BY-Biology

BY 501. Advanced Genetics for Teachers I. 3 Hours.

Basic genetic principles; recent research developments. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BY 502. Botany for Teachers. 3 Hours.

Provides understanding of human structural and functional relationships essential in modern biology. Corequisite: BY 503.

BY 503. Advanced Biology for Teachers III. 1 Hour.

Laboratory supplementing lecture (BY 502) through use of human specimens, models, and demonstrations.

BY 504. Life Science for Middle School Teachers. 3 Hours.

Life Science for Middle School Teachers.

BY 507. Microbial Ecology. 3 Hours.

Microorganisms in nature; interactions with each other and with environment. Independent project required. Prerequisite: BY 271.

BY 511. Molecular Genetics. 3 Hours.

Prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene structure and function. Independent project required. Prerequisite: BY 271, BY 330 and CH 232.

BY 527. Histology. 4 Hours.

Microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues, and organs of animals; correlation of structure and function. Techniques and methodology. Lecture and laboratory. Completion of additional independent project required for graduate credit.

BY 527L. Histology Laboratory. 0 Hours.

Histology Lab required with BY 527 lecture.

BY 531. Advanced Recombinant DNA Technology. 3 Hours.

Manipulation of genes and their regulations, and techniques used in recombinant DNA technology. Independent project required. Prerequisites: BY 311, BY 330, CH 233 and CH 460 or 461.

BY 535. Natural History of Vertebrates. 4 Hours.

Adaptations of vertebrates for survival in particular environments. Survey and classification of local vertebrates. Two lectures, one laboratory or field trip per week. Independent project required.

BY 535L. Natural History of the Vertebrates Lab. 0 Hours.

Lab must be taken with BY 535 lecture.

BY 540. Biology of Aging. 3 Hours.

Current understanding of aging, measuring aging changes, theories of aging and aging changes in various human systems.
Prerequisites: BY 123 [Min Grade: C]

BY 552. Field Botany. 4 Hours.

Principles and techniques of plant identification and classification; consideration of phylogenetic systems. Lecture and field trips. Independent project required.

BY 552L. Field Botany Lab. 0 Hours.

Lab must be taken with BY 552 lecture.

BY 555. Principles of Scientific Investigation. 3 Hours.

Methods of scientific process, experimental design, data interpretation and presentation, and scientific writing.

BY 560. Advanced Invertebrate Zoology. 3 Hours.

Selected topics. Lecture and student projects. Prerequisite: BY 255.

BY 565. Limnology. 4 Hours.

Biology of freshwater and estuarine organisms. Lecture, laboratory, and field trips. Prerequisite: BY 124 and BY 470.
Prerequisites: BY 104 [Min Grade: D] and BY 370 [Min Grade: D]

BY 565L. Limnology Lab. 0 Hours.

Lab must be taken with BY 565 lecture.

BY 567. Tropical Ecology. 3 Hours.

An overview of the major tropical ecotypes with emphasis on ecology of terrestrial, aquatic, and marine tropical organisms. Major portion of course taught at a tropical field station in the Caribbean. Lectures, laboratory, and field trips. Library research paper required. Prerequisites: BY 255 or 256 or 470 and Graduate Standing and Permission of Instructor.

BY 568. Galapagos Ecology. 3 Hours.

The ecology of the Galapagos Islands, with an emphasis on terrestrial & marine organisms. Major portion conducted on the Galapagos Islands. Lecture & field trips. Library research paper required. Prerequisites: BY 255 or 256 or 470 and Graduate Standing and Permission of Instructor.
Prerequisites: BY 255 [Min Grade: D] or BY 256 [Min Grade: D] or BY 470 [Min Grade: D]

BY 569. Rain Forest Ecology. 3 Hours.

Overview of physical and environmental factors that structure the rainforest, biodiversity of life, and interactions of its organisms. A survey of prominent biota will be conducted. Major portion of course taught in Costa Rica. Lectures and field trips. Library research paper required. Prerequisites: BY 255 or 256 or 470 and Graduate Standing and Permission of Instructor.

BY 570. Ecology. 3 Hours.

Ecosystems and population biology. Lectures. Independent project required. Prerequisite: BY 255 or 256 or 260 and Graduate Standing.

BY 571. Ecology Lab. 1 Hour.

Preq is BY 570 or concurrent enrollment. Field trips. 1 hour.
Prerequisites: BY 570 [Min Grade: C](Can be taken Concurrently)

BY 573. Biochemical Adaptation to the Environment. 3 Hours.

BY 585. Northern Field Studies. 3 Hours.

Ecology of northern coniferous forest and tundra ecosystems. Major portion of course taught on site in Alaska. Lecture and field trips. Graduate project/paper required. 3 hours. (Irregular offering).

BY 595. Special Topics in Biology I. 1-4 Hour.

BY 596. Special Topics in Biology II. 0-4 Hours.

BY 597. Investigative Techniques. 2 Hours.

BY 598. MR Lev Non-Thesis Research. 1-10 Hour.

BY 605. Microbial Physiology. 3 Hours.

Microbial structure and function, growth, metabolism, and regulation of cellular activity. Independent project required. Prerequisites: BY 271 and 3 semester hours of organic chemistry.

BY 607. Microbiology Ecology. 3 Hours.

Microorganisms in nature; interactions with each other and with the environment. Independent project required.

BY 610. Comparative Animal Physiology. 3 Hours.

Special physical and chemical processes occurring at cell tissue, and organ levels. Independent projects required.

BY 611. Advanced Human Anatomy. 4 Hours.

This course is a detailed, advanced examination of human anatomy and histology. In a laboratory setting, students will achieve course objectives from dissecting a human cadaver, and observing prosected cadavers and casted models.

BY 612. CIRTL-Biology. 1-4 Hour.

This discipline specific seminar course in CIRTL (The Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning) - Biology is specially designed to offer students a hands-on opportunity to do an in-depth analysis on various effective teaching techniques that can be utilized in a typical college classroom setting. In the light of this analysis, students are expected to deliver a presentation simulating a classroom lecture on any topic related to Biology or if they prefer, they can also give an oral presentation on any pedagogical topic.

BY 613. CIRTL Service-Learning Workshop. 1 Hour.

This workshop offered by the Department of Biology for CIRTL (The Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning) @UAB is specially designed to offer students a hands-on opportunity on designing a service-learning course in the realm of their study with an added emphasis on the importance of service-learning in today’s classroom.

BY 615. Eco-Epid. of Arthrpd Brn Dis. 4 Hours.

This course covers the ecology, epidemiology, & control of arthropods and the pathogens they transmit to humans and animals. Special emphasis will be placed on emerging and re-emerging pathogens such as: dengue, yellow fever, bartonella, Rift Valley fever, typhus, & Chagas disease. The laboratory will reinforce the lectures with hands-on identification of both arthropods and pathogens. Lecture and Lab. Independent Project required. 3 hours.

BY 615L. Eclogy & EPI Arthrop Lab. 0 Hours.

BY 616. Cellular Physiology. 3 Hours.

Structure and function of cells and their components at the molecular level. Laboratory experience using modern equipment and biochemical methods. Independent project required.

BY 618. Colloquium in Biology of Aging. 1 Hour.

The course will focus on readings and interpretation of scientific papers, data, and experimental results relevant to endocrinology and aging. In addition to readings, oral presentations, discussions, and a research proposal are the major components of the course.

BY 619. Reproductive Physiology. 3 Hours.

Comparative reproductive physiology in animals with emphasis on mammals. Independent project required.

BY 620. General Endocrinology. 3 Hours.

The central theme of this course is the role of hormone chemical messengers in the regulation of physiological processes. Topics include structure of endocrine cells and glands, hormone synthesis and chemistry, physiological effects of hormones, and mechanisms of hormone action. Emphasis is placed on vertebrate systems, but instructive invertebrate systems are also considered. Term paper required.
Prerequisites: BY 256 [Min Grade: C]

BY 626. Evolutionary Medicine. 3 Hours.

An evolutionary approach to issues relating to human health and disease.

BY 628. Instruct Bio Labs: Teaching Techniques. 3 Hours.

Student will assist in instruction of an introductory biology laboratory. Responsibilities will also include preparation of quizzes and practicals and designing and conducting an instructional laboratory exercise.

BY 629. Evolutionary Biology. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the history of evolutionary thought and modern evolutionary theory. Discussions cover (but are not limited to) the history of life, mechanisms of evolutionary change, sexual selection, adaptation, speciation, and molecular evolution. Students will also be introduced to historical and contemporary studies of evolution on a wide variety of topics and organisms. Regular meetings outside of lecture will involve discussions of classic and contemporary research papers in the field.

BY 632. Biological Information Resources. 3 Hours.

The National Center for Biological Information (NCBI) website is a treasure house of information and tools for researchers in all areas of modern Biology. The goal of this course is to provide guidance for students who wish to become familiar with the NCBI website through an online learning experience. They will learn many of the features available at this site and will gain experience using some of the tools. The course will be taught completely online and will consist of 1) Guidelines for navigating through NCBI, 2) Study guide questions for students to answer online, 3) NCBI tutorials with questions to be answered online, 4) Assignments with questions to be answered online, 5) Online exams. Graduate levels require a graduate project.
Prerequisites: BY 123 [Min Grade: C] or BY 124 [Min Grade: C]

BY 633. Advanced Molecular Genetics. 3 Hours.

Examination of the molecular genetics of eukaryotic organisms, including genomes, nucleosomes, chromosomes, transcription, splicing, transposition and signal transduction. The role of molecular biology in immune diversity and cell growth will also be studied.

BY 634. Functional Genomics and Systems Biology. 3 Hours.

Systems biology is an inter-disciplinary study underlying complex biological processes as integrated systems of many interacting components. This course will give students a foundation in understanding complex biological interactions at the molecular, network and genomic level. This course will cover state-of-the-art high throughput established and novel approaches used in genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics to obtain, integrate and analyze complex data. The students will also get familiar with knowledge on experimental perturbation of genomes, gene regulatory networks, comparative genomics and evolution, basic bioinformatics. This course will be a combination of text based lectures and discussions of the current literature relevant to Functional Genomics and Systems Biology. Prerequisite: BY210 minimum grade of C.
Prerequisites: BY 210 [Min Grade: C]

BY 637. Epigenetics. 3 Hours.

This course provides a survey of the field of epigenetics, introducing the student to the diverse areas of epigenetic research in a variety of eukaryotic systems. The course combines lectures with discussion of primary literature and research talks from invited faculty speakers working in epigenetics. In addition to providing an overview of the field of epigenetics, this course emphasizes working with primary scientific literature and the development of critical reading skills. Additional assignments are required for graduate credit.

BY 640. Immunology. 3 Hours.

Immune system and functions of host humoral and cellular immune responses. Mechanisms of antigen and antibody reactions and basic immunological methods. Term paper required.

BY 642. Experimental Phycology. 4 Hours.

Introduction to algae. Experimental approaches to productivity. Algae as model systems. Independent project required. Concurrent enrollment in BY 642 lab required.

BY 642L. Experimental Phycology Lab. 0 Hours.

Lab must be taken concurrently with BY 642 lecture.

BY 645. Neuroanatomy. 4 Hours.

This course will provide detailed lecture and laboratory experiences that describe the anatomy of the human brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nervous system. Students will culture rat hippocampal neurons and map the cerebral and cerebellar cortex on preserved human brains. Deep brain structures will be identified and their functional significance explored. Cranial nerves and major peripheral nerves will be described and identified through cadaveric dissections. Normal pathways will be contrasted with examples of abnormalities along with the resulting functional impairments. Graduate credit will be earned through the completion of additional term papers and/or projects.

BY 646. Techniques in Biological Research. 3 Hours.

Concepts and practical application of techniques pertinent to biological research.

BY 648. Psychoneuroimmunology. 3 Hours.

Explores communication between neuroendocrine and immune systems.

BY 651. Principles of Botany. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the student to the basic concepts of plant biology including plant diversity, structure, physiology, metabolism, reproduction, genetics, molecular biology, evolution and ecology. It is targeted to Biology Majors and Biology Graduate Students. This class brings together knowledge and methodologies from a number of different disciplines to provide students with an intensive and comprehensive plant curriculum from the molecular to the organismal level.

BY 652. Field Botany for Teachers. 4 Hours.

Principles and techniques of plant identification and classification; consideration of phylogenetic systems. Lectures and field trips. Independent project required.

BY 652L. Field Botany Lab. 0 Hours.

Lab must be taken with BY 652 lecture.

BY 655. Biometry. 3 Hours.

Statistical techniques used to analyze and interpret data, with emphasis on biological applications. Lecture and computer-based laboratory. 3 semester hours. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

BY 656. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. 4 Hours.

Study of the anatomical systems of vertebrates in an evolutionary and functional context. Covers form, function, development and phylogeny of vertebrates, with overviews of organ systems, and the major adaptive events of vertebrate evolution. Labs complement lectures with dissections of representative species, and surveys of specializations in other forms. Lecture and laboratory.

BY 656L. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Lab. 0 Hours.

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Lab required with BY 656 lecture.

BY 662. Introductory Neurobiology. 3 Hours.

Introduction to biological basis of nervous system function. Comparative approach applying molecular, cellular, and systems' concepts to nervous system function is used to examine electrical and chemical signaling, neural circuitry, and cellular basis of behavior and neural development. Independent project required.

BY 665. Limnology. 4 Hours.

Introduction to ecology of inland waters and estuaries. Lectures and field trips.

BY 665L. Limnology Lab. 0 Hours.

Lab must be taken concurrently with BY 665 lecture.

BY 667. Population Ecology. 3 Hours.

This course covers the structure and dynamics of populations with an emphasis on understanding how reproduction, mortality, and dispersal interact to control fluctuations in population size and structure. Special emphasis will be placed on the use of models to address specific applications in conservation biology and natural resource management. Independent project/paper required. Preqs: BY 570 & graduate stranding or permission of instructor.

BY 668. Conservation Genetics. 3 Hours.

This intensive course will introduce students to the genetic tools of modern population biology – which ones are available, practical, and useful for particular questions – and how these genetic analyses have been applied to a wide variety of ecological topics, including: dispersal, life histories, recruitment, habitat and mate choice, local selection, genetic differentiation, the conservation of biodiversity, and speciation. Importantly, this course is an opportunity to become proficient at applying molecular tools to bolster ecological studies. Time will be spent in lectures and learning practical coding and data analyses.

BY 669. Molecular Ecol & Phylogenetics. 3 Hours.

Course surveys processes and patterns of molecular evolution and methods of phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences, amino acid sequences, and other molecular markers. Additionally, a project/paper will be required. Graduate level; 3 hours credit.

BY 670. Scientific Communication. 3 Hours.

Becoming a professional biologist is challenging and requires mastering a variety of skills. This course complements the biological knowledge graduate students gain from other courses and their thesis research by providing training, experience, and critical feedback in the following areas.

BY 671. Biochemical Adapt Environment. 3 Hours.

Examination of physiological and biochemical adaptations of organisms to physical environment.

BY 673. Biochemical Adaptation to the Environment. 3 Hours.

BY 674. Chemical Ecology. 3 Hours.

Study of chemical interactions between organisms or between organisms and their environment. Topics include chemical signaling between organisms, sensing of the chemical environment, and chemical defenses against predators, pathogens, biofoulers, or competitors. Students will be introduced to these topics in a wide variety of terrestrial and aquatic habitats, with a special emphasis on marine organisms. Independent project/paper required. Preq: Graduate standing.

BY 675. Comparative Developmental Biology. 3 Hours.

Mechanisms of development with emphasis on comparative biology. Graduate standing.
Prerequisites: BY 210 [Min Grade: D]

BY 679. Colloquium in Evidenced Based Teaching. 1 Hour.

This pedagogy based colloquium is designed to prepare the next generation of future STEM faculty members in evidence-based practices. The course will begin with an in-depth discussion related to the Vision and Change in Biology Undergraduate Education: A Call to Action. Specific chapters from this document will be assigned as “Reading Assignments” on a weekly basis. Furthermore, journal article discussions will be included to better understand innovative teaching strategies like active-learning, classroom-response system, inclusive learning environments and initiating team based learning activities.

BY 680. Epigenetics Discussion. 1 Hour.

This course provides the student with an exposure to a wide range of basic epigenetics research topics. It will promote scientific literacy, discussion skills, and critical thinking skills. In addition, students will gain experience developing lectures and providing constructive criticisms to their peers.

BY 681. Colloquium in Physiological Ecology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 682. Colloquium in Immunology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 683. Colloquium in Physiology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 684. Colloquium in Microbial Ecology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 685. Colloquium in Cell Biology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 686. Colloquium in Mammalian Development. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 687. Colloquium in Endocrinology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 688. Colloquium in Algal Ecophysiology. 1 Hour.

Current research in specific areas.

BY 689. Colloquium in Genetics. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 690. Colloquium in Cellular Physiology. 1 Hour.

Current research in specific areas.

BY 691. Colloquium in Botany. 1 Hour.

Current research developments.

BY 692. Colloquium in Ecology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 693. Colloquium in Embryology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 694. Colloquium in Microbiology. 1 Hour.

Current research in microbial ecology and microbial physiology.

BY 695. Special Topics in Biology I. 1-4 Hour.

BY 696. Special Topics in Biology II. 1-4 Hour.

biology special topics.

BY 697. Investigative Techniques. 1-2 Hour.

Application of modern experimental techniques in solving research problems.

BY 698. Nonthesis Research. 1-12 Hour.

Non-thesis research hours.

BY 699. Thesis Research. 1-10 Hour.

Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy.
Prerequisites: GAC M

BY 718. Colloquium in Biology of Aging. 1 Hour.

The course will focus on readings and interpretation of scientific papers, data, and experimental results relevant to endocrinology and aging. In addition to readings, oral presentations, discussions, and a research proposal are the major components of the course.

BY 732. Biological Information Resources. 3 Hours.

The National Center for Biological Information (NCBI) website is a treasure house of information and tools for researchers in all areas of modern Biology. The goal of this course is to provide guidance for students who wish to become familiar with the NCBI website through an online learning experience. They will learn many of the features available at this site and will gain experience using some of the tools. The course will be taught completely online and will consist of 1) Guidelines for navigating through NCBI, 2) Study guide questions for students to answer online, 3) NCBI tutorials with questions to be answered online, 4) Assignments with questions to be answered online, 5) Online exams. Graduate levels require a graduate project.
Prerequisites: BY 123 [Min Grade: C] or BY 124 [Min Grade: C]

BY 734. Functional Genomics and Systems Biology. 3 Hours.

Systems biology is an inter-disciplinary study underlying complex biological processes as integrated systems of many interacting components. This course will give students a foundation in understanding complex biological interactions at the molecular, network and genomic level. This course will cover state-of-the-art high throughput established and novel approaches used in genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics to obtain, integrate and analyze complex data. The students will also get familiar with knowledge on experimental perturbation of genomes, gene regulatory networks, comparative genomics and evolution, basic bioinformatics. This course will be a combination of text based lectures and discussions of the current literature relevant to Functional Genomics and Systems Biology. Prerequisite: BY210 minimum grade of C.
Prerequisites: BY 210 [Min Grade: C]

BY 737. Epigenetics. 3 Hours.

This course provides a survey of the field of epigenetics, introducing the student to the diverse areas of epigenetic research in a variety of eukaryotic systems. The course combines lectures with discussion of primary literature and research talks from invited faculty speakers working in epigenetics. In addition to providing an overview of the field of epigenetics, this course emphasizes working with primary scientific literature and the development of critical reading skills. Additional assignments are required for graduate credit.

BY 746. Tech in Biological Research I. 3 Hours.

Concepts and practical application of techniques pertinent to biological research.

BY 751. Principles of Botany. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the student to the basic concepts of plant biology including plant diversity, structure, physiology, metabolism, reproduction, genetics, molecular biology, evolution and ecology. It is targeted to Biology Majors and Biology Graduate Students. This class brings together knowledge and methodologies from a number of different disciplines to provide students with an intensive and comprehensive plant curriculum from the molecular to the organismal level.

BY 755. Biometry. 3 Hours.

Statistical techniques used to analyze and interpret data, with emphasis on biological applications. Lecture and computer-based laboratory. 3 semester hours. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

BY 767. Population Ecology. 3 Hours.

This course covers the structure and dynamics of populations with an emphasis on understanding how reproduction, mortality, and dispersal interact to control fluctuations in population size and structure. Special emphasis will be placed on the use of models to address specific applications in conservation biology and natural resource management. Independent project/paper required. Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

BY 768. Conservation Genetics. 3 Hours.

This intensive course will introduce students to the genetic tools of modern population biology – which ones are available, practical, and useful for particular questions – and how these genetic analyses have been applied to a wide variety of ecological topics, including: dispersal, life histories, recruitment, habitat and mate choice, local selection, genetic differentiation, the conservation of biodiversity, and speciation. Importantly, this course is an opportunity to become proficient at applying molecular tools to bolster ecological studies. Time will be spent in lectures and learning practical coding and data analyses.

BY 769. Molecular Ecol & Phylogenetics. 3 Hours.

This intensive course will introduce students to the genetic tools of modern population biology – which ones are available, practical and useful for particular questions – and how these genetic analyses have been applied to a wide variety of ecological topics, including: dispersal, life histories, recruitment, habitat and mate choice, local selection and genetic differentiation, the conservation of biodiversity and speciation. Importantly, this course is an opportunity to become proficient at applying molecular tools to bolster ecological studies. Time will be spent in lectures and learning practical coding and data analyses.

BY 770. Scientific Communication. 3 Hours.

Becoming a professional biologist is challenging and requires mastering a variety of skills. This course complements the biological knowledge graduate students gain from other courses and their thesis research by providing training, experience, and critical feedback in the following areas.

BY 773. Biochemical Adaptation to the Environment. 3 Hours.

BY 780. Epigenetics Discussion. 1 Hour.

This course provides the student with an exposure to a wide range of basic epigenetics research topics. It will promote scientific literacy, discussion skills, and critical thinking skills. In addition, students will gain experience developing lectures and providing constructive criticisms to their peers.

BY 781. Colloquium in Physiological Ecology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 782. Colloquium in Immunology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 783. Colloquium in Physiology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 784. Colloquium in Microbial Ecology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 785. Colloquium in Cell Biology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 786. Colloquium in Mammalian Development. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 787. Colloquium in Endocrinology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 788. Colloquium in Algal Ecophysiology. 1 Hour.

Current research in specific areas.

BY 789. Colloquium in Genetics. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 790. Colloquium in Cellular Physiology. 1 Hour.

Current research in specific areas.

BY 791. Colloquium in Botany. 1 Hour.

Current research developments.

BY 792. Colloquium in Ecology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 793. Colloquium in Embryology. 1 Hour.

Current research.

BY 794. Colloquium in Microbiology. 1 Hour.

Current research in microbial ecology and microbial physiology.

BY 795. Special Topics in Biology I. 1-4 Hour.

BY 796. Special Topics in Biology II. 1-4 Hour.

BY 797. Investigative Techniques. 1-2 Hour.

Application of modern experimental techniques in solving research problems.

BY 798. Nondissertation Research. 1-10 Hour.

Non-dissertation research hours.

BY 799. Dissertation Research. 1-10 Hour.

Dissertation research hours. Admission to candidacy required.
Prerequisites: GAC Z