational Credential Evaluators (www.ece.org) may be required.
  • Students from countries where English is not the official and primary language may be required to take and receive an acceptable score on the TOEFL, or the IELTS.
  • Submit official TOEFL test score (Institution code: 1856) or official IELTS score (provide the Graduate School's mailing address to the testing company/center)

Typical Program (Course requirements are listed in semester credit hours)

The curriculum is designed with the working occupational therapist in mind. Coursework emphasizes practical application to the clinic. Projects are designed to reinforce learning of application to practice. Materials for completion of the courses can be obtained through the internet and required texts. The student must have consistent access to the internet. A high-speed connection (DSL, cable, satellite) is strongly recommended.

Two Tracks Are Available:

Certificate Only

On completion of the required coursework the student will be awarded a Graduate Certificate in Low Vision Rehabilitation by the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the student’s name will appear in the commencement bulletin. A transcript of the coursework taken for the certificate will be available.

The curriculum for the certificate is offered online as web-based distance education for practitioners. Students accepted into the program begin the curriculum in August and complete one course per semester. Because one course builds on another, students must take the courses in sequence. The final course requires that the student come to the UAB campus for a 2-day on campus intensive where they will work in small groups with instructors to demonstrate assessment and intervention skills. This is the only time the student is required to come to the UAB campus during the entire curriculum. Based on these requirements, course work for completion of the certificate will require 5 semesters.

LOW VISION REHABILITATION CURRICULUM

The courses must be completed sequentially in the order listed below.

Typical OT Curriculum Course Sequence

RequirementsHours
Fall Cohort
OT 677Foundations in Low Vision Rehabilitation I (1st Fall semester)3
OT 679Foundations in Low Vision Rehabilitation II (1st Spring semester)3
1st Summer semester Open
OT 690Foundations in Low Vision Rehabilitation III (2nd Fall semester)3
OT 689Foundations in Treatment of Visual Impairment from Brain Injury (2nd Spring semester)3
OT 691Foundations in Low Vision Rehabilitation IV (2nd Summer semester)3
Total Credits 15 credits

For further information contact:

Program Coordinator
Occupational Therapy Low Vision Rehabilitation Certificate Program
UAB School of Health Professions
SHPB 351
1720 2nd Avenue South
Birmingham, AL 35294-1212
Telephone 205-975-6860
E-mail lvrcert@uab.edu
Web http://www.uab.edu/shp/ot/low-vision-rehabilitation

Courses

OT 595. Occupations and Health: Groups and Communities I. 1 Hour.

A service-based learning model, pairing students with community partners to provide opportunities to reflect upon the facilitating and inhibiting nature of group and community settings. The course will also provide opportunity to consider the domains and contexts of both occupation and its influence on health, well-being, and lifestyle. The course aims to facilitate self-awareness through reflection of personal values, family, and roles as aspects of development of personality type and sense of self, as well as emphasizing cultural diversity competence and clearance of institutional administrative requirements for off campus experiences.

OT 596. Occupations and Health: Groups and Communities II. 1 Hour.

A service-based learning model, pairing students with community partners to provide opportunities to reflect upon the facilitating and inhibiting nature of group and community settings. In addition, the course will allow the opportunity to consider the domains and contexts of both occupation and its influence on health, well-being, and lifestyle. The course introduces the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework and application of the Occupational Therapy Process for clients at the groups and communities level. Service-based learning is introduced, and a number of service-based experiences are coordinated as a means to introduce the existing community partnerships.
Prerequisites: OT 595 [Min Grade: C]

OT 597. Occupations and Health: Groups and Communities III. 1 Hour.

A service-based learning model, pairing students with community partners to provide opportunities to reflect upon the facilitating and inhibiting nature of group and community settings. The course will allow for consideration of the domains and contexts of both occupation and its influence on health, well-being, and lifestyle. The course will facilitate use of the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework and the Occupational Therapy Process when working with groups and communities. An emphasis on establishing rapport with the partners and initiating the evaluation process (i.e., development of the occupational profile, beginning the analysis of occupation, generating project ideas including outcomes, and development of a working hypothesis for the focus of the intervention plan).
Prerequisites: OT 595 [Min Grade: C] and OT 596 [Min Grade: C]

OT 598. Occupations and Health: Groups and Communities IV. 1 Hour.

A service-based learning model, pairing students with community partners to provide opportunities to reflect upon the facilitating and inhibiting nature of group and community settings. In addition, the course will allow for consideration of the domains and contexts of both occupation and its influence on health, well-being, and lifestyle. Application of the Practice Framework and Occupational Therapy Process is continued, with emphasis on completion of evaluation, development of an intervention plan including selecting desired outcomes and goals, identifying possible intervention approaches and specific interventions, and potential discharge recommendations and plan.
Prerequisites: OT 595 [Min Grade: C] and OT 596 [Min Grade: C] and OT 597 [Min Grade: C]

OT 599. Occupations and Health: Groups and Communities V. 2 Hours.

A service-based learning model, pairing students with community partners to provide opportunities to reflect upon the facilitating and inhibiting nature of group and community settings and to consider the domains and contexts of both occupation and its influence on health, well-being, and lifestyle. Application of the Practice Framework and Occupational Therapy Process with emphasis on reassessment and discharge recommendations and public dissemination of the project via poster presentation.
Prerequisites: OT 595 [Min Grade: C] and OT 596 [Min Grade: C] and OT 597 [Min Grade: C] and OT 598 [Min Grade: C]

OT 605. Therapeutic Skills. 3 Hours.

Group theory and group dynamics are presented. Basic group and individual client-therapist interaction skills are introduced, including: selecting a theory base, designing groups, writing group protocols, analyzing group activities, implementing specific group techniques, and evaluating progress of group members. Methods of establishing rapport, giving feedback, and employing therapeutic use of self are emphasized.

OT 606. Frameworks for Occupational Therapy Practice. 3 Hours.

Introduction to fundamental concepts of Occupational Therapy frameworks, theory, philosophy, conceptual models and models of practice.

OT 607. Analysis of Occupational Performance. 3 Hours.

Introduction to intervention techniques commonly used in occupational therapy practice; activity analysis and synthesis; application of typical growth and development in relationship to different age groups and populations.

OT 609. Barriers to Occupational Performance. 3 Hours.

Exposure to content specific to human disease processes, injuries, and developmental or inherited abnormalities within body systems that affect individual's occupational performance.

OT 610. Mental Health Diagnosis Across Life Span. 3 Hours.

Examines developmental and psychiatric conditions that result from disease, congenital, traumatic, environmental or social processes. Relationships among disease or disorder, impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions are emphasized in terms of the impact upon occupational performance.

OT 620. Found of Occupation: A&P. 4 Hours.

Designed to provide Occupational Therapy students a fundamental knowledge of human anatomy. An emphasis will be placed on the musculo-skeletal and peripheral nervous systems to enhance the understanding of conditions that will likely be encountered in the practice of Occupational Therapy.

OT 622. Introduction to Occupations of Infants, Children and Adolescents. 3 Hours.

Aspects of common pediatric diagnoses seen by occupational therapists; process of occupational therapy evaluation birth through adolescence, addressing needs through a holistic approach; assessment of occupational performance and occupational performance issues related to adaptation and life satisfaction.

OT 623. Found of Occup: Neuroscience. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of structure and function of central nervous system augmented with client examples.

OT 624. Occupations of Infants, Children and Adolescents. 4 Hours.

Evaluation, intervention planning, implementation, and specific intervention strategies across diagnostic categories for children, birth through adolescents using a holistic approach. Focus on components of occupational performance and occupational performance issues related to adaptation and life satisfaction.
Prerequisites: OT 622 [Min Grade: C]

OT 625. Occupations of Adults and Older Adults I. 4 Hours.

This course addresses aspects of evaluation, intervention planning, implementation, and specific intervention strategies across diagnostic categories in adult and elder rehabilitation. Occupational therapy addresses client needs using a holistic approach that incorporates all aspects of an individual's lifestyle. This course will focus on occupational areas of work, play, and leisure addressing components of occupational performance and contexts and how these areas affect occupational performance.

OT 630. Fieldwork Preparatory. 1 Hour.

Knowledge and ideas in preparation for upcoming fieldwork experiences throughout the program.

OT 631. Found of Occup: Biomechanics. 3 Hours.

Basic kinesiological principles and functional movement patterns of the human body during occupational performance. Study of principles and techniques for obtaining data about the status of the client's joint range of motion and muscle strength.

OT 632. Fieldwork Experience I. 1 Hour.

Fieldwork experience to enrich the didactic coursework through direct observation and participation in selected aspects of the occupational therapy process with emphasis on increasing awareness of better therapeutic use of self, occupational barriers and decision making skills when working with clients. An in class forum for exchange of ideas and experiences will be conducted after participating in the clinical experience.
Prerequisites: OT 630 [Min Grade: C]

OT 633. Fieldwork Experience II. 1 Hour.

Forum for exchange of ideas and experiences; detailed case study/inservice on modality and interventions chosen from client census during previous term's Level I Fieldwork experience.
Prerequisites: OT 630 [Min Grade: C] and OT 632 [Min Grade: C]

OT 634. Seminar in Professional Readiness. 2 Hours.

Forum for exchange of ideas and experiences; student, faculty, and alumni presentations on variety of topics.

OT 642. Research Design in Occupational Therapy. 1-3 Hour.

Review of research methodologies appropriate for use in clinical practice; topics include sampling, data management, and IRB training and approval. Students will design, implement, and document final projects.

OT 643. Data Analysis in Occupational Therapy Research. 1-3 Hour.

Review of data management and data analysis using SPSS Student Version to design, implement, analyze and document student final projects.

OT 644. Project Dissemination - Professional Writing and Presentation. 1-3 Hour.

Review documentation of project outcomes, writing for publication, and professional presentations to design, implement, analyze and, document student final projects.

OT 647. Leadership in Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

To develop leadership competencies for the occupational therapist to enable understanding of personal development and organizational change dynamics.

OT 653. Using the Literature for Evidence Based Practice. 3 Hours.

History of and rationale for evidence-based practice, introduction to typologies of evidence, search of data bases, developing questions for occupational therapy practice, critiquing evidence, analyzing bodies of evidence developed in response to research questions, and integrating evidence into practice.

OT 655. Qualitative Research Methods for Health Profession. 2 Hours.

Explores the paradigm of qualitative research including the role it has in the development of a deeper understanding of client populations and the development of theory in occupational therapy. Research design, data collection strategies, and methods of analysis will be discussed.

OT 658. Foundations of Professional Education. 4 Hours.

Introduction to occupational therapy post-professional education. Concepts introduced include the World Health Organization International Classification of Function, OT Practice Framework, aspects of continuing competency, American Psychological Association writing framework, and the American Occupational Therapy Association Professional Development Tool.

OT 660. Seminar: Interdisciplinary Svcs/Devel Disabilities. 1-2 Hour.

Synthesis of team-based approaches to intervention for infants, children, and youth with known or suspected disabilities.

OT 661. Well-being and Health Through Occupation. 3 Hours.

Critical analysis of the patterns of participation of occupation and its influence on the health and well-being in the lives of individuals, groups and populations across the lifespan, identifying contextual factors which facilitate and or inhibit this participation. Evaluate and critique the evidence which supports the relationship between occupation, health promotion, lifestyle choices, and prevention of injury and disease, utilizing occupational therapy models and approaches to practice while considering contexts.

OT 662. Upper Extremity Function in Occupation. 4 Hours.

This course will provide the opportunity to consider the occupational therapy process related to the design, fabrication, application, fitting, and training in the use of orthotics, prosthetics, and other modalities. Students will consider and apply the foundational knowledge, underlying principles, indications, contraindications, and precautions necessary for evidence-based practice.

OT 663. Occupations of Communities, Organizations, & Systems of Practice. 2 Hours.

This course will introduce students to the relationship between occupation, health promotion, lifestyle and health within communities, using occupational therapy models of practice to frame this critique. The course provides opportunities to evaluate and critique the evidence base for current and emerging areas of occupational therapy practice within communities. Students will critically evaluate current occupational therapy practice and identify potential service gaps. Students will critically discuss strategies for the development of occupational therapy services, emphasizing the business-related aspects of working with communities. Funding will be a significant obstacle for occupational therapists working with communities. For this reason, the course will provide information on business plans, grant and foundation monies and opportunities for students to plan monetarily for a project.

OT 665. Occupations of Adults and Older Adults II. 4-5 Hours.

This course addresses aspects of evaluation, intervention planning, implementation and specific intervention strategies across diagnostic categories in adult and elder rehabilitation. Occupational therapy addresses client needs using a holistic approach that incorporates all aspects of an individual's lifestyle. This course will focus on occupational areas of work, play, and leisure addressing components of occupational performance and contexts and how these areas affect occupational performance.

OT 667. Research Methods. 3-4 Hours.

Research ethics, descriptive, exploratory and experimental design, basic statistical concepts, and discussion of various types of research to enable students to critically analyze and use scientific literature to improve practice. Emphasis on understanding components of the research report and concepts associated with judging of internal and external validity.

OT 668. Mental Health Practice in Adulthood. 4 Hours.

Examines psychiatric conditions that result from disease, congenital, traumatic, environmental or social processes. Relationships among impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions are emphasized in terms of the impact upon occupational performance. Evaluation, intervention planning, and intervention are studied.

OT 670. Occupation and Low Vision. 3 Hours.

Overview of issues related to individuals with vision loss referred for OT treatment in all practice settings across the lifespan.

OT 673. Engagement in Occupation Thru Technology I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the relationship between occupation, health promotion, lifestyle, and health within communities, using occupational therapy models of practice to frame this critique. Evaluation and critique of the evidence base for current and emerging areas of occupational therapy practice and identification of potential service gaps.

OT 674. Engagement in Occupation thru Technology II. 3 Hours.

Designed to acquaint the student with assessments used in evaluation of clients for assistive technology, specific intervention strategies, elements of safety related to assistive technology, the education of clients and families and other key people in the context of the user.

OT 675. History and Theory of Occupation. 2 Hours.

Historical survey of occupation, occupational meaning, and purposeful activity as used by occupational therapists in study of occupational nature of human beings across life span.

OT 677. Foundations in Low Vision Rehabilitation I. 3 Hours.

Information on the topics of low vision rehabilitation including demographics and characteristics, settings and provider systems, anatomy and physiology of the eye and visual system, medical conditions causing low vision and common co-occurring secondary health conditions, low vision evaluation and screening, contribution of low vision on occupational performance and environmental interaction, and intervention strategies used by the occupational therapy generalist working in low vision.

OT 679. Foundations in Low Vision Rehabilitation II. 3 Hours.

Techniques for selecting, developing, and applying interventions to enhance occupational performance. Topics covered include assistive technology and computer modifications, reading, writing, and environmental assessment/modification.
Prerequisites: OT 677 [Min Grade: C]

OT 685. Advanced Fieldwork Experience I. 10 Hours.

Full time supervised practice experience designed to develop entry level professional skills consisting of a 3-month experience.

OT 686. Advanced Fieldwork Experience II. 10 Hours.

Full time supervised practice experience designed to develop entry level professional skills consisting of a 3-month experience.

OT 688. Occupation & Health: Groups and Community. 1-2 Hour.

This course will provide opportunities to reflect upon the facilitating and inhibiting nature of group and community settings and to consider the domains and contexts of both occupation and its influence on health, well-being, and lifestyle.

OT 689. Foundations in Treatment of Visual Impairment from Brain Injury. 3 Hours.

Evaluation and intervention for adults experiencing occupational limitations due to visual processing impairment from acquired brain injury. Topics include neuroanatomy of the visual processing system, evaluation and intervention for deficits in visual acuity, visual field oculomotor function, and visual attention and cognitive processing.
Prerequisites: OT 679 [Min Grade: C]

OT 690. Foundations in Low Vision Rehabilitation III. 3 Hours.

Techniques for selecting, developing, and applying interventions to enhance occupational performance. Topics covered include activities of daily living with and without vision, functional mobility, diabetes, self-management, and driving and transportation.
Prerequisites: OT 679 [Min Grade: C]

OT 691. Foundations in Low Vision Rehabilitation IV. 3 Hours.

Students demonstrate ability to apply knowledge gained in the previous foundation courses to select and interpret evaluations and design interventions for adults with vision impairment. Format includes: a three-day on-campus intensive to provide review and synthesis of key evaluation and intervention principles for working with persons with age-related vision impairment and brain injury; practicum in diabetes self-management, prescribed optical devices and assistive technology; influence of policy and regulation on practice; ethical reasoning and advocacy; professional development and continuing professional competence.
Prerequisites: OT 677 [Min Grade: C] and OT 679 [Min Grade: C] and OT 689 [Min Grade: C] and OT 690 [Min Grade: C]

OT 692. Special Topics in OT. 1-4 Hour.

Readings for in depth study of specialized topics.

OT 693. Design and Implementation of Low Vision Rehabilitation Programs in the Healthcare System. 2 Hours.

In this course, students complete steps to implement a viable low vision rehabilitation program using the medical rehabilitation model. Topics covered: procedures and issues unique to low vision programs; identifying the target population and services; establishing a program structure; developing the rehab team, evaluation tools and treatment materials.
Prerequisites: OT 677 [Min Grade: C] and OT 679 [Min Grade: C] and OT 689 [Min Grade: C]

OT 695. Foundations in Treatment of Visual Impairment from Brain Injury II. 2 Hours.

Application of selecting appropriate evaluations and interventions for clients with visual processing impairment from brain injury. Includes creation of decision trees and completion of a series of case analyses.
Prerequisites: OT 677 [Min Grade: C] and OT 679 [Min Grade: C] and OT 689 [Min Grade: C]

OT 698. Master's Level Non-Thesis Research. 1-6 Hour.

Implementation of project activities with data collection, analysis, and preparation of scholarly activity project.
Prerequisites: OT 677 [Min Grade: C] and OT 679 [Min Grade: C] and OT 689 [Min Grade: C]

OT 699. Master's Level Thesis Research. 1-6 Hour.

Elements of proposal and development of thesis/project; thesis and institutional review board procedures; student presentation, group discussion, recommendations, and critique. Admission to candidacy required.
Prerequisites: GAC M

Faculty

Barstow, Elizabeth A., Assistant Professor, 2002, PhD (UAB), OTR/L, Low-Vision Rehabilitation, Neurodevelopmental Intervention, Functional Capacity Evaluations, Driver’s Assessment
Cunningham, Anthony "Deek", Assistant Professor, Academic Coordinator of Fieldwork Education, 2011, MSOT (UAB), OTR/L, Low Vision, Pediatrics
Dudgeon, Brian J., Department Chair and Professor, 2012, PhD (Washington), OTR/L, FAOTA, Pediatric Rehabilitation, Disability Studies, Pain, Wheeled Mobility
Edison, Christopher, Assistant Professor, 2004, MSOT (UAB), OTR/L, Assessment in Practice Teaching and Learning
Jenkins, Gavin, Assistant Professor, 2008, PhD (England), OTR/L, Assistive Technology and the Built Environment
McCurry, Valley, Assistant Professor, 2013, OTR/L, MBA (UAB), Disability and Participation
Tucker, Sarah, Assistant Professor, 013, MSOT (Ithaca College), Pediatrics, Cycle of Incarceration
Vogtle, Laura, Associate Professor, 1995, PhD (Virginia), OTR/L, FAOTA, Developmental Disability, Downs Syndrome
Warren, Mary, Associate Professor, 2001, PhD (UAB), OTR/L, SCLV, FAOTA, Low Vision
Wingo, Brooks, Assistant Professor, 2013, PhD (UAB), MSW, Self-Management and Self-Efficiency
Yeun, Hon, Professor and Director of Research, 2010, PhD (Florida), MS, Scleroderma, Chronic Disease and Disability
Yuen, Hon, Professor and Director of Research, Ph.D., OTR/L