EE-Electrical & Computer Egr Courses

Courses

EE 011. Coop/Internship in EE. 0 Hours.

The Co-op/Internship is a short-term engineering workplace learning experience in preparation for the student's intended career.

EE 210. Digital Logic. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the basic principles of how computers do computations using digital components. Topics include: the number systems, Boolean algebra, circuit minimization of multi-level logic, K-Maps, combinational and sequential logic circuit design, clocked latches, flip-flops, registers, and finite state machines. In class lab.
Prerequisites: MA 106 [Min Grade: C] or MA 107 [Min Grade: C] or MA 125 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

EE 233. Engineering Programming Methods. 3 Hours.

This course covers fundamentals of computer programming including coding and design elements. Topics include: the software development method, logic and algorithm development, C language coding, debugging, documentation, file input and output, an introduction to data structures, development environments, and command line tools.
Prerequisites: EGR 150 [Min Grade: C]

EE 254. Applied Numerical Methods. 3 Hours.

This course covers applications of numerical mathematical techniques and theories laid out in prior courses. Topics include: Euler’s Method, numerical integration and differentiation methods, root finding methods, accuracy versus precision and its relationship to data storage and algorithm efficiency.
Prerequisites: EGR 265 [Min Grade: C] or (MA 227 [Min Grade: C] and MA 252 [Min Grade: C]) and EGR 150 [Min Grade: C]

EE 300. Engineering Problem Solving II. 3 Hours.

This course covers fundamental mathematical background on complex functions, linear algebra, and the theory of probability and statistics which are indispensable in many electrical and computer engineering sub-fields such as signal and image processing, circuit design, and control systems.
Prerequisites: EGR 265 [Min Grade: D] or (MA 227 [Min Grade: C] and MA 252 [Min Grade: C])

EE 305. Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering. 3 Hours.

This course provides a survey of topics fundamental to field of electrical engineering. For non-engineering majors. Not available for credit toward engineering major.
Prerequisites: MA 109 [Min Grade: C]

EE 312. Electrical Systems. 3 Hours.

This course introduces how electrical circuits work and how to analyze them. Topics include: introduction to DC circuit analysis, AC steady-state analysis, first-order transient analysis, ideal transformers, and electrical safety. For non-EE majors.
Prerequisites: MA 126 [Min Grade: C] or MA 226 [Min Grade: C] and PH 221 [Min Grade: C]

EE 314. Electrical Circuits. 3 Hours.

This course covers electrical circuits and their analysis. Topics include: DC circuit analysis, AC steady-state analysis, first-order transient analysis, and electrical safety. For EE Majors.
Prerequisites: (MA 126 [Min Grade: C] or MA 226 [Min Grade: C]) and PH 221 [Min Grade: C]

EE 314R. Electrical Circuits Recitation. 0 Hours.

A problem-solving course designed to reinforce concepts in EE 314.
Prerequisites: (MA 226 [Min Grade: C] or MA 126 [Min Grade: C]) and PH 221 [Min Grade: C]

EE 316. Electrical Networks. 4 Hours.

This course expands the Electrical Circuits course with advanced circuits and teaches how to report the results of experiments (emphasis on quantitative literacy). Topics include: Analysis of circuits using classical differential/integral techniques; Laplace transforms; Two-port network parameters; Ideal operational amplifiers; Circuit solution using simulation.
Prerequisites: EE 314 [Min Grade: C] and EH 101 [Min Grade: C] and EGR 265 [Min Grade: D] or (MA 227 [Min Grade: C] and MA 252 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

EE 316L. Electrical Networks Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Electrical Networks laboratory component.

EE 318. Signals and Systems. 3 Hours.

This course provides fundamental mathematical background for extraction of useful information from signals and for modeling dynamic systems in the frequency domain. Topics include: time-domain and frequency-domain methods for modeling and analyzing continuous-time and discrete-time signals and systems, Fourier, Laplace, and Z transform methods.
Prerequisites: EE 300 [Min Grade: D] and EE 316 [Min Grade: D]

EE 333. Engineering Programming Using Objects. 3 Hours.

This course covers object-oriented thinking and applies it to creating software for engineering applications. Topics include: objected-oriented design and programming in an object-oriented language, graphical user interface framework, project management skills, written and oral communication, Team work, introduction to ethics and intellectual property issues.
Prerequisites: EE 233 [Min Grade: D]

EE 337. Introduction to Microprocessors. 4 Hours.

This course covers computer hardware, interfaces, and programming in assembly and C languages with applications of microcomputers to engineering problems, such as data acquisition and control. Topics include: CPU architecture, assembly language, Input/output interfacing.
Prerequisites: EE 210 [Min Grade: C] and EE 233 [Min Grade: D]

EE 337L. Introduction to Microprocessors Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Introduction to Microprocessors laboratory component.

EE 341. Electromagnetics. 3 Hours.

This course introduces mathematical techniques used to solve problems in antenna design, high-frequency circuit design, and communications. Topics include: Maxwell equations, dynamic and static problems, electromagnetic wave propagation.
Prerequisites: EE 300 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently) and EE 316 [Min Grade: C]

EE 351. Electronics. 4 Hours.

This course covers fundamentals of solid-state electronics, PN junction diode and diode circuits, bipolar junction transistor (BJT) and field-effect transistor (FET) properties, biasing, frequency response, amplifier configurations, single and multistage amplifier circuits. Students will work on projects in areas such as Internet-of-Things (IoT), and sensor instrumentation.
Prerequisites: EE 210 [Min Grade: C] and EE 316 [Min Grade: C]

EE 351L. Electronics Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Electronics laboratory component.

EE 361. Machinery I. 4 Hours.

This course covers single and multi-phase electrical machines with an introduction to industrial applications. Topics include: Fundamentals and applications of polyphase circuits; magnetic circuits; transformers; polyphase synchronous and asynchronous machines.
Prerequisites: EE 316 [Min Grade: C]

EE 361L. Machinery I Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Machinery I laboratory component.

EE 412. Practical Computer Vision. 3 Hours.

This course covers fundamentals and applications of image analysis. Topics include: image preprocessing, detection, segmentation, classification and recognition, visual tracking, and deep learning.
Prerequisites: EE 318 [Min Grade: C]

EE 418. Wireless Communications. 3 Hours.

This course covers the principles and current applications of wireless technology. Topics include propagation models, modulation, multiple access, and channel and signal coding. Applications of wireless for cellular and Internet of Things (IoT) will also be covered.
Prerequisites: EE 316 [Min Grade: C]

EE 421. Communication Systems. 3 Hours.

This course covers the mathematics of modulation and demodulation of radio signals to transmit and receive information. It focuses on various forms of amplitude modulation (AM), phase and frequency modulation (FM). This course builds on the mathematics from signals and systems course to study how to represent and manipulate these signals in both time and frequency domain. It also studies the effects of sampling, and how these systems operate in the presence of noise.
Prerequisites: EE 318 [Min Grade: C]

EE 423. Digital Signal Processing. 3 Hours.

This course covers the theory and practice of using computers to process and analyze signals. The topics include Digital filter analysis and design; Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithms; Applications of digital signal processing in engineering problems such as data acquisition and control.
Prerequisites: EE 318 [Min Grade: C]

EE 426. Control Systems. 3 Hours.

This course covers modeling and control of mechanisms or circuits to satisfy stability and performance criteria. Topics include: theory of linear feedback control systems using complex frequency techniques, block diagram manipulation, performance measures, stability, analysis and design using root locus, and Z-transform methods.
Prerequisites: EE 318 [Min Grade: C]

EE 427. Controls and Automation. 3 Hours.

This course covers power control devices and applications, relay logic and translation to other forms, programmable logic controllers (PLCs), proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and other methods for process control, modern laboratory instrumentation, and human-machine interface (HMI) software.
Prerequisites: EE 233 [Min Grade: C] and EE 318 [Min Grade: C] and EE 351 [Min Grade: C]

EE 431. Analog Integrated Electronics. 4 Hours.

This course covers advanced analysis and design using op-amps, differential amplifier, half-circuit analysis, error analysis and compensation. Applications include signal conditioning for instrumentation, instrumentation amplifiers, nonlinear and computational circuits, analog filter design, voltage regulator design, oscillators, and circuit configurations for A-to-D and D-to-A conversion methods. Laboratory exercises emphasize design techniques for projects in areas such as Internet-of-Things (IoT).
Prerequisites: EE 318 [Min Grade: C] and EE 351 [Min Grade: C]

EE 432. Introduction to Computer Networking. 3 Hours.

This course covers the fundamentals of modern computer networks including current applications such as Internet of Things (IoT). Topics Include: hardware and software level network protocols, network architecture and topology including WANs and LANs, client-server relationships, distributed computing, data transfer, security, virtualization of hardware, multi-tier network configuration examples, and certifications will be addressed.
Prerequisites: EE 233 [Min Grade: C]

EE 433. Engineering Software Solutions. 3 Hours.

This course covers the fundamentals of software design, architecture, and implementation for future software engineers. Topics include: customer-focused requirements gathering, project planning, team tools, architectural patterns, environment and component selection, quality assurance, sustainability, versioning. Various development methodologies are discussed with a project demonstrating at least one release cycle.
Prerequisites: EE 333 [Min Grade: C]

EE 434. Power Semiconductor Electronics. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of integrated circuit design for radio-frequency and power converter circuits. Course contents include basics of RF circuit theory, matching networks, high frequency MOS model, low-noise-amplifier, voltage controlled oscillator, fundamentals of power electronics, power semiconductor switches, steady-state equivalent circuit modeling, DC transformer model, basic AC equivalent circuit modeling, linearization and perturbation, etc. Students will require accomplishing a computer aided design, simulation and chip layout of an integrated circuit design project.
Prerequisites: EE 316 [Min Grade: C] and EE 318 [Min Grade: D] and EE 351 [Min Grade: D]

EE 437. Introduction to Embedded Systems. 3 Hours.

This course provides an applied introduction to the design of embedded systems, including hardware and software aspects. Topics include: various embedded hardware platforms, interfacing industrial bus systems, sensors, actuators, low-power wireless communication, and application of Internet-of-Things (IoT).
Prerequisites: EE 314 [Min Grade: D] and EE 337 [Min Grade: D]

EE 438. Computer Architecture. 3 Hours.

Advanced microprocessor topics including cache design, pipelining, superscalar architecture, design of control units, microcoding, and parallel processors. Comparison of advanced, contemporary microprocessors from Intel and IBM. EE 337 (Introduction to Microprocessors) is a recommended prerequisite for this course.
Prerequisites: EE 210 [Min Grade: C] and EE 233 [Min Grade: D] and EE 337 [Min Grade: D]

EE 444. Real-Time Process & Protocols. 3 Hours.

Hands-on laboratory course covering topics in real-time computer systems such as algorithms, state-machine implementations, communication protocols, instrumentation, and hardware interfaces.
Prerequisites: EE 233 [Min Grade: D] and EE 337 [Min Grade: D]

EE 447. Internet/Intranet Application Development. 3 Hours.

This course covers development of software models and applications using Internet/Intranet technologies. Topics include: web client-server relationships, multi-tier design models, scripting and validation, basic TCP/IP networking, separation of concerns, markup and data description languages. Projects will allow the opportunity for the use of a range of tools and development platforms.
Prerequisites: EE 233 [Min Grade: C]

EE 448. Software Engineering Projects. 3 Hours.

This course covers practical applications of software engineering including development of applications for Internet of Things (IoT). Topics include: requirements gathering, design matrices, environment selection, relevant architectural patterns, networking basics, databases, service endpoints, embedded systems selection and security. Projects with a software emphasis will be utilized to demonstrate principles of IoT applications.
Prerequisites: EE 333 [Min Grade: C]

EE 452. Digital Systems Design. 3 Hours.

This course covers the design of customized complex digital systems using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based platforms, using modern design tools for simulation, synthesis, and implementation. Topics include hardware design and development languages such as Verilog or VHDL.
Prerequisites: EE 337 [Min Grade: C] and EE 351 [Min Grade: C]

EE 458. Medical Instrumentation. 3 Hours.

This course covers the fundamental operating principles, applications, safety, and design of electronic instrumentation used in the measurement of physiological parameters.
Prerequisites: EE 351 [Min Grade: C]

EE 461. Machinery II. 3 Hours.

Physical principles of DC machines. Mathematical analysis of generator designs using equivalent circuits and magnetization curves. Calculation of motor speed, torque, power, efficiency, and starting requirements. Solid-state speed control systems.
Prerequisites: EE 361 [Min Grade: D]

EE 467. Brain Machine Interface. 3 Hours.

This course explores the brain-machine interfaces, particularly the technologies that directly stimulate and/or record neural activity. This course is divided into three major components: 1) neuroscience and electrode interfaces, 2) brain recording and stimulating front-end circuits, and 3) circuit modeling, simulating, and optimization.
Prerequisites: EE 233 [Min Grade: C] and EE 351 [Min Grade: C]

EE 471. Power Systems I. 3 Hours.

Components of power systems. Performance of modern interconnected power systems under normal and abnormal conditions. Calculation of inductive and capacitive reactances of three-phase transmission lines in steady state.
Prerequisites: EE 361 [Min Grade: D]

EE 472. Power Systems II. 3 Hours.

Modeling of generators, transformers, and transmission lines for system studies. Introduction to symmetrical components. Calculation of short-circuit currents due to balanced and unbalanced faults. Determination of interrupting ratings of circuit breakers. Transient stability of power systems. Derivation of swing equation and solution by numerical method. Equal area criterion.
Prerequisites: EE 471 [Min Grade: D]

EE 473. Protective Relaying of Power Systems. 3 Hours.

Operating principles of protective relays. Protection of transmission lines, generators, motors, transformers, and buses.
Prerequisites: EE 361 [Min Grade: D]

EE 485. Engineering Operations. 3 Hours.

This course covers the principles and standards of engineering design from ideation to final design. Topics include: product development process, problem definition and need identification, embodiment and detail design, design for specific criterion, modeling and cost evaluation. Emphasis is placed on ethics and civil responsibilities in design including environmental, social, liable, sustainability and reliability through the lens of engineering design.
Prerequisites: (EGR 111 [Min Grade: C] or EGR 200 [Min Grade: C]) and EE 210 [Min Grade: D] and (EE 314 [Min Grade: D] or EE 312 [Min Grade: D])

EE 489. Undergraduate Engineering Research. 0 Hours.

Undergraduate research experiences in electrical and computer engineering under faculty guidance.
Prerequisites: EGR 111 [Min Grade: C] or EGR 200 [Min Grade: C]

EE 490. Special Topics in Electrical Engineering. 1-3 Hour.

This course covers contemporary topics in Electrical Engineering selected by faculty.

EE 491. Individual Study in Electrical Engineering. 1-6 Hour.

Faculty-guided self-study of special topic in electrical and computer engineering.

EE 492. Honors Research I. 4 Hours.

Departmental honors students work closely with faculty to develop research skills.
Prerequisites: EGR 301 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

EE 493. Honors Research II. 4 Hours.

Departmental honors students work closely with faculty to develop research skills.
Prerequisites: EGR 492 [Min Grade: C]

EE 498. Team Design Project I. 3 Hours.

This course is the first part of a two-semester team design project. The deliverables include: detailed design, documentation, and project plan for completion in EE 499. Design projects are chosen from analog/digital systems, machine learning, embedded systems, signal processing, Internet of Things (IoT), and others. Course taken during the student's final year of the program.
Prerequisites: EE 318 [Min Grade: D] and EE 337 [Min Grade: D] and EE 485 [Min Grade: D](Can be taken Concurrently) and EE 351 [Min Grade: D](Can be taken Concurrently)

EE 499. Team Design Project II. 3 Hours.

This course is the second part of a two-semester team design project focusing on project implementation. Teams are required to complete a written design report and a final oral and poster presentation. Course is taken the during the student's final year of the program, in the term immediately after successfully completing EE 498.
Prerequisites: EE 498 [Min Grade: C]